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38177 documents - page 6 of 1909

Bronze Coins Of Tiberius, Roman Emperor

Object Type:
Coin
Place:
Palestine
Topic:
Archaeology
USNM Number:
A332161-0
Specimen Count:
1
Record Last Modified:
18 Nov 2014
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Anthropology
Data Source:
NMNH - Anthropology Dept.
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Two Bronze Coins Of Jonathan Maccabaeus (?)

Object Type:
Coin
Place:
Palestine
Topic:
Archaeology
USNM Number:
A332159-0
Specimen Count:
2
Record Last Modified:
18 Nov 2014
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Anthropology
Data Source:
NMNH - Anthropology Dept.
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Bronze Coins Of Nero, Roman Emperor

Object Type:
Coin
Place:
Palestine
Topic:
Archaeology
USNM Number:
A332162-0
Specimen Count:
1
Record Last Modified:
18 Nov 2014
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Anthropology
Data Source:
NMNH - Anthropology Dept.
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Fifteen (15) Carthaginian Coins 1 Lot

Object Type:
Coin
Place:
Lebanon (Phoenicia)
Topic:
Archaeology
USNM Number:
A278377-0
Specimen Count:
15
Record Last Modified:
2 Oct 2014
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Anthropology
Data Source:
NMNH - Anthropology Dept.
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Russian Brass Coin Of 1731

Donor Name:
Panama-California Exposition
Dr. Ales F. Hrdlicka
Dr. Vojtech Suk
Object Type:
Coin
Place:
Ukraine, Europe
Accession Date:
1917-Jun-30
Topic:
Archaeology
Accession Number:
061302
USNM Number:
A288069-0
Specimen Count:
01
Record Last Modified:
14 Oct 2014
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Anthropology
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NMNH - Anthropology Dept.
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Two Plaster Casts Of "Christ Coin"

Donor Name:
Department Of Anthropology
Culture:
Palestine
Object Type:
Coin
Place:
Not Given, Palestine (not certain)
Accession Date:
1908-May-15
Topic:
Ethnology
Accession Number:
048700
USNM Number:
E249638-0
Specimen Count:
2
Record Last Modified:
29 Sep 2014
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Anthropology
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NMNH - Anthropology Dept.
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Two Coins From Han Dynasty Caves.

Donor Name:
Rev. Dr. David C. Graham
Culture:
Han Dynasty
Object Type:
Coin
Place:
Sichuan Province (Szechuan), China, Asia
Accession Date:
1931
Topic:
Archaeology
Accession Number:
114461
USNM Number:
A349818-0
Specimen Count:
2
Record Last Modified:
25 Nov 2014
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Anthropology
Data Source:
NMNH - Anthropology Dept.
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Bronze Coins Of Ptolemy (II) Philadelphus

Site Name:
Thebes
Donor Name:
John C. Davis
Culture:
Ancient Egyptian
Object Type:
Coin
Place:
Qena, Upper Egypt, Egypt, Africa
Accession Date:
1917-Jun-29
Topic:
Archaeology
Accession Number:
061283
USNM Number:
A299941-0
Specimen Count:
5
Record Last Modified:
4 Nov 2014
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NMNH - Anthropology Dept.
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Bronze Coin Of Ptolemy (I) Soter

Site Name:
Thebes
Donor Name:
John C. Davis
Culture:
Ancient Egyptian
Object Type:
Coin
Place:
Qena, Upper Egypt, Egypt, Africa
Accession Date:
1917-Jun-29
Topic:
Archaeology
Accession Number:
061283
USNM Number:
A299940-0
Specimen Count:
1
Record Last Modified:
4 Nov 2014
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NMNH - Anthropology Dept.
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Brashler Doubloon, United States, 1787

Brasher Doubloon, 1787
Designer:
Brasher, Ephraim
Engraver:
Brasher, Ephraim
Maker:
Brasher, Ephraim
Physical Description:
gold (overall material)
Measurements:
overall: .2 cm x 3.1 cm; 3/32 in x 1 7/32 in
Object Name:
coin
Place made:
United States: New York, New York
City:
United States: New York, New York
Province:
United States: New York
Country:
United States
Political area:
United States
Date made:
1787
Subject:
Coins, Currency and Medals
Legendary Coins
Numismatics
Coins
Publication title:
Zoomable Image and Details
Glossary of Coins and Currency Terms
Publication URL:
http://americanhistory.si.edu/coins/flash/exhibition_theme.cfm?coincode=1_05
http://americanhistory.si.edu/coins/glossary.cfm
Credit Line:
US Mint Coll.
ID Number:
1988.0063.0070
Accession number:
1988.0063
Catalog number:
1988.0063.0070
1988.0063.0070
Description:
Sunrise over mountians and water
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Armed Forces History: National Numismatic Collection
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Exhibit:
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center
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50 Dollars, United States, 1851

