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Hansen Writing Ball (Commercial)

view Hansen Writing Ball (Commercial) digital asset number 1
Maker:
Rasmus Malling-Hansen, Danish, 1835-1890
Medium:
Brass, ferrous alloy, paper
Type:
Exhibitions
Hansen Writing Ball (Commercial)
Made in:
Denmark
Date:
1878
Credit Line:
Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of American History, On deposit from Wyckoff, Seamans and Benedict, Cat. 181005
Accession Number:
14.2012.42
See more items in:
Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum Collection
Exhibitions Department
Data Source:
Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:chndm_14.2012.42

Hansen Writing Ball Patent Model

view Hansen Writing Ball Patent Model digital asset: Open.
Maker:
Hansen, Hans R. M. J.
Inventor:
Hansen, Hans R. M. J.
Physical Description:
mahogany (overall material)
Measurements:
overall: 5 in x 12 1/2 in x 10 in; 12.7 cm x 31.75 cm x 25.4 cm
Object Name:
patent model, typewriter
Associated place:
Danmark: København, Copenhagen
Date made:
1872-04-23
Patent date:
1872-04-23
Description:
This typewriter patent model accompanied the patent application of Hans R. Malling J. Hansen of Copenhagen, Denmark in his patent application that received patent number 125,952 on April 23, 1872. The model only shows a portion of the machine, with three letters in the “type-ball.” This patent was one of the earlier designs of Hansen’s unique writing ball typewriter. In his patent Hansen claimed the combination of converging types arranged circularly that met at the same point. Hansen also claimed the use of a spring or electro-magnet as a means of paper carriage movement. The electromagnet in the typewriter operated by closing the circuit on each descent of the type before it makes it impression on the paper. Closing the circuit causes an attraction of the armature of the magnet, moving the drum before the type hits. After the drum moved a full line, the mechanism would move it down a line.
Location:
Currently not on view
ID Number:
ME.308874
Catalog number:
308874
License number:
125,952
Accession number:
89797
Patent number:
125,952
See more items in:
Work and Industry: Mechanisms
Typewriters
Computers & Business Machines
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmah_850025
Additional Online Media:

Curators' Annual Reports, 1881-1964

view Curators' Annual Reports, 1881-1964 digital asset number 1
Creator:
United States National Museum
Subject:
Kellogg, Remington 1892-1969
Rathbun, Richard 1852-1918
Goode, G. Brown (George Brown) 1851-1896
Wetmore, Alexander 1886-1978
Baird, Spencer Fullerton 1823-1887
Ravenel, W. de C (William de Chastignier) 1859-1933
Walcott, Charles D (Charles Doolittle) 1850-1927
Taylor, Frank H (Frank Hamilton) 1846-1927
Smithsonian Institution Administration
Physical description:
49 cu. ft. (98 document boxes)
Type:
Manuscripts
Collection descriptions
Date:
1881
1881-1964
Notes:
The administration of the United States National Museum required curators to submit regular reports on the activities of the departments, divisions, and sections. Prior to about 1900 these reports were often made monthly and semi-annually as well as annually. The reports were traditionally submitted to the Director of the National Museum to be used in preparing the published Annual Report of the United States National Museum. The individual reports, however, were not reproduced in their entirety in the published Annual Report and generally contain more information than is to be found in the published version.
Reports were stored by the Division of Correspondence and Documents, and later by the Office of the Registrar.
For a description of the record series of which these materials are a part, refer to "Forms part of" above.
Summary:
Includes reports submitted to the Director of the United States National Museum by curators and administrators.
Topic:
Museums--Administration
Museum curators
Local number:
SIA RU000158
See more items in:
Curators' Annual Reports 1881-1964 [United States National Museum]
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_arc_216750
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Negative Log Book Number 20, (90-1 to 91-22194)

view Negative Log Book Number 20, (90-1 to 91-22194) digital asset number 1
Creator:
Smithsonian Institution Archives Smithsonian Photographic Services
Physical description:
Ink on paper
Type:
Logs (records)
Collection descriptions
Date:
1990
1990-1991
Summary:
Negative log book number 20, or "green book," documenting various Smithsonian museums and events. Information includes negative numbers, subjects of the photographs, persons and departments for whom the pictures were taken, dates the pictures were taken, photographers, and dates the information was entered into the log books.
Cite as:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Accession 10-001, Negative Log Book Number 20, 1990-1991
Topic:
Photography--History
Local number:
SIA Acc. 10-001 [SIA_10-001_NLB20]
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_arc_367118
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  • View Negative Log Book Number 20, (90-1 to 91-22194) digital asset number 3

