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Hansen Writing Ball (Commercial)

view Hansen Writing Ball (Commercial) digital asset number 1
Maker:
Rasmus Malling-Hansen, Danish, 1835-1890
Medium:
Brass, ferrous alloy, paper
Type:
Exhibitions
Hansen Writing Ball (Commercial)
Made in:
Denmark
Date:
1878
Credit Line:
Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of American History, On deposit from Wyckoff, Seamans and Benedict, Cat. 181005
Accession Number:
14.2012.42
See more items in:
Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum Collection
Exhibitions Department
Data Source:
Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum

Hansen Writing Ball Patent Model

view Hansen Writing Ball Patent Model digital asset: Open.
Maker:
Hansen, Hans R. M. J.
Inventor:
Hansen, Hans R. M. J.
Physical Description:
mahogany (overall material)
Measurements:
overall: 5 in x 12 1/2 in x 10 in; 12.7 cm x 31.75 cm x 25.4 cm
Object Name:
patent model, typewriter
Associated place:
Danmark: København, Copenhagen
Date made:
1872-04-23
Patent date:
1872-04-23
Description:
This typewriter patent model accompanied the patent application of Hans R. Malling J. Hansen of Copenhagen, Denmark in his patent application that received patent number 125,952 on April 23, 1872. The model only shows a portion of the machine, with three letters in the “type-ball.” This patent was one of the earlier designs of Hansen’s unique writing ball typewriter. In his patent Hansen claimed the combination of converging types arranged circularly that met at the same point. Hansen also claimed the use of a spring or electro-magnet as a means of paper carriage movement. The electromagnet in the typewriter operated by closing the circuit on each descent of the type before it makes it impression on the paper. Closing the circuit causes an attraction of the armature of the magnet, moving the drum before the type hits. After the drum moved a full line, the mechanism would move it down a line.
Location:
Currently not on view
ID Number:
ME*308874
Catalog number:
308874
License number:
125,952
Accession number:
89797
Patent number:
125,952
See more items in:
Work and Industry: Mechanisms
Typewriters
Computers & Business Machines
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center
Additional Online Media:

William J. Clinton Presidential Inauguration, aerial view of the National Mall, (depicting Quadrangle Building, Smithsonian Institution Building [Castle], and National Museum of Natural History), 1993

view William J. Clinton Presidential Inauguration, aerial view of the National Mall, (depicting Quadrangle Building, Smithsonian Institution Building [Castle], and National Museum of Natural History), 1993 digital asset number 1
Creator:
Hansen, Carl C
Subject:
Clinton, Bill 1946-
National Museum of Natural History (U.S.)
Quadrangle Building (Washington, D.C.)
Smithsonian Institution Building (Washington, D.C.)
Type:
Ektachrome print
Color transparencies
Place:
United States
Date:
1993
Notes:
Also known as: [SPI_5694]
Summary:
Aerial Photography, William J. Clinton Presidential Inauguration, aerial view of the National Mall, (depicting Quadrangle Building, Smithsonian Institution Building [Castle], and National Museum of Natural History).
Cite as:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Accession 11-009, Image #2003-0102
Topic:
Aerial photography
Presidents
Presidents--Inauguration
Local number:
SIA Acc. 11-009 [2003-0102]
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution Archives

William J. Clinton Presidential Inauguration, aerial view of the National Mall (depicting area of National Air and Space Museum towards the Washington Monument, and tents set up for the celebration), 1993

view William J. Clinton Presidential Inauguration, aerial view of the National Mall (depicting area of National Air and Space Museum towards the Washington Monument, and tents set up for the celebration), 1993 digital asset number 1
Creator:
Hansen, Carl C
Subject:
Clinton, Bill 1946-
National Air and Space Museum
Type:
Ektachrome print
Color transparencies
Place:
United States
Mall, The (Washington, D.C.)
Date:
1993
Notes:
Also known as: [SPI_5693]
Summary:
Aerial Photography, William J. Clinton Presidential Inauguration, aerial view of the National Mall, (depicting area of National Air and Space Museum towards the Washington Monument, and tents set up for the celebration).
Cite as:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Accession 11-009, Image #2003-0088
Topic:
Aerial photography
Presidents
Presidents--Inauguration
Washington Monument (Washington, D.C.)
Local number:
SIA Acc. 11-009 [2003-0088]
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution Archives