Mint:
U.S. Assay Office
Physical Description:
gold (overall metal)
0 (overall die axis)
0 (overall die axis measurement)
struck (overall production method)
Measurements:
overall: .5 cm x 4.2 cm; 3/16 in x 1 21/32 in
Object Name:
coin
Place made:
United States: California, San Francisco
Date made:
1851
Subject:
Coins, Currency and Medals
Legendary Coins
Coins
Numismatics
Publication title:
Glossary of Coins and Currency Terms
Publication URL:
http://americanhistory.si.edu/coins/glossary.cfm
Credit Line:
Estate of Josiah K. Lilly
ID Number:
NU*283645.1280
Accession number:
283645
Catalog number:
68.159.1142
Description:
As early as 1850, agitation began in Congress for the establishment of a San Francisco branch of the United States Mint. This action was blocked by people from New York-who wanted a branch in their own state-and from Georgia and Louisiana-who argued that any California operation would represent unfair competition to the branch mints in Dahlonega and New Orleans.
The opposition won, and San Francisco would go without a mint for another four years. But it did get an odd sort of hybrid, the United States Assay Office of Gold, striking an odd sort of money-a gigantic, fifty-dollar ingot that would also do duty as a coin. The arrangement was made by the Treasury Department under a contract with Moffat & Company, private assayers and gold coiners in San Francisco.
Augustus Humbert came west to oversee the operation, which got under way at the end of January 1851. For most of the next two years, Humbert's fifty-dollar "slugs" were the principal accepted currency in California. He was eventually allowed to turn his attentions to the production of smaller, and altogether more useful, coins, ten- and twenty-dollar pieces. And his operation finally laid the framework for a formal, normal branch Mint, which began the production of ordinary federal coinage in the spring of 1854.
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Armed Forces History: National Numismatic Collection
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Coins
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National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center
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$20 Pattern Coin, by Augustus Saint-Gaudens

United States, Twenty Dollars, Pattern, 1907
Designer:
Saint-Gaudens, Augustus
Mint:
U.S. Mint, Philadelphia
Physical Description:
gold (overall material)
Measurements:
overall: .4 cm x 3.42 cm; 5/32 in x 1 11/32 in
Object Name:
coin
Place Made:
United States: Pennsylvania, Philadelphia
City:
United States: Pennsylvania, Philadelphia
Province:
United States: Pennsylvania
Date made:
1907
Subject:
Coins, Currency and Medals
National Treasures exhibit
Publication title:
Glossary of Coins and Currency Terms
Publication URL:
http://americanhistory.si.edu/coins/glossary.cfm
Credit Line:
Mrs. Richard Derby
ID Number:
NU*236191.0001
Catalog number:
NU71628
236191.0001
Accession number:
236191
Description:
United States Mint, Philadelphia. Less than two dozen of these coins were struck. This kind of relief was never intended for a circulating coin, because it took nearly a dozen passes through the press to achieve. We should instead see these marvelous coins as testimony to the human spirit and to human curiosity: just how much relief could you obtain, and how long would it take to create it?
This ultra high relief twenty has pedigree as well as beauty in its favor. Presdient Theodore Roosevelt gave it to his daughter as a Christmas present in 1907. Augustus Saint-Gaudens had presented it to the president, and it may have been the first piece struck. Roosevelt's daughter donated this coin to the Smithsonian in 1961.
[reference no. Judd 1778]
Location:
Currently not on view
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Political History: National Numismatic Collection
National Treasures exhibit
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center
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Dollar, United States, 1804 (Class One)