Negative Log Book Number 21, (92-1 to 94-5200)

view Negative Log Book Number 21, (92-1 to 94-5200) digital asset number 1
Creator:
Smithsonian Institution Archives Smithsonian Photographic Services
Physical description:
Ink on paper
Type:
Logs (records)
Collection descriptions
Date:
1992
1992-1994
Summary:
Negative log book number 21, or "green book," documenting various Smithsonian museums and events. Information includes negative numbers, subjects of the photographs, persons and departments for whom the pictures were taken, dates the pictures were taken, photographers, and dates the information was entered into the log books.
Cite as:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Accession 10-001, Negative Log Book Number 21, 1992-1994
Topic:
Photography--History
Local number:
SIA Acc. 10-001 [SIA_10-001_NLB21]
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_arc_367119
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Negative Log Book Number 19, (88-15271 to 89-23594)

view Negative Log Book Number 19, (88-15271 to 89-23594) digital asset number 1
Creator:
Smithsonian Institution Archives Smithsonian Photographic Services
Physical description:
Ink on paper
Type:
Logs (records)
Collection descriptions
Date:
1988
1988-1989
Summary:
Negative log book number 19, or "green book," documenting various Smithsonian museums and events. Information includes negative numbers, subjects of the photographs, persons and departments for whom the pictures were taken, dates the pictures were taken, photographers, and dates the information was entered into the log books.
Cite as:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Accession 10-001, Negative Log Book Number 19, 1988-1989
Topic:
Photography--History
Local number:
SIA Acc. 10-001 [SIA_10-001_NLB19]
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_arc_367116
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  • View Negative Log Book Number 19, (88-15271 to 89-23594) digital asset number 2

William J. Clinton Presidential Inauguration, aerial view of the National Mall, (depicting Quadrangle Building, Smithsonian Institution Building [Castle], and National Museum of Natural History), 1993

view William J. Clinton Presidential Inauguration, aerial view of the National Mall, (depicting Quadrangle Building, Smithsonian Institution Building [Castle], and National Museum of Natural History), 1993 digital asset number 1
Creator:
Hansen, Carl C
Subject:
Clinton, Bill 1946-
National Museum of Natural History (U.S.)
Quadrangle Building (Washington, D.C.)
Smithsonian Institution Building (Washington, D.C.)
Type:
Ektachrome print
Color transparencies
Place:
United States
Date:
1993
Notes:
Also known as: [SPI_5694]
Summary:
Aerial Photography, William J. Clinton Presidential Inauguration, aerial view of the National Mall, (depicting Quadrangle Building, Smithsonian Institution Building [Castle], and National Museum of Natural History).
Cite as:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Accession 11-009, Image #2003-0102
Topic:
Aerial photography
Presidents
Presidents--Inauguration
Local number:
SIA Acc. 11-009 [2003-0102]
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_arc_308431

William J. Clinton Presidential Inauguration, aerial view of the National Mall (depicting area of National Air and Space Museum towards the Washington Monument, and tents set up for the celebration), 1993

view William J. Clinton Presidential Inauguration, aerial view of the National Mall (depicting area of National Air and Space Museum towards the Washington Monument, and tents set up for the celebration), 1993 digital asset number 1
Creator:
Hansen, Carl C
Subject:
Clinton, Bill 1946-
National Air and Space Museum
Type:
Ektachrome print
Color transparencies
Place:
United States
Mall, The (Washington, D.C.)
Date:
1993
Notes:
Also known as: [SPI_5693]
Summary:
Aerial Photography, William J. Clinton Presidential Inauguration, aerial view of the National Mall, (depicting area of National Air and Space Museum towards the Washington Monument, and tents set up for the celebration).
Cite as:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Accession 11-009, Image #2003-0088
Topic:
Aerial photography
Presidents
Presidents--Inauguration
Washington Monument (Washington, D.C.)
Local number:
SIA Acc. 11-009 [2003-0088]
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_arc_308430

Bunch and Conwill Look at NMAAHC Museum Site

view Bunch and Conwill Look at NMAAHC Museum Site digital asset number 1
Author:
Hansen, Carl C
Subject:
Bunch, Lonnie G
Conwill, Kinshasha Holman
National Museum of African American History and Culture
Physical description:
Number of Images: 1 Color: Color; Size: 16.64w x 11.09h ; Type of Image: Group, Candid; Medium: Digital Image
Type:
Group, candid
Digital Image
Place:
Washington (D.C.)
Mall, The (Washington, D.C.)
Date:
February 15, 2006
Category:
Historic Images of the Smithsonian
Summary:
Director of the National Museum of African American History and Culture, Lonnie Bunch, with Deputy Director, Kinshasha Holman Conwill, has a hand on a wall as they view the site for the new Museum on the Mall. 15th Street and the Washington Monument are behind them.
Contained within:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Accession 11-009, Smithsonian Photographic Services Collection
Contact information:
Institutional History Division, Smithsonian Archives, 600 Maryland Avenue, SW, Washington, D.C. 20024-2520, SIHistory@si.edu
Topic:
Museum directors
African Americans--History
Washington Monument (Washington, D.C.)
New Museums
Museums
Women
Smithsonian Institution--Employees
Standard number:
2006-2100
Restrictions:
No restrictions
Data Source:
Smithsonian Archives - History Div
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sic_12676

Bunch and Conwill Look at NMAAHC Museum Site

view Bunch and Conwill Look at NMAAHC Museum Site digital asset number 1
Author:
Hansen, Carl C
Subject:
Bunch, Lonnie G
Conwill, Kinshasha Holman
National Museum of African American History and Culture
Physical description:
Number of Images: 1 Color: Color; Size: 16.64w x 11.09h ; Type of Image: Portrait; Medium: Digital Image
Type:
Landscape
Digital Image
Portraits
Place:
Washington (D.C.)
Mall, The (Washington, D.C.)
Date:
February 15, 2006
Category:
Historic Images of the Smithsonian
Summary:
Director of the National Museum of African American History and Culture (NMAAHC), Lonnie Bunch, points to the site where the new NMAAHC museum will be built on the National Mall, with Deputy Director, Kinshasha Holman Conwill. The Washington Monument is visible beyond the site.
Contained within:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Accession 11-009, Smithsonian Photographic Services Collection
Contact information:
Institutional History Division, Smithsonian Archives, 600 Maryland Avenue, SW, Washington, D.C. 20024-2520, SIHistory@si.edu
Topic:
Museum directors
African Americans--History
Portraits
Washington Monument (Washington, D.C.)
Standard number:
2006-2107
Restrictions:
No restrictions
Data Source:
Smithsonian Archives - History Div
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sic_12686

