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National Tribal Chairmen's Association records 1971-1978

Creator:
National Tribal Chairmenʹs Association
Youpee, William
Toda, Chinzu
Subject:
United States Indian Health Service
American Indian Movement
Advisory Commission on Intergovernment Relations
Association on American Indian Tradition and Cultural Activities
Physical description:
40 linear feet
Culture:
American Indians legal cases tribal government agriculture
Type:
Sound recordings
Letters
Printed material
Minutes
Lists
Date:
1971-1978
Topic:
Indian-government relations
Indian interest groups
Local number:
NMAI.AC.014
Notes:
Planning for the establishment of the National Tribal Chairmenʹs Association took place in Pierre, North Dakota, in April 1971, and formal organization took place in Albuquerque in July 1971. The organization serves as a voice for elected Indian leaders of federally recognized tribes and promotes American Indian unity, observation of treaty and other rights, preservation of values, and progress in justice, social standing, education, economic well being, and political influence of all Indians of the United States. The organization no longer exists.
Summary:
The files are those of the Washington, D.C., office that were acculated primarily under William Youpee. Youpee served as the first president of the association and became its executive director in 1972. There are also files accumulated by Chinzu Toda, a Bureau of Indian Affairs employee who was on loan to the NTCA. In 1978, Kenneth E. Black became the executive director. Material created from 1978 to the end of the NTCA are in private hands.
Cite as:
Records of the National Tribal Chairmenʹs Association, Smithsonian Institution National Museum of the American Indian Archives
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution National Museum of the American Indian Archives
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Harvest of Hope: 4 Phil Fontaine

Creator:
National Museum of the American Indian
Type:
Youtube videos
Uploaded:
2013-12-20T14:04:50.000Z
Topic:
Native Americans
American Indians
Youtube Category:
Education
Video Title:
Harvest of Hope: 4 Phil Fontaine
Description:
In the spirit of Thanksgiving, this timely and insightful forum moderated by Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian Director Kevin Gover (Pawnee/Comanche) focuses on topical issues of reconciliation and highlights national apologies made to Native peoples. The symposium covers the eloquent apology issued in June 2008 by the Canadian government for the abuse and cultural loss suffered by Aboriginal peoples in Canada's residential schools. It includes a presentation on the Native American Apology Resolution recently passed in the United States Senate as well as an examination of reconciliation efforts in Guatemala. A wrap-up speaker considers the issues involved in apologies and reconciliation processes in a broad scope. Concluding with panel discussion and questions from the audience, Harvest of Hope seeks a deeper, more inclusive understanding of our national narratives and the experiences of the Native peoples of the Americas. In Part 4, Phil Fontaine gives a talk entitled, "The Apology Breakthrough: Now What?" Chief Phil Fontaine (Sagkeeng First Nation) is a dedicated and highly respected leader in Canada. He has been instrumental in facilitating change and advancement for First Nations people from the time he was first elected to public office as Chief, at the young age of twenty-eight. He is a proud member of the Sagkeeng First Nation in Manitoba and still plays an active role in the support of his community. In the early 1980s he was elected to the position of Manitoba Regional Chief for the Assembly of First Nations. When his term expired in 1991, he was elected Grand Chief of the Assembly of Manitoba Chiefs where he served three consecutive terms. He played a key role in the development of Manitoba's Framework Agreement Initiative and in the defeat of the Meech Lake Accord, and signed an Employment Equity Agreement with thirty-nine federal agencies. In 1997 he stepped onto the national stage where he was elected to the highest elected position in First Nations politics, National Chief. He is now serving an unprecedented third term in office. His list of accomplishments as National Chief include signing the Declaration of Kinship and Cooperation of the Indigenous and First Nations of North America; being the first Indigenous leader to address the Organization of American States; leading the successful resolution and settlement of the 150-year Indian residential school tragedy; the Making Poverty History Campaign; lobbying for the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous People; and negotiating a fair and just process for the settlement of specific land claims. National Chief Fontaine has received many awards and honors for his work, including four honorary degrees and membership in the Order of Manitoba. This symposium took place in the Rasmuson Theater of the Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian in Washington, DC on November 13, 2008.
Views:
220
Video Duration:
26 min 7 sec
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Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian
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Kee-o-kúk, The Watchful Fox, Chief of the Tribe

Artist:
George Catlin, born Wilkes-Barre, PA 1796-died Jersey City, NJ 1872
Sitter:
Keokuk
Medium:
oil on canvas
Dimensions:
29 x 24 in. (73.7 x 6 0.9 cm)
Type:
Painting
Date:
1835
Topic:
Dress\ethnic\Indian dress
Figure male\full length
Portrait male
Ethnic\Indian\Sac and Fox
Ethnic\Indian\Sac and Fox
Object\weapon\spear
Dress\accessory\shield
Credit Line:
Smithsonian American Art Museum, Gift of Mrs. Joseph Harrison, Jr.
Object number:
1985.66.1
Description:
George Catlin painted Kee-o-kúk at the Sac and Fox village in 1835. He described the chief as a “vain man” who was very pleased with his portraits, including this version. He wears an elaborate costume of white buckskin leggings, a red blanket, and a bear-claw necklace. Two years later, in 1837, Catlin brought Kee-o-kúk to Washington, where the artist showed his portraits, hoping the government would buy his Indian Gallery. During this visit, a journalist for the New York Evening Herald described the chief as a “fine and noble looking man.” Kee-o-kúk thought it useless for his people to fight the United States government. Instead, he signed over lands in the states known today as Illinois, Missouri, and Wisconsin, for which his tribe received about seventy-five cents per acre. Catlin noted that the Sac and Fox “have sold so much of their land lately, that they have the luxuries of life to a considerable degree . . . they look elated and happy, carrying themselves much above the humbled manner of most of the semi-civilized tribes, whose heads are hanging and drooping in poverty and despair.” (Dippie, Catlin and His Contemporaries: The Politics of Patronage, 1990)
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Smithsonian American Art Museum
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Red Cloud