Mint:
U.S. Mint, Philadelphia
Physical Description:
silver (overall metal)
0 (overall die axis)
0 (overall die axis measurement)
struck (overall production method)
Measurements:
overall: .3 cm x 4 cm; 1/8 in x 1 9/16 in
Object Name:
coin
Place made:
United States
Date made:
1804
Subject:
Coins, Currency and Medals
Legendary Coins
Coins
Numismatics
Publication title:
Glossary of Coins and Currency Terms
Publication URL:
http://americanhistory.si.edu/coins/glossary.cfm
Credit Line:
Government Transfer: US DOTT, USM
ID Number:
1986.0836.0061
Catalog number:
1986.0836.0061
Accession number:
1986.0836
Description:
The early dollars from the United States Mint were not instantly embraced by the public, which had become accustomed to the dollar's predecessor, the Spanish-American Piece of Eight. That coin contained slightly more silver than its new competitor.
Then some entrepreneurs made an interesting discovery. They could buy American dollars, send them to the West Indies, and exchange them there at par for Spanish-American Pieces of Eight. Then they could bring the pesos home, turn them in to the Mint for melting, and make a profit by getting paid back in shiny new dollars.
When the scheme was uncovered, it resulted in a thirty-year halt in dollar production, beginning in 1805. Some 19,570 dollars were coined in 1804, before the halt began. Interestingly, they weren't dated 1804, but 1803, thus avoiding the production of new dies. Although a common, cost-cutting policy at the early United States Mint, this act led to confusion years later, and to three legendary coins included in this exhibition.
By the 1830s, American officials were actively exploring commercial opportunities elsewhere in the world. Seeking to influence foreign dignitaries, the Jackson administration instructed the Mint to create complete sets of specimen coins as gifts.
The Philadelphia coiners did so for most other denominations without difficulty. But what to do about the silver dollar? They knew that 1804 dollars had been struck, but there didn't seem to be any survivors. So in November 1834, they created eight new 1804-dated dollars for the gift sets (later termed "class one" 1804 dollars).
One of the eight became part of the set given to the Imam of Muscat, and another was sent to the King of Siam. And the other six? Within a few years, they escaped into private hands or entered circulation. And they became numismatic legends very quickly, for they had it all: mystery, intrigue, and tremendous rarity.
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National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center
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United States, 20 Dollars, 1908 (Matte Proof)

Mint:
U.S. Mint, Philadelphia
Maker:
Saint-Gaudens, Augustus
Physical Description:
gold (overall metal)
0 (overall die axis)
0 (overall die axis measurement)
struck (overall production method)
Measurements:
overall: wt. 33.449 g
Object Name:
coin
Place of issue:
United States
Place made:
United States: Pennsylvania, Philadelphia
Date made:
1908
Subject:
Coins, Currency and Medals
Legendary Coins
Coins
Numismatics
United States Double Eagle
Publication title:
Glossary of Coins and Currency Terms
Publication URL:
http://americanhistory.si.edu/coins/glossary.cfm
Credit Line:
Transfer: US Mint
ID Number:
1985.0441.1285
Catalog number:
1985.0441.1285
Accession number:
1985.0441
Description:
In 1905 President Theodore Roosevelt asked sculptor Augustus Saint-Gaudens to lead an effort to redesign American coinage. Saint-Gaudens developed a design that many consider the most beautiful American coin ever conceived. The Mint's Chief Engraver, Charles E. Barber, opposed the project, but ultimately developed a low-relief version of the Saint-Gaudens design that became the standard American $20 coin.
Barber was not averse to experimentation. He simply believed it had to be kept within fairly close bounds, and under the Mint's control. It would also help if there was profit involved. Instead of experimenting with relief, Barber tried modifying the finish of the Saint-Gaudens coin design. In one test, a "Roman Gold" finish was devised, imparting a glowing, golden surface to coins that would otherwise have a slight reddish sheen about them, from the copper added to the mixture to make the coins wear better.
No records of how this special finish was applied have survived; but a good guess would be that a light layer of pure gold dust was applied to both surfaces of the coin blank before striking. The force of the press would bond the dust to the blank as the blank was coined. In another test that yielded the coin shown here, Barber developed a "Matte" finish. In this case, the coin was likely struck first (more than once, in order to fully bring up what relief there was), and then "pickled," or etched in dilute acid.
The result was a coin of a vaguely medallic appearance, without all the work entailed in multiple striking. In addition to testing a concept, this experiment was directed at producing a few specialized coins that could be sold to collectors at inflated prices.
Location:
Currently not on view
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Political History: National Numismatic Collection
Legendary Coins
Coins
Numismatics
United States Double Eagle
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center
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United States, 20 Dollars, 1907