National Museum of African American History and Culture Site

view National Museum of African American History and Culture Site digital asset number 1
Author:
Hansen, Carl C
Subject:
National Museum of African American History and Culture
National Museum of American History (U.S.) (NMAH)
Physical description:
Number of Images: 1 Color: Color; Size: 16.6w x 11h ; Type of Image: Landscape; Medium: Digital Image
Type:
Landscape
Digital Image
Place:
Mall, The (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
Date:
January 27, 2006
Category:
Historic Images of the Smithsonian
Summary:
One of four sites proposed for the National Museum of African American History and Culture (NMAAHC). This site ultimately is chosen for the new museum. The Washington Monument, Constitution Avenue, 14th Street in the foreground and 15th Street, and part of the National Museum of American History building are all the picture.
Contained within:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Accession 11-009, Smithsonian Photographic Services Collection
Contact information:
Institutional History Division, Smithsonian Archives, 600 Maryland Avenue, SW, Washington, D.C. 20024-2520, SIHistory@si.edu
Topic:
African Americans--History
Washington Monument (Washington, D.C.)
New Museums
Standard number:
2006-800
Restrictions:
No restrictions
Data Source:
Smithsonian Archives - History Div
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sic_12681

Negative Log Book Number 14, (82-532 to 83-3726)

view Negative Log Book Number 14, (82-532 to 83-3726) digital asset number 1
Creator:
Smithsonian Institution Archives Smithsonian Photographic Services
Physical description:
Ink on paper
Type:
Logs (records)
Collection descriptions
Date:
1982
1982-1983
Summary:
Negative log book number 14, or "green book," documenting various Smithsonian museums and events. Information includes negative numbers, subjects of the photographs, persons and departments for whom the pictures were taken, dates the pictures were taken, photographers, and dates the information was entered into the log books.
Cite as:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Accession 10-001, Negative Log Book Number 14, 1982-1983
Topic:
Photography--History
Local number:
SIA Acc. 10-001 [SIA_10-001_NLB14]
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_arc_367111
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Negative Log Book Number 9, (77-1 to 77-13865)

view Negative Log Book Number 9, (77-1 to 77-13865) digital asset number 1
Creator:
Smithsonian Institution Archives Smithsonian Photographic Services
Physical description:
Ink on paper
Type:
Logs (records)
Collection descriptions
Date:
1977
Summary:
Negative log book number 9, or "green book," documenting various Smithsonian museums and events. Information includes negative numbers, subjects of the photographs, persons and departments for whom the pictures were taken, dates the pictures were taken, photographers, and dates the information was entered into the log books.
Cite as:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Accession 10-001, Negative Log Book Number 9, 1977
Topic:
Photography--History
Local number:
SIA Acc. 10-001 [SIA_10-001_NLB09]
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_arc_367106
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William J. Clinton Presidential Inauguration, aerial view of White House, 1993

view William J. Clinton Presidential Inauguration, aerial view of White House, 1993 digital asset number 1
Creator:
Hansen, Carl C
Subject:
Clinton, Bill 1946-
United States Department of Agriculture
Type:
Ektachrome print
Color transparencies
Place:
United States
Mall, The (Washington, D.C.)
Date:
1993
Notes:
Also known as: [SPI_5691]
Summary:
Aerial Photography, William J. Clinton Presidential Inauguration, aerial view of White House.
Cite as:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Accession 11-009, Image #2003-0078
Topic:
Aerial photography
Presidents
Presidents--Inauguration
Local number:
SIA Acc. 11-009 [2003-0078]
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_arc_308428

William J. Clinton Presidential Inauguration, aerial view of White House, 1993

view William J. Clinton Presidential Inauguration, aerial view of White House, 1993 digital asset number 1
Creator:
Hansen, Carl C
Subject:
Clinton, Bill 1946-
United States Department of Agriculture
Type:
Ektachrome print
Color transparencies
Place:
United States
Mall, The (Washington, D.C.)
Date:
1993
Notes:
Also known as: [SPI_5692]
Summary:
Aerial Photography, William J. Clinton Presidential Inauguration, aerial view of White House.
Cite as:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Accession 11-009, Image #2003-0080
Topic:
Aerial photography
Presidents
Presidents--Inauguration
Local number:
SIA Acc. 11-009 [2003-0080]
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_arc_308429

What Digitization Will Do for the Future of Museums

view What Digitization Will Do for the Future of Museums digital asset number 1
Creator:
Smithsonian Magazine
Type:
Blog posts
Smithsonian staff publications
Conversations and talks
Lesson Plans
Blog posts
Published Date:
Thu, 29 Aug 2013 13:21:27 +0000
Blog Post Category:
At the Smithsonian
At the Smithsonian
Blogs
Around the Mall
Technology
Description:

In a first of its kind, the Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution G. Wayne Clough has published a new e-book, entitled Best of Both Worlds: Museums, Libraries, and Archives in a Digital Age. As a call to action, Clough charts the course that the Smithsonian will follow in the coming years in digitizing its artifacts, crowdsourcing its research and opening up its collections for public interpretation and consumption. “Today digital technology is pervasive, ” he writes, “its use, particularly by the world’s youth, is universal; its possibilities are vast; and everyone in our educational and cultural institutions is trying to figure out what to do with it all. It is mandatory that museums, libraries, and archives join with educational institutions in embracing it.”

