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2007 Powwow

Creator:
Ken Rahaim
Medium:
Digital photograph
Type:
Photographs
Place:
USA
Date:
2007
Description:
Powwows are large social gatherings of Native Americans who follow traditional dances started centuries ago by their ancestors, and which continually evolve to include contemporary aspects. These events of drum music, dancing, singing, artistry and food, are attended by Natives and non-Natives, all of whom join in the dancing and take advantage of the opportunity to see old friends and teach the traditional ways to a younger generation. <p>During the National Powwow, the audience see dancers in full regalia compete in several dance categories, including Men and Women?s Golden Age (ages 50 and older); Men?s Fancy Dance, Grass and Traditional (Northern and Southern); Women?s Jingle Dress, Fancy Shawl, and Traditional (Northern and Southern); Teens (13-17); Juniors (6-12) and Tiny Tots (ages 5 and younger). The drum groups are the heart of all powwows and provide the pulsating and thunderous beats that accompany a dancer?s every movement. The powwow is led by three ?host drums? that showcase three distinct styles of singing (Northern, Southern and contemporary) and represent the best examples of each style. The drum contest highlights groups of 10 to 12 members each, and they sing traditional family songs that are passed down orally from one generation to the next. The National Museum of the American Indian sponsored the National Powwow in 2002, 2005, and 2007 as a way of presenting to the public the diversity and social traditions of contemporary Native cultures.
Image ID:
07natl-powwow_0012
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian

2007 Powwow

Creator:
Ken Rahaim
Medium:
Digital photograph
Type:
Photographs
Place:
USA
Date:
2007
Description:
Powwows are large social gatherings of Native Americans who follow traditional dances started centuries ago by their ancestors, and which continually evolve to include contemporary aspects. These events of drum music, dancing, singing, artistry and food, are attended by Natives and non-Natives, all of whom join in the dancing and take advantage of the opportunity to see old friends and teach the traditional ways to a younger generation. <p> During the National Powwow, the audience see dancers in full regalia compete in several dance categories, including Men and Women?s Golden Age (ages 50 and older); Men?s Fancy Dance, Grass and Traditional (Northern and Southern); Women?s Jingle Dress, Fancy Shawl, and Traditional (Northern and Southern); Teens (13-17); Juniors (6-12) and Tiny Tots (ages 5 and younger). The drum groups are the heart of all powwows and provide the pulsating and thunderous beats that accompany a dancer?s every movement. The powwow is led by three ?host drums? that showcase three distinct styles of singing (Northern, Southern and contemporary) and represent the best examples of each style. The drum contest highlights groups of 10 to 12 members each, and they sing traditional family songs that are passed down orally from one generation to the next. The National Museum of the American Indian sponsored the National Powwow in 2002, 2005, and 2007 as a way of presenting to the public the diversity and social traditions of contemporary Native cultures.
Image ID:
07natl-powwow_0021
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian

2007 Powwow

Creator:
Ken Rahaim
Medium:
Digital photograph
Type:
Photographs
Place:
USA
Date:
2007
Description:
Powwows are large social gatherings of Native Americans who follow traditional dances started centuries ago by their ancestors, and which continually evolve to include contemporary aspects. These events of drum music, dancing, singing, artistry and food, are attended by Natives and non-Natives, all of whom join in the dancing and take advantage of the opportunity to see old friends and teach the traditional ways to a younger generation. <p> During the National Powwow, the audience see dancers in full regalia compete in several dance categories, including Men and Women?s Golden Age (ages 50 and older); Men?s Fancy Dance, Grass and Traditional (Northern and Southern); Women?s Jingle Dress, Fancy Shawl, and Traditional (Northern and Southern); Teens (13-17); Juniors (6-12) and Tiny Tots (ages 5 and younger). The drum groups are the heart of all powwows and provide the pulsating and thunderous beats that accompany a dancer?s every movement. The powwow is led by three ?host drums? that showcase three distinct styles of singing (Northern, Southern and contemporary) and represent the best examples of each style. The drum contest highlights groups of 10 to 12 members each, and they sing traditional family songs that are passed down orally from one generation to the next. The National Museum of the American Indian sponsored the National Powwow in 2002, 2005, and 2007 as a way of presenting to the public the diversity and social traditions of contemporary Native cultures.
Image ID:
07natl-powwow_0052
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian

2007 Powwow

Creator:
Ken Rahaim
Medium:
Digital photograph
Type:
Photographs
Place:
USA
Date:
2007
Description:
Powwows are large social gatherings of Native Americans who follow traditional dances started centuries ago by their ancestors, and which continually evolve to include contemporary aspects. These events of drum music, dancing, singing, artistry and food, are attended by Natives and non-Natives, all of whom join in the dancing and take advantage of the opportunity to see old friends and teach the traditional ways to a younger generation. <p> During the National Powwow, the audience see dancers in full regalia compete in several dance categories, including Men and Women?s Golden Age (ages 50 and older); Men?s Fancy Dance, Grass and Traditional (Northern and Southern); Women?s Jingle Dress, Fancy Shawl, and Traditional (Northern and Southern); Teens (13-17); Juniors (6-12) and Tiny Tots (ages 5 and younger). The drum groups are the heart of all powwows and provide the pulsating and thunderous beats that accompany a dancer?s every movement. The powwow is led by three ?host drums? that showcase three distinct styles of singing (Northern, Southern and contemporary) and represent the best examples of each style. The drum contest highlights groups of 10 to 12 members each, and they sing traditional family songs that are passed down orally from one generation to the next. The National Museum of the American Indian sponsored the National Powwow in 2002, 2005, and 2007 as a way of presenting to the public the diversity and social traditions of contemporary Native cultures.
Image ID:
07natl-powwow_0078
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian

2007 Powwow

Creator:
Ken Rahaim
Medium:
Digital photograph
Type:
Photographs
Place:
USA
Date:
2007
Description:
Powwows are large social gatherings of Native Americans who follow traditional dances started centuries ago by their ancestors, and which continually evolve to include contemporary aspects. These events of drum music, dancing, singing, artistry and food, are attended by Natives and non-Natives, all of whom join in the dancing and take advantage of the opportunity to see old friends and teach the traditional ways to a younger generation. <p> During the National Powwow, the audience see dancers in full regalia compete in several dance categories, including Men and Women?s Golden Age (ages 50 and older); Men?s Fancy Dance, Grass and Traditional (Northern and Southern); Women?s Jingle Dress, Fancy Shawl, and Traditional (Northern and Southern); Teens (13-17); Juniors (6-12) and Tiny Tots (ages 5 and younger). The drum groups are the heart of all powwows and provide the pulsating and thunderous beats that accompany a dancer?s every movement. The powwow is led by three ?host drums? that showcase three distinct styles of singing (Northern, Southern and contemporary) and represent the best examples of each style. The drum contest highlights groups of 10 to 12 members each, and they sing traditional family songs that are passed down orally from one generation to the next. The National Museum of the American Indian sponsored the National Powwow in 2002, 2005, and 2007 as a way of presenting to the public the diversity and social traditions of contemporary Native cultures.
Image ID:
07natl-powwow_0095
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian

2007 Powwow

Creator:
Ken Rahaim
Medium:
Digital photograph
Type:
Photographs
Place:
USA
Date:
2007
Description:
Powwows are large social gatherings of Native Americans who follow traditional dances started centuries ago by their ancestors, and which continually evolve to include contemporary aspects. These events of drum music, dancing, singing, artistry and food, are attended by Natives and non-Natives, all of whom join in the dancing and take advantage of the opportunity to see old friends and teach the traditional ways to a younger generation. <p> During the National Powwow, the audience see dancers in full regalia compete in several dance categories, including Men and Women?s Golden Age (ages 50 and older); Men?s Fancy Dance, Grass and Traditional (Northern and Southern); Women?s Jingle Dress, Fancy Shawl, and Traditional (Northern and Southern); Teens (13-17); Juniors (6-12) and Tiny Tots (ages 5 and younger). The drum groups are the heart of all powwows and provide the pulsating and thunderous beats that accompany a dancer?s every movement. The powwow is led by three ?host drums? that showcase three distinct styles of singing (Northern, Southern and contemporary) and represent the best examples of each style. The drum contest highlights groups of 10 to 12 members each, and they sing traditional family songs that are passed down orally from one generation to the next. The National Museum of the American Indian sponsored the National Powwow in 2002, 2005, and 2007 as a way of presenting to the public the diversity and social traditions of contemporary Native cultures.
Image ID:
07natl-powwow_0119
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian

2007 Powwow

Creator:
Ken Rahaim
Medium:
Digital photograph
Type:
Photographs
Place:
USA
Date:
2007
Description:
Powwows are large social gatherings of Native Americans who follow traditional dances started centuries ago by their ancestors, and which continually evolve to include contemporary aspects. These events of drum music, dancing, singing, artistry and food, are attended by Natives and non-Natives, all of whom join in the dancing and take advantage of the opportunity to see old friends and teach the traditional ways to a younger generation. <p> During the National Powwow, the audience see dancers in full regalia compete in several dance categories, including Men and Women?s Golden Age (ages 50 and older); Men?s Fancy Dance, Grass and Traditional (Northern and Southern); Women?s Jingle Dress, Fancy Shawl, and Traditional (Northern and Southern); Teens (13-17); Juniors (6-12) and Tiny Tots (ages 5 and younger). The drum groups are the heart of all powwows and provide the pulsating and thunderous beats that accompany a dancer?s every movement. The powwow is led by three ?host drums? that showcase three distinct styles of singing (Northern, Southern and contemporary) and represent the best examples of each style. The drum contest highlights groups of 10 to 12 members each, and they sing traditional family songs that are passed down orally from one generation to the next. The National Museum of the American Indian sponsored the National Powwow in 2002, 2005, and 2007 as a way of presenting to the public the diversity and social traditions of contemporary Native cultures.
Image ID:
07natl-powwow_0141
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian

2007 Powwow

Creator:
Ken Rahaim
Medium:
Digital photograph
Type:
Photographs
Place:
USA
Date:
2007
Description:
Powwows are large social gatherings of Native Americans who follow traditional dances started centuries ago by their ancestors, and which continually evolve to include contemporary aspects. These events of drum music, dancing, singing, artistry and food, are attended by Natives and non-Natives, all of whom join in the dancing and take advantage of the opportunity to see old friends and teach the traditional ways to a younger generation. <p> During the National Powwow, the audience see dancers in full regalia compete in several dance categories, including Men and Women?s Golden Age (ages 50 and older); Men?s Fancy Dance, Grass and Traditional (Northern and Southern); Women?s Jingle Dress, Fancy Shawl, and Traditional (Northern and Southern); Teens (13-17); Juniors (6-12) and Tiny Tots (ages 5 and younger). The drum groups are the heart of all powwows and provide the pulsating and thunderous beats that accompany a dancer?s every movement. The powwow is led by three ?host drums? that showcase three distinct styles of singing (Northern, Southern and contemporary) and represent the best examples of each style. The drum contest highlights groups of 10 to 12 members each, and they sing traditional family songs that are passed down orally from one generation to the next. The National Museum of the American Indian sponsored the National Powwow in 2002, 2005, and 2007 as a way of presenting to the public the diversity and social traditions of contemporary Native cultures.
Image ID:
07natl-powwow_0150
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian

2007 Powwow

Creator:
Ken Rahaim
Medium:
Digital photograph
Type:
Photographs
Place:
USA
Date:
2007
Description:
Powwows are large social gatherings of Native Americans who follow traditional dances started centuries ago by their ancestors, and which continually evolve to include contemporary aspects. These events of drum music, dancing, singing, artistry and food, are attended by Natives and non-Natives, all of whom join in the dancing and take advantage of the opportunity to see old friends and teach the traditional ways to a younger generation. <p> During the National Powwow, the audience see dancers in full regalia compete in several dance categories, including Men and Women?s Golden Age (ages 50 and older); Men?s Fancy Dance, Grass and Traditional (Northern and Southern); Women?s Jingle Dress, Fancy Shawl, and Traditional (Northern and Southern); Teens (13-17); Juniors (6-12) and Tiny Tots (ages 5 and younger). The drum groups are the heart of all powwows and provide the pulsating and thunderous beats that accompany a dancer?s every movement. The powwow is led by three ?host drums? that showcase three distinct styles of singing (Northern, Southern and contemporary) and represent the best examples of each style. The drum contest highlights groups of 10 to 12 members each, and they sing traditional family songs that are passed down orally from one generation to the next. The National Museum of the American Indian sponsored the National Powwow in 2002, 2005, and 2007 as a way of presenting to the public the diversity and social traditions of contemporary Native cultures.
Image ID:
07natl-powwow_0158
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian

2007 Powwow

Creator:
Ken Rahaim
Medium:
Digital photograph
Type:
Photographs
Place:
USA
Date:
2007
Description:
Powwows are large social gatherings of Native Americans who follow traditional dances started centuries ago by their ancestors, and which continually evolve to include contemporary aspects. These events of drum music, dancing, singing, artistry and food, are attended by Natives and non-Natives, all of whom join in the dancing and take advantage of the opportunity to see old friends and teach the traditional ways to a younger generation. <p> During the National Powwow, the audience see dancers in full regalia compete in several dance categories, including Men and Women?s Golden Age (ages 50 and older); Men?s Fancy Dance, Grass and Traditional (Northern and Southern); Women?s Jingle Dress, Fancy Shawl, and Traditional (Northern and Southern); Teens (13-17); Juniors (6-12) and Tiny Tots (ages 5 and younger). The drum groups are the heart of all powwows and provide the pulsating and thunderous beats that accompany a dancer?s every movement. The powwow is led by three ?host drums? that showcase three distinct styles of singing (Northern, Southern and contemporary) and represent the best examples of each style. The drum contest highlights groups of 10 to 12 members each, and they sing traditional family songs that are passed down orally from one generation to the next. The National Museum of the American Indian sponsored the National Powwow in 2002, 2005, and 2007 as a way of presenting to the public the diversity and social traditions of contemporary Native cultures.
Image ID:
07natl-powwow_0204
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian

2007 Powwow

Creator:
Ken Rahaim
Medium:
Digital photograph
Type:
Photographs
Place:
USA
Date:
2007
Description:
Powwows are large social gatherings of Native Americans who follow traditional dances started centuries ago by their ancestors, and which continually evolve to include contemporary aspects. These events of drum music, dancing, singing, artistry and food, are attended by Natives and non-Natives, all of whom join in the dancing and take advantage of the opportunity to see old friends and teach the traditional ways to a younger generation. <p> During the National Powwow, the audience see dancers in full regalia compete in several dance categories, including Men and Women?s Golden Age (ages 50 and older); Men?s Fancy Dance, Grass and Traditional (Northern and Southern); Women?s Jingle Dress, Fancy Shawl, and Traditional (Northern and Southern); Teens (13-17); Juniors (6-12) and Tiny Tots (ages 5 and younger). The drum groups are the heart of all powwows and provide the pulsating and thunderous beats that accompany a dancer?s every movement. The powwow is led by three ?host drums? that showcase three distinct styles of singing (Northern, Southern and contemporary) and represent the best examples of each style. The drum contest highlights groups of 10 to 12 members each, and they sing traditional family songs that are passed down orally from one generation to the next. The National Museum of the American Indian sponsored the National Powwow in 2002, 2005, and 2007 as a way of presenting to the public the diversity and social traditions of contemporary Native cultures.
Image ID:
07natl-powwow_0211
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian

2007 Powwow

Creator:
Ken Rahaim
Medium:
Digital photograph
Type:
Photographs
Place:
USA
Date:
2007
Description:
Powwows are large social gatherings of Native Americans who follow traditional dances started centuries ago by their ancestors, and which continually evolve to include contemporary aspects. These events of drum music, dancing, singing, artistry and food, are attended by Natives and non-Natives, all of whom join in the dancing and take advantage of the opportunity to see old friends and teach the traditional ways to a younger generation. <p> During the National Powwow, the audience see dancers in full regalia compete in several dance categories, including Men and Women?s Golden Age (ages 50 and older); Men?s Fancy Dance, Grass and Traditional (Northern and Southern); Women?s Jingle Dress, Fancy Shawl, and Traditional (Northern and Southern); Teens (13-17); Juniors (6-12) and Tiny Tots (ages 5 and younger). The drum groups are the heart of all powwows and provide the pulsating and thunderous beats that accompany a dancer?s every movement. The powwow is led by three ?host drums? that showcase three distinct styles of singing (Northern, Southern and contemporary) and represent the best examples of each style. The drum contest highlights groups of 10 to 12 members each, and they sing traditional family songs that are passed down orally from one generation to the next. The National Museum of the American Indian sponsored the National Powwow in 2002, 2005, and 2007 as a way of presenting to the public the diversity and social traditions of contemporary Native cultures.
Image ID:
07natl-powwow_0232
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian

2007 Powwow

Creator:
Ken Rahaim
Medium:
Digital photograph
Type:
Photographs
Place:
USA
Date:
2007
Description:
Powwows are large social gatherings of Native Americans who follow traditional dances started centuries ago by their ancestors, and which continually evolve to include contemporary aspects. These events of drum music, dancing, singing, artistry and food, are attended by Natives and non-Natives, all of whom join in the dancing and take advantage of the opportunity to see old friends and teach the traditional ways to a younger generation. <p> During the National Powwow, the audience see dancers in full regalia compete in several dance categories, including Men and Women?s Golden Age (ages 50 and older); Men?s Fancy Dance, Grass and Traditional (Northern and Southern); Women?s Jingle Dress, Fancy Shawl, and Traditional (Northern and Southern); Teens (13-17); Juniors (6-12) and Tiny Tots (ages 5 and younger). The drum groups are the heart of all powwows and provide the pulsating and thunderous beats that accompany a dancer?s every movement. The powwow is led by three ?host drums? that showcase three distinct styles of singing (Northern, Southern and contemporary) and represent the best examples of each style. The drum contest highlights groups of 10 to 12 members each, and they sing traditional family songs that are passed down orally from one generation to the next. The National Museum of the American Indian sponsored the National Powwow in 2002, 2005, and 2007 as a way of presenting to the public the diversity and social traditions of contemporary Native cultures.
Image ID:
07natl-powwow_0257
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian

2007 Powwow

Creator:
Ken Rahaim
Medium:
Digital photograph
Type:
Photographs
Place:
USA
Date:
2007
Description:
Powwows are large social gatherings of Native Americans who follow traditional dances started centuries ago by their ancestors, and which continually evolve to include contemporary aspects. These events of drum music, dancing, singing, artistry and food, are attended by Natives and non-Natives, all of whom join in the dancing and take advantage of the opportunity to see old friends and teach the traditional ways to a younger generation. <p> During the National Powwow, the audience see dancers in full regalia compete in several dance categories, including Men and Women?s Golden Age (ages 50 and older); Men?s Fancy Dance, Grass and Traditional (Northern and Southern); Women?s Jingle Dress, Fancy Shawl, and Traditional (Northern and Southern); Teens (13-17); Juniors (6-12) and Tiny Tots (ages 5 and younger). The drum groups are the heart of all powwows and provide the pulsating and thunderous beats that accompany a dancer?s every movement. The powwow is led by three ?host drums? that showcase three distinct styles of singing (Northern, Southern and contemporary) and represent the best examples of each style. The drum contest highlights groups of 10 to 12 members each, and they sing traditional family songs that are passed down orally from one generation to the next. The National Museum of the American Indian sponsored the National Powwow in 2002, 2005, and 2007 as a way of presenting to the public the diversity and social traditions of contemporary Native cultures.
Image ID:
07natl-powwow_0279
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian

2007 Powwow

Creator:
Ken Rahaim
Medium:
Digital photograph
Type:
Photographs
Place:
USA
Date:
2007
Description:
Powwows are large social gatherings of Native Americans who follow traditional dances started centuries ago by their ancestors, and which continually evolve to include contemporary aspects. These events of drum music, dancing, singing, artistry and food, are attended by Natives and non-Natives, all of whom join in the dancing and take advantage of the opportunity to see old friends and teach the traditional ways to a younger generation. <p> During the National Powwow, the audience see dancers in full regalia compete in several dance categories, including Men and Women?s Golden Age (ages 50 and older); Men?s Fancy Dance, Grass and Traditional (Northern and Southern); Women?s Jingle Dress, Fancy Shawl, and Traditional (Northern and Southern); Teens (13-17); Juniors (6-12) and Tiny Tots (ages 5 and younger). The drum groups are the heart of all powwows and provide the pulsating and thunderous beats that accompany a dancer?s every movement. The powwow is led by three ?host drums? that showcase three distinct styles of singing (Northern, Southern and contemporary) and represent the best examples of each style. The drum contest highlights groups of 10 to 12 members each, and they sing traditional family songs that are passed down orally from one generation to the next. The National Museum of the American Indian sponsored the National Powwow in 2002, 2005, and 2007 as a way of presenting to the public the diversity and social traditions of contemporary Native cultures.
Image ID:
07natl-powwow_0293
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian

2007 Powwow

Creator:
Ken Rahaim
Medium:
Digital photograph
Type:
Photographs
Place:
USA
Date:
2007
Description:
Powwows are large social gatherings of Native Americans who follow traditional dances started centuries ago by their ancestors, and which continually evolve to include contemporary aspects. These events of drum music, dancing, singing, artistry and food, are attended by Natives and non-Natives, all of whom join in the dancing and take advantage of the opportunity to see old friends and teach the traditional ways to a younger generation. <p> During the National Powwow, the audience see dancers in full regalia compete in several dance categories, including Men and Women?s Golden Age (ages 50 and older); Men?s Fancy Dance, Grass and Traditional (Northern and Southern); Women?s Jingle Dress, Fancy Shawl, and Traditional (Northern and Southern); Teens (13-17); Juniors (6-12) and Tiny Tots (ages 5 and younger). The drum groups are the heart of all powwows and provide the pulsating and thunderous beats that accompany a dancer?s every movement. The powwow is led by three ?host drums? that showcase three distinct styles of singing (Northern, Southern and contemporary) and represent the best examples of each style. The drum contest highlights groups of 10 to 12 members each, and they sing traditional family songs that are passed down orally from one generation to the next. The National Museum of the American Indian sponsored the National Powwow in 2002, 2005, and 2007 as a way of presenting to the public the diversity and social traditions of contemporary Native cultures.
Image ID:
07natl-powwow_0303
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian

2007 Powwow

Creator:
Ken Rahaim
Medium:
Digital photograph
Type:
Photographs
Place:
USA
Date:
2007
Description:
Powwows are large social gatherings of Native Americans who follow traditional dances started centuries ago by their ancestors, and which continually evolve to include contemporary aspects. These events of drum music, dancing, singing, artistry and food, are attended by Natives and non-Natives, all of whom join in the dancing and take advantage of the opportunity to see old friends and teach the traditional ways to a younger generation. <p> During the National Powwow, the audience see dancers in full regalia compete in several dance categories, including Men and Women?s Golden Age (ages 50 and older); Men?s Fancy Dance, Grass and Traditional (Northern and Southern); Women?s Jingle Dress, Fancy Shawl, and Traditional (Northern and Southern); Teens (13-17); Juniors (6-12) and Tiny Tots (ages 5 and younger). The drum groups are the heart of all powwows and provide the pulsating and thunderous beats that accompany a dancer?s every movement. The powwow is led by three ?host drums? that showcase three distinct styles of singing (Northern, Southern and contemporary) and represent the best examples of each style. The drum contest highlights groups of 10 to 12 members each, and they sing traditional family songs that are passed down orally from one generation to the next. The National Museum of the American Indian sponsored the National Powwow in 2002, 2005, and 2007 as a way of presenting to the public the diversity and social traditions of contemporary Native cultures.
Image ID:
07natl-powwow_0376
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian

2007 Powwow

Creator:
Ken Rahaim
Medium:
Digital photograph
Type:
Photographs
Place:
USA
Date:
2007
Description:
Powwows are large social gatherings of Native Americans who follow traditional dances started centuries ago by their ancestors, and which continually evolve to include contemporary aspects. These events of drum music, dancing, singing, artistry and food, are attended by Natives and non-Natives, all of whom join in the dancing and take advantage of the opportunity to see old friends and teach the traditional ways to a younger generation. <p> During the National Powwow, the audience see dancers in full regalia compete in several dance categories, including Men and Women?s Golden Age (ages 50 and older); Men?s Fancy Dance, Grass and Traditional (Northern and Southern); Women?s Jingle Dress, Fancy Shawl, and Traditional (Northern and Southern); Teens (13-17); Juniors (6-12) and Tiny Tots (ages 5 and younger). The drum groups are the heart of all powwows and provide the pulsating and thunderous beats that accompany a dancer?s every movement. The powwow is led by three ?host drums? that showcase three distinct styles of singing (Northern, Southern and contemporary) and represent the best examples of each style. The drum contest highlights groups of 10 to 12 members each, and they sing traditional family songs that are passed down orally from one generation to the next. The National Museum of the American Indian sponsored the National Powwow in 2002, 2005, and 2007 as a way of presenting to the public the diversity and social traditions of contemporary Native cultures.
Image ID:
07natl-powwow_0401
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian

2007 Powwow

Creator:
Ken Rahaim
Medium:
Digital photograph
Type:
Photographs
Place:
USA
Date:
2007
Description:
Powwows are large social gatherings of Native Americans who follow traditional dances started centuries ago by their ancestors, and which continually evolve to include contemporary aspects. These events of drum music, dancing, singing, artistry and food, are attended by Natives and non-Natives, all of whom join in the dancing and take advantage of the opportunity to see old friends and teach the traditional ways to a younger generation. <p> During the National Powwow, the audience see dancers in full regalia compete in several dance categories, including Men and Women?s Golden Age (ages 50 and older); Men?s Fancy Dance, Grass and Traditional (Northern and Southern); Women?s Jingle Dress, Fancy Shawl, and Traditional (Northern and Southern); Teens (13-17); Juniors (6-12) and Tiny Tots (ages 5 and younger). The drum groups are the heart of all powwows and provide the pulsating and thunderous beats that accompany a dancer?s every movement. The powwow is led by three ?host drums? that showcase three distinct styles of singing (Northern, Southern and contemporary) and represent the best examples of each style. The drum contest highlights groups of 10 to 12 members each, and they sing traditional family songs that are passed down orally from one generation to the next. The National Museum of the American Indian sponsored the National Powwow in 2002, 2005, and 2007 as a way of presenting to the public the diversity and social traditions of contemporary Native cultures.
Image ID:
07natl-powwow_0467
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian

2007 Powwow

Creator:
Ken Rahaim
Medium:
Digital photograph
Type:
Photographs
Place:
USA
Date:
2007
Description:
Powwows are large social gatherings of Native Americans who follow traditional dances started centuries ago by their ancestors, and which continually evolve to include contemporary aspects. These events of drum music, dancing, singing, artistry and food, are attended by Natives and non-Natives, all of whom join in the dancing and take advantage of the opportunity to see old friends and teach the traditional ways to a younger generation. <p> During the National Powwow, the audience see dancers in full regalia compete in several dance categories, including Men and Women?s Golden Age (ages 50 and older); Men?s Fancy Dance, Grass and Traditional (Northern and Southern); Women?s Jingle Dress, Fancy Shawl, and Traditional (Northern and Southern); Teens (13-17); Juniors (6-12) and Tiny Tots (ages 5 and younger). The drum groups are the heart of all powwows and provide the pulsating and thunderous beats that accompany a dancer?s every movement. The powwow is led by three ?host drums? that showcase three distinct styles of singing (Northern, Southern and contemporary) and represent the best examples of each style. The drum contest highlights groups of 10 to 12 members each, and they sing traditional family songs that are passed down orally from one generation to the next. The National Museum of the American Indian sponsored the National Powwow in 2002, 2005, and 2007 as a way of presenting to the public the diversity and social traditions of contemporary Native cultures.
Image ID:
07natl-powwow_0498
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian

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