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Louis Schellbach collection of negatives, photographs and lantern slides, 1922-1930

Creator:
Schellbach, Louis 1887-1971
Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation
Physical description:
16 lantern slides
138 negatives : black and white
106 photographic prints : black and white
Culture:
Northern Inunaina (Arapaho)
Type:
Lantern slides
Collection descriptions
Photographs
Negatives
Photographic prints
Place:
Nevada
Date:
1922
1922-1930
Topic:
Excavations (Archaeology)
Antiquities
Local number:
NMAI.AC.001.017
Notes:
Born in New York in 1887, Louis Schellbach is primarily remembered as the Grand Canyon's chief park naturalist, a position he held from 1941 to 1957. Prior to joining the Grand Canyon staff in 1937, Schellbach worked for the state of Nevada (as state archaeologist), the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation, the Western Museum Laboratory in Berkeley, Aztec Ruins National Monument, and the Department of the Interior Museum. Schellbach died in Tucson, Arizona, in 1971
Summary:
The Schellbach collection consists primarily of negatives, photographs, and lantern slides made from 1924 to 1929 on behalf of the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation by Schellbach. The bulk of the materials depict various Museum excavations in Nevada, particuarly at Pueblo Grande de Nevada (known as Nevada's "Lost City') but also St. Thomas, Virginia City, and Mesa House. Related to this body of work are photographs of exhumed antiquities, etc. from Pueblo Grande. The Museum and the state of Nevada apparently co-sponsored these excavations. The collection also includes photographs Schellbach made in 1922 in Guatemala; in 1929 in Idaho, again on behalf of the Musuem, along the Snake River of both the landscape and various petroglyphs he encountered; and in 1930 of Pinckney's Hummock archaeological site. In addition the collection includes several photographs made by Schellbach on September 23, 1923, of Northern Inunaina (Arapaho) men from the Wind River Reservation visiting the Musuem on their way to London
Cite as:
Louis Schellbach collection of negatives, photographs and lantern slides, 1922-1930. National Museum of the American Indian Archives, Smithsonian Institution (negative, slide or catalog number)
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution National Museum of the American Indian Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

Carl Moon negatives, photographs and other materials, 1900-1925

Creator:
Moon, Carl 1878-1948
Physical description:
14 negatives : black and white
10 photographic prints : black and white
5 photomechanical prints : color
Type:
Portraits
Collection descriptions
Photographs
Photographic prints
Black-and-white negatives
Photomechanical prints
Place:
Arizona
New Mexico
Oklahoma
Date:
1900
1925
1900-1925
Topic:
Navajo Indians
Taos Indians
Laguna Indians
Pueblo Indians
Notes:
Carl Moon (1878-1948) grew up in Wilmington, Ohio, but left the Midwest after a photographic apprenticeship in Cincinnati to open a private studio in Albuquerque. He spent many years traveling and taking pictures among the various tribes of the Southwest, primarily in Arizona, New Mexico and Oklahoma. With his wife Gracie, he also produced several children's books of collected Native American stories and legends, which were illustrated with his photographs, drawings and paintings
Summary:
The photography of Carl Moon documents the people and environment of the Southwest, primarily in Arizona, New Mexico and Oklahoma. American Indian tribes portrayed include the Navajo, the Taos and the Laguna. Images include portraits, outdoor domestic scenes and views of landscape
Cite as:
Carl Moon negatives, photographs and other materials, 1900-1925, National Museum of the American Indian Archives, Smithsonian Institution (negative, slide or catalog number)
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution National Museum of the American Indian Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

[Woodside] [glass negative]: photographic image of Sibley Coslett Smith's plan for this garden

Photographer:
Sears, Thomas Warren 1880-1966
Physical description:
1 glass negative: b&w ; 3 x 5 in
Type:
Glass negatives
Place:
United States of America, New York, Monroe County, Rochester
New York
Rochester
Woodside (Rochester, New York)
Date:
1910
1920
[between 1910 and 1920]
Topic:
Plan views
Gardens
Local number:
NY254001
Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu
Data Source:
Archives of American Gardens
Visitor Tag(s):

[Backus Garden] [glass negative]: photograph of a perspective sketch by Thomas Warren Sears

Landscape architect:
Sears, Thomas Warren 1880-1966
Physical description:
1 glass negative: b&w.; 8 X 10 in
Type:
Glass negatives
Place:
United States of America, Michigan, Wayne County, Grosse Pointe, Grosse Pointe Shores
Michigan
Grosse Pointe Shores
Backus Garden (Grosse Pointe Shores, Michigan)
Date:
1930
1940
[between 1930 and 1940]
Topic:
Perspective drawings
Formal gardens
Houses
Gardens
Local number:
MI024001
Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu
Notes:
An anomaly among the Backus Garden documentation, this is an image of a perspective sketch by Thomas Warren Sears. It shows a sunken garden with a narrow strip of turf/garden borders leading to a fountain with a trellis on either side of it. The garden is surrounded by a brick wall and looks to have some kind of a greenhouse adjoining it, adjacent to the house. This may have been an unrealized proposal for the Grosse Pointe Shores property or a design created for an earlier Backus residence, since "Detroit, Mich." is indicated as the client location
Data Source:
Archives of American Gardens
Visitor Tag(s):

