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A. Hyatt Verrill collection of negatives, photographs and other materials, ca. 1880-1925

Creator:
Verrill, A. Hyatt (Alpheus Hyatt) 1871-1954
Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation
Physical description:
392 negatives : acetate
170 photographic prints
1 glass lantern slide
Culture:
Carib
Patamona
Warao
Arecuna
Akawaio (Acawai)
Akurio (Acuria)
Arawak
Macushi (Macusi)
Waiwai
Taruma
Teribe (Terraba)
Ngäbe (Boorabi)
Coclé Guaymi (Cocle)
Guaymi
Kuna (Cuna)
Emberá (Choikoi)
Sabanero
Type:
Negatives
Collection descriptions
Photographs
Lantern slides
Photographic prints
Place:
Guiana
Panama
Penonomé (Panama)
Date:
1880
1880-1925
ca 1880-1925
Topic:
Indians of South America
Indians of Central America
Antiquities
Local number:
NMAI.AC.001.015
Notes:
Born in 1871 in New Haven, Connecticut, A. Hyatt Verrill was an illustrator, naturalist, explorer, and author of more than 105 books. From 1889 to 1928, he either explored, made ethnological expeditions to, or excavated in Bermuda, the West Indies, Guyana, Panama, Peru, Bolivia, Chile, and Surinam.
Summary:
The Verrill collection consists primarily of photographic materials made by Verrill in Guyana and Panama. Dating from 1917 and 1925, the Guyana photographs depict mostly Carib and Patamona but also Warao, Arecuna, Akawaio (Acawai), Akurio (Acuria), Arawak, Macushi (Macusi), Waiwai, and Taruma men and women. These are mostly informal portraits, but the photographs also document dwellings and various activities, such as weaving, spinning, fishing, and canoeing. Included in the Guyana materials are also nineteenth-century (ca. 1880?) albumen prints of portraits of Wapichana (Wapishana), Waiwai, Atorai, and Taruma men and women; Verrill most likely did not make these photographs. The Panama materials date from 1924 and 1925 and are primarily portraits of Teribe (Terraba), Ngäbe (Boorabi), Coclé Guaymi (Cocle), Guaymi, Kuna (Cuna), Emberá (Choikoi), and Sabanero men and women, but the photographs also depict dwellings, ceremonials, and canoes. Among the Panama materials are photographs depicting antiquities from Penonomé. The collection also consists of 1924 photographs of the indigenous peoples of Peru, Bolivia, and Chile and 1925 photographs of the indigenous peoples of Suriname and Peru.
Cite as:
A. Hyatt Verrill collection of negatives, photographs and other materials, 1880-1925, National Museum of the American Indian Archives, Smithsonian Institution (negative, slide or catalog number)
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution National Museum of the American Indian Archives
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S. K. Lothrop collection of negatives, photographs and lantern slides, 1915-1928

