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Micmac manuscript

view Micmac manuscript digital asset number 1
Creator:
ANONYMOUS
Harlow, Louis
Physical description:
29 pages
Culture:
Micmac Indians
Indians of North America Northeast
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Cite as:
Manuscript 1663, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Topic:
Pictographs--Micmac Indians
Micmac language
Language and languages--Documentation
Local number:
NAA MS 1663
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Numbered manuscripts 1850s-1980s (some earlier)
Data Source:
National Anthropological Archives

Three Micmac stories by Chief Nicholas Jerome, 1910

view Three Micmac stories by Chief Nicholas Jerome, 1910 digital asset number 1
Collector:
Michelson, Truman 1879-1938
Creator:
Jerome, Nicholas Chief
Physical description:
89 pages
Culture:
Micmac Indians
Indians of North America Northeast
Type:
Folklore
Collection descriptions
Narratives
Manuscripts
Date:
1910
Summary:
Three Micmac stories handwritten in English by Chief Nicholas Jerome. These were collected by Truman Michelson during his fieldwork among the Micmac of Restigouche, Canada in 1910. The stories are: "The wejiboque," "The man who married the beaver," and "The man who married among the giants."
Publications:
Edited versions of these stories were published in The Journal of American Folklore, Vol. 38, No. 147, pages 33-54
Cite as:
Manuscript 2800, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Topic:
Micmac language
Language and languages--Documentation
Local number:
NAA MS 2800
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Numbered manuscripts 1850s-1980s (some earlier)
Data Source:
National Anthropological Archives
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Micmac texts and notes collected by Truman Michelson, 1910

view Micmac texts and notes collected by Truman Michelson, 1910 digital asset number 1
Collector:
Michelson, Truman 1879-1938
Creator:
Catpat Mrs
de Dame, Ekin
de Dame, Noel Mrs
Jerome, Nicholas Chief
la Bob, Barney
Marchand, Noel
Physical description:
143 pages
Culture:
Micmac Indians
Indians of North America Northeast
Type:
Folklore
Collection descriptions
Narratives
Manuscripts
Vocabulary
Date:
1910
Summary:
Primarily texts with some linguistic notes from Truman Michelson's fieldwork among the Micmac in Restigouche, Canada. Michelson collected stories in Micmac from Barney la Bob, Noel Marchand, Mrs. Catpat, and Ekin de Dame. Chief Chief Nicholas Jerome provided interlineal English translations. There is also a story in English from Mrs. Noel de Dame. The linguistic notes cover vocabulary and grammar.
Cite as:
Manuscript 2825, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Topic:
Micmac language
Language and languages--Documentation
Linguistics
Local number:
NAA MS 2825
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Numbered manuscripts 1850s-1980s (some earlier)
Data Source:
National Anthropological Archives
Additional Online Media:

Portrait of Woman and Boy in Native Dress 1865

view Portrait of Woman and Boy in Native Dress 1865 digital asset number 1
Physical description:
1 photoprint 003 in x 004 in mounted on 003 in x 004 in
Culture:
Micmac Indians
Indians of North America Northeast
Type:
Photographs
Date:
1865
Cite as:
Photo Lot 24 SPC E Canada Micmac BAE 1-6 00290200, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Local number:
NAA INV 00290200
OPPS NEG 56827
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Photographs of American Indians and Other Subjects 1840s-1960s
Data Source:
National Anthropological Archives

Eight Men Near Wood Frame Building, John Denny, Polycarp Martin, Pere Pacifique and Five Unidentified Men MAY 1908

view Eight Men Near Wood Frame Building, John Denny, Polycarp Martin, Pere Pacifique and Five Unidentified Men MAY 1908 digital asset number 1
Physical description:
1 008 in x 010 in photograph
Culture:
Micmac Indians
Indians of North America Northeast
Type:
Photographs
Date:
MAY 1908
Cite as:
BAE GN 00848 06193000, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Local number:
NAA INV 06193000
OPPS NEG 00848
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Glass Negatives of Indians (Collected by the Bureau of American Ethnology) 1850s-1930s
Data Source:
National Anthropological Archives