[Sheldon Garden] [photographic negative]: Daylily border

Photographer:
Adams, Molly 1918-2003
Physical description:
1 photographic negative b&w; 120 mm
Type:
Negatives (photographic)
Place:
United States of America, Massachusetts, Suffolk County, Boston
Massachusetts
Boston
Sheldon Garden (Boston, Massachusetts)
Date:
1960
Ca. 1960-1994
Topic:
Daylilies
Shrubs
Garden borders
Ground cover plants
Lawns
Trees
Gardens
Ferns
Local number:
MA334019
Data Source:
Archives of American Gardens
Visitor Tag(s):

A. Hyatt Verrill collection of negatives, photographs and other materials, ca. 1880-1925

Creator:
Verrill, A. Hyatt (Alpheus Hyatt) 1871-1954
Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation
Physical description:
392 negatives : acetate
170 photographic prints
1 glass lantern slide
Culture:
Carib
Patamona
Warao
Arecuna
Akawaio (Acawai)
Akurio (Acuria)
Arawak
Macushi (Macusi)
Waiwai
Taruma
Teribe (Terraba)
Ngäbe (Boorabi)
Coclé Guaymi (Cocle)
Guaymi
Kuna (Cuna)
Emberá (Choikoi)
Sabanero
Type:
Negatives
Collection descriptions
Photographs
Lantern slides
Photographic prints
Place:
Guiana
Panama
Penonomé (Panama)
Date:
1880
1880-1925
ca 1880-1925
Topic:
Indians of South America
Indians of Central America
Antiquities
Local number:
NMAI.AC.001.015
Notes:
Born in 1871 in New Haven, Connecticut, A. Hyatt Verrill was an illustrator, naturalist, explorer, and author of more than 105 books. From 1889 to 1928, he either explored, made ethnological expeditions to, or excavated in Bermuda, the West Indies, Guyana, Panama, Peru, Bolivia, Chile, and Surinam
Summary:
The Verrill collection consists primarily of photographic materials made by Verrill in Guyana and Panama. Dating from 1917 and 1925, the Guyana photographs depict mostly Carib and Patamona but also Warao, Arecuna, Akawaio (Acawai), Akurio (Acuria), Arawak, Macushi (Macusi), Waiwai, and Taruma men and women. These are mostly informal portraits, but the photographs also document dwellings and various activities, such as weaving, spinning, fishing, and canoeing. Included in the Guyana materials are also nineteenth-century (ca. 1880?) albumen prints of portraits of Wapichana (Wapishana), Waiwai, Atorai, and Taruma men and women; Verrill most likely did not make these photographs. The Panama materials date from 1924 and 1925 and are primarily portraits of Teribe (Terraba), Ngäbe (Boorabi), Coclé Guaymi (Cocle), Guaymi, Kuna (Cuna), Emberá (Choikoi), and Sabanero men and women, but the photographs also depict dwellings, ceremonials, and canoes. Among the Panama materials are photographs depicting antiquities from Penonomé. The collection also consists of 1924 photographs of the indigenous peoples of Peru, Bolivia, and Chile and 1925 photographs of the indigenous peoples of Suriname and Peru
Cite as:
A. Hyatt Verrill collection of negatives, photographs and other materials, 1880-1925, National Museum of the American Indian Archives, Smithsonian Institution (negative, slide or catalog number)
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution National Museum of the American Indian Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