Creator:
Lothrop, S. K (Samuel Kirkland) 1892-1965
Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation
Physical description:
18 lantern slides
1144 negatives : acetate
3 photographic prints
Culture:
Tz'utuhil Maya (Tzutuhil/Zutigil)
Quiché Maya (Quiche)
Kaqchikel Maya (Cakchiquel)
Maya (archaeological culture)
Yámana (Yagán/Yahgan)
Selk'nam (Ona)
A:shiwi (Zuni)
Type:
Negatives
Collection descriptions
Photographs
Lantern slides
Photographic prints
Place:
Guatemala
El Salvador
Argentina
South America
Central America
Zuni (N.M.)
Date:
1915
1915-1928
Topic:
Indians of Central America
Fuegians--Social life and customs
Excavations (Archaeology)
Local number:
NMAI.AC.001.010
Notes:
Samuel Kirkland Lothrop was an archaeologist and photographer who extensively traveled and worked throughout Central America and South America. Heye originally hired Lothrop to research native Guatemalan and El Salvadoran textiles and pottery. He subsequently excavated on behalf of the Museum in such places as the Tierra del Fuego. Here he photographed indigenous communities who would not survive the twentieth century as a distinct culture group. In 1923, he also photographed the activities of the Hendricks-Hodge Hawikku Expedition excavations. In addition to the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation, the Peabody Museum and the Carnegie Institute sponsored his research and archaeological work.
Summary:
The S.K. Lothrop collection primarily contains negatives, photographic prints, and lantern slides made by Lothrop while employed by the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation. Lothrop traveled on behalf of the Museum to New Mexico, Argentina, Chile, El Salvador, Guatemala, and Peru. The four New Mexico negatives in this collection date from 1915, before Lothrop worked for the Museum, and depict scenes around Zuni. During his 1924 trip to El Salvador, Lothrop photographed volcanos, archaeological sites, antiquities, the landscape, villages, and native peoples engaged in pottery and rope making, food preparation, house building, and ceremonial activities. The 1925 views particularly concentrate on Argentina (but also Chile and Peru). The Argentina materials include views made in the Tierra del Fuego (also part of Chile), including depictions of the daily lives and ceremonial activities of natives peoples of Tierra del Fuego--Selk'nam (Ona) and Yámana (Yagán/Yahgan); the Patagonia landscape; and excavations undertaken by the Museum's La Plata Expedition. The 1928 Guatemala views include depictions of Mayan ruins of Zaculeu and of Tz'utuhil Maya (Tzutuhil/Zutigil), Quiché Maya (Quiche), and Kaqchikel Maya (Cakchiquel) people engaged in weaving, rope making, canoeing, and ceremonial actitivies. The collection also contains photographs made by Lothrop before he worked for the Museum, including 1915 views of effigy mounds in Wisconsin and views at Hopi, Acoma, and Santa Clara; 1917 views of Panama, Honduras, Costa Rica, and El Salvador; and 1918 views of Guatemala, Costa Rica, Puerto Rico, and Nicaragua.
Cite as:
S. K. Lothrop collection of negatives, photographs and lantern slides, 1915-1928, National Museum of the American Indian Archives, Smithsonian Institution (negative, slide or catalog number)
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution National Museum of the American Indian Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

Ephraim George Squier collection of negatives and photographs, circa 1862-1868

Creator:
Squier, E. G (Ephraim George) 1821-1888
Physical description:
312 negatives : black and white
3 photographic prints : black and white
Culture:
Central Andes
Inka (Inca) (archaeological)
Colonial Inka (Inca)
Chimú (archaeological culture)
Type:
Black-and-white negatives
Collection descriptions
Photographs
Photographic prints
Stereoscopic photographs
Place:
Peru
Date:
1862
circa 1862-1868
Topic:
Incas--Antiquities
Antiquities
Local number:
NMAI.AC.041
Notes:
Ephraim George Squier (1821-1888) was born Bethlehem, New York, and as a young man pursued several career paths until he settled on archaeology in about 1847. This interest led to the publication of the 1848 Ancient Monuments of the Mississippi Valley, which he co-authored with Edwin H. Davis and represents the Smithsonian Institution's first official publication. His fascination with the antiquities of the Western Hemisphere encouraged him to secure political posts in Central and South America that would allow him to pursue these interests. From 1846 to 1869, Squier worked in various diplomatic positions throughout Latin America, and it was then that he undertook archaeological and ethnological field work. Originally appointed by President Lincoln, from 1862 to 1868, Squier was the United States Commissioner to Peru. His studies and travels produced another extremely popular book, Peru: Incidents of Travel and Exploration in the Land of the Incas (1877). Several of the photographs in the NMAI's collection appear as (slightly altered) illustrations in this book. Squier's papers and the original photographs from his negatives are housed at the Tulane University Library. Squier died in Brooklyn, New York, in 1888.
Summary:
The Squier collection consists primarily of glass plate negatives made by Squier in the Central Andes region of Peru from 1862 to 1868 while he served as the United States Commissioner to Peru. A few of the negatives measure 6.5 x 8.5 inches but the overwhelming majority of them are stereoscopic. Each stereoscopic negative has a notation in Squier's hand etched into the emulsion. The bulk of these Squier made in Cusco and the Cusco region and include depictions of colonial and archaeological Inka (Inca) architecture and antiquities, and Spanish architecture. The negatives he made in Lima and Lima Province, and the Trujillo, Ancash, Puno, Ayacucho, and Arequipa regions also depict Inka or Central Andres (which includes Chimú) antiquities and Inka colonial architecture. In addition, there are representations of objects, contemporary streets scenes and village scenes, and a few negatives made in Bolivia. The few prints in the collection are copy photographs made of Squier's drawings.
Cite as:
Ephraim George Squier collection of negatives and prints, circa 1862-1868, National Museum of the American Indian Archives, Smithsonian Institution (negative, slide or catalog number)
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution National Museum of the American Indian Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

