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B. Paul's Hair Dye Remover

view B. Paul's Hair Dye Remover digital asset number 1
Maker:
B. Paul
Measurements:
overall, box: 5 1/4 in x 2 1/8 in x 2 1/8 in; 13.335 cm x 5.3975 cm x 5.3975 cm
overall, bottle: 5 1/4 in x 2 in; 13.335 cm x 5.08 cm
Object Name:
hair dye, remover
hair care product
Place made:
United States: New York, New York
Description:
The indications or uses for this product as provided by the manufacturer are:
For Lightening Hair Colored to Dark
Location:
Currently not on view
Subject:
Hair Care Products
Credit Line:
Gift of Mary E. and Joseph F. Melfi, Jr., Tupper's Drug Store, Summerville, South Carolina
ID Number:
1980.0698.109
Accession number:
1980.0698
Catalog number:
1980.0698.109
See more items in:
Medicine and Science: Medicine
Beauty and Hygiene Products: Hair Care and Enhancement
Health & Medicine
Beauty and Health
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmah_716470
Additional Online Media:

In Ancient Rome, Purple Dye Was Made from Snails

view In Ancient Rome, Purple Dye Was Made from Snails digital asset number 1
Creator:
Smithsonian Magazine
Type:
Blog posts
Smithsonian staff publications
Blog posts
Published Date:
Thu, 10 Oct 2013 14:28:20 +0000
Blog Post Category:
Smart News
Smart News History & Archaeology
Description:

In ancient Rome, purple was the color of royalty, a designator of status. And while purple is flashy and pretty, it was more important at the time that purple was expensive. Purple was expensive, because purple dye came from snails.

The video above, by CreatureCast, recounts the story of Rome’s vaunted Tyrian purple, and the color’s close link with the marine snail Bolinus brandaris. The New York Times:

To make Tyrian purple, marine snails were collected by the thousands. They were then boiled for days in giant lead vats, producing a terrible odor. The snails, though, aren’t purple to begin with. The craftsmen were harvesting chemical precursors from the snails that, through heat and light, were transformed into the valuable dye.

But this telling leaves out one of the best parts of the story.

The video explains that snail-fueled purple persisted until chemists learned to make synthetic dyes. But the development of an artificial purple wasn’t a deliberate decision, but a happy accident for a young chemist named William Henry Perkin.

In the 1850s the British Empire was pushing into Africa. The Empire’s colonization attempts, though, were being beaten back by malaria. Scientists had recently realized that quinine, a chemical derived from the bark of cinchona trees, could be used to treat against malaria. But cinchona trees come mostly from South America, and scientists wanted a better way to get their hands on the drug.

Enter William Perkin, a young chemist who had joined the Royal College of Chemistry at 15. In 1856 Perkin, now 18, was trying to synthesize quinine in the lab. After repeated failures, “Perkin produced little more than a black, sticky mess,” says the Independent. Trying to dissolve his gunk in alcohol, though, revealed a deep purple liquid.

Perkin’s purple, otherwise known as aniline purple, or mauveine, was the first synthetic dye. The synthesis transformed purple’s elite status, and probably saved the lives of a great many snails.

More from Smithsonian.com:

In 2010, Malaria Killed 660,000 People, And Now It’s Resistant to the Drugs We Use to Fight It

Topic:
0
See more post:
Smithsonian Article Database
Data Source:
Smithsonian Magazine
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:posts_7609aa94a5a01c7bfcc5fca4620d3465

Earliest Evidence of Indigo Dye Found at Ancient Peruvian Burial Site

view Earliest Evidence of Indigo Dye Found at Ancient Peruvian Burial Site digital asset number 1
Creator:
Smithsonian Magazine
Type:
Blog posts
Smithsonian staff publications
Blog posts
Published Date:
Thu, 15 Sep 2016 19:44:00 +0000
Blog Post Category:
Smart News
Smart News History & Archaeology
Smart News Science
Description:

Archaeologists recently uncovered several scraps of indigo-dyed fabric at the Huaca Prieta ceremonial mound in northern Peru. Believed to be about 6,200 years old, this find pushes back the date for the earliest known use of the dye by roughly 1,600 years, Cynthia Graber reports for Scientific American.

The small cotton scraps were discovered on a 2007 excavation of Huaca Prieta, found bundled and embedded in concrete-like layers on a ramp leading up to the temple. They remain in surprisingly good condition despite their age because of this unusual burial at the site.

"They were literally sealed under these new layers of building, but because the building material had so much ash in it, it leached into the textiles, making them a very dirty, sooty color," Jeffrey Splitstoser, archaeologist and textile expert at The George Washington University, told Stephanie Pappas for Live Science.

Though the fabrics’ color was initially hidden, when Splitstoser carefully washed the fabric, the true indigo color appeared. “It was at that point we realized that we probably had indigo, and that it was probably the world’s oldest indigo,” he told Graber. They published their findings this week in the journal Science Advances.

Prior to this discovery, the oldest known dyed fabrics were Egyptian textiles with indigo-dyed bands from the Fifth Dynasty, roughly 2400 BC. The earliest known examples of indigo in the Americas, however, were a mere 2,500 years old.

Almost all blue dye in nature stems from an organic compound, known as indigoid, found in a variety of plant genera. The source of indigo at Huaca Prieta was most likely Indigofera, an indigo-producing plant native to the tropics of South America. Plants are not the only source of indigo, however—ancient Egyptians also extracted high-quality indigo from sea snails. Today, indigo is largely synthetically created and is primarily associated with the color in blue jeans.

Splitstoser and his colleagues identified the indigo in the fabric scraps using an advanced analytical technique known as high-performance liquid chromatography. Splitstoser confirmed indigo in five out of the eight fabric samples he tested. The lack of indigo in three of the samples could be due to age, where the indigo had either washed out over time or degraded, Splitstoser told Dani Cooper of ABC Science.

The findings also validate the contributions of early people in the Americas. “We in the West typically skip over the accomplishments of the ancient people of the western hemisphere ... but in this case, the cottons domesticated by the people of South America and Mesoamerica form the basis of the cottons we wear today,” he said.

