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Goblet

view Goblet digital asset number 1
Maker:
Undetermined peoples
Medium:
Wood
Dimensions:
H x W: 14.6 x 7 cm (5 3/4 x 2 3/4 in.)
Type:
Container
Geography:
Bondoukou area, Côte d'Ivoire
Date:
Early to mid-20th century
Label Text:
The Bondoukou region carver of this goblet took a European example as his model. The swirling linear design incised on the base is suggestive of a silverwork surface decoration called gadrooning that would be common on a church chalice or candlestick. Artists in Africa were particularly struck by certain European imports that they perceived as status symbols or as identifying object types such as the pith helmet and the teapot. These images were then incorporated into traditional status hierarchies.
Description:
Wood goblet with a chevron relief carving along the edge of the mouth, an incised diamond motif divided through the center by two lines going around the lower portion of the bowl and a round base partitioned by linear arcs radiating from the center.
Provenance:
Philip Ravenhill and Judith Timyan, Washington, D.C., -- to 1991
Exhibition History:
Art of the Personal Object, National Museum of African Art, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C., September 24, 1991-April 9, 2007
Topic:
Household
Status
Credit Line:
Gift of Philip L. Ravenhill and Judith Timyan
Object number:
91-3-8
See more items in:
National Museum of African Art Collection
Data Source:
National Museum of African Art

A.W. Bahr Papers 1919-1957

view A.W. Bahr Papers 1919-1957 digital asset number 1
Creator:
Bahr, A. W
Subject:
Bahr, A. W
Cammell, Charles Richard
Physical description:
1.25 linear feet
Type:
Photographs
Collection descriptions
Correspondence
Manuscripts
Place:
Canada, Quebec, Montreal
China
Japan
England
Connecticut
Date:
1919
1919-1957
Notes:
A.W. Bahr was born in Shanghai in 1877 to a German father and a Chinese mother. He founded the Central Trading Company with a friend in 1898. Throughout the next few years, he remained in China, organizing various art exhibitions with pieces from his own collection. Bahr moved to London, England in 1910, where he continued to exhibit art, finally moving to Canada with his family in 1946. Before his death in 1959, Bahr donated pieces of his collection to the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Royal Ontario Museum of Archaeology, and the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts.
Summary:
This collection contains manuscript drafts and notes for Bahr's memoir, written by Bahr himself and C.R. Cammell, who was also the editor of 'The Connoisseur' magazine. Other papers include correspondence with collectors of Chinese art or other figures in the art world, such as Lord Kitchener, the King and Queen of Sweden, Walter Muir Whitehill, Kenjiro Matsumoto and Senator Theodore Francis Green, among others. The bulk of the collection contains approximately 300 photographs of different Chinese art objects, from jade figurines to pottery to paintings. Most of these photographs are unidentified, but some of them include marginalia that indicate that they were of Bahr's own art objects for publication in books or articles. Photographs which are identified point to art objects also belonging to Bahr. The photographs have been organized based on the object type in the photograph, such as painting, statue or figurine.
Cite as:
A.W. Bahr Papers. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C. Gift of Penelope Jane Bahr, November 12th, 2001
Topic:
Art, Chinese
Art, Japanese
China--Description and travel
Japan--Description and travel
Local number:
FSA A2001.14
Data Source:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
Additional Online Media:

Hewlett-Packard HP-28C Handheld Electronic Calculator

view Hewlett-Packard HP-28C Handheld Electronic Calculator digital asset: Hewlett-Packard HP-28C Handheld Electronic Calculator
Maker:
Hewlett-Packard Company
Physical Description:
plastic (case; keys; display cover; hinge material)
metal (circuitry material)
Measurements:
overall: 2 cm x 9.5 cm x 15.9 cm; 25/32 in x 3 3/4 in x 6 1/4 in
Object Name:
electronic calculator, graphing
Place made:
United States
Date made:
1987
Description:
This advanced scientific calculator, to use the maker's phrase, was the first graphing handheld electronic calculator made by Hewlett-Packard. It also was the first HP calculator using algebraic expressions and the first to allow integration and differentiation. It was introduced in 1987 and sold into early 1988.
The object has a black plastic case hinged along the left edge. Opening it reveals a double keyboard. Thirty-five sloping rectangular keys are on the left side and another thirty-seven on the right. Keys on the left side have letters and symbols; keys on the right include digits, symbols for arithmetic operations, and symbols associated with trigonometry, statistics, plotting, integration, and differentiation.
Above the keyboard on the left is a list of object types (e.g. complex number), symbols used to designate that type (e.g. parenthesis for complex numbers) and examples (e.g. (123.45, 678.90) for the complex number 123.45 + 678.90i). The display on the right side shows four rows of text, indicating what number or command is stored in each of four stacks. The display also can be using to show the graph of functions. A mark above it reads: hp HEWLETT (/) PACKARD 28C.
The battery cover is on the right side. A mark on the back reads: COMPLIES WITH THE LIMITS FOR A CLASS B (/) COMPUTING DEVICE PURSUANT TO SUBPART (/) J OF PART 15OF ICC RULES (/) ATI confrome classe B 2729A04383 (/) MADE IN USA. The serial number indicates the device was made in the 29th week of 1987.
Programming for the calculator – both internally and by users – was in a programming language known as RPL (Reverse Polish Lisp or ROM-based Procedural Language), a variation on the programming language LISP.
For related documentation, see 1999.0291.02. For an example of the closely related calculator that succeeded it, the HP-28S, see 2012.0063.01. The HP28-C sold for $235.
This HP28C was used by Professor Norton Starr, who taught mathematics at Amherst College in Massachusetts.
References:
W.A.C. Mier-Jedrzejowicz, A Guide to HP Handheld Calculators and Computers , Tustin, California: Wilson/Burnett Publishing, 1997, pp. 84–87, 133.
David G. Hicks, The Museum of HP Calculators, http://www.hpmuseum.org/, accessed July, 2014.
Yves Nievergelt, “The Chip with the College Education: the HP-28C,” The American Mathematical Monthly, vol. 94, # 9, November 1987, pp. 895–902.
Location:
Currently not on view
Subject:
Computers & Business Machines
Handheld Electronic Calculators
Credit Line:
Gift of Norton Starr
ID Number:
1999.0291.01
Accession number:
1999.0291
Catalog number:
1999.0291.01
See more items in:
Medicine and Science: Computers
Handheld Electronic Calculators
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center