T. T. Waterman collection of negatives and photographs, 1921-1924

Creator:
Waterman, T. T (Thomas Talbot) b. 1885
Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation
Physical description:
12 negatives : black and white
12 photographic prints : black and white
Culture:
Tolowa
Haida [Kasaan]
Southern Coast Salish
Duwamish (Dwamish)
Type:
Black-and-white negatives
Collection descriptions
Photographs
Photographic prints
Place:
Washington (State)
Alaska
California
Date:
1921
1921-1924
Topic:
Indians of North America
Haida Indians--Dwellings
Tolowa Indians--Fishing
Local number:
NMAI.AC.001.021
Notes:
Born in Hamilton, Missouri, in 1885, Thomas Talbot Waterman grew up in Calfornia and was expected, like his father, to become an Episcopalian clergyman. After taking courses in phonetics and fieldwork with P.E. Goddard, Waterman instead chose to study anthropology and in 1913 received his Ph.D in anthropology at Columbia University under the direction of Franz Boas. From 1907 to 1921, he held both teaching and curatorial positions at the University of California and the University of Washington and from 1921 to 1922 briefly joined the staff of the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation as a field collector. Waterman went on to hold positions at the National Museum of Guatemala, Fresno State College, University of Arizona, Territorial Normal College (Hawaii), and University of Hawaii. He is best known for bringing Ishi, the last surviving member of the Yahi people, from the town of Oroville, California, to the University of California Museum of Anthropology. Waterman died in Honolulu at the age of 50.
Summary:
The Waterman collection consists of photographic materials made by Waterman from 1921 to 1924 in California, Alaska, Washington State, and Guatemala. He made the bulk of the materials on behalf of the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation while working in 1921 in California among the Tolowa and in Washington State among the Southern Coast Salish and Duwamish (Dwamish) and in 1922 in Alaska at Kasaan (Haida) village. Of particular note are the series of photographs of a Tolowa fisherman. The few remaining photographs date from 1923 and 1924 and depict Quiché Maya (Quiche) Indians in the Quetzaltenango Guatemalan highlands and an illustration from Waterman's contribution to the 1924 Annual Report of the Smithsonian Institution.
Cite as:
T. T. Waterman collection of negatives and photographs, 1921-1924, National Museum of the American Indian Archives, Smithsonian Institution (negative, slide or print number)
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution National Museum of the American Indian Archives
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Odd Halseth collection of negatives and photographs, 1920-1925