"The people of the Americas were making scientific and technological contributions as early and in this case even earlier than people were in other parts of the world," Splitstoser told Pappas. "We always leave them out. I think this finding just shows that that's a mistake."

Topic:
0
See more post:
Smithsonian Article Database
Data Source:
Smithsonian Magazine
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:posts_42d0621b4513c86e5761eb95e3701f22

English-Alabama and Alabama-English dictionary 1906-1913

view English-Alabama and Alabama-English dictionary 1906-1913 digital asset number 1
Creator:
Swanton, John Reed
Sylestine, Harden
Physical description:
5400 cards
4 boxes
Culture:
Alibamu
Koasati Indians
Alabama Indians
Indians of North America Southern States
Type:
Dictionaries
Collection descriptions
Date:
1906-1913
Notes:
Related Collection: Manuscript 4151
Related Collection: Manuscript 7360
Related Collection: Manuscript 7361
The note by Swanton preceding Alabama-English section reads? "The material marked (H) was furnished by an Alabama Indian, Harden Sylestine, who translated in his own way. His translation is usually preserved lest a mistake be made in altering; the material is to be corrected later. This includes all of my Alabama material except 12 pages of text by native informants and a vocabulary which for the most part duplicates what has been given."
Addl. KW Subjects:
Alibamu
Summary:
Alabama-English, 2433 typed cards in 2 boxes; English-Alabama, approximately 3000 typed and autograph A. cards in 2 boxes. Includes terms written in pencil and marked "(K)," which may be terms in Koasati. Informants are Harden Sylestine and others.
Swanton's arrangement of the Alabama-English section is generally alphabetical, with many terms grouped together by stesm. The cards have been stamped with consecutive numbers 1-2433, and Swanton's order has been preserved. Cards that had been clipped together now have a second number, beginning with 1 for the first in a clipped group (e.g., if cards 25-27 were found clipped together, they would now be numbered 25-1, 26-2, 27-3).
The Alabama-English section (with sequentially numbered cards) contains utterances identifiable by a following number in parentheses. If the number does not begin with zero, apparently if refers to Swanton's page numbers in his rough field notes (M 4151 "second set"). Numbers beginning with zero seem to refer to the"first set," MS 4151-- Karen Lupardus, August 18, 1978.
Cite as:
Manuscript 2435, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Repository Loc.:
National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Museum Support Center, Suitland, Maryland
Topic:
Language and languages--Documentation
Local number:
NAA MS 2435
See more items in:
Numbered manuscripts 1850s-1980s (some earlier)
Data Source:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_arc_745
1 Page(s) matching your search term, top most relevant ones are shown: View entire completed project in transcription center
  • View English-Alabama and Alabama-English dictionary 1906-1913 digital asset number 1

Field Work in Ibadan, Western Region (Nigeria): Large Indigo Dye Pots Used to Create Adire Clothes

view Field Work in Ibadan, Western Region (Nigeria): Large Indigo Dye Pots Used to Create Adire Clothes digital asset number 1
Creator:
Turner, Lorenzo Dow 1890-1972
Subject:
Turner, Lorenzo Dow
Physical description:
1 photographic negative : b&w; 35mm
Culture:
Yoruba (African people)
Type:
Negatives
Place:
Nigeria, Oyo State, Ibadan
Africa
Nigeria
Nigeria, Western
Ibadan (Nigeria)
Date:
1951
Notes:
Title is provided by ACMA Archives staff based on researcher's notes.
This photograph was taken by Lorenzo Dow Turner while conducting field research in Nigeria, on a Fulbright Research Award from March 1951 through December 1951.
The Lorenzo Dow Turner papers were donated to the Anacostia Community Museum in 2003 by Professor Turner's widow, Lois Turner Williams. Additional materials were donated in the spring of 2010 by Mrs. Turner Williams.
Organization:
Lorenzo Dow Turner papers are arranged into seven main categories; Lorenzo Dow Turner papers, Series 5: Photographs, ca. 1890-1974 is organized into five subdivisions which include one or several items of original materials; Sub-series 5.4: Research is ultimately divided by the country where field research was conducted. This negative is included in Sub-series 5.4.1: Research: Africa
Summary:
Additional information from Alcione M. Amos reads, "In 1951, Lorenzo Dow Turner was able to achieve his dream of visiting Africa after he received a Fulbright award. His visit to West Africa was a major adventure of interacting with the local people, presenting lectures, and again recording songs, folktales, and proverbs. Turner was initially located at the University of Ibadan, Nigeria, where he lectured to appreciative audiences on topics such as Africans in the New World and the English language in America. Soon after his arrival he was extending his reach and traveling all over the country. During these excursions he often played the recordings he had made in Brazil with Yoruba speakers. His audiences in Africa were fascinated. He was further connecting the worlds of the African Diaspora through language." [Lorenzo Dow Turner: Connecting Communities through Language. Alcione M. Amos. The Black Scholar: Volume 41, No.1, Journal of Black Studies and Research (Spring 2011), pp. 4-15. Published by: the Black World Foundation and Paradigm Publishers, Boulder, Colorado]
Cite as:
Lorenzo Dow Turner papers, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution, gift of Lois Turner Williams
Repository Loc.:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives, MRC-777 1901 Fort Place, SE, Washington, DC 20020 (tel. 202.633.4853, fax 202.287.2422) ACMarchives@si.edu Consult archivist by appointment
Topic:
Clothing and dress
Cultural landscapes
Dyes and dyeing
Local number:
ACMA LDT-N-R36-1193
See more items in:
Sub-series 5.4.1: Research: Africa
Lorenzo Dow Turner papers, Series 5: Photographs ca 1890-1974
Lorenzo Dow Turner papers 1895-1972
Data Source:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_arc_302925