William J. Clinton Presidential Inauguration, aerial view of White House, 1993

view William J. Clinton Presidential Inauguration, aerial view of White House, 1993 digital asset number 1
Creator:
Hansen, Carl C
Subject:
Clinton, Bill 1946-
United States Department of Agriculture
Type:
Ektachrome print
Color transparencies
Place:
United States
Mall, The (Washington, D.C.)
Date:
1993
Notes:
Also known as: [SPI_5691]
Summary:
Aerial Photography, William J. Clinton Presidential Inauguration, aerial view of White House.
Cite as:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Accession 11-009, Image #2003-0078
Topic:
Aerial photography
Presidents
Presidents--Inauguration
Local number:
SIA Acc. 11-009 [2003-0078]
Restrictions:
All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by the Smithsonian Institution Archives. Contact SIA Reference Staff for further information (email OSIAREF@si.edu)
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution Archives

William J. Clinton Presidential Inauguration, aerial view of White House, 1993

view William J. Clinton Presidential Inauguration, aerial view of White House, 1993 digital asset number 1
Creator:
Hansen, Carl C
Subject:
Clinton, Bill 1946-
United States Department of Agriculture
Type:
Ektachrome print
Color transparencies
Place:
United States
Mall, The (Washington, D.C.)
Date:
1993
Notes:
Also known as: [SPI_5692]
Summary:
Aerial Photography, William J. Clinton Presidential Inauguration, aerial view of White House.
Cite as:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Accession 11-009, Image #2003-0080
Topic:
Aerial photography
Presidents
Presidents--Inauguration
Local number:
SIA Acc. 11-009 [2003-0080]
Restrictions:
All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by the Smithsonian Institution Archives. Contact SIA Reference Staff for further information (email OSIAREF@si.edu)
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution Archives

Bunch and Conwill Look at NMAAHC Museum Site

view Bunch and Conwill Look at NMAAHC Museum Site digital asset number 1
Author:
Hansen, Carl C
Subject:
Bunch, Lonnie G
Conwill, Kinshasha Holman
National Museum of African American History and Culture
Physical description:
Number of Images: 1 Color: Color; Size: 16.64w x 11.09h ; Type of Image: Group, Candid; Medium: Digital Image
Type:
Group, candid
Digital Image
Place:
Washington (D.C.)
Mall, The (Washington, D.C.)
Date:
February 15, 2006
Category:
Historic Images of the Smithsonian
Summary:
Director of the National Museum of African American History and Culture, Lonnie Bunch, with Deputy Director, Kinshasha Holman Conwill, has a hand on a wall as they view the site for the new Museum on the Mall. 15th Street and the Washington Monument are behind them.
Contained within:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Accession 11-009, Smithsonian Photographic Services Collection
Contact information:
Institutional History Division, Smithsonian Archives, 600 Maryland Avenue, SW, Washington, D.C. 20024-2520, SIHistory@si.edu
Topic:
Museum directors
African Americans--History
Washington Monument (Washington, D.C.)
New Museums
Museums
Women
Smithsonian Institution--Employees
Standard number:
2006-2100
Restrictions:
No restrictions
Data Source:
Smithsonian Archives - History Div

Bunch and Conwill Look at NMAAHC Museum Site

view Bunch and Conwill Look at NMAAHC Museum Site digital asset number 1
Author:
Hansen, Carl C
Subject:
Bunch, Lonnie G
Conwill, Kinshasha Holman
National Museum of African American History and Culture
Physical description:
Number of Images: 1 Color: Color; Size: 16.64w x 11.09h ; Type of Image: Portrait; Medium: Digital Image
Type:
Landscape
Digital Image
Portraits
Place:
Washington (D.C.)
Mall, The (Washington, D.C.)
Date:
February 15, 2006
Category:
Historic Images of the Smithsonian
Summary:
Director of the National Museum of African American History and Culture (NMAAHC), Lonnie Bunch, points to the site where the new NMAAHC museum will be built on the National Mall, with Deputy Director, Kinshasha Holman Conwill. The Washington Monument is visible beyond the site.
Contained within:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Accession 11-009, Smithsonian Photographic Services Collection
Contact information:
Institutional History Division, Smithsonian Archives, 600 Maryland Avenue, SW, Washington, D.C. 20024-2520, SIHistory@si.edu
Topic:
Museum directors
African Americans--History
Portraits
Washington Monument (Washington, D.C.)
Standard number:
2006-2107
Restrictions:
No restrictions
Data Source:
Smithsonian Archives - History Div