Portrait (Front) of E-Roneta (Eagle Feather), (Mixed Blood) NOV 1906

view Portrait (Front) of E-Roneta (Eagle Feather), (Mixed Blood) NOV 1906 digital asset number 1
Creator:
Gill, De Lancey W
Subject:
Delegation, 1906
Physical description:
1 007 in x 009 in photograph
Culture:
Iroquois Indians
Micmac Indians
Indians of North America Northeast
Type:
Photographs
Date:
NOV 1906
Cite as:
BAE GN 00847A 06192800, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Local number:
NAA INV 06192800
OPPS NEG 00847 A
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Glass Negatives of Indians (Collected by the Bureau of American Ethnology) 1850s-1930s
Data Source:
National Anthropological Archives

Portrait (Profile) of E-Roneta (Eagle Feather), (Mixed Blood) NOV 1906

view Portrait (Profile) of E-Roneta (Eagle Feather), (Mixed Blood) NOV 1906 digital asset number 1
Creator:
Gill, De Lancey W
Subject:
Delegation, 1906
Physical description:
1 007 in x 009 in photograph
Culture:
Iroquois Indians
Micmac Indians
Indians of North America Northeast
Type:
Photographs
Date:
NOV 1906
Cite as:
BAE GN 00847B 06192900, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Local number:
NAA INV 06192900
OPPS NEG 00847 B
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Glass Negatives of Indians (Collected by the Bureau of American Ethnology) 1850s-1930s
Data Source:
National Anthropological Archives

Edward Sapir notes on vocabularies of Algonquian languages, circa 1911

view Edward Sapir notes on vocabularies of Algonquian languages, circa 1911 digital asset number 1
Creator:
Sapir, Edward 1884-1939
Collector:
Michelson, Truman 1879-1938
Physical description:
28 pages
Culture:
Cree Rupert's House
Delaware Indians
Malecite Indians
Montagnais Indians
Micmac Indians
Indians of North America Northeast
Abenaki Indians
Indians of North America Subarctic
Cree Indians
Indians of North America Great Plains
Type:
Vocabulary
Collection descriptions
Date:
1911
circa 1911
Summary:
Edward Sapir's typed notes on the vocabularies of various Algonquian languages that he collected in 1911. List of languages covered: Delaware, pages 1-6; Abnaki (Pierreville), page 7-12; Malecite (Riviere du Loup, Thomas Paul), pages 13-17; Micmac, pages 18-23, Cree (Rupert's House), pages 24-25; Montagnais (Louis Clairie, Pointe Bleue), pages 26-28. There are annotations and corrections in ink in Sapir's handwriting (identified by Mary Haas, 4/58). There are also pencil additions signed by Michelson; perhaps all of the pencil additions are his.
Cite as:
Manuscript 2806, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Topic:
Algonquian languages
Munsee language
Abenaki language
Passamaquoddy language
Micmac language
Cree language
Montagnais language
Language and languages--Documentation
Linguistics
Local number:
NAA MS 2806
See more items in:
Numbered manuscripts 1850s-1980s (some earlier)
Data Source:
National Anthropological Archives
Additional Online Media:

John Peabody Harrington papers: Western Abnaki/Eastern Abnaki/Passamaquoddy, 1949-circa 1952