Field Work in Ibadan, Western Region (Nigeria): Large Indigo Dye Pots Used to Create Adire Clothes

view Field Work in Ibadan, Western Region (Nigeria): Large Indigo Dye Pots Used to Create Adire Clothes digital asset number 1
Creator:
Turner, Lorenzo Dow 1890-1972
Subject:
Turner, Lorenzo Dow
Physical description:
1 photographic negative : b&w; 35mm
Culture:
Yoruba (African people)
Type:
Negatives
Place:
Nigeria, Oyo State, Ibadan
Africa
Nigeria
Nigeria, Western
Ibadan (Nigeria)
Date:
1951
Notes:
Title is provided by ACMA Archives staff based on researcher's notes.
This photograph was taken by Lorenzo Dow Turner while conducting field research in Nigeria, on a Fulbright Research Award from March 1951 through December 1951.
The Lorenzo Dow Turner papers were donated to the Anacostia Community Museum in 2003 by Professor Turner's widow, Lois Turner Williams. Additional materials were donated in the spring of 2010 by Mrs. Turner Williams.
Organization:
Lorenzo Dow Turner papers are arranged into seven main categories; Lorenzo Dow Turner papers, Series 5: Photographs, ca. 1890-1974 is organized into five subdivisions which include one or several items of original materials; Sub-series 5.4: Research is ultimately divided by the country where field research was conducted. This negative is included in Sub-series 5.4.1: Research: Africa
Summary:
Additional information from Alcione M. Amos reads, "In 1951, Lorenzo Dow Turner was able to achieve his dream of visiting Africa after he received a Fulbright award. His visit to West Africa was a major adventure of interacting with the local people, presenting lectures, and again recording songs, folktales, and proverbs. Turner was initially located at the University of Ibadan, Nigeria, where he lectured to appreciative audiences on topics such as Africans in the New World and the English language in America. Soon after his arrival he was extending his reach and traveling all over the country. During these excursions he often played the recordings he had made in Brazil with Yoruba speakers. His audiences in Africa were fascinated. He was further connecting the worlds of the African Diaspora through language." [Lorenzo Dow Turner: Connecting Communities through Language. Alcione M. Amos. The Black Scholar: Volume 41, No.1, Journal of Black Studies and Research (Spring 2011), pp. 4-15. Published by: the Black World Foundation and Paradigm Publishers, Boulder, Colorado]
Cite as:
Lorenzo Dow Turner papers, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution, gift of Lois Turner Williams
Repository Loc.:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives, MRC-777 1901 Fort Place, SE, Washington, DC 20020 (tel. 202.633.4853, fax 202.287.2422) ACMarchives@si.edu Consult archivist by appointment
Topic:
Clothing and dress
Cultural landscapes
Dyes and dyeing
Local number:
ACMA LDT-N-R36-1194
See more items in:
Sub-series 5.4.1: Research: Africa
Lorenzo Dow Turner papers, Series 5: Photographs ca 1890-1974
Lorenzo Dow Turner papers 1895-1972
Data Source:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_arc_302926

Field Work in Ibadan, Western Region (Nigeria): Large Indigo Dye Pots Used to Create Adire Clothes

view Field Work in Ibadan, Western Region (Nigeria): Large Indigo Dye Pots Used to Create Adire Clothes digital asset number 1
Creator:
Turner, Lorenzo Dow 1890-1972
Subject:
Turner, Lorenzo Dow
Physical description:
1 photographic negative : b&w; 35mm
Culture:
Yoruba (African people)
Type:
Negatives
Place:
Nigeria, Oyo State, Ibadan
Africa
Nigeria
Nigeria, Western
Ibadan (Nigeria)
Date:
1951
Notes:
Title is provided by ACMA Archives staff based on researcher's notes.
This photograph was taken by Lorenzo Dow Turner while conducting field research in Nigeria, on a Fulbright Research Award from March 1951 through December 1951.
The Lorenzo Dow Turner papers were donated to the Anacostia Community Museum in 2003 by Professor Turner's widow, Lois Turner Williams. Additional materials were donated in the spring of 2010 by Mrs. Turner Williams.
Organization:
Lorenzo Dow Turner papers are arranged into seven main categories; Lorenzo Dow Turner papers, Series 5: Photographs, ca. 1890-1974 is organized into five subdivisions which include one or several items of original materials; Sub-series 5.4: Research is ultimately divided by the country where field research was conducted. This negative is included in Sub-series 5.4.1: Research: Africa
Summary:
Additional information from Alcione M. Amos reads, "In 1951, Lorenzo Dow Turner was able to achieve his dream of visiting Africa after he received a Fulbright award. His visit to West Africa was a major adventure of interacting with the local people, presenting lectures, and again recording songs, folktales, and proverbs. Turner was initially located at the University of Ibadan, Nigeria, where he lectured to appreciative audiences on topics such as Africans in the New World and the English language in America. Soon after his arrival he was extending his reach and traveling all over the country. During these excursions he often played the recordings he had made in Brazil with Yoruba speakers. His audiences in Africa were fascinated. He was further connecting the worlds of the African Diaspora through language." [Lorenzo Dow Turner: Connecting Communities through Language. Alcione M. Amos. The Black Scholar: Volume 41, No.1, Journal of Black Studies and Research (Spring 2011), pp. 4-15. Published by: the Black World Foundation and Paradigm Publishers, Boulder, Colorado]
Cite as:
Lorenzo Dow Turner papers, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution, gift of Lois Turner Williams
Repository Loc.:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives, MRC-777 1901 Fort Place, SE, Washington, DC 20020 (tel. 202.633.4853, fax 202.287.2422) ACMarchives@si.edu Consult archivist by appointment
Topic:
Clothing and dress
Cultural landscapes
Dyes and dyeing
Local number:
ACMA LDT-N-R36-1195
See more items in:
Sub-series 5.4.1: Research: Africa
Lorenzo Dow Turner papers, Series 5: Photographs ca 1890-1974
Lorenzo Dow Turner papers 1895-1972
Data Source:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_arc_302927

An English Town Had to Dye This Beautiful Lagoon Black to Get People to Stop Swimming in It

view An English Town Had to Dye This Beautiful Lagoon Black to Get People to Stop Swimming in It digital asset number 1
Creator:
Smithsonian Magazine
Type:
Blog posts
Smithsonian staff publications
Blog posts
Published Date:
Tue, 23 Jul 2013 13:22:40 +0000
Blog Post Category:
Smart News
Smart News
Description:

Sometimes, things are just too beautiful. Such is the case for the Blue Lagoon of Buxton, England. The lagoon is so blue it attracts visitors from all over. The problem is that the lagoon is incredibly toxic. And yet, despite warnings all over, people still swam in it. Which left Buxton with no choice but to dye the lagoon black.