S. K. Lothrop collection of negatives, photographs and lantern slides, 1915-1928

Creator:
Lothrop, S. K (Samuel Kirkland) 1892-1965
Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation
Physical description:
18 lantern slides
1144 negatives : acetate
3 photographic prints
Culture:
Tz'utuhil Maya (Tzutuhil/Zutigil)
Quiché Maya (Quiche)
Kaqchikel Maya (Cakchiquel)
Maya (archaeological culture)
Yámana (Yagán/Yahgan)
Selk'nam (Ona)
A:shiwi (Zuni)
Type:
Negatives
Collection descriptions
Photographs
Lantern slides
Photographic prints
Place:
Guatemala
El Salvador
Argentina
South America
Central America
Zuni (N.M.)
Date:
1915
1915-1928
Topic:
Indians of Central America
Fuegians--Social life and customs
Excavations (Archaeology)
Local number:
NMAI.AC.001.010
Notes:
Samuel Kirkland Lothrop was an archaeologist and photographer who extensively traveled and worked throughout Central America and South America. Heye originally hired Lothrop to research native Guatemalan and El Salvadoran textiles and pottery. He subsequently excavated on behalf of the Museum in such places as the Tierra del Fuego. Here he photographed indigenous communities who would not survive the twentieth century as a distinct culture group. In 1923, he also photographed the activities of the Hendricks-Hodge Hawikku Expedition excavations. In addition to the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation, the Peabody Museum and the Carnegie Institute sponsored his research and archaeological work
Summary:
The S.K. Lothrop collection primarily contains negatives, photographic prints, and lantern slides made by Lothrop while employed by the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation. Lothrop traveled on behalf of the Museum to New Mexico, Argentina, Chile, El Salvador, Guatemala, and Peru. The four New Mexico negatives in this collection date from 1915, before Lothrop worked for the Museum, and depict scenes around Zuni. During his 1924 trip to El Salvador, Lothrop photographed volcanos, archaeological sites, antiquities, the landscape, villages, and native peoples engaged in pottery and rope making, food preparation, house building, and ceremonial activities. The 1925 views particularly concentrate on Argentina (but also Chile and Peru). The Argentina materials include views made in the Tierra del Fuego (also part of Chile), including depictions of the daily lives and ceremonial activities of natives peoples of Tierra del Fuego--Selk'nam (Ona) and Yámana (Yagán/Yahgan); the Patagonia landscape; and excavations undertaken by the Museum's La Plata Expedition. The 1928 Guatemala views include depictions of Mayan ruins of Zaculeu and of Tz'utuhil Maya (Tzutuhil/Zutigil), Quiché Maya (Quiche), and Kaqchikel Maya (Cakchiquel) people engaged in weaving, rope making, canoeing, and ceremonial actitivies. The collection also contains photographs made by Lothrop before he worked for the Museum, including 1915 views of effigy mounds in Wisconsin and views at Hopi, Acoma, and Santa Clara; 1917 views of Panama, Honduras, Costa Rica, and El Salvador; and 1918 views of Guatemala, Costa Rica, Puerto Rico, and Nicaragua
Cite as:
S. K. Lothrop collection of negatives, photographs and lantern slides, 1915-1928, National Museum of the American Indian Archives, Smithsonian Institution (negative, slide or catalog number)
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution National Museum of the American Indian Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

Nacoochee Mound excavation collection of negatives, photographs, and other materials, 1915

Creator:
Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation
Heye, George G (George Gustav) 1874-1957
Smithsonian Institution Bureau of American Ethnology
Subject:
Heye, George G (George Gustav) 1874-1957
Heye, Thea
Physical description:
195 negatives : acetate
14 photographic prints
1 slide : color
1 transparency : color
Culture:
Mississippian Tradition (archaeological culture)
Type:
Photographs
Collection descriptions
Photographic prints
Black-and-white negatives
Slides (photographs)
Color transparencies
Place:
Georgia
Nacoochee Valley (Ga.)
Date:
1915
Topic:
Indians of North America--Antiqiuties
Mounds
Excavations (Archaeology)
Antiquities
Local number:
NMAI.AC.001.007
Notes:
In 1915, the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation and the Smithsonian Institution Bureau of American Ethnology collaborated to excavate the Nacoochee Mound, located in the Nacooche Valley along the upper Chattahoochee River in northeast Georgia. One of the earliest scientific excavations of its kind in the state of Georgia, the Nacoochee Mound excavation found evidence of at least two mound stages with a total of seventy-five human burials, some of them intrusive from a later time. George G. Heye, F.W. Hodge, and George H. Pepper's co-authored paper, "The Nacoochee Mound in Georgia," appeared in vol. 4, no. 3 of Contributions from the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation
Although there is also evidence for previous occupation, archaeological evidence at the Nacoochee Mound site and the nearby Eastwood site suggests that these two mound sites probably served as local, primarily administrative, centers during the Middle Lamar Period (approximately late fifteenth to early sixteenth centuries). (particularly Eastwood) The village around Nacoochee Mound has not been excavated but is possibly the site of Nacoochee or Chota, two Cherokee villages documented by Colonel George Chicken's 1715 expedition. These two towns continued to appear on maps until the mid-eighteenth century but were abandoned shortly thereafter
Summary:
The Nacoochee Mound excavation collection consists of negatives, photographs, slides and transparencies related to the joint effort of the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation and the Smithsonian Institution Bureau of American Ethnology to excavate the mound in the summer of 1915. The photographic materials primarily depict the mound photographed from various directions before and during excavation, but also objects and antiquities exhumed from the mound and members of the field team posed singly and as a group on the mound site, including George G. Heye and his wife Thea Heye. Some of the photographs are attributed to Heye, but the creator of the majority of photographs is unknown
Cite as:
Nacoochee Mound excavation negatives, photographs and other materials, 1915, National Museum of the American Indian Archives, Smithsonian Institution (negative, slide or catalog number)
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution National Museum of the American Indian Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