National Museum of African American History and Culture Site

view National Museum of African American History and Culture Site digital asset number 1
Author:
Hansen, Carl C
Subject:
National Museum of African American History and Culture
National Museum of American History (U.S.) (NMAH)
Physical description:
Number of Images: 1 Color: Color; Size: 16.6w x 11h ; Type of Image: Landscape; Medium: Digital Image
Type:
Landscape
Digital Image
Place:
Mall, The (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
Date:
January 27, 2006
Category:
Historic Images of the Smithsonian
Summary:
One of four sites proposed for the National Museum of African American History and Culture (NMAAHC). This site ultimately is chosen for the new museum. The Washington Monument, Constitution Avenue, 14th Street in the foreground and 15th Street, and part of the National Museum of American History building are all the picture.
Contained within:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Accession 11-009, Smithsonian Photographic Services Collection
Contact information:
Institutional History Division, Smithsonian Archives, 600 Maryland Avenue, SW, Washington, D.C. 20024-2520, SIHistory@si.edu
Topic:
African Americans--History
Washington Monument (Washington, D.C.)
New Museums
Standard number:
2006-800
Restrictions:
No restrictions
Data Source:
Smithsonian Archives - History Div

(Artist-Designed Manhole Covers), (sculpture)

view (Artist-Designed Manhole Covers), (sculpture) digital asset number 1
Sculptor:
Stone, Marcia
Janz, Wes
Leaman, Keith A.
Atkinson, David
Hansen, Karen
Klipper, Stuart D. 1941-
Salzman, Wayne
Corbit, Robert
Smith, Craig
Curiskis, Juris
Main, Craig L.
Antoncich, Frank
Caster:
Monette, Tom
Medium:
Brass
Type:
Sculptures-Outdoor Sculpture
Sculptures-Relief
Sculptures
Owner/Location:
Administered by City of Minneapolis Minneapolis Arts Commission 350 South 5th Street, City Hall, Room 200 Minneapolis Minnesota 55415
Located Minneapolis City Center sidewalks along north side of 6th Street South between Nicollet Mall & Hennepin Avenue, south side of 7th Street South between Nicollet Mall & Hennepin Avenue Minneapolis Minnesota
Date:
1983-1984. Dedicated Aug. 23, 1984. Installed Sept. 1984
Notes:
Save Outdoor Sculpture, Minnesota, Minneapolis - St. Paul survey, 1993.
Summary:
Eleven manhole covers on the theme of "Entertainment in Minneapolis." 1.) Minneapolis City of Lakes (Marcia Stone and Wes Janz); 2.) music, theater, dance (Keith A. Leaman); 3.) hamburgers and hotdogs on a grill (David Atkinson); 4.) footprints and leaves (Karen Hansen); 5.) geographic location information (Stuart D. Klipper); 6.) a couple dining (Wayne Salzman); 7.) people dancing,(Robert Corbit); 8) a star, musical notes, chorus line (Craig Smith); 9.) drinks with cherries (Juris Curiskis); 10.) pattern with musical symbols (Craig L. Main); 11.) a figure peeking out from a manhole cover bearing the mini-apple symbol (Frank Antoncich).
Topic:
Allegory--Place--Minneapolis
Figure group
Recreation
Abstract
Control number:
IAS MN000163
Data Source:
Art Inventories Catalog, Smithsonian American Art Museums
Additional Online Media:

Taos #2, (sculpture)

Sculptor:
Hansen, James Lee 1925-
Medium:
Bronze
Type:
Sculptures
Owner/Location:
Civic Transit Mall Portland Oregon
Notes:
Hansen, James Lee, 1998.
Topic:
Undetermined
Control number:
IAS 74810003
Data Source:
Art Inventories Catalog, Smithsonian American Art Museums

Curators' Annual Reports, 1881-1964

view Curators' Annual Reports, 1881-1964 digital asset number 1
Creator:
United States National Museum
Subject:
Kellogg, Remington 1892-1969
Rathbun, Richard 1852-1918
Goode, G. Brown (George Brown) 1851-1896
Wetmore, Alexander 1886-1978
Baird, Spencer Fullerton 1823-1887
Ravenel, William de Chastignier 1859-
Walcott, Charles D (Charles Doolittle) 1850-1927
Taylor, Frank H (Frank Hamilton) 1846-1927
Physical description:
49 cu. ft. (98 document boxes)
Type:
Mixed archival materials
Collection descriptions
Date:
1881
1881-1964
Notes:
The administration of the United States National Museum required curators to submit regular reports on the activities of the departments, divisions, and sections. Prior to about 1900 these reports were often made monthly and semi-annually as well as annually. The reports were traditionally submitted to the Director of the National Museum to be used in preparing the published Annual Report of the United States National Museum. The individual reports, however, were not reproduced in their entirety in the published Annual Report and generally contain more information than is to be found in the published version.
Reports were stored by the Division of Correspondence and Documents, and later by the Office of the Registrar.
Summary:
Includes reports submitted to the Director of the United States National Museum by curators and administrators.
Topic:
Museums--Administration
Local number:
SIA RU000158
See more items in:
Curators' Annual Reports 1881-1964 [United States National Museum]
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
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  • View Curators' Annual Reports, 1881-1964 digital asset number 1