Creator:
Halseth, Odd S
Physical description:
158 negatives : black and white
4 photographic print : black and white
Culture:
Akimel O'odham (Pima)
K'apovi (Santa Clara Pueblo)
Diné (Navajo)
Zia Pueblo
Piipaash (Maricopa)
San Ildefonso Pueblo
Jemez Pueblo
Cochiti Pueblo
Kewa (Santo Domingo Pueblo)
Puye Pueblo
Yoeme (Yaqui) [Pascua Yaqui]
Tesuque Pueblo
Type:
Black-and-white negatives
Collection descriptions
Photographs
Photographic prints
Place:
Arizona
New Mexico
Date:
1920
1920-1925
Topic:
Indians of North America
Local number:
NMAI.AC.038
Notes:
Born in 1893 in Moss, Norway, Halseth was an anthropologist, museum director, educator, author, art critic, and lecturer. As a young man he studied electrical engineering and anthropology in Germany and served both Norway and the United States during World War I. While in San Diego for military training, he met archaeologist Edgar L. Hewett and after the war accepted a position with Hewett as the curator of art at the San Diego Museum. In 1923, he moved to Santa Fe, where he was on both the staff of the School of American Research and the Museum of New Mexico. After four years, Halseth was appointed director of the newly established Arizona Museum in Phoenix and in 1929 initiated the excavation of the Pueblo Grande Indian ruins and founded the Pueblo Grande Museum. Halseth was also Phoenix's head archaeologist and superintendent of the city's Division of Archaeology. Active in his field, Halseth was a fellow of the American Anthropological Association, a member of the Society of American Archaeology, and the author of numerous publications on Arizona archaeology and indigenous arts and crafts. He retired in 1960.
Summary:
The collection consists of negatives and photographs made by Halseth from 1920 to 1925 in Arizona and New Mexico. The materials are primarily informal, outdoor group and individual portraits of Akimel O'odham (Pima), Diné (Navajo), Yoeme (Yaqui) [Pascua Yaqui], Piipaash (Maricopa), K'apovi (Santa Clara Pueblo), Zia Pueblo, San Ildefonso Pueblo, Jemez Pueblo, Cochiti Pueblo, Kewa (Santo Domingo Pueblo), and Tesuque Pueblo men, women, and children. In addition among the Akimel O'odham photographs are depictions of dwellings, potters, ladle makers, baskets, the construction of an oven, food preparation, dwellings, and mattress factory wokers; among the K'apovi ceremonials and village views; among the Zia pottery and portraits of and paintings by Velino Shije Herrera; among the Jemez ceremonials and village views; among Kewa ovens; and among San Ildefonso village views and paintings by Awa Tsireh. The collection also includes photogrpahs depicting the pictographs at Puye.
Cite as:
Odd Halseth collection of negatives and photographs, 1920-1925, National Museum of the American Indian Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution National Museum of the American Indian Archives
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Fred R. Meyer collection of lantern slides, negatives, and photographic prints, 1890-1915