We sat down with Secretary Clough to learn about his motivation for writing the book, the difficulties in digitizing 14 million objects and his favorite digitization projects so far.

Photo by Carl C. Hansen, Smithsonian

What first got you interested in digitization and thinking about the Smithsonian’s involvement with it?

I’ve been involved with computing all my professional life. I tell people that when I went to Georgia Tech as an undergraduate, the first course I had was how to use a slide rule, and the last one was how to use a computer. I put the slide rule away, and became very involved with computing. My thesis, at Berkeley, in the 60s, used a CDC 6600 machine to simulate complex environments. This kind of technology revolutionized the way we could think about geology and engineering.

Later, in my life as a faculty member and an educator, I used computing throughout. At Duke, the first assignment they gave me was teaching a freshman course in computing, and I really had a ball doing it, so it’s been something I’ve been at for a long time. As an administrator, I always had people trying to sell me different technological tools that would revolutionize education. All the same, it wasn’t quite time yet. The tools weren’t robust enough, they were too balky, they couldn’t be scaled.

When I came to the Smithsonian, it was clear to me that there was a huge potential and that we were finally at a tipping point in terms of the tools that we could use. What was happening was that everyone had their own devices, and then apps came along, and offered huge possibilities. Social media came along. And now it’s changing so fast. Just a few years ago, we didn’t have social media, and now Smithsonian has 3.5 million people following us on social media.

In those early years, what we did was experiment. I said ‘let a thousand flowers bloom.’ So we put up a venture fund called the Smithsonian 2.0 fund. Then through the Gates Foundation, we established a $30 million endowment for reaching new audiences, so we let people compete for those funds. All of a sudden, people were coming up with great ideas, so we could see things happening, but we didn’t have an umbrella over it.

So that is the next step, and the book really is the thought process of how you put this together and make it work—keeping the innovative and creative spirit within it, not saying everything has to be the same, but at the same time lift all parts of the Smithsonian up in digitization. It’s not going to be workable for us to have two museums at the top of their fields in this area, and 16 not. So how do we move everybody up into the game? The opportunities are there for us to reach people everywhere, and to me, the timing is just perfect to implement these ideas.

What, in a nutshell, is your vision for the digital future of the Smithsonian? In 10, 20, or 30 years, what are going to be some of the key ways the Institution embraces digitization and uses it to give access to the public?

Looking down the road, we will see people engaged in the creative activities of the Institution. In the past, the creative activities were entirely behind the walls of museums and collection centers. The public only got to access that through labels in exhibitions, which told them what we thought. Now, in this new world, people actually will help us design exhibitions, and it will be interactive. We have a beta version of a volunteer site, for example, that has several hundred working with us on projects. Essentially, you put up tasks, and volunteers can choose which ones they want to do. They submit their credentials, then, say, transcribe a cursive journal. Fundamentally, they’re taking things that have never been seen before by the public and making them available.

There are also cases where people know more about certain artifacts than we do. We have lots of implements from Native American tribes, and they may know more about them than we do, and we’d love for them to tell us about those objects. People are going to be engaged with us in a conversation, not a monologue. We’re not the ‘Voice of God’ anymore.

It’ll also mean letting people share in our research. We have this thing called LeafSnap, an app that identifies tree species based on images of their leaves. And if you take a picture and tell us you did it, we know where you were, and we know what that tree is. So we’re now mapping tree ranges based on people’s reports of that information. In the future, that’ll be extremely valuable, because as global warming hits, ranges of trees will change. Up at the Harvard-Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, we have the Colorful Cosmos project, where kids in a hundred museums are able to use their telescopes, and those kids are able to talk to Smithsonian scientists. That never would have happened before.

The other thing is that fundamentally, this is going to change the way our Institution works. We’re going to have to be a much more flexible and adaptable Institution, because maybe the greatest technology today may not be in the future. If we don’t shift and move, we’ll get left behind.

Smithsonian staff perform a 3D scan of Abraham Lincoln’s death mask. Image via Smithsonian Digitization Program Office 3D Lab

In the book, you also wrote that you want Smithsonian to digitize 14 million objects as a start. How do you prioritize which objects to make digitally available first?

It’s a good question, because even 14 million is too big. It’s better than 137 million, but it’s a huge number. When you think about digitizing a three-dimensional object, somebody has to go get it, they need to bring it somewhere where there’s sophisticated scanners, they need to scan it, and then they need to process it and then put it back. Think about doing that 14 million times. They estimate that would take 50 years, at best.

So that’s why you have to prioritize. There are a few elements in that. One is that we kind of have an understanding of what we think people would want, and we’re also asking people what they would want. So our art collections, for example, contain around 400,000 art objects. So we’ve asked our art people, and they told us 20,000 objects that are the best of the best. So we’re going to do high-resolution digitization of those objects.