Atlas Obscura explains the danger of the lagoon, caused from residue left by industry:

In the case of the blue lagoon, calcium oxide, used as part of the quarrying process has left the lagoon with a pH of 11.3, compared to Ammonia’s pH of 11.5 and bleach’s pH of 12.6. If that is not enough, the site has been used as a dumping ground.

If you visit the lagoon, there are ample warning signs, Atlas Obscura reports: “Warning! Polluted water Lagoon known to contain: Car Wrecks, Dead Animals, Excrement, Rubbish” says one. ” Warning! Do not enter water, due to high pH levels. This can cause: Skin and eye irritations, Stomach Problems, Fungal infections such as thrush” says another. And the most desperate sounding of all: “Think! would you swim in ammonia or bleach?”

Turns out, people didn’t really want to think and would still go into the lagoon regardless of the signs. Here is one woman posing in the lake.

The locals hope the lagoon will be closed, but the water is too toxic to be removed, according to officials. So in June of this year, they dyed the lake black, to keep people from swimming. ” So far the plan seems to be working — according to locals,” writes Atlas Obscura,  “disappointed weekend road trippers have been turning back when they spot the newly inky lagoon.”

More from Smithsonian:

Unless You Like Toxic Chemicals, Skip This Chinese Delicacy
2.5 Million Gallons of Toxic Waste Just Spilled in Alberta

Topic:
0
See more post:
Smithsonian Article Database
Data Source:
Smithsonian Magazine
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:posts_7e7a82f9f89a5d6d3c600954f547df9b

This Company Just Ditched Artificial Food Dyes

view This Company Just Ditched Artificial Food Dyes digital asset number 1
Creator:
Smithsonian Magazine
Type:
Blog posts
Smithsonian staff publications
Blog posts
Published Date:
Tue, 09 Feb 2016 16:43:29 +0000
Blog Post Category:
Smart News
Smart News Science
Description:

Do you have a sweet tooth? If so, your favorite candy may come with a side of artificial colors. But not for long. As Michal Addady reports for Fortune, candy behemoth Mars, Inc. has announced it will remove artificial colors from all of its human food products over the next five years.

In a press release about the change, Mars announced that it’s ditching all artificial colors as “part of a commitment to meet evolving consumer preferences.” The company states that though artificial colors do not pose risks to humans, it is now working on ways to develop vibrant natural colors for candies like M&Ms, Skittles and other products.

Mars isn’t the only company that has responded to consumer outcries against artificial ingredients in recent years. Earlier this year, Kraft announced that the iconic orange hue behind its bestselling Macaroni & Cheese will soon lose all synthetic coloring. Other companies from Nestlé to Noodles & Company followed suit. General Mills has also vowed to nix synthetic dyes from its foods, but conceded that its Trix cereal will lose a few colors in the process.

Though FDA officials have repeatedly advised that artificial colorings do not cause conditions like hyperactivity or warrant warning labels, a growing number of consumers object to fake coloring agents with pharmaceutical-sounding names like FD&C Red 40. A 2015 global Nielsen poll found that 42 percent of consumers consider a lack of artificial colors in food to be “very important,” though the number of North American consumers who shunned artificial colors was lower than that of all other regions (only 29 percent versus, for example, 44 percent in the Asia-Pacific region).

You may think that the change at Mars and other large food companies will only affect outlandishly colored foods like candies and cereals. You’d be wrong: Dyes are a mainstay of mass-produced food. Some specialists say that swapping out the synthetic stuff for dyes produced from real ingredients will be difficult and expensive. But in the land of food, the consumer is king. Food sans artificial dyes probably won’t look less fake—but its ingredient list just might.

Topic:
0
See more post:
Smithsonian Article Database
Data Source:
Smithsonian Magazine
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:posts_a23f3cf341b65935cdb1d2bd2233f57a

Field Work in Ibadan, Western Region (Nigeria): Large Indigo Dye Pots Used by Yoruba Women to Create Adire Clothes