Cap mask

gelede
view Cap mask digital asset number 1
Maker:
Anago Master
Yoruba peoples
Medium:
Wood, pigment
Dimensions:
H x W x D: 21.5 x 25.0 x 27.8 cm (8 7/16 x 9 13/16 x 10 15/16 in.)
Type:
Mask
Geography:
Anago or Ifonyin region, Benin
Date:
19th century
Label Text:
Gelede is a masquerade to honor and placate the "mothers," incarnate forces of thwarted fertility and spiritual power who are less diplomatically referred to as witches. Although men, appearing in pairs, dance these masks, many gelede masks depict women. Some are satiric or genre characters such as the prostitute or the Islamic northerner. Others have elaborate superstructures with figures of devotees, animals, exaggerated head ties (a woman's head covering) or even palm trees. The headdress on this mask is apparently unique; it most probably refers to a particular deity or the deity's devotee. Although the sections rising from the head have some stylistic affinities with the relief carving of divination boards, a reference to Ifa, the god of fate and order, is unlikely. Similarities can also be found with the designs on the textile panels of some gelede mask costumes.
Gelede masks are worn like caps and tilted at a 45-degree angle on the forehead. The sculptor takes this angle into account when carving the mask.
This mask is one of four identified as being by the same individual, an unidentified artist from a far western Yoruba group, the Anago of Benin. The attribution is now formalized as the Anago Master. The distinctive arrangement and size of the features are consistent with characteristics of this master, as are the flat-topped, rectangular ear, the profile of the eyelids and the precise triangular chip carving.
This beautiful mask is masterfully carved and retains much of its traditional polychrome decoration. Exemplifying a particular workshop and artist, the mask is distinctly local but also clearly Yoruba in a panregional sense. It offers possibilities for iconographic research and references to other Yoruba deities and related object types.
Description:
Wood cap mask representing a person with an elaborate headdress of alternating rectangular panels, and openwork circles. Panels either have rows of triangles or an "8" motif. The mask has a distinctive variant C-form ear, chip carved hair across the forehead and sideburns and three scarification marks on cheeks and forehead. Remains of yellow pigment are visible on the face.
Provenance:
Pace Primitive, New York, 1982
Drs. Daniel and Marian Malcolm, New York, -- to 1997
Entwistle, London, 1997
Exhibition History:
Black Womanhood: Images, Icons, and Ideologies of the African Body, Hood Museum of Art, Dartmouth, New Hampshire, April 1-August 10, 2008, Davis Museum, Wellesley College, September 17-December 14, 2008, San Diego Museum of Art, January 31-April 26, 2009
Playful Performers, National Museum of African Art, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C., April 9-December 12, 2004
Master Hand: Individuality and Creativity Among Yoruba Sculptors, Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, September 11, 1997-August 1, 1998
Published References:
Cunningham, Lawrence. 2006. Culture and Values: A Survey of the Humanities. Belmont, CA : Thomson/Wadsworth, pp. 542, 552, no. 20.9.
Fagg, William Buller and John Pemberton III. 1982. Yoruba: Sculpture of West Africa. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, no. 29.
Fagg, William and John Pemberton III. 1982. Yoruba Sculpture of West Africa. New York: Pace Editions, pp. 110-111, no. 29.
National Museum of African Art. 1999. Selected Works from the Collection of the National Museum of African Art. Washington, D.C.: National Museum of African Art, Smithsonian Institution, p. 76, no. 48.
Thompson, Barbara. 2008. Black Womanhood: Images, Icons, and Ideologies of the African Body. Hanover: Hood Museum of Art, Dartmouth College with Seattle: University of Washington Press, no. 2.
Topic:
Male use
Credit Line:
Museum purchase
Object number:
97-11-1
See more items in:
National Museum of African Art Collection
Data Source:
National Museum of African Art

We're answering your questions on Wednesday, September 14

view We're answering your questions on Wednesday, September 14 digital asset number 1
Creator:
National Museum of American History
Type:
Blog posts
Smithsonian staff publications
Blog posts
Published Date:
Mon, 12 Sep 2016 15:43:05 +0000
Description:

Ask a Curator Day has begun! We're sharing some of our favorite questions and answers on Storify.

In Part 1 of the Q&A, we answer questions on maritime history, editing museum labels, the history of money, and women in World War I.

In Part 2, curator Hal Wallace answers questions about electricity.

In Part 3, we answer questions about political history, guitars, and becoming museum professionals.

Museums make me curious. I want to know about the old and often rare objects they display, but I also want to know what happens after hours. For example, how do you dust the Spirit of St. Louis hovering overhead at the National Air and Space Museum? How do the employees at Hillwood Estate, Museum and Gardens resist the temptation to try on all that stunning jewelry? And who gets to organize the logistics of "carcass feeding" at the National Zoo? Luckily for me, there's Ask a Curator Day, when museums, historic houses, zoos, aquaria, heritage centers, archives, and other educational institutions answer questions via social media sites such as Twitter.

Blue sign with white text

But what to ask? That part sounds easy, but, as curious as I am about how museums work, I can't always phrase a perfect question on demand. When a museum docent or tour guide invites questions at the end of their tour, I panic. But I recently learned a trick from another visitor while touring the National Building Museum. When question time rolled around, she found a smart way to indulge her curiosity without having to come up with a perfectly worded inquiry, saying, "I was interested in the part about how this building was designed with the needs of office workers and Civil War veterans in mind. Could you say more about that?" Voila!

With that "tell me more" trick in mind, check out the schedule of National Museum of American History experts who will be answering questions on Wednesday, September 14.