Once you’ve identified these, there are robots that can produce the images. So they can do it relatively quickly. It’s a little gizmo, and it goes up to a painting on the wall, scans the thing, and then it’s finished. Then you put another painting on the wall, and it does that one.

Of the digitization projects the Smithsonian has done thus far, which are some of your favorites?

Well they’ve been at it for a few years now, and I’ve been fascinated by it. One of the first things they did was the Kennicott skull, which I keep on my desk and scare people with sometimes. I’ve also got a few other ones in my office—Lincoln’s death mask, and Owney, the postal dog. I’ve also got a 3D print of an instrument that will go up on a solar probe to measure the solar wind—it’ll go up in 2018, and the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory folks decided the best way to visualize it was to print it in plastic, so I’ve got that.

There’s also another story I really like. I went to a meeting with some of our people in the repatriation business—when a Native American tribe says, ‘we want this object back, and we can prove our ownership of it.’ Many of these objects are funerary items, so when the tribes get them back, they’ll bury them, and they’re gone from view. So our people have been saying to the tribes, ‘we’d love to make a three-dimensional copy of it,’ and with their permission, they’ve been making copies. They can paint the things, and they look exactly the same as the original objects. So in some cases, the tribes have seen the replicas, and said ‘wow, can you make some for us?’ Because they don’t want people handling the real deal, but want to have access to it. In some cases they’re even sending us their own objects, asking us to make copies.

To me, that’s where it’s all going. I just think it’s going to get cheaper, faster, quicker. It’ll take a while, but it makes things so accessible. You put the image or file on your iPad and can see the items, play with them. It really brings history alive.

With the book, you’re putting a statement out there that this sort of digitization is a priority for the Smithsonian. Why is it important that the Institution leads in this field?

When I came, people used to say ‘We’re the largest museum and science organization in the world.’ I’d say, ‘So what? We want to be the best.’

And if you want to be the best, that’s a big word. We’re one of the best in putting on exhibitions. We have the best collection of stamps, one of the best scientific collections. But you can’t be the best at your business if you walk away from anything this big. So if the Smithsonian wants to be a leader in museums, or astronomy, or whatever, it has to be a leader in the digital world.

The other thing is that this gives us a chance to deliver education to every person. And we can tailor the stories we tell based on the audience, and setting. And so suddenly, that “Voice of God” is no longer there. We can be much more considerate and thoughtful about what we provide. It’s very clear to me that we’re moving into a world where people want to customize the way they approach things. We provide teachers with lesson plans, for example, but they tell us that they just want to use them as a basic framework to put their own lessons in. We have a lesson plan on science in your backyard, but if you live in Tucson, it’d be a different story than the one you’d tell in Bellingham, Washington, where there’s tons of rain. So teachers want a framework, but they want to put their own substance in. So more and more, I think we’re going to be a facilitator.

The other thing is, once you start putting everything in the cloud, it all becomes a mixed bag. What’s the difference between the art of the Metropolitan Museum of Art and the Smithsonian when it’s in the cloud? People are going to be less concerned with where things come from. When they go to a museum, they’ve got to go to the Met or the Smithsonian. But when it’s in the cloud, they don’t really care. When they’re looking at a Winslow Homer painting in the cloud, they don’t care if it came from the Met or the Smithsonian—they’re just looking at a painting. So that’s going to change the way we do business and approach things. And I think, again, it’s a reason that it’s important for the Smithsonian to be a leader, so we can be controlling the options—at least understanding and appreciating and shaping the options—but if you’re not a leader, they’re going to shape you. People are looking to us to be a leader in this field.

When you put data about these artifacts in the cloud, how do you guard against technology becoming obsolete and losing access to this data?

We have a group working on this—they call it time-dependent materials. We have lots of objects in our collections that are subject to deterioration over time. The old film movies are a classic example of that, but there are lots of examples. Can you still read 8-track tapes? So we’ve got a group studying this, trying to figure out how to deal with it and ensure you have access in the future.

A good example of overcoming that sort of barrier, right now, is we have thousands of field journals that people made notes and illustrated with on hugely important expeditions. We have some of Charles Darwin’s notebooks. So in a way, that’s an obsolete medium, because few people can read it. But if you can digitize it, everyone can read it. So we have a volunteer transcription center to help transcribe cursive into a digital format.

You chose to publish these ideas in an e-book format. What do you think about the future of books and reading? Do you read on paper or e-books?

Well, when I got to the beach, I still like to have a real book. An iPad doesn’t work well out in the sun. But I’ve tried everything—iPads, Kindles, etc. Right now, it’s all about convenience, which is why I mostly use the iPad. If I’m sitting at the airport and realize I wanted to download a book, I can just download it right there. But I still like a real newspaper. The digital version doesn’t do as much for me. A real newspaper, you can flip back and forth, go back to earlier articles. But one thing I like about the iPad, I can go back and see what I read a few years ago. Sometimes I even go back and read the stuff I’ve finished over again years later.

Best of Both Worlds: Museums, Libraries, and Archives in a Digital Age is available via a free PDF.