[Miles Garden] [safety film negative and photographic print]: Buddha sculpture

Photographer:
Adams, Molly 1918-2003
Physical description:
1 safety film negative: b&w ; 120 mm
1 photographic print: b&w ; 8 x 10 in
Type:
Photographic prints
Safety film negatives
Place:
United States of America, Connecticut, Fairfield County, Weston
Connecticut
Weston
Miles Garden (Weston, Connecticut)
Date:
1964
Ca. 1964
Topic:
Japanese gardens
Trees
Rocks
Shrubs
Evergreens
Ferns
Sculpture
Buddhas
Gardens
Local number:
CT317012
Data Source:
Archives of American Gardens
Visitor Tag(s):

[Miles Garden] [safety film negative and photographic print]: bamboo-roofed gatehouse

Photographer:
Adams, Molly 1918-2003
Physical description:
1 safety film negative: b&w ; 4 x 5 in
1 photographic print: b&w; 8 x 10 in
Type:
Photographic prints
Safety film negatives
Place:
United States of America, Connecticut, Fairfield County, Weston
Connecticut
Weston
Miles Garden (Weston, Connecticut)
Date:
1964
Ca. 1964
Topic:
Japanese gardens
Trees
Rocks
Gravel
Shrubs
Evergreens
Walkways, stone
Gatehouses
Bamboo
Gardens
Local number:
CT317003
Data Source:
Archives of American Gardens
Visitor Tag(s):

[Buttonbrook] [contact print, safety film negative. and photographic print]: driveway

Photographer:
Adams, Molly 1918-2003
Physical description:
1 contact print: b&w ; 2 x 2 in
1 safety film negative: b&w ; 120 mm
1 photographic print: b&w ; 7 x 8.5 in
Type:
Contact prints
Safety film negatives
Photographic prints
Place:
United States of America, New Jersey, Somerset County, Far Hills
New Jersey
Far Hills
Buttonbrook (Far Hills, New Jersey)
Date:
1960
1967
[between 1960 and 1967]
Topic:
Trees
Shrubs
Lawns
Driveways, gravel
Edging, brick
Fences--wooden
Garages
Gardens
Local number:
NJ108102
Data Source:
Archives of American Gardens
Visitor Tag(s):

Victor Schindler photographs and negatives, 1923

Creator:
Schindler, Victor
Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation
Physical description:
4 negatives : acetate
29 prints : albumen
Type:
Photographs
Collection descriptions
Photographic prints
Albumen prints
Negatives
Place:
Hawikuh (N. M.)
New Mexico
Date:
1912
1923
Topic:
Zuni Indians
Local number:
NMAI.AC.001.011
Notes:
Victor Schindler was an anthropologist who participated in Hendricks-Hodge Expedition, which conducted archaeological excavations of the Zuni village of Hawikku (New Mexico) from 1917-1923 and was sponsored by the Museum of the American Indian/Heye Foundation
Summary:
The Schindler photographs and negatives contain views of the ruins at Hawikku and the surrounding environs near Zuni Pueblo (New Mexico), as well as Rain Dance images
Cite as:
Victor Schindler photographs and negatives, 1923, National Museum of the American Indian Archives, Smithsonian Institution (negative, slide or catalog number)
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution National Museum of the American Indian Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

Edwin F. Coffin collection of negatives and photographs, 1918-1932

Creator:
Coffin, Edwin F. (Edwin Francis) b. 1883
Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation
Subject:
Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation
Physical description:
93 negatives : acetate
Type:
Photographs
Collection descriptions
Photographic prints
Negatives
Place:
Texas
New Jersey
New York (State)
Date:
1918
1918-1932
Topic:
Excavations (Archaeology)
Local number:
NMAI.AC.001.009
Notes:
Around 1922, George G. Heye hired former racecar driver Edwin F. Coffin to be the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation's first official staff photographer, a position he retained until 1932. Coffin was a capable archaeological photographer--in 1918, 1921, and 1923, he also photographed the activities of the Hendricks-Hodge Hawikku Expedition excavations--and eventually conducted fieldwork in Texas
Summary:
The Edwin F. Coffin collection consists of photographs made by Coffin on behalf of the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation. Aside from a number of views of New York real estate owned by the Museum (1924), the remainder of the collection contains Museum of the American Indian excavation photographs made in the Bee Cave Canyon rockshelter in Brewster County, Texas (1929); in the Burson Bell Farm in Montague, New Jersey (1932); and in the Bronx and on Staten Island, New York City (1918 and 1922 respectively)
Cite as:
Edwin F. Coffin collection of negatives and photographs, 1918-1932, National Museum of the American Indian Archives, Smithsonian Institution (negative, slide or catalog number)
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution National Museum of the American Indian Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