11 a.m. – 12 p.m.: Motorcycles, maritime history, and money, money, money

Paul Johnston, Curator of Transportation in the Division of Work and Industry: I will answer questions on maritime history, shipwrecks, motorcycles, how aquatic avian excrement changed the world, nuclear submarines, and collecting transportation history for the nation.

Canvas-colored life vest with ties on each side

Hillery York, Collections Manager for the National Numismatic Collection: I'll answer your questions about numismatics, the study of coins, paper currency, and medals. I look forward to chatting about new monetary technologies in the numismatic collection and the digitization of museum collections. One of my favorite things in the museum is our exhibition The Value of Money because it shows the breadth and depth of our numismatic collections.

12-1 p.m.: Wordsmithing and women's military history

Patri O'Gan, Project Assistant in the Division of Armed Forces History: I'll answer questions about World War I and the history of women in the military. I'm particularly excited to chat about the official artwork of the American Expeditionary Force and women's participation in World War I because I'm currently assisting on upcoming exhibitions on these topics. One of my favorite things in the museum is our collection of women's uniforms from World War I because they highlight a groundbreaking time for women in the United States that eventually led to winning the right to vote.

Blue uniform with jacket and skirt, four gold buttons, white cuffs and collar, and black tie

Leslie Poster, Editor, Office of Project Management and Editorial Services: When the words are right, information passes effortlessly from brilliant curators to intrigued museum visitors. I work with those words. I edited several of the exhibitions that opened last summer in our newly renovated West Wing's first floor, and I am now working on exhibitions planned for the second and third floors of the West Wing. You can ask me about any of our current and upcoming exhibits—I've read 'em all! I've blogged about a 400-mile journey for a paint can, the science of mounting glass, and some Alexander Graham Bell facts you may not know.

1-2 p.m.: Electrical science

Hal Wallace, Curator of the Electricity collections: I'll be happy to answer questions about our objects in electrical science and technologies. I'm a specialist in the history of electric lighting and I find rural electrification particularly interesting. I am currently collecting LEDs. I'm also working on a new exhibition on solar power that will open here in November.

Contraption with square box and rectangle

2-3 p.m.: Innovation, guitars, early motion pictures, sports, and culture

Monica Smith, Head of Exhibitions and Interpretation in the Lemelson Center for the Study of Invention and Innovation: I'm excited to answer questions about the history of invention and the inventive process. Ask me about the Places of Invention exhibition currently on display in the museum's Innovation Wing, since I worked on it as the project director and a co-curator. Besides our exhibition, one of my favorite things in the museum is the 1939 Slingerland electric guitar currently on display because it's probably the earliest commercially available solidbody electric guitar and most people, even guitar enthusiasts, have never heard of it.

Brown guitar, red background

Eric Jentsch, Deputy Chair and Curator in the Division of Culture and the Arts: I can answer questions about our upcoming exhibition on American culture, the history of sports, and popular culture. I've blogged about the history of basketball and hair bands. One interesting object I've gotten to research is counterculture guru Ken Kesey's large Acid Test Signboard. I have podcasted about the history of the Olympics. Catch me at the People, Passion, Purpose event in Los Angeles in October.

Ryan Lintelman, Curatorial Assistant in the Division of Culture and the Arts: I'll take questions on the history of popular culture and entertainment. I'm particularly excited to chat about 19th-century music and entertainment because I've been researching those topics for a new exhibition. One of my favorite things in the museum is the Mutoscope collection, because it sheds a light on early movies and their audience.

Claire Jerry, Curator in the Division of Political History: New to the museum, I can answer questions about the odd items used to promote 20th-century presidential campaigns. After all, this is the time of year when yard signs sprout like flowers and campaign buttons shout out from jackets and backpacks. One of my favorite examples in the museum was made by a delegate to the 1996 Democratic National Convention who managed to get four different things on her head at one time!

You can send your questions for these staff members via Twitter or Facebook. We'll share the most interesting questions and answers on the blog.

Ask a Curator day yellow graphic on blue background

Erin Blasco is an education specialist in the New Media Department.