Artist:
Charles Milton Bell, 1848 - 1893
Sitter:
Red Cloud, 1822 - 1909
Medium:
Albumen silver print
Dimensions:
Image/Sheet: 40.6 x 31.9cm (16 x 12 9/16")
Mount: 71.3 x 55.8cm (28 1/16 x 21 15/16")
Mat: 81.3 x 66cm (32 x 26")
Type:
Photograph
Place:
United States\District of Columbia
Date:
1880
Topic:
Interior
Equipment\Walking stick\Cane
Interior\Studio\Photography
Red Cloud: Native American\Warrior
Red Cloud: Native American\Leader\Chief
Portrait
Credit Line:
National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution
Object number:
NPG.2005.117
Exhibition Label:
"I have tried to get from my Great Father what is right and just," exclaimed Red Cloud to government officials at the conclusion of his first trip to the East in 1870. Two years earlier the celebrated Lakota leader had forced U.S. authorities to abandon a series of newly constructed forts meant to protect settlers moving across traditional Native lands. Beginning in 1870, however, Red Cloud would choose diplomacy, not warfare, to protect the Lakota's land base and to ensure the tribe's political and cultural independence. Although the westward migration of American settlers would continue largely unabated, Red Cloud remained dedicated to the future welfare of the Lakota, meeting with five different U.S. presidents over a period of thirty years. Washington photographer Charles M. Bell seated Red Cloud next to a papier-mâché rock and a painted seascape backdrop for this portrait taken during one of his many trips to the nation's capital.
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National Portrait Gallery Collection
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National Portrait Gallery
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Going Home 14: Experiences in International Repatriation - The Hon. Richard B Luarkie

Creator:
National Museum of the American Indian
Type:
Youtube videos
Uploaded:
2014-11-21T20:18:29.000Z
Topic:
Native Americans
American Indians
Youtube Category:
Education
Video Title:
Going Home 14: Experiences in International Repatriation - The Hon. Richard B Luarkie
Description:
The 1989 National Museum of the American Indian Act (NMAIA) opened a new era in relations between Native Americans and museums by giving legal weight to the spiritual and ethical concerns of tribes. To commemorate 25 years of repatriation, the National Museum of the American Indian has convened this symposium to discuss the history of the NMAIA, current repatriation practices at the Smithsonian Institution, and the future of repatriation beyond political and geographical boundaries. In this segment, the Hon. Richard B. Luarkie, Governor, Pueblo of Laguna, speaks on the panel topic, "Bringing the Ancestors Home: Experiences in International Repatriation." Richard Luarkie is from the Pueblo of Laguna and is currently serving his fourth year as the Governor for the tribe. Most recently, he served as the Pueblo’s first Lieutenant Governor. Over the years, he has also acquired experience in other areas of leadership, which includes serving on tribal and non-tribal boards of directors, and participating in various state and tribal government committees. Governor Luarkie has a passion for strategy, economic creation and globalization, and sustainability. His professional experience includes being a small business owner, as well as working for international companies such as American Management Systems and AT&T Advanced Network Products & Services-Global Strategy. The majority of Governor Luarkie’s professional career has been in the areas of technology, strategy, and economic development. He earned a BA in Economics from the University of New Mexico, an MBA from New Mexico State University, and is currently a PhD candidate at Arizona State University-School of Social Transformation. The symposium, "Going Home: 25 Years of Repatriation Under the NMAI Act," was webcast and recorded at the Rasmuson Theater of the National Museum of the American Indian on November 19, 2014.
Views:
82
Video Duration:
30 min 7 sec
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YouTube Channel:
SmithsonianNMAI
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian
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Going Home 13: Experiences in International Repatriation - The Hon. Kim Beazley

Creator:
National Museum of the American Indian
Type:
Youtube videos
Uploaded:
2014-11-21T20:18:29.000Z
Topic:
Native Americans
American Indians
Youtube Category:
Education
Video Title:
Going Home 13: Experiences in International Repatriation - The Hon. Kim Beazley
Description:
The 1989 National Museum of the American Indian Act (NMAIA) opened a new era in relations between Native Americans and museums by giving legal weight to the spiritual and ethical concerns of tribes. To commemorate 25 years of repatriation, the National Museum of the American Indian has convened this symposium to discuss the history of the NMAIA, current repatriation practices at the Smithsonian Institution, and the future of repatriation beyond political and geographical boundaries. In this segment, the Hon. Kim Beazley, Australian Ambassador to the United States, speaks on the panel topic, "Bringing the Ancestors Home: Experiences in International Repatriation." Kim Beazley is the Australian Ambassador to the United States, a position to which he was appointed in 2010. Beazley previously served in the Australian House of Representatives from 1980 to 2007. He was a Minister in the Hawke and Keating Labor Governments (1983-96) holding, at various times, the portfolios of Defence, Finance, Transport and Communications, Employment Education and Training, Aviation, and Special Minister of State. He was Deputy Prime Minister (1995-96) and Leader of the Australian Labor Party and Leader of the Opposition (1996-2001 and 2005-06). After his retirement from politics in 2007, Beazley was named Winthrop Professor in the Department of Politics and International Relations at the University of Western Australia. From July 2008–December 2009, he was appointed Chancellor of the Australian National University. In 2009, Beazley was awarded the Companion of the Order of Australia for service to the Parliament of Australia through contributions to the development of government policies in relation to defense and international relations, and as an advocate for Indigenous people, and to the community. The symposium, "Going Home: 25 Years of Repatriation Under the NMAI Act," was webcast and recorded at the Rasmuson Theater of the National Museum of the American Indian on November 19, 2014.
Views:
53
Video Duration:
30 min 32 sec
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SmithsonianNMAI
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian
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Kit Carson