view John Peabody Harrington papers: Western Abnaki/Eastern Abnaki/Passamaquoddy, 1949-circa 1952 digital asset number 1
Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody 1884-1961
Physical description:
12 boxes
Culture:
Abenaki Indians
Passamaquoddy Indians
Indians of North America Northeast
Type:
Field notes
Manuscripts
Vocabulary
Place:
New England
Maine
Date:
1949
1949-1952
1949-circa 1952
Notes:
John P. Harrington accumulated information on these languages between April 24 and October 24, 1949. Most of his time was spent in Old Town, Maine, although he worked also in Bangor, at the State House Library in Augusta, at the Maine Historical Society in Portland, and in Eastport, Maine. He secured linguistic information from St. Francis speakers of Odanak near Pierreville, Quebec, and from a colony of Abenakis in Albany, New York. In November and December of 1949 while on trips between New York City and Washington for other reasons, he carried the notes with him for further sorting and rearranging. Reports indicate that in 1952 he was in the process of assembling an extensive study on the Abenaki, possibly incorporating data on the vocabulary, grammar, history, and ethnography of both Abenaki languages.
The principal St. Francis speakers that he worked with were Oliver Obomsawin (Ol.) and Alfred Miller (Am., AI.) of Odanak, and George Dennis (Geo., Den.) and John Watso of Albany. Watso introduced Harrington to Edwin E. Nagazoa (Ed., Nag., N.) and Maude Benedict Nagazoa, the former described as a perfect Abenaki speaker. Others that he worked with include Thomas Sadoquin, Mrs. Daylight (Mrs. D., D.), Antoine Medzalabolet, Chief Charles Nolet, and Dominico Berni. Berni's role is somewhat uncertain. He may have translated a letter of inquiry to the Bureau of American Ethnology which Harrington was assigned to handle, and which may have had nothing to do with Abenaki. Andrew E. Dana (And.), Frank and Mary Mitchell, and Charles John Saulis provided Penobscot and Passamaquoddy material, yielding extensive placename etymologies. Penobscot and a few Malecite (spelled "Malacite" throughout Harrington's notes) terms came from Harry Francis whose mother, Mary Jean Francis, was a Malecite Indian. Others that he worked with were Lena Mitchell, Laura, and Mr. and Mrs. William Neptune of Pleasant Point, near Eastport, Maine. William Neptune was a Passamaquoddy but Harrington credited him with Wawenock data.
Field notes and correspondence indicate that Harrington consulted with Dr. Frank T. Siebert,Jr., in person and by mail.
Arthur E. Edgerley at the State Highway Commission office in Augusta provided bits of history surrounding the sites as well as names of some of the people who formerly inhabited them.
Summary:
This subseries of the Northeast/Southeast series contains Harrington's Western Abenaki, Eastern Abenaki, and Passamaquoddy research. The bulk of the notes consists of Maine placenames culled from numerous secondary sources ranging from seventeenth-century documents to publications of the 1940s, and also including little known local histories, old maps and atlases, highway and forestry maps, and unidentified newspaper clippings. Located here also are lesser numbers of placenames of other states in the Northeast and the provinces of Quebec and New Brunswick. Most of the material was reheard by St. Francis, Penobscot, and Passamaquoddy speakers, with an occasional Malecite, Micmac, and Menomini comparison.
The Western Abenaki (St. Francis) section contains vocabulary entries semantically arranged in about a dozen categories. The most extensive section (former B.A.E. MS 6029pt.) is that of Maine placenames copied from secondary sources. The most frequently cited sources were Joseph Laurent's New Familiar Abenakis and English Dialogues (1884), and Henry Lorne Masta's Abenaki Indian Legends, Grammar and Place Names (1932). This section also contains placenames of the New England States, New York, and the provinces of Quebec and New Brunswick, along with a few Penobscot and Passamaquoddy equivalences. The notes on tribenames include names found in the texts and maps of seventeenth-century voyages of discovery and in early histories of New England and Canada. Old and New World names and ethnic and race designations are also found in this category. The files also include a typed draft, with related notes (former B.A.E. ms. 6029pt.), dated 1950, titled "The Abnakis and Their Language." According to Harrington's introduction, the dialect is that of St. Francis and is based on terms from Laurent and Masta. There are notes covering phonetics and morphology, the latter arranged according to grammatical word form. Extensive hIstorIcal background material was sent to Harrington by T .R.L. MacInnes, secretary of the Indian Affairs Branch of the Department of MInes and Resources in Ottawa. A Mr. A. E. St. Louis did the actual research of the department's records and included some Huron data.