Topic:
0
See more post:
Smithsonian Article Database
Data Source:
Smithsonian Magazine
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edanmdm:posts_0de777d9d3f59811f0285d4400d3ff64

(Artist-Designed Manhole Covers), (sculpture)

view (Artist-Designed Manhole Covers), (sculpture) digital asset number 1
Sculptor:
Stone, Marcia
Janz, Wes
Leaman, Keith A.
Atkinson, David
Hansen, Karen
Klipper, Stuart D. 1941-
Salzman, Wayne
Corbit, Robert
Smith, Craig
Curiskis, Juris
Main, Craig L.
Antoncich, Frank
Caster:
Monette, Tom
Medium:
Brass
Type:
Sculptures-Outdoor Sculpture
Sculptures-Relief
Sculptures
Owner/Location:
Administered by City of Minneapolis Minneapolis Arts Commission 350 South 5th Street, City Hall, Room 200 Minneapolis Minnesota 55415
Located Minneapolis City Center sidewalks along north side of 6th Street South between Nicollet Mall & Hennepin Avenue, south side of 7th Street South between Nicollet Mall & Hennepin Avenue Minneapolis Minnesota
Date:
1983-1984. Dedicated Aug. 23, 1984. Installed Sept. 1984
Notes:
Save Outdoor Sculpture, Minnesota, Minneapolis - St. Paul survey, 1993.
Summary:
Eleven manhole covers on the theme of "Entertainment in Minneapolis." 1.) Minneapolis City of Lakes (Marcia Stone and Wes Janz); 2.) music, theater, dance (Keith A. Leaman); 3.) hamburgers and hotdogs on a grill (David Atkinson); 4.) footprints and leaves (Karen Hansen); 5.) geographic location information (Stuart D. Klipper); 6.) a couple dining (Wayne Salzman); 7.) people dancing,(Robert Corbit); 8) a star, musical notes, chorus line (Craig Smith); 9.) drinks with cherries (Juris Curiskis); 10.) pattern with musical symbols (Craig L. Main); 11.) a figure peeking out from a manhole cover bearing the mini-apple symbol (Frank Antoncich).
Topic:
Allegory--Place--Minneapolis
Figure group
Recreation
Abstract
Control number:
IAS MN000163
Data Source:
Art Inventories Catalog, Smithsonian American Art Museums
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_ari_321860
Additional Online Media:

Taos #2, (sculpture)

Sculptor:
Hansen, James Lee 1925-
Medium:
Bronze
Type:
Sculptures
Owner/Location:
Civic Transit Mall Portland Oregon
Notes:
Hansen, James Lee, 1998.
Topic:
Undetermined
Control number:
IAS 74810003
Data Source:
Art Inventories Catalog, Smithsonian American Art Museums
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_ari_357230

New Jersey

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage
Type:
Archival materials
Introduction:
Folklore is commonly identified by many people with rural settings, and New Jersey is basically urban, suburban, and industrial. There are indeed some rural areas in New Jersey - the truck farms of "the Garden State" and the Pine Barrens of South Jersey - but the former are fast disappearing and the latter survive only because they are preserved by the state. Most New Jerseyans live and work in the densely populated corridor that cuts across the mid-section of the state. But folklorists today recognize that there is also a folklore of the factory, a folklore of the city, and a folklore of ethnicity, and New Jersey provides a rich source for their study.

The streets of New Jersey's cities abound with traditional life as practiced for generations. One need only to walk through Hoboken or Bayonne to see children playing stick ball, hop scotch, and Double Dutch jump rope. New Jersey is populated by a large number of ethnic groups, many of which have clustered in city neighborhoods. There is a Cuban community in Union City, a Portuguese community in Newark, a Hungarian community in New Brunswick, and a Japanese community in rural Seabrook Farms. For many ethnic groups folk traditions are their symbols of identity. Their ethnicity is expressed in foodways, language, music, dance, and festivals (often in ethnic costume). Music such as Ukrainian trio music, once performed informally at weddings, is now formally presented on a stage at a public festival with dancers in folk costume. Craft traditions that used to be a vital part of rural economy in the mother country are now miniaturized and made into a hobby.

The 1983 Festival program brought a panoply of presentations from New Jersey to the National Mall, ranging from ethnic celebrations of African Americans, Japanese Americans, Italian Americans and others to craft demonstrations featuring skills and techniques of silk weaving, herbalism and glassblowing, and on to the diverse occupations associated with maritime trades and the sacred songs of menhaden fishermen.

The New Jersey Program was made possible through many generous corporate and private donations to Festival New Jersey '83!, a nonprofit corporation established and chaired by Governor Thomas H. Kean to fund New Jersey's participation in the 17th Annual Festival of American Folklife.

Sue Manos-Nahwooksy served as New Jersey Program Coordinator.
Participants:
Agriculture