Creator:
Meyer, Fred R
Miller, Fred E
Throssel, Richard d. 1933
Physical description:
199 lantern slides : black and white
377 negatives : black and white
5 prints
Culture:
Apsáalooke (Crow/Absaroke)
Pikuni (Piegan)
Numakiki (Mandan)
Ute
Niitsitapii (Blackfoot/Blackfeet)
Ojibwa
Nimi'ipuu (Nez Perce)
Type:
Lantern slides
Collection descriptions
Photographs
Black-and-white negatives
Place:
Montana
Crow Indian Reservation
Great Blackfeet Reservation
North Dakota
Fort Berthold Indian Reservation
Yosemite Valley (Calif.)
Juneau (Alaska)
Date:
1890
1890-1915
Topic:
Crow Indians
Piegan Indians
Mandan Indians
Local number:
NMAI.AC.032
Notes:
Relatively little is known about Fred R. Meyer (1874-1939), but from his photographic record it is clear that he was an amateur photographer who traveled extensively throughout the western United States, particularly in Montana and North Dakota possibly from 1890 to 1915. A handful of his Montana photographs were given to the Buffalo Bill Historical Center by Meyer's friend William P. Sargent. Meyer's notations on the versos of these prints are dated either 1902 or 1904. According to the Historical Center's records, Meyer was a surveyor but other sources indicate that he (also) worked as a butcher. It has also been suggested that he was associated in some way (perhaps as a clerk) with the Indian agencies that served the Apsáalooke, Pikuni, and Numakiki reservations. He apparently also photographed in Pine Ridge in 1907 and collected objects in Wyoming and Montana. On January 19, 1914, he gave a lantern slide lecture at the Rochester Historical Society entitled "Indian Life and Customs in the Great Northwest," and it appears that he was either originally from or eventually settled in Rochester. In addition, in 1913 he may have corresponded with Joseph Keppler. In the letter, he thanks Keppler for a book and a gun and states that he was pleased to give Keppler the medicine teeth, some of which he also planned to give to "Mr. Pepper" (George Pepper?).
Summary:
The Meyer collection consists primarily of lantern slide and glass plates negatives made by Meyer among the Apsáalooke (Crow/Absaroke) and Pikuni (Piegan) in Montana on the Crow and Blackfeet Reservations, perhaps in1902 and in 1904. The Apsáalooke and Pikuni lantern slides and negatives are mostly informal, outdoor portraits of men and women in traditional clothing, but they also depict camps and ceremonials and even buffalo herds. In addition, there are depictions of Ute, Niitsitapii (Blackfoot/Blackfeet), Nimi'ipuu (Nez Perce), Numakiki (Mandan), and Ojibwa individuals. He made the Numakiki photographs on the Fort Berthold Rerservation in North Dakota. The collection also contains landscape views made in Yosemite Valley, California, and British Columbia and cityscapes of Juneau, Alaska. Although Meyer likely photographed the vast majority of the items in the collection, it is unlikely that he created all of them. For example, there are many studio portraits that an amateur such as Meyer lacked the studio space, equipment, and experience to make. In addition, there is at least one glass plate negative of a Fred Miller Crow Reservation photograph and several that appear to be by Cree photographer Richard Throssel, who also made photographs on the Crow Reservation. The five prints (one of these--assigned a print number--is in fact a newspaper clipping announcing the death of Ka-Be-Na-Gway-Wence or Meet-Ka-Be-Nah-Gway) are certainly not by Meyer. Of interest here is a photograph depicting Goyathlay (Geronimo) in later life wearing traditional Chiricahua Apache clothing, including his headdress. Most of the negatives are on glass but some of them are film copies of the glass negatives and lantern slides.
Cite as:
Fred R. Meyer collection of lantern slides, negatives, and photographic prints, 1890-1915, National Museum of the American Indian Archives, Smithsonian Institution (negative, slide and catalog number)
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution National Museum of the American Indian Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

Negative

Format:
Acetate negative
Dimensions:
5 x 7 in.
Culture/People:
Tz'utuhil Maya (Tzutuhil/Zutigil)
Place:
Lago de Atitlán (Lake Atitlán); Sololá Department, Southwest Region; Guatemala
Site Name:
Lago de Atitlán (Lake Atitlán)
Date Created:
1928
Catalog Number:
N14113
Collection History:
Anthropologist Samuel K. Lothrop (1892-1965, MAI staff member) conducted a number of field studies for MAI, including a 1928 trip to Guatemala. This photograph accompanied the object collections he brought back for MAI.
Description:
People filling water jugs at the shore of Lake Atitan.
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Photographic Collections
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian
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Negative

Format:
Acetate negative
Dimensions:
5 x 7 in.
Culture/People:
Akawaio (Acawai)
Place:
Guyana
Date Created:
1917
Catalog Number:
N10100
Collection History:
Between 1916 and 1929, Alpheus Hyatt Verrill worked in Central and South America as a field collector for MAI while pursuing his own research and publishing; photographs by Verrill probably accompanied the object collections he acquired for MAI.
Description:
Akawaio (Acawai) fisherman standing at a water's edge. He has a bow and arrow in one hand and holds his other hand out as he calls to the fish in the water below.
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Photographic Collections
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian
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Negative