Posted Date: 
Monday, September 12, 2016 - 12:00

Categories:

Topic:
American History
See more posts:
Blog Feed
Data Source:
National Museum of American History

[Trade catalogs from Shaw Laboratories, Inc.]

Company Name:
Shaw Laboratories, Inc.
Notes content:
Instruction Manual for the Rapid-Rater ; test results ; scoring of objective type tests
Includes:
Trade catalog and manual
Black and white images
Physical description:
1 piece; 1 box
Language:
English
Type of material:
Trade catalogs
Trade literature
Place:
Syosset, Long Island, New York, United States
Date:
1900s
Topic (Romaine term):
Educational institutions; equipment and supplies (includes playground equipment)
Topic:
"Schools -- Furniture, equipment, etc."
Playgrounds
Record ID:
SILNMAHTL_39746
Collection:
Smithsonian Libraries Trade Literature Collections
Data source:
Smithsonian Libraries

W. Cullen Bryant, (sculpture)

Artist:
Thompson, Launt
Subject:
Bryant, William Cullen
Type:
Sculptures
Exhibition Catalogs
Date:
1876
Notes:
Appears in exhibition catalog as entry no. 329
[Object type not specified in catalogue. Designated by indexer's analysis.]
Catalogue of the First Annual Prize Exhibition of the Philadelphia Sketch Club, held at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, December, 1865. Philadelphia: Stein & Jones, Printers, 321 Chestnut Street. 1865.
Topic:
Portrait male
Occupation--Political--Statesman
Control number:
AECI 01700309
Data Source:
Pre-1877 Art Exhibition Catalogue Index

Goethe, (sculpture)

Artist:
Kuntze, E. J.
Subject:
Goethe
Type:
Sculptures
Exhibition Catalogs
Date:
1876
Notes:
Appears in exhibition catalog as entry no. 334 (Sale info: For Sale).
[Object type not specified in catalogue. Designated by indexer's analysis.]
Catalogue of the First Annual Prize Exhibition of the Philadelphia Sketch Club, held at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, December, 1865. Philadelphia: Stein & Jones, Printers, 321 Chestnut Street. 1865.
Topic:
Portrait male
Occupation--Writer
Control number:
AECI 01700314
Data Source:
Pre-1877 Art Exhibition Catalogue Index

Shan't have it, (painting)

Artist:
Roberts, Howard
Type:
Paintings
Exhibition Catalogs
Date:
1876
Notes:
Appears in exhibition catalog as entry no. 335 (Sale info: For Sale).
[Object type not specified in catalogue. Designated by indexer's analysis.]
Catalogue of the First Annual Prize Exhibition of the Philadelphia Sketch Club, held at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, December, 1865. Philadelphia: Stein & Jones, Printers, 321 Chestnut Street. 1865.
Topic:
Undetermined
Figure
Control number:
AECI 01700315
Data Source:
Pre-1877 Art Exhibition Catalogue Index

Schiller, (sculpture)

Artist:
Kuntze, E. J.
Subject:
Schiller
Type:
Sculptures
Exhibition Catalogs
Date:
1876
Notes:
Appears in exhibition catalog as entry no. 336 (Sale info: For Sale).
[Object type not specified in catalogue. Designated by indexer's analysis.]
Catalogue of the First Annual Prize Exhibition of the Philadelphia Sketch Club, held at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, December, 1865. Philadelphia: Stein & Jones, Printers, 321 Chestnut Street. 1865.
Topic:
Portrait male
Occupation--Writer
Control number:
AECI 01700316
Data Source:
Pre-1877 Art Exhibition Catalogue Index

Catalogue of holdings of southern African material / Diana L. Newman, Fiona Rankin-Smith and Rayda Becker

Author:
Newman, Diana L
Rankin-Smith, Fiona
Becker, Rayda
Smithsonian Libraries African Art Index Project DSI
Subject:
University of the Witwatersrand Art Galleries
Standard Bank Foundation Art collections
Type:
Articles
Date:
1989
Notes:
This is an inventory of the ethnographic collections of the Standard Bank Foundation and of the University of the Witwatersrand classifed by ethnic group and object type. It also includes "signed" works by artists, wherever known.
Topic:
Art, South African
Call number:
N7380.5 .N47c 1989
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries

Transaction terms for collections management / Smithsonian Institution, Data Content Committee

Author:
Smithsonian Institution
Subject:
Smithsonian Institution
Physical description:
viii, 31 p. ; 28 cm
Type:
Terminology
Date:
1994
C1994
Notes:
The Data Content Committee was formed to make the Smithsonian Institution Data Dictionary more accessible. The Committee collected terms for three data elements: transaction terms, roles, object type in order to describe how Smithsonian museums and collecting units acquire, dispose, lend, borrow and hold in temporary custody objects and specimens.
Topic:
Museums
Museum techniques
Call number:
AM3 .S64 1994
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries

Design for a Lincoln Monument, (drawing)

Artist:
Bailly, J. A.
Type:
Drawings
Exhibition Catalogs
Date:
1876
Notes:
Appears in exhibition catalog as entry no. 330 (Sale info: For Competition).
[Object type not specified in catalogue. Designated by indexer's analysis.]
Catalogue of the First Annual Prize Exhibition of the Philadelphia Sketch Club, held at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, December, 1865. Philadelphia: Stein & Jones, Printers, 321 Chestnut Street. 1865.
Artist professional affiliation: Philadelphia Sketch Club.
Topic:
Architecture--Design
Architecture--Monument--Lincoln Monument
Control number:
AECI 01700310
Data Source:
Pre-1877 Art Exhibition Catalogue Index

Bust of Gen'l Patterson, (sculpture)

Artist:
Bailly, J. A.
Subject:
Patterson, General
Type:
Sculptures
Exhibition Catalogs
Date:
1876
Notes:
Appears in exhibition catalog as entry no. 331
[Object type not specified in catalogue. Designated by indexer's analysis.]
Catalogue of the First Annual Prize Exhibition of the Philadelphia Sketch Club, held at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, December, 1865. Philadelphia: Stein & Jones, Printers, 321 Chestnut Street. 1865.
Artist professional affiliation: Philadelphia Sketch Club.
Topic:
Portrait male
Occupation--Military--General
Control number:
AECI 01700311
Data Source:
Pre-1877 Art Exhibition Catalogue Index

Bust of Youth, (sculpture)

Artist:
Bailly, J. A.
Subject:
Unidentified
Type:
Sculptures
Exhibition Catalogs
Date:
1876
Notes:
Appears in exhibition catalog as entry no. 333 (Sale info: For Sale).
[Object type not specified in catalogue. Designated by indexer's analysis.]
Catalogue of the First Annual Prize Exhibition of the Philadelphia Sketch Club, held at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, December, 1865. Philadelphia: Stein & Jones, Printers, 321 Chestnut Street. 1865.
Artist professional affiliation: Philadelphia Sketch Club.
Topic:
Portrait male--Bust
Control number:
AECI 01700313
Data Source:
Pre-1877 Art Exhibition Catalogue Index

Taking the Oath and drawing Rations, (sculpture)

Artist:
Rogers, John
Type:
Sculptures
Exhibition Catalogs
Date:
1876
Notes:
Appears in exhibition catalog as entry no. 337 (Sale info: For Sale).
[Object type not specified in catalogue. Designated by indexer's analysis.]
Catalogue of the First Annual Prize Exhibition of the Philadelphia Sketch Club, held at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, December, 1865. Philadelphia: Stein & Jones, Printers, 321 Chestnut Street. 1865.
Topic:
Ceremony--Military
Occupation--Military
History--United States--Civil War
Recreation--Leisure--Eating & Drinking
Control number:
AECI 01700317
Data Source:
Pre-1877 Art Exhibition Catalogue Index

Inventories of American painting and sculpture [electronic resource]