Ephraim George Squier collection of negatives and photographs, circa 1862-1868

Creator:
Squier, E. G (Ephraim George) 1821-1888
Physical description:
312 negatives : black and white
3 photographic prints : black and white
Culture:
Central Andes
Inka (Inca) (archaeological)
Colonial Inka (Inca)
Chimú (archaeological culture)
Type:
Black-and-white negatives
Collection descriptions
Photographs
Photographic prints
Stereoscopic photographs
Place:
Peru
Date:
1862
circa 1862-1868
Topic:
Incas--Antiquities
Antiquities
Local number:
NMAI.AC.041
Notes:
Ephraim George Squier (1821-1888) was born Bethlehem, New York, and as a young man pursued several career paths until he settled on archaeology in about 1847. This interest led to the publication of the 1848 Ancient Monuments of the Mississippi Valley, which he co-authored with Edwin H. Davis and represents the Smithsonian Institution's first official publication. His fascination with the antiquities of the Western Hemisphere encouraged him to secure political posts in Central and South America that would allow him to pursue these interests. From 1846 to 1869, Squier worked in various diplomatic positions throughout Latin America, and it was then that he undertook archaeological and ethnological field work. Originally appointed by President Lincoln, from 1862 to 1868, Squier was the United States Commissioner to Peru. His studies and travels produced another extremely popular book, Peru: Incidents of Travel and Exploration in the Land of the Incas (1877). Several of the photographs in the NMAI's collection appear as (slightly altered) illustrations in this book. Squier's papers and the original photographs from his negatives are housed at the Tulane University Library. Squier died in Brooklyn, New York, in 1888
Summary:
The Squier collection consists primarily of glass plate negatives made by Squier in the Central Andes region of Peru from 1862 to 1868 while he served as the United States Commissioner to Peru. A few of the negatives measure 6.5 x 8.5 inches but the overwhelming majority of them are stereoscopic. Each stereoscopic negative has a notation in Squier's hand etched into the emulsion. The bulk of these Squier made in Cusco and the Cusco region and include depictions of colonial and archaeological Inka (Inca) architecture and antiquities, and Spanish architecture. The negatives he made in Lima and Lima Province, and the Trujillo, Ancash, Puno, Ayacucho, and Arequipa regions also depict Inka or Central Andres (which includes Chimú) antiquities and Inka colonial architecture. In addition, there are representations of objects, contemporary streets scenes and village scenes, and a few negatives made in Bolivia. The few prints in the collection are copy photographs made of Squier's drawings
Cite as:
Ephraim George Squier collection of negatives and prints, circa 1862-1868, National Museum of the American Indian Archives, Smithsonian Institution (negative, slide or catalog number)
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution National Museum of the American Indian Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

T. T. Waterman collection of negatives and photographs, 1921-1924

Creator:
Waterman, T. T (Thomas Talbot) b. 1885
Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation
Physical description:
12 negatives : black and white
12 photographic prints : black and white
Culture:
Tolowa
Haida [Kasaan]
Southern Coast Salish
Duwamish (Dwamish)
Type:
Black-and-white negatives
Collection descriptions
Photographs
Photographic prints
Place:
Washington (State)
Alaska
California
Date:
1921
1921-1924
Topic:
Indians of North America
Haida Indians--Dwellings
Tolowa Indians--Fishing
Local number:
NMAI.AC.001.021
Notes:
Born in Hamilton, Missouri, in 1885, Thomas Talbot Waterman grew up in Calfornia and was expected, like his father, to become an Episcopalian clergyman. After taking courses in phonetics and fieldwork with P.E. Goddard, Waterman instead chose to study anthropology and in 1913 received his Ph.D in anthropology at Columbia University under the direction of Franz Boas. From 1907 to 1921, he held both teaching and curatorial positions at the University of California and the University of Washington and from 1921 to 1922 briefly joined the staff of the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation as a field collector. Waterman went on to hold positions at the National Museum of Guatemala, Fresno State College, University of Arizona, Territorial Normal College (Hawaii), and University of Hawaii. He is best known for bringing Ishi, the last surviving member of the Yahi people, from the town of Oroville, California, to the University of California Museum of Anthropology. Waterman died in Honolulu at the age of 50
Summary:
The Waterman collection consists of photographic materials made by Waterman from 1921 to 1924 in California, Alaska, Washington State, and Guatemala. He made the bulk of the materials on behalf of the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation while working in 1921 in California among the Tolowa and in Washington State among the Southern Coast Salish and Duwamish (Dwamish) and in 1922 in Alaska at Kasaan (Haida) village. Of particular note are the series of photographs of a Tolowa fisherman. The few remaining photographs date from 1923 and 1924 and depict Quiché Maya (Quiche) Indians in the Quetzaltenango Guatemalan highlands and an illustration from Waterman's contribution to the 1924 Annual Report of the Smithsonian Institution
Cite as:
T. T. Waterman collection of negatives and photographs, 1921-1924, National Museum of the American Indian Archives, Smithsonian Institution (negative, slide or print number)
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution National Museum of the American Indian Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