National Museum of the American Indian in Washington Marks 10th Anniversary

view National Museum of the American Indian in Washington Marks 10th Anniversary digital asset number 1
Creator:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
Type:
Blog posts
Smithsonian staff publications
Blog posts
Published Date:
Thu, 18 Sep 2014 11:00:00 +0000
Description:

Every year the Archives receives a variety of digital video for its permanent collections. Contents include Smithsonian Channel programming, museum events, and special ceremonies. The timing of one such video from Accession 13-266, Smithsonian Institution, Video Recordings, c. 2001-2009 was a nice surprise, as it is the 2-hour video of the opening ceremony of the National Museum of the American Indian (NMAI) from September 21, 2004, in Washington, D.C.

President George H. W. Bush signed legislation in 1989 creating the National Museum of the American Indian as part of the Smithsonian. The National Museum of the American Indian Act (NMAIA) allowed for a museum in New York, a storage facility in Maryland, and a flagship museum in Washington, D.C. The New York museum opened as the George Gustav Heye Center in 1994, which is named after the founder of the Museum of the American Indian in New York City in 1916. The Cultural Resources Center in Suitland, Maryland, which opened in 1999, serves conservation and collection storage needs.

Opening day of the Washington, D.C., museum featured a Native Nations Procession along the National Mall with thousands of indigenous peoples participating from all over the Western Hemisphere. There also were special remarks by Peruvian President Alejandro Toledo, U.S. lawmakers, and Smithsonian officials. The First Americans Festival also featured various musicians and entertainers. The opening brought together the largest known gathering of Native American communities in history.

Aerial view of the National Museum of the American Indian from September 21, 2004, by Carl C. Hansen, Accession 11-019 - Smithsonian Photographic Services Collection, Smithsonian Institution Archives, neg. no. 2004-53062.

U.S. Senator Ben Nighthorse Campbell said at the opening, “Senator Dan Inouye, my friend and colleague, to whom we owe so much, often says that Washington is a city of monuments and yet, there is not one monument to the native people of this land. This magnificent structure, which we are going to open today, is that monument and in it we will tell our story.”

The limestone building itself is curvilinear and was the initial design of GBQC and Douglas Cardinal Limited. The project was further developed by Jones, House, and Sakiestewa, along with the architecture firms Jones & Jones, SmithGroup in collaboration with Lou Weller (Caddo) and the Native American Design Collaborative, and Polshek Partnership Architects. There also was input from Native American communities. Important requirements were that it be a “living museum,” resulting in an east-facing main entrance, a dome that opens to the sky, and a 4.25-acre landscape that includes many plants and trees, as well as some ducks.

The cost of the museum was $199 million and it had 1.4 million visitors in 2013. The three facilities have the world’s largest collection of Native American art and artifacts from North, South, and Central America.

Nation to Nation: Treaties Between the United States and American Indian Nations launches on the anniversary of the museum’s opening on September 21.

Enjoy some of the highlights from the procession. Please note that some of the clips have some glitches in playback.

Related Resources

Blog Categories: 
Topic:
Archive
See more posts:
The Bigger Picture | Smithsonian Institution Archives
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution Archives

Type-O-Rama: What do typewriters reveal about innovation?

view Type-O-Rama: What do typewriters reveal about innovation? digital asset number 1
Creator:
National Museum of American History
Type:
Blog posts
Smithsonian staff publications
Blog posts
Published Date:
Mon, 18 Apr 2016 21:43:55 +0000
Description:

The sound of clicking typewriter keys filled the museum's Innovation Wing recently during Type-O-Rama. This event, presented by the Patrick F. Taylor Foundation Object Project team, featured typewriters from the permanent collections and gave visitors a chance to try their hands at typing on models from the teaching collection. The poets from Typewriter Rodeo brought their vintage machines along to compose free poems on any topic—even an ode to typewriters themselves!

Nine typewriters of varying styles and eras set out on a table

The Taylor Foundation Object Project explores how objects we use in daily life grew out of groundbreaking innovations, and typewriters are one example of these "everyday things that changed everything." At Type-O-Rama, seeing machines that were used in American history and tapping away on devices from different eras got us thinking about what we can learn about innovation through typewriters.

Why revisit typewriter innovations today?

When you look at a computer or cell phone today, you can see evidence of the typewriter. It was used for many of the same purposes as today’s devices, like office work, personal correspondence, and creative expression. Controlled by physical touch, typewriters allowed users to stamp ink letters directly on paper with the press of a key.