Artist:
Charles DeForest Fredricks, 11 Dec 1823 - 25 May 1894
Sitter:
Christopher Houston Carson, 24 Dec 1809 - 23 May 1868
Medium:
Albumen silver print
Dimensions:
Image/Sheet: 8.3 x 5.6cm (3 1/4 x 2 3/16")
Mount: 10.3 x 6.1cm (4 1/16 x 2 3/8")
Mat: 45.7 x 35.6cm (18 x 14")
Type:
Photograph
Date:
c. 1863
Topic:
Photographic Format\Carte-de-visite
Christopher Houston Carson: Military and Intelligence\Army\Officer\Colonel
Christopher Houston Carson: Military and Intelligence\Soldier
Christopher Houston Carson: Business and Industry\Merchant\Trader\Fur trader
Christopher Houston Carson: Natural Resources\Scout
Christopher Houston Carson: Natural Resources\Guide
Christopher Houston Carson: Politics and Government\Government Official\Indian agent
Christopher Houston Carson: Natural Resources\Hunter
Christopher Houston Carson: Natural Resources\Trapper
Portrait
Credit Line:
National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution
Object number:
NPG.2005.115
Exhibition Label:
Christopher "Kit" Carson was a legendary yet controversial figure whose career as a mountain man and an army officer in the Southwest earned him national acclaim. Carson first gained notoriety working under explorer John C. Frémont. Serving on three Frémont-led expeditions during the 1840s, he distinguished himself for his skills as a hunter and a guide. Despite being illiterate, he was fluent in several languages and was able to communicate with many Native American tribes in the region. During the Civil War, Carson commanded a Union regiment, successfully defending New Mexico from Confederate invaders. Also at this time he was called upon to lead a campaign to relocate the Navajo to a reservation three hundred miles away on the Pecos River. The 1864 "Long Walk" to Bosque Redondo-during which more than two hundred died-represented one of the largest forced relocations in U.S. history.
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Data Source:
National Portrait Gallery
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New voyages to North-America : Containing an account of the several nations of that vast continent : their customs, commerce, and way of navigation upon the lakes and rivers : the several attempts of the English and French to dispossess one another : with the reasons of the miscarriage of the former : and the various adventures between the French, and the Iroquese confederates of England, from 1683 to 1694. A geographical description of Canada, and a natural history of the country, with remarks upon their government, and the interest of the English and French in their commerce. Also a dialogue between the author and a general of the savages, giving a full view of the religion and strange opinions of those people : with an account of the author's retreat to Portugal and Denmark and his remarks on those courts. To which is added, a dictionary of the Algonkine language, which is generally spoke in North-America : illustrated with twenty three mapps and cutts / Written in French by the Baron Lahontan, lord lievtenant of the French colony at Placentia in Newfoundland, now in England. Done into English, in two volumes. A great part of which never printed in the original

Some new voyages to North-America
Author:
Lahontan, Louis Armand de Lom d'Arce baron de 1666-1716
Engraver:
Moll, Herman d. 1732
Physical description:
2 v., [23] leaves of plates (some folded) : ill., maps ; 20 cm. (8vo)
Type:
Early works to 1800
Glossaries, vocabularies, etc
Place:
Canada
Portugal
Denmark
Date:
1703
To 1763 (New France)
Topic:
Algonquin language
Wyandot language
Description and travel
History
Call number:
F1030 .L1813 1703
Notes:
Translation of: Nouveaux voyages de Mr. le baron de Lahontan dans l'Amerique septentrionale.
Vol. 2 has title: New voyages to North-America. Giving a full account of the customs, commerce, religion, and strange opinions of the savages of that country. With political remarks upon the courts of Portugal and Denmark, and the present state of the commerce of those countries ...
"The engravings are by H. Moll"--Sabin.
Title pages with double-rule borders.
Pagination of each v.: v. 1. [24], 280 p., [12] leaves of plates; v. 2. [2], 302, [16] p. (final p. is blank), [11] leaves of plates.
Includes index at end of v. 2.
Errata in v. 1, p. [24] (1st group).
Publisher's advertisement on p. [1] (3rd group) of v. 2.
Sabin 38644
Pilling, J.C. Bib. of the Algonquian languages, p. 290-291
Contents:
v. 1. Some new voyages to North-America (letters I-XXV). Memoirs of North-America. A table explaining some terms made use of in both volumes -- v. 2. A discourse of the habit, houses, complexion and temperament of the savages of North-America. A conference or dialogue between the author and Adario, a noted man among the savages. An appendix, containing some new voyages to Portugal and Denmark. A short dictionary of the most universal language of the savages. Index
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
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Ales Hrdlicka Papers ca. 1887-1943

