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Mesoplodon traversii (Gray, 1874)

view Mesoplodon traversii (Gray, 1874) digital asset number 1
Collector:
Department of Conservation
Ocean/Sea/Gulf:
South Pacific Ocean, Bay Of Plenty
Bay/Sound:
Bay Of Plenty
Sex:
Female
Male
Stage:
Mature
Juvenile
Place:
Opape Beach, North Island, New Zealand, Australia, South Pacific Ocean
Collection Date:
31 Dec 2010
Specimen Count:
1
Notes:
Cow and calf stranded at Opape Beach. DOC agents identified it as M. grayi. University of Auckland did DNA comparisons to confirm the identification and discovered that it was M. traversii. Slkeltal remains to the Museum of New Zealand.
Thompson, Kirsten, C. Scott Baker, Anton van Helden, Selina Patel, Craig Millar and Rochelle Constantine (2012). "The world’s rarest whale." Current Biology 22(21): R905-906, supplemental material.
Record Last Modified:
30 Nov 2012
Taxonomy:
Animalia Chordata Mammalia Cetacea Ziphiidae
Published Name:
Mesoplodon traversii (Gray, 1874)
Other Numbers:
Whale Field Number 1 : No Number
USNM Number:
STR18403
See more items in:
Mammals
Vertebrate Zoology
Data Source:
NMNH - Vertebrate Zoology - Mammals Division
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmnhvz_10469823
Additional Online Media:

Mesoplodon traversii (Gray, 1874)

view Mesoplodon traversii (Gray, 1874) digital asset number 1
Collector:
F. Robson
Ocean/Sea/Gulf:
South Pacific Ocean, Bay Of Plenty
Bay/Sound:
Bay Of Plenty
Preparation:
Skull
Photograph
Remarks:
3 photos of skull
Sex:
Unknown
Place:
White Island, New Zealand, Australia, South Pacific Ocean
Specimen Count:
1
Record Last Modified:
25 Apr 2013
Taxonomy:
Animalia Animalia Chordata Chordata Mammalia Mammalia Cetacea Cetacea Ziphiidae Ziphiidae
Published Name:
Mesoplodon traversii (Gray, 1874)
Mesoplodon ginkgodens Nishiwaki & Kamiya, 1958
Other Numbers:
Whale Field Number 1 : No Number
Other Number : STR12149
USNM Number:
STR10590
See more items in:
Mammals
Vertebrate Zoology
Data Source:
NMNH - Vertebrate Zoology - Mammals Division
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmnhvz_7212066

Mesoplodon traversii (Gray, 1874)

Collector:
J. C. Cardenas
Ocean/Sea/Gulf:
South Pacific Ocean
Preparation:
Skull
Sex:
Unknown
Type Status:
Type
Type Citation:
[Article] Reyes, J. C., et al. 1995.
Place:
Robinson Crusoe Island, Playa El Arenal, Isla Robinson Crusoe, Juan Fernandez Islands, South Pacific Ocean
Collection Date:
Jun 1986
Specimen Count:
1
Notes:
MNHN 1156 (santiago museum). ;
Record Last Modified:
26 Jul 2013
Taxonomy:
Animalia Animalia Animalia Chordata Chordata Chordata Mammalia Mammalia Mammalia Cetacea Cetacea Cetacea Ziphiidae Ziphiidae Ziphiidae
Published Name:
Mesoplodon traversii (Gray, 1874)
Mesoplodon traversii bahamondi
Mesoplodon bahamondi Reyes et al., 1995
Other Numbers:
Whale Field Number 1 : No Number
USNM Number:
STR10555
See more items in:
Mammals
Vertebrate Zoology
Data Source:
NMNH - Vertebrate Zoology - Mammals Division
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmnhvz_7207515

See the First Video of One of the World's Rarest Whales

view See the First Video of One of the World's Rarest Whales digital asset number 1
Creator:
Smithsonian Magazine
Type:
Blog posts
Smithsonian staff publications
Blog posts
Published Date:
Wed, 08 Mar 2017 18:02:39 +0000
Blog Post Category:
Smart News
Smart News Science
Description:

There are 22 beaked whale species in the world’s oceans, but they are probably the most elusive group of marine mammals out there. That’s because, reports Chelsea Whyte at New Scientist, the whales are deep divers that can spend up to 92 percent of their lives underwater. They usually surface for just a few moments, making sightings rare. One of the most elusive of the animals is the True’s beaked whale. But researchers report that the first recorded video of the whales swimming underwater is giving them invaluable insight into the creatures.