Joan Sorbello Adams, farm life, Mullica Hill

Anthony Catalano, produce sales, Salem

Toni Catalano, produce sales, Salem

Mary Sorbello, produce sales, Mullica Hill

Susan Sorbello, produce sales, Mullica Hill

Celebrations

Alabama Day

Thelma Britt, Afro-American cooking, Newark

Glennie Davis Franklin, 1933-2003, shape note singing, Hillside

Mabel Jackson, shape note singing, East Orange

Mary Alice Phillips, shape note singing, Elizabeth

Mabel Upshaw, shape note singing, East Orange

Bon Festival

Iddy Asada, cooking, Bridgeton

Sandy Ikeda, drums-New York, New York

Fusaye Kazaoka, 1930-2006, embroidery, Bridgeton

Shigeko Kazaoka, 1902-1992, crafts, Bridgeton

Ellen Nakamura, 1919-2000, obon dancing, kimono making, Elmer

Kiyomi Nakamura, 1916-1986, technical director, obon dancing, Elmer

Kazuyo Nakao, dancing, Seabrook

Sunke Oye, dancing, Vineland

Wendy Takahisa, drums, New York, New York

Suzi Takata, 1924-2004, crafts, Bridgeton

Harumi Taniguchi, 1902-2001, cooking, Seabrook

Hisano Tazumi, 1898-1999, kimono dressing, Bridgeton

Jenny Wada, drums, New York, New York

Audee Kochiyama Williams, drums, New York, New York

Peter Wong, drums, New York, New York

Theodora Yoshikami, drums, Brooklyn, New York

The Feast of Our Lady of Casadrino

The Joseph Colletti Marching Band

John Bonfante, trumpet, Trenton

Louis Cordas, 1909-1997, clarinet, Trenton

Joseph D'Ambrosio, drums, Trenton

Carmine DeLorento, trumpet, Trenton

Paul Farinella, drums, Trenton

Bill Felter, drums, Bordentown

Ronald E. Hansen, 1936-, trombone, Morrisville, Pennsylvania

Roy Hasty, tuba, Trenton

Russ Jenkins, trumpet, Trenton

Franz Mayer, drums, Trenton

Frank Miller, saxophone, Hamilton Square

James Penkala, baritone, Trenton

James Peraino, saxophone, Cranbury

John Peraino, band leader, Trenton

Sarah Peraino, assistant, Trenton

Nate Pratico, tuba, Trenton

AI Procassini, trombone, West Chester, Pennsylvania

Nick Sciarrotta, trumpet, Trenton

Aldo Stagi, baritone, Yardley, Pennsylvania

Andrew Wierzbowski, clarinet, Trenton

Oktoberfest

Bernie Bunger, Sr., 1950-, dance, Scotch Plains

Bernie Bunger, band leader, Piscataway

Betty Bunger, cooking, Piscataway

Elfreide Bunger, dance, Scotch Plains

Bill Mueller, drums, vocals, Union

Karl Pfeifer, singing, Franklin Lake

Dana Sylvander, brass, Englewood

John Van Decker, brass, Avenel

Queimada Ritual

Arturo Lopez-Dominguez, 1948-, coordinator, Newark

"Andurina" Bagpipers

Alvaro Castro, Bayonne

Carlos Corbacho, 1947-, director, Newark

Jorge Fernandez, Jr., Newark

Francisco Lara, drums, Newark

Amador Lopez, Irvington

José Noguerol, Newark

José Noguerol, Jr., Newark

Ballet Folklore "Alborada"