Theodoor de Booy negatives and photographs collection, 1912-1918

Creator:
Booy, Theodoor Hendrik Nikolaas de 1882-1919
Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation
Subject:
Booy, Theodoor Hendrik Nikolaas de 1882-1919
Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation
Physical description:
824 negatives : acetate, glass plate
2 photographic prints
Culture:
Indians of the West Indies
Type:
Negatives
Collection descriptions
Photographs
Photographic prints
Place:
West Indies
Date:
1915
1915-1917
1912-1918
Topic:
Indians of the West Indies--Social life and customs
Indians of the West Indies--Antiquities
Excavations (Archaeology)
Antiquities
Local number:
NMAI.AC.006
Notes:
Theodoor de Booy was born in 1882 in Hellevoetsluis, Netherlands. The son of a vice-admiral, he received his education from the Royal Naval Institute of Holland; in 1906, at the age of 24, he immigrated to the United States. During a 1911 trip to the Bahamas, he explored several caves and mounds and, based on his discoveries, published an article in the American Anthropologist entitled "Lucayan Remains on the Caicos Islands." This trip affirmed his interest in antiquities, and in 1912 he accepted one of the first positions on George Gustav Heye's "scientific staff," who were charged with collecting American Indian specimens throughout the Western Hemisphere for the Museum of the American Indian collections. De Booy's appointment was as field explorer for the West Indies. From 1912 to 1918, as an employee of the Museum, de Booy conducted archaeological expeditions to and excavations in the Bahamas, Jamaica, Santo Domingo, Cuba, Venezuela, and in Trinidad. After 1918, de Booy worked for a short time at the University of Pennsylvania Museum and then joined the State Department Inquiry as a specialist for South America. A casualty of the influenza epidemic of 1918-1919, de Booy died in Yonkers, New York, at the age of 37
Summary:
The Theodoor de Booy collection consists of photographic negatives and prints made by de Booy from 1912 to 1918. The materials largely relate to various archaeological expeditions undertaken by de Booy on behalf of the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation to such places as the Bahamas, Jamaica, Dominican Republic's Island of Saona, Cuba, Venezuela's Island of Margarita, and Trinidad. The West Indies views represent excavation sites, archaeological activities, and antiquities presumably felt to be related to the Indians of the West Indies. In addition are city street scenes, landscapes, and seascapes; plantations; native peoples and their dwellings, social customs, and agricultural practices; and U.S. military activities in the region as well as a few negatives made in New York at the Museum of the American Indian
Cite as:
Theodoor de Booy negatives and photographs collection, 1912-1918, National Museum of the American Indian Archives, Smithsonian Institution (negative, slide or catalog number)
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution National Museum of the American Indian Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