Whyte reports that a group of students and teachers on a field trip in the Azores, the southern tip of the whale's range in the North Atlantic, were exploring the water in an inflatable boat in 2013. “Suddenly this group of whales appear from nowhere and start to surround the boat,” Natacha Aguilar de Soto, a marine biologist from the University of St Andrews, U.K., and the University of La Laguna on the Canary Islands, tells Whyte. The group was able to get out a waterproof GoPro camera and slip into the water to record the whales for 46 seconds. De Soto later confirmed that the footage was of True’s beaked whales, releasing the video along with other data on the species a new paper in the journal Peer J. “These are whales that very few people in the world have ever seen.”

According to a press release, the video footage is the first underwater footage ever taken of the species and the first images of a True’s calf. It also shows a new coloration pattern for the whales, which have a distinctive white spot on their heads. “The white on the melon, it’s sometimes called a white beanie because it looks like a beanie cap. ...There seems to be variation in that color pattern and sometimes the white extends much further to the anterior, into the beak, and around the eye,” Jay Barlow, a marine mammal biologist at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, tells Whyte. “Apparently we didn’t know as much as we thought we knew about the color and pattern.”

Sarah Kaplan at The Washington Post reports that True’s beaked whale was first identified in 1913 by Frederick William True, the first curator of marine mammals at the Smithsonian Institution. In over 100 years, however, there have only been a handful of live sightings of the whale, and most of what we know come from carcasses that have washed ashore. Kaplan explains that the whales have torpedo-shaped bodies with indentations on their sides where they can tuck their flippers, allowing them to dive to incredible depths.

According to the press release, De Soto hopes the video and data about color variation will help researchers be able to better identify True’s beaked whales at sea. She also hopes the paper will offer a baseline to help researchers begin to understand their distribution, population and potential impacts from humans. “Beaked whales are an incredible example of the adaptations of mammals to the ocean,” she tells Kaplan. “They overcome incredible physiological challenges to dive, but that means they are very sensitive to anything that changes or challenges the physiological balance.”

In fact, in recent years researchers have begun to make some headway in understanding beaked whales. In 2014 researchers tagged a Cuvier’s beaked whale, collecting 3,700 hours of data showing the whale dived to an average of .87 miles 1,100 times, with its longest dive lasting 2 hours and 17 minutes and reaching almost two miles below the surface. Last July, DNA analysis confirmed the existence of a new species of beaked whale known as the karasu, and in 2012 researchers got their first look at a spade-toothed beaked whale, Mesoplodon traversii, when it washed up on a beach in New Zealand. In fact, four species of beaked whales have been discovered in just the last two decades.

Reseachers are also learning about threats to the whales. “We know that some species of beaked whale are very vulnerable to navy sonar,” Barlow tells Whyte. “We want to monitor those species and determine if they’re being impacted. The only way to be able to do that is to tell them apart at sea.”

Augilar tells tells Kaplan that there is a possibility that the northern population and southern populations of True’s beaked whales may be different species, something that she hopes to investigate in a broader DNA study of the animals.

Topic:
0
See more post:
Smithsonian Article Database
Data Source:
Smithsonian Magazine
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:posts_817fd6ba8b0466c5885a2f8f997a466e

Whales, dolphins, and other marine mammals of the world / Hadoram Shirihai ; illustrated by Brett Jarrett ; edited by Guy M. Kirwan ; editorial consultants, Graeme Cresswell ... [et al.] ; maps by Kelly Macleod, Dylan Walker and Julie Dando