Creator:
Hrdlička, Aleš 1869-1943
Bohemian Circle in Washington
Smithsonian Institution Department of Anthropology Division of Physical Anthropology
Army Medical Museum (U.S.)
Correspondent:
Adams, W. I
Adler, Cyrus 1863-1940
Alderman, E.M
Alliot, Hector
Alvarez, Walter C
Ameghino, Florentino
Angell, James R
Abbott, William Louis 1860-1936
Absolon, Karel
Allyn, Harriet M
Lowie, Robert
Robinson, Edward G
Hemingway, Ernest
Ami, Henry
Anthony, R
Ashley-Montagu, Montague Francis
Atwood, Charles E
Avirette, John Allfred
Baer, John Leonard
Bell, Enoch
Martin, Fredericka I
Bingham, Hiram
Bingman, C.E
Blue, Ruppert
Bloomfield, Leonard 1887-1949
Bodding, P.C
Bogue, E.A
Bothwell, J.A
Bridges, Calvin B
Burlin, Natalie Curtis
Babcock, William H
Baldwin, Bird T
Barrus, Clara
Barry, J. Neilson
Bartashchell, A.W
Barton, James L
Bather, F.A
Bean, Robert Bennett
Benes, Edward
Betsche, Chris
Bell, Earl H
Bilgery, Conrad
Birket-Smith, Kaj
Bishop, Carl W
Black, Davidson
Boas, Franz 1858-1942
Bogoras, Waldemar G
Borbolla, F. Rubin I
Bowman, Isaiah
Boyd, William C
Boyle, Mary Elizabeth
Breasted, James Henry
Breton, Adela C
Breuil Abbe
Briggs, H.H
Brockett, Paul 1872-1946
Brown, A.R
Barnum, Brown
Bunak, V
Bunnell, Charles E
Bushnell, David Ives Jr 1875-1941
Cadbury, William W
Callendar, G.R
Campbell, W.W
Capitan, Louis
Castellanos, Abraham
Edison, Thomas A (Thomas Alva) 1847-1931
Celler, Emanuel
Chamberlain, Thomas C
Clark, G. Hardy
Clemens, James B
Colbert, L.O
Comas, Juan
Comer, George
Cameron, John
Candela, P.B
Carroll, Mitchell
Cattell, Jacque
Cattell, James McKeen
Chapman, John W Rev
Ciocco, Antonio
Cipriani, Lidio
United States Department of Agriculture
Academy of Natural Sciences Philadelphia
Alaskan Sportsman
American Anthropological Association
American Association for the Advancement of Science
American Committee for Protection of the Foreign Born
American Geographical Society
Journal of the American Medical Association
American Philosophical Society
United States Department of Commerce
American Association of Physical Anthropologists
Abbot, Charles Greeley
Subject:
Hyde Exploring Expedition (1902-1903)
Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York
Panama California Exposition physical anthropology exhibits
Peking Union Medical College
Royal Anthropological Society Huxley lecture
Army Medical Museum (U.S.)
American Association of Physical Anthropologists
International Congress of Americanists
Anthropological Society of Washington (Washington, D.C.)
American Anthropological Association
Washington Academy of Sciences (Washington, D.C.)
National Academy of Science
American Journal of Physical Anthropology
Institute of Population
American School in France for Prehistoric Studies
Committee on Anthropological Affairs
Physical description:
133 linear feet
Culture:
American Indian tuberculosis among
Chippewa Leech Lake
Chippewa White Earth
Dakota Indians
Pachamac Peru archeology
Apache Indians
Dakota Oglala
Shawnee Indians
Menominee Indians
Pima Indians
Huichol
Mohave Indians
Hupa Indians
Tarahumara Indians
Quinailt
Indians of North America Northeast
Ojibwa Indians
Indians of North America Northwest Coast of North America
Quinault Indians
Indians of North America Great Plains
Indians of North America Southwest, New
Oglala Indians
Indians of North America California
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Date:
1887
1887-1943
ca 1887-1943
Topic:
Old Americans
Trenton skeletal material
Fossils--man
Human evolution
Children--physical anthropology
Tuberculosis--American Indians
Huntington collection
Forensic anthropology
Immigration law--and physical anthropology
Children who run on all fours
Anthropometry
My Journeys, by A. Hrdlicka
Notes:
Ales Hrdlicka was born in Bohemia and came to America when he was thirteen. As a young man, he was trained in medicine at New York's Eclectic Medical College and the New York Homeopathic Medical College, receiving degrees from each. His first professional work was as a private practitioner, but he gave that up in 1894 when he joined the staff of the New York State Hospital for the Insane at Middletown. There, in addition to other duties, he began studies of the physical characteristics of inmates. This set in motion developments that would eventually lead him to become one of the world's most prominent anthropologists who has sometimes been referred to as "the founder of physical anthropology in America."
In 1896, in preparation for a research appointment with the Department of Anthropology in the Pathological Institute of the New York State hospitals, Hrdlicka went to Paris and studied with Leon Manouvrier. After his return to America, he worked for a short period with the Pathological Institute and came into contact with G.S. Huntington, of the College of Physicians and Surgeons in New York. Hrdlicka arranged and studied Huntington's large collection of skeletal material, thus gaining knowledge of a well-documented collection representing largely normal persons of European ancestry. He furthermore came to the attention of Frederic Ward Putnam, of the American Museum of Natural History, who arranged for his first anthropological field studies.
It was thus that Hrdlicka became a member of the Hyde Expeditions to the American Southwest and northern Mexico. In 1898, he traveled to Mexico with Carl Lumholtz to study the Tarahumaras, Huichols, and neighboring tribes. In subsequent years, he returned to Mexico and the Southwest alone and studied physical characteristics and medical conditions of several American Indian tribes. With this experience and examinations of the Trenton and Lansing skeletal material for Putnam, Hrdlicka came fully into the world of anthropology. In 1903, he was appointed head of the newly formed Division of Physical Anthropology in the United States National Museum.
In his position at the Smithsonian, Hrdlicka's contributions to American physical anthropology were great. His travels and field studies alone were impressive and important in his growth as an authority on the migration of man to the New World, human evolution, and the variations of man's physical form. In 1905, he returned to the Southwest for studies of Pima and Apache children and, in the following year, traveled to Florida to examine allegedly ancient remains of man. In 1908, he worked among a number of Indian tribes, including the Menominee, Oglala Dakota, Quinailt, Hupa, and Mohave, in a study of tuberculosis among them. In 1909, he traveled to Egypt with an expedition of the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York in order to study living Egyptians and to examine remains of Egypt's past population. The following year took him to Argentina, Peru, and Mexico. In the first of these, he again examined allegedly ancient remains of man. In Peru, he made a large collection of skeletal material near Trujillo, at Pachamac, and in the Chicama Valley.
Between 1912-1914, Hrdlicka undertook a physical anthropological exhibit for the Panama-California Exposition in San Diego and, for this, traveled to eastern Siberia, Mongolia, Peru, and Florida. He also examined fossil remains of man in Europe and directed field work of other anthropologists in South and East Africa, St. Lawrence Island in Alaska, the Philippines, eastern Siberia, and the Ukraine. In 1915, for the Department of Justice, he assessed the racial makeup of Chippewas on the Leech Lake and White Earth reservations in Minnesota and also studied Dakota Indians. In 1917, his field work was directed toward white American families with longtime residence in the United States. In 1918, he carried out a survey of ancient sites in eastern Florida for the Bureau of American Ethnology. In 1920, he traveled to Hawaii, Japan, Korea, and Manchuria in connection with an appointment to lecture at the Peking Union Medical College. As director of the American School for Prehistoric Studies in France, he again studied fossil remains of man in Europe in 1922 and 1923. In 1925, he carried out work in India, Ceylon, Java, Australia, South Africa, and Europe. In 1927, he was again in Europe to deliver the Huxley Memorial Lecture before the Royal Anthropological Society in Great Britain. Between 1929 and 1938, he traveled frequently to Alaska to carry on an anthropological survey. In 1939, he traveled to Russia and Siberia.
Beginning with much of the skeletal collection of the Army Medical Museum, which had been transferred to the Smithsonian in 1898 before he was appointed there, Hrdlicka amassed a bone collection that included, among many other specimens, the Huntington collection, casts of fossil remains of man, and a large and diverse North American collection. He also gathered a large collection of human brains. Over three hundred publications resulted from his study of this material, his field work, and his study of specimens in other museums. In addition, he was involved in many other activities. For United States government agencies, he provided services ranging from examinations of human remains for law enforcement officials to providing information and opinions concerning national origins and traits that were needed to interpret laws and form foreign policy. During World War II, he also advised government officials on policies to be pursued with certain national groups following the war.
In 1918, Hrdlicka founded the American Journal of Physical Anthropology and remained its editor until 1942. In 1928, he was the major force behind the organization of the American Association of Physical Anthropologists and served as its president in 1928-1932. He was also president of the Anthropological Society of Washington in 1907, the American Anthroplogical Association in 1925-1927, and the Washington Academy of Sciences in 1928-1929. He was chairman of Section H of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in 1918 and secretary of the Committee on Anthropology of the National Research Council in 1917. In addition, Hrdlicka was a member of the American Philosophical Society and the National Academy of Sciences. He represented the Smithsonian at several international gatherings of scholars, including meetings of the International Congress of Americanists.
Summary:
Hrdlicka's papers comprise a wide variety of materials but consist largely of correspondence, manuscripts of writings, physical anthropological tables and notes, and photographs. The material reflects his many professional interests and activities except for the earliest, for which the documents were destroyed by fire. Since he apparently made little distinction between his official and private activities, the papers incorporate many official records of the of the Smithsonian's Division of Physical Anthropology. This and other material show his wide-range of contacts with anthroplogists, especially physical anthropologists, and with many scholars in related sciences. Yet other material is personal and includes such documents as those relating to Hrdlicka's private property and correspondence with members of his family. Notably present is correspondence with his first wife, Marie Strickler. There are also documents that concern Hrdlicka's continued ties with Czechoslovakia (much of it in Czech) and his interests in Czech-American organizations, scientific development of Czechoslovakia, and his concern for its political fate, especially during World War II.
Cite as:
Ales Hrdlicka Papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Data Source:
National Anthropological Archives
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Indians of North America The Cherokee [published] 95.1.7 RV 1993