view Field Work in Ibadan, Western Region (Nigeria): Large Indigo Dye Pots Used by Yoruba Women to Create Adire Clothes digital asset number 1
Creator:
Turner, Lorenzo Dow 1890-1972
Subject:
Turner, Lorenzo Dow
Physical description:
1 photographic negative : b&w; 35mm
Culture:
Yoruba (African people)
Type:
Negatives
Place:
Nigeria, Oyo State, Ibadan
Africa
Nigeria
Nigeria, Western
Ibadan (Nigeria)
Date:
1951
Notes:
Title is provided by ACMA Archives staff based on researcher's notes.
This photograph was taken by Lorenzo Dow Turner while conducting field research in Nigeria, on a Fulbright Research Award from March 1951 through December 1951.
The Lorenzo Dow Turner papers were donated to the Anacostia Community Museum in 2003 by Professor Turner's widow, Lois Turner Williams. Additional materials were donated in the spring of 2010 by Mrs. Turner Williams.
Organization:
Lorenzo Dow Turner papers are arranged into seven main categories; Lorenzo Dow Turner papers, Series 5: Photographs, ca. 1890-1974 is organized into five subdivisions which include one or several items of original materials; Sub-series 5.4: Research is ultimately divided by the country where field research was conducted. This negative is included in Sub-series 5.4.1: Research: Africa
Summary:
Additional information from Alcione M. Amos reads, "In 1951, Lorenzo Dow Turner was able to achieve his dream of visiting Africa after he received a Fulbright award. His visit to West Africa was a major adventure of interacting with the local people, presenting lectures, and again recording songs, folktales, and proverbs. Turner was initially located at the University of Ibadan, Nigeria, where he lectured to appreciative audiences on topics such as Africans in the New World and the English language in America. Soon after his arrival he was extending his reach and traveling all over the country. During these excursions he often played the recordings he had made in Brazil with Yoruba speakers. His audiences in Africa were fascinated. He was further connecting the worlds of the African Diaspora through language." [Lorenzo Dow Turner: Connecting Communities through Language. Alcione M. Amos. The Black Scholar: Volume 41, No.1, Journal of Black Studies and Research (Spring 2011), pp. 4-15. Published by: the Black World Foundation and Paradigm Publishers, Boulder, Colorado]
Cite as:
Lorenzo Dow Turner papers, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution, gift of Lois Turner Williams
Repository Loc.:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives, MRC-777 1901 Fort Place, SE, Washington, DC 20020 (tel. 202.633.4853, fax 202.287.2422) ACMarchives@si.edu Consult archivist by appointment
Topic:
Clothing and dress
Cultural landscapes
Dyes and dyeing
Women
Local number:
ACMA LDT-N-R06-160
See more items in:
Sub-series 5.4.1: Research: Africa
Lorenzo Dow Turner papers, Series 5: Photographs ca 1890-1974
Lorenzo Dow Turner papers 1895-1972
Data Source:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_arc_302917

Field Work in Ibadan, Western Region (Nigeria): Large Indigo Dye Pots Used by Yoruba Women to Create Adire Clothes

view Field Work in Ibadan, Western Region (Nigeria): Large Indigo Dye Pots Used by Yoruba Women to Create Adire Clothes digital asset number 1
Creator:
Turner, Lorenzo Dow 1890-1972
Subject:
Turner, Lorenzo Dow
Physical description:
1 photographic negative : b&w; 35mm
Culture:
Yoruba (African people)
Type:
Negatives
Place:
Nigeria, Oyo State, Ibadan
Africa
Nigeria
Nigeria, Western
Ibadan (Nigeria)
Date:
1951
Notes:
Title is provided by ACMA Archives staff based on researcher's notes.
This photograph was taken by Lorenzo Dow Turner while conducting field research in Nigeria, on a Fulbright Research Award from March 1951 through December 1951.
The Lorenzo Dow Turner papers were donated to the Anacostia Community Museum in 2003 by Professor Turner's widow, Lois Turner Williams. Additional materials were donated in the spring of 2010 by Mrs. Turner Williams.
Organization:
Lorenzo Dow Turner papers are arranged into seven main categories; Lorenzo Dow Turner papers, Series 5: Photographs, ca. 1890-1974 is organized into five subdivisions which include one or several items of original materials; Sub-series 5.4: Research is ultimately divided by the country where field research was conducted. This negative is included in Sub-series 5.4.1: Research: Africa
Summary:
Additional information from Alcione M. Amos reads, "In 1951, Lorenzo Dow Turner was able to achieve his dream of visiting Africa after he received a Fulbright award. His visit to West Africa was a major adventure of interacting with the local people, presenting lectures, and again recording songs, folktales, and proverbs. Turner was initially located at the University of Ibadan, Nigeria, where he lectured to appreciative audiences on topics such as Africans in the New World and the English language in America. Soon after his arrival he was extending his reach and traveling all over the country. During these excursions he often played the recordings he had made in Brazil with Yoruba speakers. His audiences in Africa were fascinated. He was further connecting the worlds of the African Diaspora through language." [Lorenzo Dow Turner: Connecting Communities through Language. Alcione M. Amos. The Black Scholar: Volume 41, No.1, Journal of Black Studies and Research (Spring 2011), pp. 4-15. Published by: the Black World Foundation and Paradigm Publishers, Boulder, Colorado]
Cite as:
Lorenzo Dow Turner papers, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution, gift of Lois Turner Williams
Repository Loc.:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives, MRC-777 1901 Fort Place, SE, Washington, DC 20020 (tel. 202.633.4853, fax 202.287.2422) ACMarchives@si.edu Consult archivist by appointment
Topic:
Clothing and dress
Cultural landscapes
Dyes and dyeing
Women
Local number:
ACMA LDT-N-R06-161
See more items in:
Sub-series 5.4.1: Research: Africa
Lorenzo Dow Turner papers, Series 5: Photographs ca 1890-1974
Lorenzo Dow Turner papers 1895-1972
Data Source:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_arc_302918

Field Work in Ibadan, Western Region (Nigeria): Large Indigo Dye Pots Used by Yoruba Women to Create Adire Clothes