Joseph W. Keppler collection of negatives and photographs, 1870-1947

Creator:
Keppler, Udo J. 1872-1956
Fly, C. S (Camillus Sidney) 1849-1901
Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation
Physical description:
129 negatives : black and white
79 photographic prints : black and white
Culture:
Seneca
Cayuga
Oneida
Onondaga
Tuscarora
Kiowa
Chiricahua Apache
Type:
Black-and-white negatives
Collection descriptions
Photographs
Photographic prints
Place:
Cattaraugus Indian Reservation (N.Y.)
Date:
1870
1870-1947
Topic:
Seneca Indians
Local number:
NMAI.AC.001.016
Notes:
Born Udo J. Keppler, Joseph W. Keppler (1872-1956), or "Kep," was the son of Joseph Keppler, the great political cartoonist and founder and publisher of the popular and highly influential magazine, Puck. The younger Keppler was born in St. Louis, Missouri and educated in Munich, Germany and New York City. Like his father, he too was a political cartoonist. He became the art director at Puck and, when his father died in 1894, took over as publisher. Joseph W. Keppler ran the magazine until he sold it in 1914. The younger Keppler's two great interests in life were said to be Puck and American Indians. Evidently, Keppler's deep interest in Indians and Indian affairs developed out of his desire to collect Indian objects and his friendship with Mrs. Harriet Maxwell Converse, an early advocate for Native rights. Through Converse, Keppler built friendships with Iroquois living on reservations in New York State and Canada, but especially with Senecas living on the Cattaraugus and Tonawanda reservations in New York. At Converse's funeral in 1903, the 31-year-old Keppler was adopted by the Seneca Nation and made a member of the Wolf Clan. Like Converse, Keppler served as an advocate for Senecas. Most importantly, he worked to help defeat or modify plans to allot Iroquois reservations in New York State. Keppler became a major collector of American Indian objects and his passion to collect led to an association with George G. Heye. In 1901, Heye apparently accompanied Keppler to the Seneca and Cattaraugus Reservations; this trip might have been Heye's first to a Native community. From 1927 to 1942, Keppler served on the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation board of trustrees and for a time was also the Museum's vice president. In 1944, Keppler and his (second) wife Vera left New York and moved to California. Keppler died in La Jolla, California, at the age of 84
Summary:
The Keppler collection consists primarily of informal portraits of Seneca men and women made in 1900, 1904, 1905, 1908 and 1910. Keppler made most of these photographs on the Cattaraugus Reservation (including a photograph of Edward Cornplanter's Indian and Minstrel show) but also on the Tonawanda, Onondaga, and Allegany Reservations. Aside from the portraits, the photographs depict Seneca dwellings and ceremonials. Also by Keppler is a group of photographs depicting Seneca and Cayuga athletes playing lacrosse and standing for a group portrait. These he made in 1902 at the Crescent Athletic Club in New York City. In New York State, he also photographed Oneida, Onondaga, and Tuscarora individuals. The collection includes several potraits of Keppler and approximately 15 photographs dated ca. 1937 of the interior of Keppler's home. The latter showcase Keppler's American Indian object collection. He also made portraits of Native sitters in his home. There are several photographs in the collection that Keppler did not make. Among them is an 1886 print by Camillus S. Fly entitled "Council between General Crook and Geronimo," and studio portrait made before 1870 of a group of Kiowa sitters, including Lone Wolf and his wife, and full-length studio portrait of a Shoshone or Bannock man dating ca. 1870. Some of the negatives are later copy negatives
Cite as:
Joseph W. Keppler collection of negatives and photographs, 1870-1947, National Museum of the American Indian Archives, Smithsonian Institution (negative, slide or catalog number)
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution National Museum of the American Indian Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

Odd Halseth collection of negatives and photographs, 1920-1925

Creator:
Halseth, Odd S
Physical description:
158 negatives : black and white
4 photographic print : black and white
Culture:
Akimel O'odham (Pima)
K'apovi (Santa Clara Pueblo)
Diné (Navajo)
Zia Pueblo
Piipaash (Maricopa)
San Ildefonso Pueblo
Jemez Pueblo
Cochiti Pueblo
Kewa (Santo Domingo Pueblo)
Puye Pueblo
Yoeme (Yaqui) [Pascua Yaqui]
Tesuque Pueblo
Type:
Black-and-white negatives
Collection descriptions
Photographs
Photographic prints
Place:
Arizona
New Mexico
Date:
1920
1920-1925
Topic:
Indians of North America
Local number:
NMAI.AC.038
Notes:
Born in 1893 in Moss, Norway, Halseth was an anthropologist, museum director, educator, author, art critic, and lecturer. As a young man he studied electrical engineering and anthropology in Germany and served both Norway and the United States during World War I. While in San Diego for military training, he met archaeologist Edgar L. Hewett and after the war accepted a position with Hewett as the curator of art at the San Diego Museum. In 1923, he moved to Santa Fe, where he was on both the staff of the School of American Research and the Museum of New Mexico. After four years, Halseth was appointed director of the newly established Arizona Museum in Phoenix and in 1929 initiated the excavation of the Pueblo Grande Indian ruins and founded the Pueblo Grande Museum. Halseth was also Phoenix's head archaeologist and superintendent of the city's Division of Archaeology. Active in his field, Halseth was a fellow of the American Anthropological Association, a member of the Society of American Archaeology, and the author of numerous publications on Arizona archaeology and indigenous arts and crafts. He retired in 1960
Summary:
The collection consists of negatives and photographs made by Halseth from 1920 to 1925 in Arizona and New Mexico. The materials are primarily informal, outdoor group and individual portraits of Akimel O'odham (Pima), Diné (Navajo), Yoeme (Yaqui) [Pascua Yaqui], Piipaash (Maricopa), K'apovi (Santa Clara Pueblo), Zia Pueblo, San Ildefonso Pueblo, Jemez Pueblo, Cochiti Pueblo, Kewa (Santo Domingo Pueblo), and Tesuque Pueblo men, women, and children. In addition among the Akimel O'odham photographs are depictions of dwellings, potters, ladle makers, baskets, the construction of an oven, food preparation, dwellings, and mattress factory wokers; among the K'apovi ceremonials and village views; among the Zia pottery and portraits of and paintings by Velino Shije Herrera; among the Jemez ceremonials and village views; among Kewa ovens; and among San Ildefonso village views and paintings by Awa Tsireh. The collection also includes photogrpahs depicting the pictographs at Puye
Cite as:
Odd Halseth collection of negatives and photographs, 1920-1925, National Museum of the American Indian Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution National Museum of the American Indian Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