Creator:
Nevison, Henry Producer
Henry Nevison; Producer, Director
Marty Moss-Coane; Narration
John Douglas White; Editor
Dana Palermo, Rick Scott; Audio
Rich Wilson; script writer
Andrew Schlessinger, John Gerbec, Dana Palermo; producers
Physical description:
31 min sound color video
Culture:
Cherokee Indians
Indians of North America
Indians of North America Southern States
Type:
Projected media
Collection descriptions
Place:
Cherokee
North America
disintigration
United States, Kentucky, Oklahoma, North Carolina
Date:
1993
Topic:
Land--acquisition of
Land--as a source of wealth
Land--as property
Land--reclamation
Land--reservations
Settlement--patterns
Migration
Boundaries--territorial
Conflict
Warriors--status of
Territorial--boundaries--exploitation
Territory--annexed consolidation of
Government--activities--agencies, relief
Government--care of dependent ethnic groups
Government--education--public
Government--expeditions
Government--military
Government--policies
Government--constitutions
Military--armed forces
Education--curriculum
Education--teachers in--theories of
Education--attitudes toward
Literacy
Spiritualism
Missions--religious
Nature--ideas about
Descent--matrilineal
Assimilation--of ethnic groups
Bands--migratory
Hunting--buffalo
Horses
Gardens
Exploring--expeditions
Ownership--individual--collective
Culture--accomodation--adaptation
Culture--change
Culture--continuity
Culture
Culture--ideals
Treaties--peace--capitulation
Newspapers
Railways--construction
Rail--transport
Law--court--of law and justice
Imprisonment
Local number:
HSFA 95.1.7 RV
Summary:
Indians of North America Series: The Cherokee. Edited film documents the history of the Cherokee American Indians since the arrival of European settlers in North America. Emphasis is placed on the Cherokee language, literacy and education, effects of settlers on Cherokee culture and lifeways, life on the reservation, and conflicts with the Unites States government over land rights. Film follows the fissioning of the factions of Cherokee tribes into the western Cherokees of Oklahoma and the eastern Cherokees of North Carolina and Georgia until their ultimate unification and creation of the Cherokee Nation in 1839. Featured is Secoya, the inventor of the Cherokee written language which was disseminated throughout the tribe, insuring the literacy of most Cherokees within one generation. This began a tradition of education and literacy which would later establish the Cherokees as the first tribe to write a tribal newspaper, "The Cherokee Phoenix," and to establish two high schools in 1851, one of which was for women. Film addresses the impact of government land policies such as the 1887 Dawes Act, allotting land to individuals rather than to the tribe; the 1830 Indian Removal Act, forcing Indians to relocate and resettle on land west of the Mississippi, including the forced migration known as the Trail of Tears. Footage sequences include: Cherokee council houses; open plazas for social, political and religious events; homes made from a framework of wooden beams sealed with mud plaster; black and white government films recruiting Indian laborors to the city; interviews with Cherokee elders and youths.
Data Source:
Human Studies Film Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