Format:
Acetate negative
Dimensions:
5 x 7 in.
Culture/People:
Patamona
Place:
Guyana
Date Created:
1917
Catalog Number:
N10080
Collection History:
Between 1916 and 1929, Alpheus Hyatt Verrill worked in Central and South America as a field collector for MAI while pursuing his own research and publishing; photographs by Verrill probably accompanied the object collections he acquired for MAI.
Description:
Patamona woman sitting in a hammock and weaving a bead apron on a bow loom.
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Photographic Collections
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian
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Negative

Subject:
(unknown first name) Street, Nanticoke
Format:
Acetate negative
Dimensions:
5 x 7 in.
Culture/People:
Nanticoke
Place:
Indian River Hundred; Sussex County; Delaware; USA (inferred)
Date Created:
1911-1914
Catalog Number:
N01278
Collection History:
Frank G. Speck documented Native life through fieldwork, collecting, and photography; this photograph probably accompanied objects acquired by MAI between 1910 and 1930.
Description:
Three Nanticoke schoolboys posed outdoors wearing overalls. Boy in center is from the Street family.
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Photographic Collections
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian
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Negative

Format:
Acetate negative
Dimensions:
5 x 7 in.
Culture/People:
Assiniboine (Stoney)
Place:
Northern Alberta; Alberta; Canada
Site Name:
Northern Alberta
Date Created:
1926
Catalog Number:
N11750
Collection History:
Donald A. Cadzow worked extensively for MAI as a field collector after 1916; much of his work was carried out in the Plains and Arctic regions. This photograph accompanied the object collections he acquired for MAI.
Description:
Young Assiniboin (Stoney) woman on horseback in a field. She wears a cotton striped dress and horse wears a studded bridle.
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Photographic Collections
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian
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Negative

Donor:
Dr. George Bird Grinnell, Non-Indian, 1849-1938
Format:
Glass plate negative
Dimensions:
6.5 x 8.5 in.
Culture/People:
Non-Indian
Date Created:
1902-1904
Catalog Number:
N13584
Collection History:
Anthropologist, naturalist, and author George Bird Grinnell (1849-1938) worked among Plains tribes, and especially the Northern Cheyenne, from the 1870s onward. Photographs taken during his fieldwork probably accompanied the objects he donated to MAI in 1922.
Description:
View of a valley from above with a large waterfall in the background; wooded low mountains beyond. Catalog card states "View of Grinnell and Elizabeth glaciers"
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Photographic Collections
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian
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Negative

Donor:
Dr. George Bird Grinnell, Non-Indian, 1849-1938
Format:
Glass plate negative
Dimensions:
6.5 x 8.5 in.
Culture/People:
Non-Indian
Date Created:
1902-1904
Catalog Number:
N13585
Collection History:
Anthropologist, naturalist, and author George Bird Grinnell (1849-1938) worked among Plains tribes, especially the Cheyenne, from the 1870s onward. Photographs taken by him or his wife Elizabeth Curtis Grinnell during his fieldwork probably accompanied the objects he donated to MAI in 1922.
Description:
View of a valley from above; wooded low mountains beyond. Catalog card states "View of Grinnell and Elizabeth glaciers"
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Photographic Collections
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian
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Negative

Subject:
George Gustav Heye (GGH), Non-Indian, 1874-1957
Format:
Acetate negative
Dimensions:
5 x 7 in.
Culture/People:
Non-Indian
Place:
New York City, Manhattan; New York County; New York; USA (inferred)
Island Name:
Manhattan Island
Date Created:
1938
Catalog Number:
N29505
Collection History:
Dr. Orrin S. Wightman was a New York City physician and amateur photographer; this portrait was presumably commissioned by George Heye in 1938.
Description:
Copy negative of studio portrait of George Gustav Heye, Director, Museum of the American Indian/Heye Foundation
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Photographic Collections
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian
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Negative

Format:
Acetate negative
Dimensions:
5 x 7 in.
Culture/People:
Eastern Band of Cherokee
Place:
North Carolina; USA
Date Created:
1908
Catalog Number:
N26899
Collection History:
Colonel Frank Churchill supported the assimilation of Native people in the U.S. to Christian ways of life; acting as an inspector of Indian schools and agencies from 1899 through 1909, he and his wife Clara visited and documented Native lives on dozens of reservations.
Description:
View overlooking a large gathering on a waterfront during an Indian baptism.
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Photographic Collections
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian
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Negative