Title: Whales, dolphins
Author:
Shirihai, Hadoram
Jarrett, Brett
Kirwan, Guy M
Physical description:
384 p. : col. ill., col. maps ; 22 cm
Type:
Identification
Date:
2006
Contents:
Preface -- What is a marine mammal? -- Main groups of marine mammals -- Modern taxonomy of marine mammals -- How to look for marine mammals -- Natural history of marine mammals -- Conservation -- How to use this book -- The illustrations -- The maps -- Species accounts -- Sperm whale (Physeter macrocephalus) -- Humpback whale (Megaptera novaeangliae) -- Grey whale (Eschrichtius robustus) -- Right whales -- North Atlantic Right whale (Eubalaena glacialis) -- North Pacific Right whale (Eubalaena japonica) -- Southern Right whale (Eubalaena australis) -- Bowhead whale (Balaena mysticetus) -- Pgymy Right whale (Caperea marginata) -- Rorquals with streamlined bodies -- Blue whale (Balaenoptera musculus) -- Fin whale (Balaenoptera physalus) -- Sei whale (Balaenoptera borealis) -- Bryde's whale (Balaenoptera edeni) -- Omura's whale (Balaenoptera omurai) -- Northern Minke whale (Balaenoptera acutorostrata) -- Dwarf Minke whale (Balaenoptera [acutorostrata] species/allospecies) -- Antarctic minke whale (Balaenotera bonaerensis) -- Killer whale (Orcinus orca) -- Pilot whale : the large 'blackfish' -- Short-finned Pilot whale (Globicephala macrorhynchus) -- Long-finned Pilot whale (Globicephala melas) -- Small 'blackfish" whales and Risso's dolphin -- Pygmy Killer whale (Feresa attenuata) -- Melon-headed whale (Peponocephala electra) -- False killer whale (Pseudorca crassidens) -- Risso's dolphin (Grampus griseus) --
Beluga and Norwhal -- Beluga (Delphinapterus leucas) -- Norwhal (Monodon monoceros) -- Beaked whales -- Cuvier's Beaked whale (Ziphius cavirostris) -- Arnoux's Beaked whale (Berardius arnuxii) -- Baird's Beaked whale (Berardius bairdii) -- Shepherd's Beaked whale (Tasmacetus shepherdi) -- Longman's Beaked whale (Indopacetus pacificus) -- Northern Bottlenose whale (Hyperoodon ampullatus) -- Southern bottlenose whale (Hyperoodon planifrons) -- Hector's Beaked whale (Mesoplodon hectori) -- True's Beaked whale (Mesoplodon mirus) -- Gervais' Beaked whale (Mesoplodon europaeus) -- Sowerby's Beaked whale (Mesoplodon bidens) -- Gray's Beaked whale (Mesoplodon grayi) -- Pygmy Beaked whale (Mesoplodon peruvianus) -- Andrews' Beaked whale (Mesoplodon bowdoini) -- Spade-toothed Beaked whale (Mesoplodon traversii) -- Hubbs' Beaked whale (Mesoplodon carlhubbsi) -- Gingko-toothed Beaked whale (Mesoplodon ginkgodens) -- Stejneger's Beaked whale (Mesoplodon stejnegeri) -- Strap-toothed whale (Mesoplodon layardii) -- Blainville's Beaked whale (Mesoplodon densirostris) -- Perrin's Beaked whale (Mesoplodon perrini) -- Pygmy and Dwarf Sperm whales -- Pygmy Sperm whale (Kogia breviceps) -- Dwarf Sperm whale (Kogia sima) -- Bottlenose and similar plain dolphins -- Common Bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) --
Indo-Pacific Bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops aduncus) -- Indo-Pacific Humpback dolphin (Sousa chinensis) -- Atlantic Humpback dolphin (Sousa teuszii) -- Rough-toothed dolphin (Steno bredanensis) -- Narrow-beaked Oceanic dolphins -- Common dolphins -- Short-beaked Common dolphin (Delphinus delphis) -- Long-beaked Common dolphin (Delphinus capensis) -- Spinner dolphins -- Spinner dolphin (Stenella longirostris) -- Clymene dolphin (Stenella clymene) -- Striped dolphin (Stenella coeruleoalba) -- Pantropical Spotted dolphin (Stenella attenuata) -- Atlantic Spotted dolphin (Stenella frontalis) -- Short-beaked Oceanic dolphins -- Fraser's dolphin (Lagenodelphis hosei) -- White-beaked dolphin (Lagenorhynchus albirostris) -- Atlantic White-sided dolphin (Lagenorhynchus acutus) -- Pacific White-sided dolphin (Lagenorhynchus obliquidens) -- Peale's dolphin (Lagenorhynchus australis ) -- Hourglass dolphin (Lagenorhynchus cruciger) -- Dusky dolphin (Lagenorhynchus obscurus) --