Obverse designer:
Saint-Gaudens, Augustus
Mint:
U.S. Mint, Philadelphia
Physical Description:
gold (overall metal)
0 (overall die axis)
0 (overall die axis measurement)
struck (overall production method)
Measurements:
overall: wt. 33.450 g
Object Name:
coin
Place of issue:
United States
Date made:
1907
Subject:
Coins, Currency and Medals
Legendary Coins
Coins
Numismatics
United States Double Eagle
Publication title:
Glossary of Coins and Currency Terms
Publication URL:
http://americanhistory.si.edu/coins/glossary.cfm
Credit Line:
Transfer: US Mint
ID Number:
1985.0441.1266
Catalog number:
1985.0441.1266
Accession number:
1985.0441
Description:
In 1905, President Theodore Roosevelt asked sculptor Augustus Saint-Gaudens to lead an effort to redesign American coinage. Saint-Gaudens developed a design for what many consider the most beautiful American coin ever conceived. Unfortunately, the coin required multiple strikes to produce, even when its ultra-high relief design was reduced to a lower relief.
Deciding how to modify the coin so it could be produced in large quantities with a single strike in a high speed press was left to the Mint's Chief Engraver, Charles E. Barber. In effect, he told President Roosevelt to make a choice. He could have artistry in small quantities or mediocrity in large amounts.
If he chose the first, Americans would have beautiful money that few would ever see. If he opted for the second, Americans would have as much money as they needed, even though it might be merely pretty rather than beautiful. Roosevelt likely felt he had little choice: the purpose of coinage is commercial first, anything else second. And so one can imagine him being upset, but accepting low relief to facilitate an increase in production.
The first of the redesigned coins was struck in December 1907. It was easily distinguished from earlier versions: not only was there a radical difference in the coins' relief, but even the date had been altered. Saint-Gaudens's ultra high relief and Hering's high relief coins bore the date in Roman numerals (MCMVII). Barber's version featured Arabic numerals (1907). Thus amended, the new double eagles would continue to be struck through the beginning of 1933.
Location:
Currently not on view
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Political History: National Numismatic Collection
Legendary Coins
Coins
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United States Double Eagle
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center
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United States, 20 Dollars, 1849 (Pattern)

Mint:
U.S. Mint, Philadelphia
Obverse designer:
Longacre, James Barton
Reverse designer:
Longacre, James Barton
Physical Description:
gold (overall metal)
0 (overall die axis)
0 (overall die axis measurement)
struck (overall production method)
Measurements:
overall: .3 cm x 3.4 cm; 1/8 in x 1 11/32 in
Object Name:
coin
pattern coin
Place made:
United States
Date made:
1849
Subject:
Coins, Currency and Medals
Legendary Coins
Coins
Numismatics
United States Double Eagle
Publication title:
Glossary of Coins and Currency Terms
Publication URL:
http://americanhistory.si.edu/coins/glossary.cfm
Credit Line:
Transfer from the United States Mint
ID Number:
1986.0836.0064
Catalog number:
1986.0836.0064
Accession number:
1986.0836
Description:
The California gold rush quickly gave the United States not one new gold coin, but two: a tiny gold dollar at the lower end of the monetary spectrum, and a large double eagle, or twenty-dollar coin, at the upper end. Why did Americans need more gold denominations?
So much gold was now coming out of California that it was actually lowering the value of that metal against silver. Bullion dealers began buying up silver dollars and half dollars for melting and export, for they were now worth more than face value as bullion. A Congressman from North Carolina had an idea: If gold dollars were struck, to pass at par with the silver ones, it might ease some of the pressure on silver coinage.
His bill was introduced late in January 1849. At the last minute, a provision was added for an entirely new coin, a double eagle. Thus amended, the bill became law on March 3, 1849. The production of gold dollars swung into action fairly quickly, and coinage had gotten under way by early May.
But the double eagles took longer. James B. Longacre, the artist selected to design the new large coin, encountered initial opposition from Mint officials, and it was late December before the first two pattern double eagles could be struck. One disappeared long ago, leaving this as the only surviving gold pattern from 1849.
Location:
Currently not on view
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Political History: National Numismatic Collection
Legendary Coins
Coins
Numismatics
United States Double Eagle
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center
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1 Pattern Ruble, Alexander I