Indians of North America The Navajo [published] 95.1.7 RV 1993

Creator:
Nevison, Henry Producer
Henry Nevison; Producer, Director
Marty Moss-Coane; Narration
Harold Boihem; Editor
Dana Palermo, Rick Scott; Audio
Robin Buerki, Henry Nevison, Leon Skyharse Thomas; Video
Andrew Schlessinger, John Gerbec, Dana Palermo; producers
Physical description:
29 min sound color video
Culture:
Navajo Indians
Indians of North America
Indians of North America Southwest, New
Type:
Projected media
Collection descriptions
Place:
Navajo
North America
disintigration
United States, Texas, Mexico
Date:
1993
Topic:
Land--acquisition of
Land--as a source of wealth
Land--as property
Land--reclamation
Land--clearing for construction
Land--conservation policies
Land--reservations
Settlement--patterns
Exploitation
Warfare--surrender
Migration
World War II
Territorial--boundaries--exploitation
Territory--annexed consolidation of
Government--activities--agencies
Government--care of dependent ethnic groups
Government--education--public
Government--expeditions
Government--military
Government--policies
Political--authority
Political--reform
Political--system--philosopy
Military--armed forces
Military--posts--tactics
Education--curriculum
Education--teachers in--theories of
Education--attitudes toward
History--oral, as a method
Spiritualism
Missions--religious
Nature--ideas about
Descent--matrilineal
Assimilation--of ethnic groups
Trading--posts
Weaving--weavers
Weaving--looms--hand
Wool--production--blankets
Silversmiths
Dwellings--Hogans
Jewelry--manufacture
Hunting--buffalo
Animals--sheep
Animals--herding
Animals--cattle
Animals--grazing, round-ups of--ideas about--taming and domestication of
Agriculture--by-products--science--tools
Exploring--expeditions
Ownership--individual--collective
Culture--accomodation--adaptation
Culture--change
Culture--continuity
Culture
Culture--ideals
Local number:
HSFA 95.1.7 RV
Summary:
Indians of North America Series: The Navajo. Edited film documents the history of the Navajo with special emphasis on the transitions from a hunter gatherer society to farming and then to shepherding, the ever present conflict with the United States government and a discussion of the future of Navajo culture and traditions. Film addresses the issue of land seizure by the United States, The Republic of Texas and Mexico, focusing on the ultimate surrender of the Navajos to the U.S. Army in 1863, the forced "Long Walk" 250 miles to New Mexico, and their subsequent life on a reservation. Once on the reservation, film explores the educational policies for Navajo schoolchildren which included forbidding children to speak Navajo or openly discussing any aspect of tradition or culture, the effects of the Christian missionaries, the policies of the Bureau of Indian Affairs and the marketing of Navajo blankets and jewelry for the outside world. Footage depicts "Hogans," Navajo homes made of a thick branch framework covered with mud and earth; Navajo beadwork, blankets and jewelry; 1934 black and white government film; World War II footage of Navajo men in the armed services; schoolchildren on reservations; the site of the Navajo surrender to the U.S. Army in 1863; Navajo youth today in public schools. Interviews with various Navajos reveal the use of Navajo language for codes during World War II, the importance of respect and kindness to animals and nature, and the necessity to instill a knowledge and appreciation of Navajo culture and traditions in Navajo youth today.
Data Source:
Human Studies Film Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