Linda Acebo, Newark

Herminio Alvarez, Newark

Julio Barreiro, Irvington

Manolo Lago, director, Irvington

Julia Lara, Newark

Emilio Lopez, Harrison

Dorothy Ventoso, Kearny

Isabel Ventoso, Lyndhurst

Nancy Villanueva, North Arlington

Hispania: Coral Polifonica

Manuel Alonso, Kearny

Juan Alvarez, Roselle Park

Donato Barreiro, Newark

Agustina Caamano, Newark

Marcelino Caamaflo, Newark

Alezandro Cobelo, Newark

Eugenio Fernandez, Newark

Maria Fernandez, Newark

Clementina Garcia, Newark

Manuel R. Garcia, 1942-, choral director, Califon

Santiago Garcia, Newark

Maria Rodriguez Gil, Brooklyn, New York

Ana Maria Gomez, Newark

Maria Dolores Gonzalez, Newark

Ramona Gonzalez, Newark

Francisca Lopez, Harrison

Manuela Lopez, Harrison

Manuel Malvarez, Newark

Maria del Carmen Maza, Kearny

Immaculada Mendez, Newark

Maria Mendez, Newark

Emilio Nepomuceno, Newark

Francisco Platas, Linden

Herminia Rodriguez, Kearny

Josefa Salgado, Newark

Maritime Area

Robert Ames, menhaden chanties, Port Norris

Bernie Borrelli, 1957-, boat building, Lavallette

Owen Carney, 1921-, salt hay rope making, Port Norris

Donald Cisrow, 1957-, oyster shucking, gospel singing, Port Norris

Evelyn Cisrow, 1929-2006, oyster shucking, gospel singing, Port Norris

Sarah Cisrow, 1961-, oyster shucking, gospel singing, Port Norris

Joseph Gibbs, 1924-1997, oyster shucking, gospel singing, Port Norris

Gary Giberson, decoy carving, Port Republic

Robert Lee Hamon, menhaden chanties, Port Norris

Charles E. Hankins, 1925-2003, boat building, Lavallette

Anthony Hillman, boat building, decoy carving, Seaville

Sam Hunt, 1911-2004, boat building, Waretown

Oliver Johnson, menhaden chanties, Port Norris

William Richardson, 1916-1987, lobster trap making, Keyport

Mrs. William Richardson, lobster trap making, Keyport

Harry Shourds, decoy carving, Seaville

Henry Weldon, 1915-1990, rush seat weaving, Milville

Beryl Whittington, 1919-2003, oyster shucking, gospel singing, Port Norris

Music

Herb Abramson, Walter Rhodes' manager, New York, New York

Saul Betesh, Sephardic oud, Deal

Walter Rhodes, blues singing, guitar, Paterson

Tex Logan Band

Jimmy Arnold, fiddle, banjo, guitar, Fredericksburg, Virginia

Chad Bruce, drums, harmonica, vocals, Fairfax, Virginia

John Carlini, guitar bass, Summit

Ken Gallahan, rhythm guitar, Alexandria, Virginia

Joey Greene, mandolin banjo, Fredericksburg, Virginia

Wade Hill, banjo mandolin, Fredericksburg, Virginia

Benjamin Franklin "Tex" Logan, fiddle, Madison

Peter Rowan, rhythm guitar, vocals, Madison

"Doc" McKenzie and the Gospel Hi-Lites

Marvin Bradshaw, bass, Paterson

Darryl Henley, guitar, Paterson

Greg Herbert, organ, Paterson

Abraham McKenzie, vocals, Paterson

David McKenzie, vocals, Paterson

Milbert "Doc" McKenzie, 1949-, vocals, Paterson

Henry Redmond, drums, Paterson

William Wribbee, vocals, Paterson

Pure Water

Charles Banks, Jr., vocals, Newark

Joe Briscoe, vocals, Newark

Terrance Forward, vocals, Newark

Wayne Johnson, vocals, Irvington

Johnny Shipley, group leader, Newark

Silk

Joseph Grauso, 1916-1997, weaving, Elmwood Park

Roy Harris, 1920-1990, weaving, Bensalem, Pennsylvania

Prince Hatley, 1916-1991, weaving, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Traditional Medicine & Pharmacology

Fred Anderson, glassblower, Sun City, Arizona

Evidio Espinosa, herbalist, West New York

Louis Molinari, 1931-2004, glassblower, Stirling

Efrain Osorio, herbalist, Newark

Alvin Segelman, pharmacognosist, Piscataway
Collection Restrictions:
Access by appointment only. Where a listening copy or viewing copy has been created, this is indicated in the respective inventory; additional materials may be accessible with sufficient advance notice and, in some cases, payment of a processing fee. Older papers are housed at a remote location and may require a minimum of three weeks' advance notice and payment of a retrieval fee. Certain formats such as multi-track audio recordings and EIAJ-1 videoreels (1/2 inch) may not be accessible. Contact the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at 202-633-7322 or rinzlerarchives@si.edu for additional information.
Collection Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1983 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1983, Series 6
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1983 Festival of American Folklife
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-1983-ref43

National Museum of the American Indian in Washington Marks 10th Anniversary

view National Museum of the American Indian in Washington Marks 10th Anniversary digital asset number 1
Creator:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
Type:
Blog posts
Smithsonian staff publications
Blog posts
Published Date:
Thu, 18 Sep 2014 11:00:00 +0000
Description:

Every year the Archives receives a variety of digital video for its permanent collections. Contents include Smithsonian Channel programming, museum events, and special ceremonies. The timing of one such video from Accession 13-266, Smithsonian Institution, Video Recordings, c. 2001-2009 was a nice surprise, as it is the 2-hour video of the opening ceremony of the National Museum of the American Indian (NMAI) from September 21, 2004, in Washington, D.C.

President George H. W. Bush signed legislation in 1989 creating the National Museum of the American Indian as part of the Smithsonian. The National Museum of the American Indian Act (NMAIA) allowed for a museum in New York, a storage facility in Maryland, and a flagship museum in Washington, D.C. The New York museum opened as the George Gustav Heye Center in 1994, which is named after the founder of the Museum of the American Indian in New York City in 1916. The Cultural Resources Center in Suitland, Maryland, which opened in 1999, serves conservation and collection storage needs.

Opening day of the Washington, D.C., museum featured a Native Nations Procession along the National Mall with thousands of indigenous peoples participating from all over the Western Hemisphere. There also were special remarks by Peruvian President Alejandro Toledo, U.S. lawmakers, and Smithsonian officials. The First Americans Festival also featured various musicians and entertainers. The opening brought together the largest known gathering of Native American communities in history.

Aerial view of the National Museum of the American Indian from September 21, 2004, by Carl C. Hansen, Accession 11-019 - Smithsonian Photographic Services Collection, Smithsonian Institution Archives, neg. no. 2004-53062.

U.S. Senator Ben Nighthorse Campbell said at the opening, “Senator Dan Inouye, my friend and colleague, to whom we owe so much, often says that Washington is a city of monuments and yet, there is not one monument to the native people of this land. This magnificent structure, which we are going to open today, is that monument and in it we will tell our story.”

The limestone building itself is curvilinear and was the initial design of GBQC and Douglas Cardinal Limited. The project was further developed by Jones, House, and Sakiestewa, along with the architecture firms Jones & Jones, SmithGroup in collaboration with Lou Weller (Caddo) and the Native American Design Collaborative, and Polshek Partnership Architects. There also was input from Native American communities. Important requirements were that it be a “living museum,” resulting in an east-facing main entrance, a dome that opens to the sky, and a 4.25-acre landscape that includes many plants and trees, as well as some ducks.

The cost of the museum was $199 million and it had 1.4 million visitors in 2013. The three facilities have the world’s largest collection of Native American art and artifacts from North, South, and Central America.

Nation to Nation: Treaties Between the United States and American Indian Nations launches on the anniversary of the museum’s opening on September 21.

Enjoy some of the highlights from the procession. Please note that some of the clips have some glitches in playback.

Related Resources

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Topic:
Archive
See more posts:
The Bigger Picture | Smithsonian Institution Archives
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
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