view Field Work in Ibadan, Western Region (Nigeria): Large Indigo Dye Pots Used by Yoruba Women to Create Adire Clothes digital asset number 1
Creator:
Turner, Lorenzo Dow 1890-1972
Subject:
Turner, Lorenzo Dow
Physical description:
1 photographic negative : b&w; 35mm
Culture:
Yoruba (African people)
Type:
Negatives
Place:
Nigeria, Oyo State, Ibadan
Africa
Nigeria
Ibadan (Nigeria)
Nigeria, Western
Date:
1951
Notes:
Title is provided by ACMA Archives staff based on researcher's notes.
This photograph was taken by Lorenzo Dow Turner while conducting field research in Nigeria, on a Fulbright Research Award from March 1951 through December 1951.
The Lorenzo Dow Turner papers were donated to the Anacostia Community Museum in 2003 by Professor Turner's widow, Lois Turner Williams. Additional materials were donated in the spring of 2010 by Mrs. Turner Williams.
Organization:
Lorenzo Dow Turner papers are arranged into seven main categories; Lorenzo Dow Turner papers, Series 5: Photographs, ca. 1890-1974 is organized into five subdivisions which include one or several items of original materials; Sub-series 5.4: Research is ultimately divided by the country where field research was conducted. This negative is included in Sub-series 5.4.1: Research: Africa
Summary:
Additional information from Alcione M. Amos reads, "In 1951, Lorenzo Dow Turner was able to achieve his dream of visiting Africa after he received a Fulbright award. His visit to West Africa was a major adventure of interacting with the local people, presenting lectures, and again recording songs, folktales, and proverbs. Turner was initially located at the University of Ibadan, Nigeria, where he lectured to appreciative audiences on topics such as Africans in the New World and the English language in America. Soon after his arrival he was extending his reach and traveling all over the country. During these excursions he often played the recordings he had made in Brazil with Yoruba speakers. His audiences in Africa were fascinated. He was further connecting the worlds of the African Diaspora through language." [Lorenzo Dow Turner: Connecting Communities through Language. Alcione M. Amos. The Black Scholar: Volume 41, No.1, Journal of Black Studies and Research (Spring 2011), pp. 4-15. Published by: the Black World Foundation and Paradigm Publishers, Boulder, Colorado]
Cite as:
Lorenzo Dow Turner papers, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution, gift of Lois Turner Williams
Repository Loc.:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives, MRC-777 1901 Fort Place, SE, Washington, DC 20020 (tel. 202.633.4853, fax 202.287.2422) ACMarchives@si.edu Consult archivist by appointment
Topic:
Clothing and dress
Cultural landscapes
Dyes and dyeing
Women
Local number:
ACMA LDT-N-R06-162
See more items in:
Sub-series 5.4.1: Research: Africa
Lorenzo Dow Turner papers, Series 5: Photographs ca 1890-1974
Lorenzo Dow Turner papers 1895-1972
Data Source:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_arc_302919

Field Work in Ibadan, Western Region (Nigeria): Large Indigo Dye Pots Used by Yoruba Women to Create Adire Clothes

view Field Work in Ibadan, Western Region (Nigeria): Large Indigo Dye Pots Used by Yoruba Women to Create Adire Clothes digital asset number 1
Creator:
Turner, Lorenzo Dow 1890-1972
Subject:
Turner, Lorenzo Dow
Physical description:
1 photographic negative : b&w; 35mm
Culture:
Yoruba (African people)
Type:
Negatives
Place:
Nigeria, Oyo State, Ibadan
Africa
Nigeria
Nigeria, Western
Ibadan (Nigeria)
Date:
1951
Notes:
Title is provided by ACMA Archives staff based on researcher's notes.
This photograph was taken by Lorenzo Dow Turner while conducting field research in Nigeria, on a Fulbright Research Award from March 1951 through December 1951.
The Lorenzo Dow Turner papers were donated to the Anacostia Community Museum in 2003 by Professor Turner's widow, Lois Turner Williams. Additional materials were donated in the spring of 2010 by Mrs. Turner Williams.
Organization:
Lorenzo Dow Turner papers are arranged into seven main categories; Lorenzo Dow Turner papers, Series 5: Photographs, ca. 1890-1974 is organized into five subdivisions which include one or several items of original materials; Sub-series 5.4: Research is ultimately divided by the country where field research was conducted. This negative is included in Sub-series 5.4.1: Research: Africa
Summary:
Additional information from Alcione M. Amos reads, "In 1951, Lorenzo Dow Turner was able to achieve his dream of visiting Africa after he received a Fulbright award. His visit to West Africa was a major adventure of interacting with the local people, presenting lectures, and again recording songs, folktales, and proverbs. Turner was initially located at the University of Ibadan, Nigeria, where he lectured to appreciative audiences on topics such as Africans in the New World and the English language in America. Soon after his arrival he was extending his reach and traveling all over the country. During these excursions he often played the recordings he had made in Brazil with Yoruba speakers. His audiences in Africa were fascinated. He was further connecting the worlds of the African Diaspora through language." [Lorenzo Dow Turner: Connecting Communities through Language. Alcione M. Amos. The Black Scholar: Volume 41, No.1, Journal of Black Studies and Research (Spring 2011), pp. 4-15. Published by: the Black World Foundation and Paradigm Publishers, Boulder, Colorado]
Cite as:
Lorenzo Dow Turner papers, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution, gift of Lois Turner Williams
Repository Loc.:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives, MRC-777 1901 Fort Place, SE, Washington, DC 20020 (tel. 202.633.4853, fax 202.287.2422) ACMarchives@si.edu Consult archivist by appointment
Topic:
Clothing and dress
Cultural landscapes
Dyes and dyeing
Women
Local number:
ACMA LDT-N-R06-163
See more items in:
Sub-series 5.4.1: Research: Africa
Lorenzo Dow Turner papers, Series 5: Photographs ca 1890-1974
Lorenzo Dow Turner papers 1895-1972
Data Source:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_arc_302920

Field Work in Ibadan, Western Region (Nigeria): Large Indigo Dye Pots Used by Yoruba Women to Create Adire Clothes