Indians of North America The Yankton Sioux [published] 95.1.7 RV 1993

Creator:
Nevison, Henry Producer
Henry Nevison; Producer, Director
Marty Moss-Coane; Narration
Harold Boihem, John Gerbec, Meg Twomey; Editors
Henry Nevison, Dana Palermo; Audio
Rich Wilson; script writer
John Gerbec, Dana Palermo; producers
Physical description:
30 min sound color video
Culture:
Yankton Sioux
Indians of North America
Type:
Projected media
Collection descriptions
Place:
Sioux
North America
disintigration
United States
Date:
1993
Topic:
Land--acquisition of
Land--as a source of wealth
Land--as property
Land--reclamation
Land--territory--boundaries
Land--reservations
Settlement--patterns
Migration
Bands--migratory
Warriors--status of
Conflict
Territorial--boundaries--exploitation
Territory--annexed consolidation of
Government--activities--agencies
Government--care of dependent ethnic groups
Government--education--public
Government--expeditions
Government--military
Government--policies
Government--treaties
Government--legal system--courts--judge
Government--imprisonment
Political--authority
Military--armed forces
Education--curriculum
Education--teachers in--theories of
Education--attitudes toward
Education--literacy
History--oral, as a method
Spiritualism
Missions--religious
Nature--ideas about
Descent--matrilineal
Assimilation--of ethnic groups
Gifts--exchange--giving
Trade
Alcoholism
Gambling--casino
Trading--posts
Pipes--smoking
Dance--dancing--performers
Dance--Sun Dance
Drums--as musical instruments
Ceremony--Vision Quest--sweat lodges
Dwellings--teepees--cabins
Animals--buffalo--hunting
Animals--horses
Animals--cattle
Agriculture--gardens
Exploring--expeditions
Ownership--individual--collective
Culture--accomodation--adaptation
Culture--change
Culture--continuity
Culture
Culture--ideals
Syncretism
Local number:
HSFA 95.1.7 RV
Summary:
Indians of North America Series: The Yankton Sioux. Edited film documents the history of the Yankton Sioux American Indians since the arrival of European settlers in the plains around the Black Hills. Emphasized are the continual conflicts with the United States government over land rights and government policies of assimilation. Film explores the particular history of the Yankton, one of the 14 divisions of the Sioux tribe; explanations reveal both Yankton and general Sioux history. Themes featured include: the change from an agricultural and hunting existance to a trade existance by 1800; The Yankton relationship with non-Indians in the area; the effects of various government acts and policies such as the 1887 Dawes Act and the Indian Reorganization Act, the role of the casino on the reservation; the syncretic relationship between the Sioux religion and the Catholic church. Film documents various spiritual ceremonies and activities: the Sioux Sun Dance ceremony, use of the sacred pipe as part of the prayer ritual; the vision quest; the role of the sweat lodge; feasts where members exchange gifts. Footage depicts drumming and dancing at a powwow, Sioux cabins and teepees, buffalo hunting, casinos on tribal land, interviews with Yankton elders and youths.
Data Source:
Human Studies Film Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

Indian wars of Mexico, Canada and the United States, 1812-1900 / Bruce Vandervort

Author:
Vandervort, Bruce
Physical description:
xvii, 337 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm
Type:
Books
Place:
United States
Canada
Mexico
Date:
2006
1812-1815
1815-1875
1866-1895
19th century
Topic:
Wars
Politics and government
Contents:
Introduction -- Worlds in motion -- The New World in a century of small wars -- Worldviews and fighting faiths -- Chiefs and warriors -- The great clearance, 1815-42 -- Indian wars in Mexico, 1821-76 -- War on the plains, 1848-77 -- Conquest of Apachería, 1860-86 -- War on the Canadian prairies, 1870-85 -- Indian wars of the Porfiriato, 1876-1900 -- Conclusion : long shadows
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
Visitor Tag(s):

A survey of the contemporary Indians of Canada; a report on economic, political, educational needs and policies. Editor, H. B. Hawthorn

Author:
Hawthorn, Harry Bertram 1910-
Canada Indian Affairs Branch
Physical description:
2 v. 36 cm
Type:
Books
Place:
Canada
Date:
1966
1966-67
Topic:
Social conditions
Government relations
Call number:
E78.C2 H39
E78.C2 H39
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
Visitor Tag(s):

Encyclopedia of United States Indian policy and law / edited by Paul Finkelman, Tim Alan Garrison

Author:
Finkelman, Paul 1949-
Garrison, Tim Alan 1961-
Physical description:
2 v. (932, 38 p.) : ill., maps ; 29 cm
Type:
Encyclopedias
Date:
2009
C2009
Topic:
Indians of North America--Legal status, laws, etc--History
Indians of North America--Government relations--History
Politics and government
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
Visitor Tag(s):

Richard Mentor Johnson and Tecumseh

View of Col. Johnson's Engagement with the Savages
Artist:
Abel Bowen, 23 Dec 1790 - 11 Mar 1850
Sitter:
Richard Mentor Johnson, 17 Oct 1781 - 18 Nov 1850
Tecumseh, c. 1768 - 1813
Medium:
Hand-colored wood engraving on paper
Dimensions:
Sheet: 21.5 × 37.5 cm (8 7/16 × 14 3/4")
Type:
Print
Date:
c. 1812
Topic:
Weapon
Nature & Environment\Plant\Tree
Weapon\Sword
Exterior\Landscape\Battleground
Nature & Environment\Animal\Horse
Tool\Axe
Human Figures\Soldier
Human Figures
Tecumseh: Native American\Leader\Chief
Richard Mentor Johnson: Law and Law Enforcement\Lawyer
Richard Mentor Johnson: Politics and Government\Vice-President of US
Richard Mentor Johnson: Military and Intelligence\Army\Officer\War of 1812
Richard Mentor Johnson: Politics and Government\US Congressman\Kentucky
Richard Mentor Johnson: Politics and Government\State Legislator\Kentucky
Richard Mentor Johnson: Politics and Government\US Senator\Kentucky
Portrait
Credit Line:
National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution
Object number:
NPG.2012.92
See more items in:
National Portrait Gallery Collection
Data Source:
National Portrait Gallery
Visitor Tag(s):