Jesse L. Nusbaum negatives and photographs, 1910-1928

Creator:
Nusbaum, Jesse L (Jesse Logan)
Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation
Physical description:
205 negatives : acetate
25 photographic prints : albumen
Type:
Negatives
Collection descriptions
Albumen prints
Photographs
Photographic prints
Place:
Puye (N.M.)
Zuni (N.M.)
Jemez Pueblo (N.M.)
Pecos National Historical Park (N.M.)
Santa Clara Pueblo (N.M.)
Hawikuh (N. M.)
Utah
New Mexico
Arizona
Date:
1910
1910-1928
Local number:
NMAI.AC.001.012
Notes:
Jesse L. Nusbaum, a long-time archaeologist and administrator for the National Park Service and recipient of the Distinguished Service ward from the Department of the Interior (1954), began his career as a teacher, attending Colorado Teachers College in Greeley, where he received his Bachelor of Pedagogy in 1907. He then moved to Las Vegas to teach science and manual arts at New Mexico State Normal School. Later that year, he made his first connection with Mesa Verde as a photographer and archeological assistant to A. V. Kidder; Nusbaum spent the next year working as an assistant to the archeologist. In June of 1909 he became the first employee of the School of American Archeology and Museum of New Mexico in Santa Fe under Dr. Edgar L. Hewett. Nusbaum traveled to Guatemala, Honduras, Mexico, Colorado, and New Mexico where he undertook archeological surveys, investigations, excavations, and ruins stabilization
Nusbaum's work at the museum brought him back to Mesa Verde for the excavation, repair, and stabilization of the Balcony House, a project which extended into the winter of 1910. In 1913, he supervised the completion of the New Mexico Palace of Governors in Santa Fe and worked in the Mayan ruins of the Yucatan with Dr. S. G. Morley. He then supervised the construction of the state art museum from 1916 to 1918. Nusbaum enlisted during World War I in the hopes of becoming an aviator, but instead he became an engineer and served in France until his discharge in 1919. After the war, Nusbaum moved to New York City and worked at the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation. While Nusbaum was working in New York he took part in several expeditions to the Southwest, including those at Hawikku (Hawikuh) Pueblo and Basketmaker Cave
In 1921, while still in New York, he was selected by Stephen Mather and Arno Cammerer to become superintendent at Mesa Verde National Park. Director Mather had become disgusted with the conditions that had developed there under a political superintendent. Nusbaum was a very effective superintendent, advancing the development of the park and preserving the archeological resources. He discontinued grazing, built a museum and developed good interpretive programs, especially ones designed to explain the Antiquities Act. His involvement with the Act led to his designation in 1927 as the lead archeologist and prime enforcer of the Act for the Southwest (while remaining Mesa Verde superintendent)
Nusbaum continued this dual capacity until 1930, when he took a leave of absence to organize and direct the Laboratory of Anthropology at Santa Fe, New Mexico. He continued as director of the laboratory until 1935, having earlier returned to the Park Service and resumed his dual duties as Mesa Verde superintendent and Department of the Interior archeologist enforcing the Antiquities Act. Nusbaum continued this dual position for many years. In 1946 he left Mesa Verde and his dual role for Santa Fe. At the National Park Service office there, he took up increased duties as the senior archeologist of the National Park Service. In this capacity, Nusbaum began one of the first salvage archeology projects when he persuaded El Paso Natural Gas Company to allow archeological excavation along their pipelines. After a year's extension Nusbaum was forced to retire from the NPS at the age of 71 in 1957. However, he continued to do consulting work for many years. He died in Santa Fe in December 1975, at the age of 88
Summary:
Includes images from the excavations at Hawikku near Zuni Pueblo and Basketmaker's Cave in Kane County, Utah, as well as objects found at Cave Lakes, also in Kane County, Utah. Also included are views of Zuni Pueblo, Santa Clara Pueblo, Jemez Pueblo, Puye cliff dwellings, Pecos Mission and other views of Arizona and New Mexico
Cite as:
Jesse L. Nusbaum negatives and photographs, 1910-1928, National Museum of the American Indian Archives, Smithsonian Institution (negative, slide or catalog number)
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution National Museum of the American Indian Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

[Miscellaneous Images in Virginia] [glass negative]: photograph of a painting (?) of the Madonna and Child

Physical description:
1 glass negative: b&w ; 6 x 8 in
Type:
Glass negatives
Place:
United States of America, Virginia
Date:
1890
1900
[between 1890 and 1900]
Topic:
Painting
Christian art and symbolism
Local number:
VA159051
Data Source:
Archives of American Gardens
Visitor Tag(s):

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