Cephalorhynchus dolphins -- Commerson's dolphin (Cephalorhynchus commersonii) -- Chilean dolphin (Cephalorhynchus eutropia) -- Haviside's (Heaviside's) dolphin (Cephalorhynchus heavisidii) -- Hector's dolphin (Cephalorhynchus hectori) -- Right whale dolphins -- Northern Right whale dolphin (Lissodelphis borealis) -- Southern Right whale dolphin (Lissodelphis peronii) -- River dolphins and Tucuxi -- Tucuxi (Sotalia fluviatilis) -- Franciscana (Pontoporia blainvillei) -- Amazon River dolphin (Ilia geoffrensis) -- Ganges River dolphin (Platanista [gangetica] gangetica) -- Indus River dolphin (Platanista [gangetica] minor) -- Chinese River dolphin (Lipotes vexillifer) -- Australian Snubfin and Irrawaddy dolphins -- Australian Snubfin dolphin (Orcaella heinsohni) -- Irrawaddy dolphin (Orcaella brevirostris) -- Porpoises -- Finless porpoise (Neophocaena phocaenoides) -- Spectacled porpoise (Phocoena dioptrica) -- Harbour porpoise (Phocoena phocoena) -- Gulf of California porpoise (Phocoena sinus) -- Burmeister's porpoise (Phocoena spinipinnis) -- Dall's porpoise (Phocoenoides dalli) -- Sirenians (Sea cows) --
Dugong (Dugong dugon) -- Steller's Sea cow (Hydrodamalis gigas) -- Amazonian Manatee (Trichechus inunguis) -- West Indian Manatee (Trichechus manatus) -- West African Manatee (Trichechus senegalensis) -- Fur seals of Northern/mid-latitudes -- Northern Fur seal (Callorhinus ursinus) -- Guadalupe Fur seal (Arctocephalus townsendi) -- South American Fur seal (Arctocephalus australis) -- Galápagos Fur seal (Arctocephalus galapagoensis) -- Juan Fernández Fur seal (Arctocephalus philippii) -- Fur seals of the Southern Ocean -- South African and Australian Fur seals (Arctocephalus pusillus) -- New Zealand Fur seal (Arctocephalus forsteri) -- Antarctic Fur seal (Arctocephalus gazella) -- Subantarctic Fur seal (Arctocephalus tropicalis) -- Sea lions -- California and Galapagos Sea lions (Zalophus californianus) -- South American Sea lions (Otaria byronia) -- Australian Sea lion (Neophoca cinerea) -- New Zealand Sea lion (Phocarctos hookeri) -- Northern Sea lion (Eumetopias jubatus) --
Northern True seals -- Northern Elephant seal (Mirounga angustirostris) -- Hooded seal (Cystophora cristata) -- Grey seal (Halichoerus grypus) -- Harp seal (Pagophilus groenlandicus) -- Ribbon seal (Histriophoca fasciata ) -- Bearded seal (Erignathus barbatus) -- Ringed seal (Pusa hispida) -- Largha seal (Phoca largha) -- Harbour seal (Phoca vitulina) -- Mid-latitude True seals -- Caspian seal (Pusa caspica) -- Baikal seal (Pusa sibirica) -- Mediterranean Monk seal (Monachus monachus) -- Hawaiian Monk seal (Monachus schauinslandi) -- West Indian Monk seal (Monachus tropicalis) -- Subantarctic and Antarctic True seals -- Southern Elephant seal (Mirounga leonina) -- Leopard seal (Hydrurga leptonyx) -- Crabeater seal (Lobodon carcinophaga) -- Weddell seal (Leptonychotes weddellii) -- Ross seal (Ommatophoca rossii) -- Arctic animals -- Walrus (Odobenus rosmarus) -- Polar bear (Ursus maritimus) -- Otters -- Sea otter (Enhydra lutris) -- Marine otter (Lutra felina) -- Glossary -- Selected marine mammal sites -- Europe -- Eastern North America -- Western North America -- Latin America -- Australia and New Zealand -- Indian Ocean and Asia -- Conversation checklist -- Selected bibliography -- Photographic credits -- Index
Topic:
Marine mammals
Aquatic mammals
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_901741

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