Folkloric poverty : neoliberal multiculturalism in Mexico / Rebecca Overmyer-Velázquez

Author:
Overmyer-Velázquez, Rebecca 1966-
Physical description:
xiii, 209 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm
Type:
Books
Place:
Mexico
Guerrero (State)
Guerrero (Mexico : State)
Date:
2010
C2010
Topic:
Indians of Mexico--Politics and government
Indians of Mexico--Government relations
Indians of Mexico--Ethnic identity
Indian activists
Protest movements
Ethnic relations
Social conditions
Politics and government
Summary:
"Analyzes the crisis indigenous political groups faced in Mexico at the turn of the twenty-first century. Focuses on an indigenous peoples movement in the state of Guerrero that gained unprecedented national and international prominence in the 1990s and yet was defunct by 2002"--Provided by publisher.
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
Visitor Tag(s):

Negotiation within domination : New Spain's Indian pueblos confront the Spanish state / edited by Ethelia Ruiz Medrano and Susan Kellogg

New Spain's Indian pueblos confront the Spanish state
Author:
Ruiz Medrano, Ethelia
Kellogg, Susan
Physical description:
xvii, 264 p. : map ; 24 cm
Type:
Books
Place:
Mexico
Spain
America
Date:
2010
C2010
Spanish colony, 1540-1810
Topic:
Government relations--History
Indians, Treatment of--History
Government, Resistance to
Ethnic relations
History
Colonies
Administration
Contents:
Introduction: back to the future : law, politics, and culture in colonial Mexican ethnohistorical studies / Susan Kellogg -- Empire, Indians, and the negotiation for the status of city in Tlaxcala, 1521-1550 / R. Jovita Baber -- Fighting destiny : Nahua nobles and friars in the sixteenth-century revolt of the encomenderos against the king / Ethelia Ruiz Medrano -- Indigenous centurions and triumphal arches : negotiation in eighteenth-century Mexico City / Edward W. Osowski -- The power of the law : the construction of colonial power in an indigenous region / María de los Ángeles Romero Frizzi -- Costumbre : a language of negotiation in eighteenth-century Oaxaca / Yanna P. Yannakakis -- Peace agreements and war signals : negotiations with the Apaches and Comanches in the interior provinces of New Spain, 1784-1788 / Cuauhtémoc Velasco Ávila -- Waterways, legal ways, and ethnic interactions : the Ríos District of Tabasco during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries / José Manuel A. Chávez-Gómez -- Afterword: the consequences of negotiation / Susan Kellogg
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
Visitor Tag(s):

Aboriginal rights and self-government : the Canadian and Mexican experience in North American perspective / edited by Curtis Cook and Juan D. Lindau

Author:
Cook, Curtis 1937-
Lindau, Juan David
Physical description:
vi, 314 p. ; 24 cm
Type:
Congresses
Date:
2000
C2000
1934-
Topic:
Government relations
Politics and government
Call number:
E91 .A26 2000
Notes:
Papers originally prepared for a colloquium at the Colorado College--Pref.
Contents:
One continent, contrasting styles : the Canadian experience in North American perspective / Juan D. Lindau and Curtis Cook -- A just relationship between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal peoples of Canada / James Tully -- Indigenous movements and politics in Mexico and Latin America / Rodolfo Stavenhagen -- Rights and self-government for Canada's Aboriginal peoples / C.E.S. Franks -- Liberalism's last stand : Aboriginal sovereignty and minority rights / Dale Turner -- First nations and the derivation of Canada's underlying title : comparing perspectives on legal ideology / Michael Asch --Quebec's conceptions of Aboriginal rights / Andrée Lajoie ... [et al.] -- The revolution of the new commons / Gustavo Esteva -- Indian policy : Canada and the United States compared / C.E.S. Franks
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
Visitor Tag(s):

Landscape and power in ancient Mesoamerica / [edited by] Rex Koontz, Kathryn Reese-Taylor, Annabeth Headrick

Author:
Koontz, Rex
Reese-Taylor, Kathryn
Headrick, Annabeth
Physical description:
xxvi, 383 p. : ill., maps ; 23 cm
Type:
Books
Place:
Mexico
Date:
2001
Topic:
Indian architecture
Religion
Politics and government
Sacred space--History
City planning--History
Landscape assessment--History
Antiquities
Contents:
The cultural poetics of power and space in Ancient Mesoameria / Kathryn Reese-Taylor and Rex Koontz -- What the heck's Coatépec? The formative roots of an enduring mythology / Linda Schele and Julia Guernsey Kappelman -- Procession rituals and shrine sites: the politics of sacred space in the late formative valley of Oaxaca / Heather S. Orr -- Sacred geography at Izapa and the performance of rulership / Julia Guernsey Kappelman -- Dance performances at Quiriguá / Matthew G. Looper -- The poetics of power and knowledge at La Venta / Carolyn E. Tate -- Merging myth and politics: the three temple complex at Teotihuacan / Annabeth Headrick -- A model for late classic community structure at Copán, Honduras / Jeffrey A. Stomper -- The form of power: the architectural meaning of building A of El Tajín / Patricia Joan Sarro -- Political rhetoric and the unification of natural geography, cosmic space, and gender spheres / Linnea Wren, Kaylee Spencer, and Krysta Hochstetler -- Mountain of heaven, mountain of earth: the great pyramid of Cholula as sacred landscape / Geoffrey G. McCafferty -- A sense of place at Chichén Itzá / Cynthia Kristan-Graham
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
Visitor Tag(s):

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