Head of government:
Alexander I Emperor of Russia
Physical Description:
metal (overall material)
Measurements:
overall: .2 cm x 3.9 cm; 3/32 in x 1 17/32 in
Object Name:
coin
pattern coin
Pattern coin
Place made:
Rossiya: Rossiya
Associated place:
Russia
Date made:
1801
Subject:
Coins, Currency and Medals
Russian Coins and Jetons
Credit Line:
Willis H. du Pont
ID Number:
NU*NU83663-3
Catalog number:
NU83663-3
Accession number:
257688
Description:
This pattern ruble was minted in Russia in 1801 during the reign of Alexander I. Alexander I reigned from 1801 until his death in 1825. He ruled during a chaotic period of the Napoleonic Wars (1803-1815). During that time Russia acquired Finland and a part of Poland.
Obverse image: Portrait of Alexander I.
Reverse text: 1801 / coin / ruble
Reverse image: The Russian coat-of-arms, a two-headed eagle wearing a shield with a mounted figure of Saint George. Imperial crowns on each eagle head stands for the unity and sovereignty of Russia, the orb and scepter grasped in the eagle's toes are traditional heraldic symbols.
Location:
Currently not on view
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Armed Forces History: National Numismatic Collection
Russian Coins and Jetons
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center
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1/2 Poltina, Peter I

Ruler:
Peter I
Physical Description:
silver (overall metal)
Measurements:
overall: .1 cm x 2.8 cm; 1/32 in x 1 3/32 in
Object Name:
coin
Place made:
Rossiya: Rossiya
Date made:
1705
Subject:
Coins, Currency and Medals
Russian Coins and Jetons
Credit Line:
duPont Collection
ID Number:
NU*NU61405
Catalog number:
NU61405
Accession number:
210914
Description:
This half poltina coin was minted in Russia in 1705 under Peter I. Better known as Peter the Great, he ruled Russia from 1689-1725. Peter l founded Saint Petersburg in 1703 and brought Western culture to Orthodox Russia.
Obverse text: Tsar Peter Alekseyevich the sovereign of all Russia
Obverse image: Small raised bumps indicate the worth of the coin to those who were illiterate.
Reverse text: Half poltina
Reverse image: Center the Russian coat-of-arms, a two-headed eagle wearing a shield with a mounted figure of Saint George. Imperial crowns on each eagle head stands for the unity and sovereignty of Russia, the orb and scepter grasped in the eagle's toes are traditional heraldic symbols.
Location:
Currently not on view
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Political History: National Numismatic Collection
Russian Coins and Jetons
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center
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Ruble, Alexander I

Ruler:
Alexander I Emperor of Russia
Physical Description:
metal (overall material)
Measurements:
overall: .2 cm x 3.5 cm; 3/32 in x 1 3/8 in
Object Name:
coin
Place made:
Rossiya: Rossiya
Date made:
1801
Subject:
Coins, Currency and Medals
Russian Coins and Jetons
Credit Line:
duPont Collection
ID Number:
NU*NU83662
Catalog number:
NU83662
Accession number:
257688
Description:
This ruble was minted in Russia in 1801 during the reign of Alexander I. Alexander I reined from 1801 until his death in 1825. He ruled during a chaotic period of the Napoleonic Wars (1803-1815). During this time Russia acquired Finland and part of Poland.
Obverse text: State Russian coin ruble
Obverse image: Wreath decoration circling inscription.
Reverse text: Coin / ruble / 1796 / year
Reverse image: Center the Russian coat-of-arms, a two-headed eagle wearing a shield with a mounted figure of Saint George. Imperial crowns on each eagle head stands for the unity and sovereignty of Russia, the orb and scepter grasped in the eagle's toes are traditional heraldic symbols.
Location:
Currently not on view
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Political History: National Numismatic Collection
Russian Coins and Jetons
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center
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Kopek, Elizabeth

Ruler:
Elizabeth
Physical Description:
copper (overall material)
Measurements:
overall: .15 cm x 2.4 cm; 1/16 in x 15/16 in
Object Name:
coin
Place made:
Rossiya: Rossiya
Date made:
1760
Subject:
Coins, Currency and Medals
Russian Coins and Jetons
Credit Line:
duPont Collection
ID Number:
NU*NU65270
Catalog number:
NU65270
Accession number:
240108
Description:
This kopek was minted in Russia in 1760 during the reign of Elizabeth Petrovna. Elizabeth disposed the infant Ivan VI and was named Peter III's successor in 1741 after a successful coup. She ruled Russia from 1741 until her death in 1761.
Obverse text: One kopek / 1760
Obverse image: Drum and flag iconography.
Reverse text: No reverse inscription.
Reverse image: Saint Gregory, the knight on horseback, slaying a dragon.
Location:
Currently not on view
See more items in:
Political History: National Numismatic Collection
Russian Coins and Jetons
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center
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