Smithsonian Institution

Search Results

Collections Search Center
6 documents - page 1 of 1

Rhincodon typus

Ocean/Sea/Gulf:
Atlantic
Preparation:
Dry Osteological Specimen
Illustration
Prep Count:
1
2
Place:
Beach 3 Miles Up From Ormond Florida., Florida, United States, Atlantic
Collection Date:
25 Jan 1902
Taxonomy:
Animalia Animalia Chordata Chordata Chondrichthyes Chondrichthyes Orectolobiformes Orectolobiformes Rhincodontidae Rhincodontidae
Published Name:
Rhincodon typus
Rhincodon typicus
Accession Number:
038960
Other Numbers:
Bone Ledger Number : 27225
USNM Number:
50227
Specimen Count:
1
Notes:
Teeth & pieces of fin in alc.; skin in bone storage. ledger as usnm 27225). rest of spec. (dried skin), in bone storage.
Record Last Modified:
19 Aug 2014
See more items in:
Fishes
Vertebrate Zoology
Data Source:
NMNH - Vertebrate Zoology - Fishes Division
Visitor Tag(s):

Additional Online Media:

On the morphology of the whale shark, Rhincodon typus Smith

Author:
Uchida, S
Type:
Citations
Date:
1983
Topic:
Shark
Morphology--External morphology
External morphology--External morphometrics
External morphometrics
Notes:
Originally published in: Aquabiology 5-2:93-101. English abstract
Data Source:
Marine Mammals Bibliography
Visitor Tag(s):

An Unprecedented Aggregation of Whale Sharks, Rhincodon typus, in Mexican Coastal Waters of the Caribbean Sea

Author:
de la Parra Venegas, Rafael
Hueter, Robert
Gonzalez Cano, Jaime
Tyminski, John
Gregorio Remolina, Jose
Maslanka, Mike
Ormos, Andrea
Weigt, Lee A.
Carlson, Bruce
Dove, Alistair
Object Type:
Smithsonian staff publication
Electronic document
Year:
2011
Topic:
Natural History
Citation:
PLoS One, 6(4): 1-8.
Abstract:
Whale sharks, Rhincodon typus, are often perceived as solitary behemoths that live and feed in the open ocean. To the contrary, evidence is accumulating that they are gregarious and form seasonal aggregations in some coastal waters. One such aggregation occurs annually north of Cabo Catoche, off Isla Holbox on the Yucatan Peninsula of Mexico. Here we report a second, much denser aggregation of whale sharks (dubbed "the Afuera") that occurs east of the tip of the Yucatan Peninsula in the Caribbean Sea. The 2009 Afuera event comprised the largest aggregation of whale sharks ever reported, with up to 420 whale sharks observed in a single aerial survey, all gathered in an elliptical patch of ocean approximately 18 km(2). Plankton studies indicated that the sharks were feeding on dense homogenous patches of fish eggs, which DNA barcoding analysis identified as belonging to little tunny, Euthynnus alletteratus. This contrasts with the annual Cabo Catoche aggregation nearby, where prey consists mostly of copepods and sergestid shrimp. Increased sightings at the Afuera coincide with decreased sightings at Cabo Catoche, and both groups have the same sex ratio, implying that the same animals are likely involved in both aggregations; tagging data support this idea. With two whale shark aggregation areas, high coastal productivity and a previously-unknown scombrid spawning ground, the northeastern Yucatan marine region is a critical habitat that deserves more concerted conservation efforts.
Doi:
10.1371/journal.pone.0018994
Data source:
Smithsonian Institution Libraries
Visitor Tag(s):

Feeding anatomy, filter-feeding rate, and diet of whale sharks Rhincodon typus during surface ram filter feeding off the Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico

Author:
Motta, Philip J.
Maslanka, Michael
Hueter, Robert E.
Davis, Ray L.
Parra, Rafael de la
Mulvany, Samantha L.
Habegger, Maria Laura
Strother, James A.
Mara, Kyle R.
Gardiner, Jayne M.
Tyminski, John P.
Zeigler, Leslie D.
Object Type:
Smithsonian staff publication
Electronic document
Year:
2010
Topic:
Zoology
Animals
Veterinary medicine
Animal health
Citation:
Zoology, 113: 199-212.
Data source:
Smithsonian Institution Libraries
Visitor Tag(s):

Remora remora

Vessel:
Tahei Maru
Collector:
H. Kami
Ocean/Sea/Gulf:
Pacific
Depth (m):
15 - 18
Preparation:
Unknown
Place:
Hawaiian Islands Maro Reef, Hawaii, United States, Pacific
Collection Date:
2 Jul 1961
Taxonomy:
Animalia Chordata Actinopterygii Perciformes Echeneidae
Published Name:
Remora remora
Accession Number:
246668
USNM Number:
202068
Specimen Count:
1
Notes:
Rec. from: usfws-honolulu thru: donald w. strasburg; from rhincodon typus est. 50-60 ft. caught by pole and line using skipjack flesh as bait. chummed away from host with same mat'l. placed in tank.
Record Last Modified:
19 Aug 2014
See more items in:
Fishes
Vertebrate Zoology
Data Source:
NMNH - Vertebrate Zoology - Fishes Division
Visitor Tag(s):

Scientists discover the largest assembly of whale sharks ever recorded

Creator:
Smithsonian Science
Type:
Blog posts
Smithsonian staff publications
Blog posts
Update Date:
2011-05-26T02:32:37Z
Topic:
Science
Synopsis:
Whale sharks (Rhincodon typus) are often thought to be solitary behemoths that live and feed in the open ocean. Scientists at the Smithsonian Institution and colleagues, however, have found that this is not necessarily the case, finding that whale sharks can be gregarious and amass in the hundreds to feed in coastal waters. Aggregations, or schools, of whale sharks have been witnessed in the past, ranging from several individual sharks to a few dozen. However this new research, which involved both surface and aerial surveys, has revealed an enormous aggregation of whale sharks—the largest eve [...]
See more posts:
Smithsonian Science
Data Source:
Smithsonian Science
Visitor Tag(s):

Modify Your Search






or


Narrow By
Filter results to a specific time period.