Format:
Acetate negative
Dimensions:
5 x 7 in.
Culture/People:
Nuaguntits (Las Vegas Paiute)
Place:
Las Vegas; Clark County; Nevada; USA
Date Created:
1873
Catalog Number:
N30022
Collection History:
John K. Hillers often accompanied John Wesley Powell (1834-1902, director of the US Geological Survey and the Bureau of American Ethnology) on expeditions; no other collection history information available.
Description:
Outdoor portrait of two Nuaguntits Paiute men, crouching on the ground, wearing breechcloths and caps, and holding bows and arrows.
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Photographic Collections
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian
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Negative

Format:
Acetate negative
Dimensions:
5 x 7 in.
Culture/People:
Mistassini Cree
Place:
Québec; Canada
Date Created:
1926
Catalog Number:
N11829
Collection History:
Photo taken during fieldwork by anthropologist Frank G. Speck; MAI also purchased Indian objects from Speck and either purchased this photo or received it along with objects purchased from him.
Description:
Horse and sled caravan on the trail to Mistassini River; man stands next sleds with loads of timber.
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Photographic Collections
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian
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Negative

Subject:
Earnest L. Spybuck (Ernest Spybuck/Mahthela), Absentee Shawnee [Shawnee, Oklahoma-Pottawatomie County], 1883-1949
Donor:
Mark Raymond Harrington (M. R. Harrington), Non-Indian, 1882-1971
Format:
Acetate negative
Dimensions:
5 x 7 in.
Culture/People:
Absentee Shawnee [Shawnee, Oklahoma-Pottawatomie County]
Place:
Oklahoma; USA
Date Created:
circa 1910
Catalog Number:
N02863
Collection History:
Photo taken during fieldwork sponsored by George Heye.
Description:
Portrait of the artist Earnest L. Spybuck, posed in front of a cloth background, wearing a cotton shirt and jacket, and a bandana. Side view
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Photographic Collections
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian
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Negative

Format:
Acetate negative
Dimensions:
4 x 6 in.
Culture/People:
Non-Indian
Place:
West coast pine barrens; Florida; USA
Site Name:
West coast pine barrens
Date Created:
1910
Catalog Number:
N01562
Collection History:
In 1910, anthropologist Alanson B. Skinner was sent by the American Museum of Natural History in New York to conduct ethnographic field research on the Seminole people of the Florida Everglades. Both Skinner and professional photographer Julian A. Dimock photographed this expedition. In 1916, Skinner joined the staff of the Museum of the American Indian; he may have donated the images to MAI or they may have been found among his things following his sudden death in 1925.
Description:
Two men yoking oxen. Man on right is possibly Frank Brown (guide) and the man on the left is possibly Alanson Skinner (anthropologist) or Julian Dimock (photographer).
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Photographic Collections
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian
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Negative

Subject:
Museum of the American Indian, Research Branch (Annex), 1926-1989
Format:
Acetate negative
Dimensions:
5 x 7 in.
Culture/People:
Non-Indian
Place:
Research Branch, Museum of the American Indian/Heye Foundation; New York City, Bronx, Pelham Bay; Bronx County; New York; USA
Site Name:
Research Branch, Museum of the American Indian/Heye Foundation
Date Created:
February 1963
Catalog Number:
N30618
Collection History:
Carmelo Guadagno was MAI's staff photographer from the 1950s through the mid 1980s; and besides photographing objects in the collections, he also documented MAI's exhibits and other work. These images, which document MAI's history, remain part of NMAI's Photographic Archives.
Description:
View of the Research Branch of the Museum of the American Indian/Heye Foundation, Bronx, New York
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Photographic Collections
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian
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