view Field Work in Ibadan, Western Region (Nigeria): Large Indigo Dye Pots Used by Yoruba Women to Create Adire Clothes digital asset number 1
Creator:
Turner, Lorenzo Dow 1890-1972
Subject:
Turner, Lorenzo Dow
Physical description:
1 photographic negative : b&w; 35mm
Culture:
Yoruba (African people)
Type:
Negatives
Place:
Nigeria, Oyo State, Ibadan
Africa
Nigeria
Nigeria, Western
Ibadan (Nigeria)
Date:
1951
Notes:
Title is provided by ACMA Archives staff based on researcher's notes.
This photograph was taken by Lorenzo Dow Turner while conducting field research in Nigeria, on a Fulbright Research Award from March 1951 through December 1951.
The Lorenzo Dow Turner papers were donated to the Anacostia Community Museum in 2003 by Professor Turner's widow, Lois Turner Williams. Additional materials were donated in the spring of 2010 by Mrs. Turner Williams.
Organization:
Lorenzo Dow Turner papers are arranged into seven main categories; Lorenzo Dow Turner papers, Series 5: Photographs, ca. 1890-1974 is organized into five subdivisions which include one or several items of original materials; Sub-series 5.4: Research is ultimately divided by the country where field research was conducted. This negative is included in Sub-series 5.4.1: Research: Africa
Summary:
Additional information from Alcione M. Amos reads, "In 1951, Lorenzo Dow Turner was able to achieve his dream of visiting Africa after he received a Fulbright award. His visit to West Africa was a major adventure of interacting with the local people, presenting lectures, and again recording songs, folktales, and proverbs. Turner was initially located at the University of Ibadan, Nigeria, where he lectured to appreciative audiences on topics such as Africans in the New World and the English language in America. Soon after his arrival he was extending his reach and traveling all over the country. During these excursions he often played the recordings he had made in Brazil with Yoruba speakers. His audiences in Africa were fascinated. He was further connecting the worlds of the African Diaspora through language." [Lorenzo Dow Turner: Connecting Communities through Language. Alcione M. Amos. The Black Scholar: Volume 41, No.1, Journal of Black Studies and Research (Spring 2011), pp. 4-15. Published by: the Black World Foundation and Paradigm Publishers, Boulder, Colorado]
Cite as:
Lorenzo Dow Turner papers, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution, gift of Lois Turner Williams
Repository Loc.:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives, MRC-777 1901 Fort Place, SE, Washington, DC 20020 (tel. 202.633.4853, fax 202.287.2422) ACMarchives@si.edu Consult archivist by appointment
Topic:
Clothing and dress
Cultural landscapes
Dyes and dyeing
Women
Local number:
ACMA LDT-N-R06-164
See more items in:
Sub-series 5.4.1: Research: Africa
Lorenzo Dow Turner papers, Series 5: Photographs ca 1890-1974
Lorenzo Dow Turner papers 1895-1972
Data Source:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_arc_302921

New England Glass Company Paperweight

view New England Glass Company Paperweight digital asset number 1
Maker:
New England Glass Company
Physical Description:
glass, transparent (overall material)
Measurements:
overall: 1 11/16 in x 2 13/32 in; 4.28625 cm x 6.096 cm
Object Name:
paperweight
Place made:
United States: Massachusetts, Cambridge
Date made:
1852-1878
Description (Brief):
In the 1700s, paperweights made from textured stone or bronze were part of the writer’s tool kit, which also included a quill pen and stand, inkpot, and blotter. By the mid-1800s, decorative paperweights produced by glassmakers in Europe and the United States became highly desired collectibles.
Decorative glass paperweights reflected the 19th-century taste for intricate, over-the-top designs. Until the spread of textiles colorized with synthetic dyes, ceramics and glass were among the few objects that added brilliant color to a 19th-century Victorian interior. The popularity of these paperweights in the 1800s testifies to the sustained cultural interest in hand craftsmanship during an age of rapid industrialization.
The New England Glass Company in Cambridge, Massachusetts was founded about 1818 by Deming Jarves along with three wealthy businessmen, and probably began producing paperweights by the mid 1850s. In 1888 the business moved to Ohio, under the name Libbey Glass Company.
A central solid white cane with a dark blue eagle silhouette floats above a latticinio (latticework) ground in this New England Glass Company paperweight.
Location:
Currently not on view
Credit Line:
Mrs. Florence E. Bushee
ID Number:
CE.66.41
Catalog number:
66.41
Accession number:
268356
Collector/donor number:
113
See more items in:
Home and Community Life: Ceramics and Glass
Domestic Furnishings
Art
Paperweights
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmah_596668
Additional Online Media:

New England Glass Company Paperweight

view New England Glass Company Paperweight digital asset number 1
Maker:
New England Glass Company
Physical Description:
glass, transparent (overall material)
Measurements:
overall: 2 3/16 in x 2 21/32 in; 5.55625 cm x 6.731 cm
Object Name:
paperweight
Place made:
United States: Massachusetts, Cambridge
Date made:
1852-1880
Description (Brief):
In the 1700s, paperweights made from textured stone or bronze were part of the writer’s tool kit, which also included a quill pen and stand, inkpot, and blotter. By the mid-1800s, decorative paperweights produced by glassmakers in Europe and the United States became highly desired collectibles.
Decorative glass paperweights reflected the 19th-century taste for intricate, over-the-top designs. Until the spread of textiles colorized with synthetic dyes, ceramics and glass were among the few objects that added brilliant color to a 19th-century Victorian interior. The popularity of these paperweights in the 1800s testifies to the sustained cultural interest in hand craftsmanship during an age of rapid industrialization.
The New England Glass Company in Cambridge, Massachusetts was founded about 1818 by Deming Jarves along with three wealthy businessmen, and probably began producing paperweights by the mid 1850s. In 1888 the business moved to Ohio, under the name Libbey Glass Company.
A collection of four yellow and salmon colored pears and five cherries rests on a latticinio (latticework) background in this New England Glass Company paperweight.
Location:
Currently not on view
Credit Line:
Mrs. Florence E. Bushee
ID Number:
CE.65.485
Catalog number:
65.485
Accession number:
264964
Collector/donor number:
148
See more items in:
Home and Community Life: Ceramics and Glass
Domestic Furnishings
Art
Paperweights
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmah_596666
Additional Online Media:

New England Glass Company Paperweight

view New England Glass Company Paperweight digital asset number 1
Maker:
New England Glass Company
Physical Description:
glass, transparent (overall material)
millifiori (joint piece production method/technique)
Measurements:
overall: 1 3/4 in x 2 13/32 in; 4.445 cm x 6.096 cm
Object Name:
paperweight
Place made:
United States: Massachusetts, Cambridge
Date made:
1852-1880
Description (Brief):
In the 1700s, paperweights made from textured stone or bronze were part of the writer’s tool kit, which also included a quill pen and stand, inkpot, and blotter. By the mid-1800s, decorative paperweights produced by glassmakers in Europe and the United States became highly desired collectibles.
Decorative glass paperweights reflected the 19th-century taste for intricate, over-the-top designs. Until the spread of textiles colorized with synthetic dyes, ceramics and glass were among the few objects that added brilliant color to a 19th-century Victorian interior. The popularity of these paperweights in the 1800s testifies to the sustained cultural interest in hand craftsmanship during an age of rapid industrialization.
The New England Glass Company in Cambridge, Massachusetts was founded about 1818 by Deming Jarves along with three wealthy businessmen, and probably began producing paperweights by the mid 1850s. In 1888 the business moved to Ohio, under the name Libbey Glass Company.
This rare New England Glass Company paperweight features a triple posy on a red, white, and blue swirl over an opaque white ground.
Location:
Currently not on view
Credit Line:
Aaron and Lillie Straus
ID Number:
CE.60.121
Catalog number:
60.121
Accession number:
211475
See more items in:
Home and Community Life: Ceramics and Glass
Domestic Furnishings
Art
Paperweights
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmah_593919
Additional Online Media:

New England Glass Company Paperweight

view New England Glass Company Paperweight digital asset number 1
Maker:
New England Glass Company
Physical Description:
glass, transparent (overall material)
cut (joint piece production method/technique)
Measurements:
overall: 2 15/16 in; 7.493 cm
Object Name:
paperweight
Place made:
United States: Massachusetts, Cambridge
Date made:
1852-1880
Description (Brief):
In the 1700s, paperweights made from textured stone or bronze were part of the writer’s tool kit, which also included a quill pen and stand, inkpot, and blotter. By the mid-1800s, decorative paperweights produced by glassmakers in Europe and the United States became highly desired collectibles.
Decorative glass paperweights reflected the 19th-century taste for intricate, over-the-top designs. Until the spread of textiles colorized with synthetic dyes, ceramics and glass were among the few objects that added brilliant color to a 19th-century Victorian interior. The popularity of these paperweights in the 1800s testifies to the sustained cultural interest in hand craftsmanship during an age of rapid industrialization.
The New England Glass Company in Cambridge, Massachusetts was founded about 1818 by Deming Jarves along with three wealthy businessmen, and probably began producing paperweights by the mid 1850s. In 1888 the business moved to Ohio, under the name Libbey Glass Company.
This New England Glass Company faceted paperweight features a dark-blue double Clematis.
Location:
Currently not on view
Credit Line:
Aaron and Lillie Straus
ID Number:
CE.60.110
Catalog number:
60.110
Accession number:
211475
See more items in:
Home and Community Life: Ceramics and Glass
Domestic Furnishings
Art
Paperweights
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmah_593909
Additional Online Media:

New England Glass Company Paperweight

view New England Glass Company Paperweight digital asset number 1
Maker:
New England Glass Company
Physical Description:
glass, transparent (overall material)
Measurements:
overall: 2 1/8 in x 2 7/8 in; 5.3975 cm x 7.3025 cm
Object Name:
paperweight
Place made:
United States: Massachusetts, Cambridge
Date made:
1852-1880
Description (Brief):
In the 1700s, paperweights made from textured stone or bronze were part of the writer’s tool kit, which also included a quill pen and stand, inkpot, and blotter. By the mid-1800s, decorative paperweights produced by glassmakers in Europe and the United States became highly desired collectibles.
Decorative glass paperweights reflected the 19th-century taste for intricate, over-the-top designs. Until the spread of textiles colorized with synthetic dyes, ceramics and glass were among the few objects that added brilliant color to a 19th-century Victorian interior. The popularity of these paperweights in the 1800s testifies to the sustained cultural interest in hand craftsmanship during an age of rapid industrialization.
The New England Glass Company in Cambridge, Massachusetts was founded about 1818 by Deming Jarves along with three wealthy businessmen, and probably began producing paperweights by the mid 1850s. In 1888 the business moved to Ohio, under the name Libbey Glass Company.
An upright Dahlia in blue, orange, and yellow above a white latticinio (latticework) ground decorates this New England Glass Company paperweight.
Credit Line:
Aaron and Lillie Straus
ID Number:
CE.60.119
Catalog number:
60.119
Accession number:
211475
See more items in:
Home and Community Life: Ceramics and Glass
Domestic Furnishings
Art
Paperweights
Exhibition:
Wonder Place
Exhibition Location:
National Museum of American History
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmah_596638

New England Glass Company Paperweight

view New England Glass Company Paperweight digital asset number 1
Maker:
New England Glass Company
Physical Description:
glass, transparent (overall material)
Measurements:
overall: 1 3/4 in x 2 27/32 in; 4.445 cm x 7.239 cm
Object Name:
paperweight
Place made:
United States: Massachusetts, Cambridge
Date made:
1850-1878
Description (Brief):
In the 1700s, paperweights made from textured stone or bronze were part of the writer’s tool kit, which also included a quill pen and stand, inkpot, and blotter. By the mid-1800s, decorative paperweights produced by glassmakers in Europe and the United States became highly desired collectibles.
Decorative glass paperweights reflected the 19th-century taste for intricate, over-the-top designs. Until the spread of textiles colorized with synthetic dyes, ceramics and glass were among the few objects that added brilliant color to a 19th-century Victorian interior. The popularity of these paperweights in the 1800s testifies to the sustained cultural interest in hand craftsmanship during an age of rapid industrialization.
The New England Glass Company in Cambridge, Massachusetts was founded about 1818 by Deming Jarves along with three wealthy businessmen, and probably began producing paperweights by the mid 1850s. In 1888 the business moved to Ohio, under the name Libbey Glass Company.
This New England Glass Company paperweight features a single Poinsettia on a latticinio (latticework) ground. Small bubbles in the glass give the appearance of dew drops on the flower.
Location:
Currently not on view
Credit Line:
Mrs. Florence E. Bushee
ID Number:
CE.66.32
Catalog number:
66.32
Accession number:
268356
Collector/donor number:
203
See more items in:
Home and Community Life: Ceramics and Glass
Domestic Furnishings
Art
Paperweights
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmah_596667
Additional Online Media:

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