Smithsonian American Art Museum inventories of American painting and sculpture
Author:
National Museum of American Art (U.S.)
Smithsonian American Art Museum
Type:
Electronic resources
Directories
Date:
199u
[199-?]-
Notes:
Title from introductory screen.
Database includes both the Inventory of American paintings executed before 1914 and the Inventory of American sculpture.
Summary:
The database provides information on artworks in public and private collections worldwide, collected from such sources as published catalogues, collection checklists, reports from collectors, journals and magazines, and preservation inventories. Searchable by keyword, or by browsing by artist, title, subject, object type, owner, or call number.
Topic:
Painting, American
Sculpture, American
Art, American
Call number:
N51 .I58 1990
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries

Tradition of metal-casting in eastern Nigeria and western Cameroon between 1840 and 1940

Author:
Kandert, Josef
Smithsonian Libraries African Art Index Project DSI
Type:
Articles
Place:
Nigeria
Cameroon
Cameroon Grassfields
Date:
1990
Notes:
Illustrations, map.
The non-ferrous metal casting traditions of eastern Nigeria and western Cameroon have never been looked at collectively and comparatively. This is the task that Kandert sets for himself: "to reconstruct the cultural-historical image of the casting tradition" in an area embracing Igboland, the Benue River basin, Adamawa, the Cross River basin, and the Cameroon Grassfields. What are the "common cultural phenomena" that link similar objects made by different ethnic groups?
The survey of metal objects is introduced with a discussion of sources of metals, historical information on metal casters, and casting techniques. The survey itself (pages 25-95) is presented by object type. Among them are manillas, ceremonial staffs, axes, pipes, swords, daggers, bells, crotals, oliphants, drums, headrests, horse trappings, amulets, figurative sculptures, masks, hairpins, earrings, necklaces, bracelets, and anklets. The illustrations are mainly line drawings. Many of the objects are from the Náprstek Museum collection in Prague, although Kandert's research took him to other European and American museums and to Nigeria and the Cameroon.
Topic:
Metalworking
Art metal-work
Art metal-work, Nigerian
Art metal-work, Cameroon
Art metal-work, Igbo
Jewelry
Manillas
Money
Lost-wax process
Crotals
Bells
Metal sculpture
Brass bracelets (Jewelry)
Brass figures (Representations)
Bronze bells (Idiophones)
Tobacco pipes
Call number:
GN37.P8 N21
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries

TGCat: The Chandra Transmission Grating Data Catalog and Archive

Author:
Huenemoerder, David P.
Mitschang, Arik
Dewey, Daniel
Nowak, Michael A.
Schulz, Norbert S.
Nichols, Joy S.
Davis, John E.
Houck, John C.
Marshall, Herman L.
Noble, Michael S.
Morgan, Doug
Canizares, Claude R.
Object Type:
Smithsonian staff publication
Electronic document
Year:
2011
Abstract:
The Chandra Transmission Grating Data Archive and Catalog (TGCat) provides easy access to analysis-ready products, specifically, high-resolution X-ray count spectra and their corresponding calibrations. The web interface makes it easy to find observations of a particular object, type of object, or type of observation; to quickly assess the quality and potential usefulness of the spectra from pre-computed summary plots; or to customize a view with an interactive plotter, optionally combining spectra over multiple orders or observations. Data and responses can be downloaded as a package or as individual files, and the query results themselves can be retrieved as ASCII or Virtual Observatory tables. Portable reprocessing scripts used to create the archive and which use the Chandra X-ray Center's (CXC's) software and other publicly available software are also available, facilitating standard or customized reprocessing from Level 1 CXC archival data to spectra and responses with minimal user interaction.
Doi:
10.1088/0004-6256/141/4/129
Citation:
Huenemoerder, David P., Mitschang, Arik, Dewey, Daniel, Nowak, Michael A., Schulz, Norbert S., Nichols, Joy S., Davis, John E., Houck, John C., Marshall, Herman L., Noble, Michael S., Morgan, Doug and Canizares, Claude R. 2011. TGCat: The Chandra Transmission Grating Data Catalog and Archive. The Astronomical Journal, 141(4): 129 doi:10.1088/0004-6256/141/4/129
Topic:
Astronomy
Data source:
Smithsonian Libraries