A boy types on a black electric IBM typewriter

Visitors to Type-O-Rama got firsthand experience with Taylor Foundation Object Project teaching collection objects, including a 1920s manual Royal typewriter and a 1950s electric IBM typewriter. Many of our younger visitors had never seen a typewriter in person or touched one before encountering our teaching collection machines. These authentic objects are intended for close-up examination and handling, unlike ones in the museum's permanent collection.

Black and white photograph of a woman sitting at a desk in front of a large typewriter

Noticing the different feels and sounds of manual and electric typewriters, visitors got a sense of how these machines have been used in different contexts and times. They also discovered how durable typewriters can be: if a key got stuck or the carriage jammed, museum educators were on hand to show visitors how to fix these issues pretty quickly. (Unlike, perhaps, solving a problem with your computer today!)

How have typewriters changed over time?

At Type-O-Rama, curator Susan Tolbert shared typewriters from the Work and Industry collection that illustrated a variety of changes and innovations in these devices from different eras.

A woman wearing gloves opens a lid on a typewriter to show its all-uppercase keyboard

Mark Twain, an early adopter of the Remington, called it a "new fangled writing machine." The Remington's QWERTY keyboard, developed by Christopher Latham Sholes and Carlos S. Glidden, was specifically designed to slow typing speeds in order to lessen the chances that machines would jam. Jamming could occur when the mechanical type bars, which were operated by the keys and arranged in a semicircle, clashed against each other. Most computer keyboards today still use the QWERTY layout, even though there's no longer a mechanical reason to do so.

Left: a small typewriter sitting in a purple case: Right: two diagrams showing the placement of letters on a QWERTY versus a scientific keyboard

The Blickensderfer No. 5 typewriter has a "scientific" rather than a QWERTY keyboard, with the most commonly used letters on the bottom row to reduce hand movement. It also has a patented "type wheel" that contains all the characters and different type fonts. The wheel would rotate to strike the paper and create a typed mark, a method that minimized jamming.

What can typewriters reveal about the people who used them?

Typewriters provide a way to explore technological innovations as well as the stories of the people who used them. Curator Stacey Kluck shared a few objects from the Culture and the Arts collection that were used by notable people.

A black and white photo of a woman holding a book (Mildred Wirt Benson) next to an Underwood typewriter out on display at the museum

Beginning in the 1930s, Mildred Wirt Benson, also known as Carolyn Keene, used this Underwood Model 5 typewriter to write several Nancy Drew mysteries. The faded keys show its regular use, and the worn spot on the right side of the space bar reveals that Benson was probably right-handed.

Black and white photograph of women sitting in close rows working on typewriters

While Benson's machine has a unique connection to her life and beloved book series, the Underwood Model 5 was a ubiquitous device. The first widely popular workplace typewriter, it was used by many different people in a variety of jobs and contexts.

Left: A small yellow and black typewriter. Right: two men standing behind that same typewriter in a collections storage space.

Shirley Temple used this Bing typewriter, branded as an Anfoe Student Model, in the late 1930s, when she was around 10 years old. Made by a German toy company, student models like the Anfoe were lightweight and small in size to be practical for children to use.

A woman and a man look closely at a gold, rounded typewriter

How did users' needs drive typewriter innovations?

This 1872 Hansen Writing Ball probably doesn't strike you as a classic typewriter in appearance, but the Danish-made writing ball was considered an engineering feat.

Rasmus Malling-Hansen, an educator and the inventor of the writing ball, created a Braille model of the writing ball that users who were blind or had low vision could operate independently. The most famous writing ball owner was philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche, who sought a typewriter that he could use as his vision declined.

Alfred Ely Beach received a patent in 1856 for an "Improvement in Printing Instruments for the Blind." Instead of making ink marks, his typewriter imprinted raised letters on paper for reading by touch.

A piece of white paper with typewriter lettering on it

Typewriters have been used by many different people, for different purposes. We think this poem by Typewriter Rodeo poet Sean, "The Tip of History," articulates what makes typewriters so fascinating: their look and feel, how they've evolved over time, and how people have used them as a tool for work, communication, and creativity.

To see photos from Type-O-Rama and read more Typewriter Rodeo poetry, check out our album:

 

Type-O-Rama

 

Caitlin Kearney is a new media assistant for the Taylor Foundation Object Project. Previously, she has blogged about exploring historical innovations through a classic American game show.

Posted Date: 
Wednesday, April 27, 2016 - 08:00
Topic:
American History
See more posts:
Blog Feed
Data Source:
National Museum of American History

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