The Eastern Abenaki (Penobscot) vocabulary is semantically arranged in about ten categories, with occasional Passamaquoddy comparisons and a few Malecite terms. Ethnographic data sometimes accompany the linguistics. Harrington also etymologized certain phenomenal and geographic terms from the placename appendix of Joseph Nicolar published by Fannie Hardy Eckstorm (cited in the notes as "Eckst.") in Indian Place-names of the Penobscot Valley and the Maine Coast (1941). Some of the tribenames were formerly part of B.A.E. manuscript 4463. He also consulted other published sources.
Eastern Abenaki grammatical notes include phonetics and morphology, with great emphasis on the former. Some St. Francis and Passamaquoddy comparisons culled from Harrington's notes are interfiled. There is also a small assortment of random historical and ethnographical reading notes culled from various secondary sources, most of which are identified in a related bibliographical section. A few bits of historical information come from Dana and Watso. There are no linguistic elaborations.
Materials relating to Penobscot and Passamaquoddy placenames primarily center around a proposed paper titled "The Indian Placenames of Maine" (former B.A.E. mss. 4463pt. and 6029pt.). A short introductory draft is followed by a linguistic study of placenames of Maine organized according to its sixteen counties. One brief section organized by regions and trails probably represents a discarded plan of procedure, and there is one group of miscellaneous names. Many terms bear the identification "Pen." for Penobscot and "Pass." for Passamaquoddy. If not identified, they are usually in the Penobscot dialect and given by Dana. There are a few Malecite and Micmac equivalences and one or two Menomini names. Two segments on Maine sites contain no linguistic elaborations. One list, organized by county and generally entered one item to a page, parallels the section described above. It comes from the same secondary sources and evidently was accumulated as a guide to the later rehearings. The second group, collected from various sources, provides historical information only (former B.A.E. ms. 6029 pt.). Placenames from other states and provinces include rehearings on the placename Massachusetts, New Brunswick placenames, and a miscellaneous group of unsorted and discarded notes. There is also linguistic treatment of "Pomole" and "Glooscap" texts, with an emphasis on Maine placenames (former B.A.E. MS 4463 pt.), as well as a typescript titled "A Short History of the Passamaquoddy Indians" in English.
Among Harrington's files are also notes for three proposed papers. One paper is on the name "Tarentine" as applied to native Americans of the East Coast. Harrington found evidence of its use among the records and histories of early voyagers to America. The second paper was to be a commentary on the Abenaki vocabulary compiled in 1605 by James Rosier, a member of the expedition under Captain George Waymouth (Weymouth). Harrington made a copy of the Waymouth terms while in New York City in November 1949. Both sets of notes contain occasional references to Laurent and Masta, but no linguistic data. A third paper was called "Bashaba and Bessabes Are Two Different Words." From numerous accounts of the earliest recorded voyages to the New World, Harrington accumulated reading notes to prove that Bashaba was a general name for a chief and that Bessabes was the personal name of a particular chief. Again there are no linguistic etymologies.
Cite as:
Northeast/Southeast: Western Abnaki/Eastern Abnaki/Passamaquoddy, John Peabody Harrington papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Topic:
Abenaki language
Passamaquoddy language
Penobscot language
Micmac language
Menominee language
Language and languages--Documentation
Linguistics
Names, Geographical
Toponymy
Ethnology
Local number:
Accession #1976-95
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John Peabody Harrington papers: Northeast/Southeast, 1907-1957
Data Source:
National Anthropological Archives
Additional Online Media:

John Peabody Harrington papers: Algonquian, circa 1907-circa 1957

view John Peabody Harrington papers: Algonquian, circa 1907-circa 1957 digital asset number 1
Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody 1884-1961
Michelson, Truman 1879-1938
Hewitt, J. N. B (John Napoleon Brinton) 1859-1937
Speck, Frank G (Frank Gouldsmith) 1881-1950
Voegelin, C. F (Charles Frederick) 1906-1986
Physical description:
2 boxes
Culture:
Cheyenne language
Fox Indians
Menominee Indians
Miami Indians
Mohegan Indians
Pequot Indians
Montauk Indians
Montagnais Indians
Nanticoke Indians
Piscataway Indians
Ojibwa Indians
Potawatomi Indians
Type:
Vocabulary
Date:
1907
1907-1957
circa 1907-circa 1957
Summary:
This subseries of the Northeast/Southeast series contains John P. Harrington's Algonquian research. It consists primarily of material he collected; there is very little original data, most of which are undated. The topics covered are Cheyenne grammar, Fox linguistic notes, Menominee grammar, Miami-Peoria grammar, Mohegan-Pequot-Montauk vocabulary, Montagnais miscellaneous notes, Nanticoke-Conoy-Unalachtigo linguistic notes, Ojibwa linguistic notes, Potawatomi linguistic notes, and comparative and miscellaneous notes.
The Cheyenne material consist of two pages of grammatical excerpts from Rodolphe Petter's English-Cheyenne Dictionary (1915).
The Fox notes stem from conversations which Harrington had with Truman Michelson on the Fox syllabary and grammar. One note is dated September 24, 1924; others are undated. One page gives the etymology of the word Chicago and a Potawatomi equivalent. Phonetic material (former B.A.E. MS 6021 pt. and 6025pt.) is based on William Jones's "Algonquian (Fox)" (1911). A bibliography is included, mainly on Michelson's publications and manuscripts which he submitted to the B.A.E.
The Menominee files contain a phonetic key from Leonard Bloomfield's Menomini Texts (1928), a short report on a conversation with Michelson (former B.A.E. MS 6025pt. and 6030), and a brief description of Menominee tentshaking was excerpted from W. J. Hoffman's The Menomini Indians (1896).
Miami-Peoria vocabulary were copied from Albert Gatschet's B.A.E. manuscripts 3025 and 3026b. (Those entries marked 3026b are no longer listed as part of that B.A.E. manuscript.)
An 1890 copy of a 1798 Montauk vocabulary taken by John Lyon Gardiner was loaned to Harrington by Foster H. Saville. There are also a three-page typescript of this manuscript and several pages of a Mohegan-Pequot bibliography.
For Montagnais, there are three bibliographical notes. Two placenames came from J.N.B. Hewitt in November 1926.
Reading notes on Nanticoke, Conoy, and Unalachtigo were taken principally from Speck's The Nanticoke and Conoy Indians . .. (1927) and from Hodge's "Handbook" (1907). Some linguistic and ethnohistoric material is included and there is a brief bibliography.
Ojibwa forms the largest portion of this subseries. It includes notes from a joint interview conducted most likely in 1940 with C. F. Voegelin and his informant, Gregor McGregor, who was technically considered a speaker of Ottawa. There are also notes Harrington took of Voegelin's lecture at the University of Michigan on June 25, 1940 (former B.A.E. MS 6020pt.). There is a slight emphasis on placenames in an otherwise random vocabulary. From James Hammond Trumbull's Notes on Forty Algonkin Versions of the Lord's Prayer (1873), Harrington copied the Southern Chippeway version (pp. 74 -75) and penciled in a slightly different English translation. A final potpourri of undated notes includes a miscellaneous vocabulary from secondary sources and a few pages of grammatical material. The etymologies of several Ojibwa words are briefly developed. Frederic Baraga's A Dictionary of the Otchipwe Language is the most frequently cited source (former B.A.E. MS 6020pt. and 6025pt.).
The Potawatomi files contain material from Harrington's interview with Chief Simon Kahquados in Blackwell, Wisconsin (n.d.) with whom he recorded general ethnographic information, particularly regarding the loss of Potawatomi lands due to Indian Office policies and illegal acts of the Menominee. A brief vocabulary is included. Unrelated to this interview is a Potawatomi phoneme chart.
Comparative material includes reading notes regarding the earliest appearances of certain Algonquian phonetic sounds. Harrington consulted primarily the works of Sir Isaac Pitman, Jean Claude Mathevet (Nipissing, Abnaki), and Silas Tertius Rand (Micmac). Additional peripheral bibliographical information is identified in the notes. The only date recorded is March 26, 1951. There are other scattered reading notes with Menominee, Cree, Fox, and Ojibwa phonetic comparisons, based mainly on Leonard Bloomfield's Menomini Texts (1938) and Plains Cree Texts (1934). One page of Arapaho terms was copied from Kroeber.
In the category of general linguistic and ethnographic notes (former B.A.E. ms. 6025pt.), information results from various conversations with fellow linguists: Truman Michelson and J.N.B. Hewitt on September 24, 1924; Hewitt in November 1924 and November 1926; Michelson in October 1930; and Michelson and Frank G. Speck in May 1934. Under the heading "The Southern Delawares," Harrington arranged random information on the Virginia Indians, touching briefly on history and ethnography. He included some Abnaki, Cree, and Cherokee linguistic terms, as well as a general bibliography. Vocabulary material in this series (former B.A.E. MS 6025pt.) consists of terms from various Algonquian languages, most probably taken from unidentified printed sources. One note gives "The Chief from Mass[achusetts]" as an informant. One group of terms is compared with Natick words and with a vocabulary recorded by Roger Williams.
Cite as:
Northeast/Southeast: Algonquian, John Peabody Harrington papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Topic:
Algonquian languages
Abenaki language
Cree language
Cherokee language
Cheyenne language
Fox language
Menominee language
Miami language (Ind. and Okla.)
Mohegan language
Montagnais language
Nanticoke language
Ojibwa language
Potawatomi language
Language and languages--Documentation
Linguistics
Ethnology
Names, Geographical
Local number:
Accession #1976-95
See more items in:
John Peabody Harrington papers: Northeast/Southeast, 1907-1957
Data Source:
National Anthropological Archives

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