Software for data analysis : programming with R / John M. Chambers

Programming with R
Author:
Chambers, John M
Physical description:
xiv, 498 p. : ill ; 24 cm
Type:
Books
Date:
2008
C2008
Contents:
Cover -- Contents -- 1 Introduction: Principles and Concepts -- 1.1 Exploration: The Mission -- 1.2 Trustworthy Software: The Prime Directive -- 1.3 Concepts for Programming with R -- 1.4 The R System and the S Language -- 2 Using R -- 2.1 Starting R -- 2.2 An Interactive Session -- 2.3 The Language -- 2.4 Objects and Names -- 2.5 Functions and Packages -- 2.6 Getting R -- 2.7 Online Information About R -- 2.8 What's Hard About Using R? -- 3 Programming with R: The Basics -- 3.1 From Commands to Functions -- 3.2 Functions and Functional Programming -- 3.3 Function Objects and Function Calls -- 3.4 The Language -- 3.5 Debugging -- 3.6 Interactive Tracing and Editing -- 3.7 Conditions: Errors and Warnings -- 3.8 Testing R Software -- 4 R Packages -- 4.1 Introduction: Why Write a Package? -- 4.2 The Package Concept and Tools -- 4.3 Creating a Package -- 4.4 Documentation for Packages -- 4.5 Testing Packages -- 4.6 Package Namespaces -- 4.7 Including C Software in Packages -- 4.8 Interfaces to Other Software -- 5 Objects -- 5.1 Objects, Names, and References -- 5.2 Replacement Expressions -- 5.3 Environments -- 5.4 Non-local Assignments; Closures -- 5.5 Connections -- 5.6 Reading and Writing Objects and Data -- 6 Basic Data and Computations -- 6.1 The Evolution of Data in the S Language -- 6.2 Object Types -- 6.3 Vectors and Vector Structures -- 6.4 Vectorizing Computations -- 6.5 Statistical Data: Data Frames -- 6.6 Operators: Arithmetic, Comparison, Logic -- 6.7 Computations on Numeric Data -- 6.8 Matrices and Matrix Computations -- 6.9 Fitting Statistical models -- 6.10 Programming Random Simulations -- 7 Data Visualization and Graphics -- 7.1 Using Graphics in R -- 7.2 The x-y Plot -- 7.3 The Common Graphics Model -- 7.4 The graphics Package -- 7.5 The grid Package -- 7.6 Trellis Graphics and the lattice Package -- 8 Computing with Text -- 8.1 Text Computations for Data Analysis -- 8.2 Importing Text Data -- 8.3 Regular Expressions -- 8.4 Text Computations in R -- 8.5 Using and Writing Perl -- 8.6 Examples of Text Computations -- 9 New Classes -- 9.1 Introduction: Why Classes? -- 9.2 Programming with New Classes -- 9.3 Inheritance and Inter-class Relations -- 9.4 Virtual Classes -- 9.5 Creating and Validating Objects -- 9.6 Programming with S3 Classes -- 9.7 Example: Binary Trees -- 9.8 Example: Data Frames -- 10 Methods and Generic Functions -- 10.1 Introduction: Why Methods? -- 10.2 Method Definitions -- 10.3 New Methods for Old Functions -- 10.4 Programming Techniques for Methods -- 10.5 Generic Functions -- 10.6 How Method Selection Works -- 11 Interfaces I: C and Fortran -- 11.1 Interfaces to C and Fortran -- 11.2 Calling R-Independent Subroutines -- 11.3 Calling R-Dependent Subroutines -- 11.4 Computations in C++ -- 11.5 Loading and Registering Compiled Routines -- 12 Interfaces II: Other Systems -- 12.1 Choosing an Interface -- 12.2 Text- and File-Based Interfaces -- 12.3 Functional Interfaces -- 12.4 Object-Based Interfaces -- 12.5 Interfaces to OOP Languages -- 12.6 Interfaces to C++ -- 12.7 Interfaces to Databases and Spreadsheets -- 12.8 Interfaces without R -- 13 How R Works
Topic:
Numerical analysis--Data processing
R (Computer program language)
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries

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