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National Tribal Chairmen's Association records 1971-1978

Creator:
National Tribal Chairmenʹs Association
Youpee, William
Toda, Chinzu
Subject:
United States Indian Health Service
American Indian Movement
Advisory Commission on Intergovernment Relations
Association on American Indian Tradition and Cultural Activities
Physical description:
40 linear feet
Culture:
American Indians legal cases tribal government agriculture
Type:
Sound recordings
Letters
Printed material
Minutes
Lists
Date:
1971-1978
Topic:
Indian-government relations
Indian interest groups
Local number:
NMAI.AC.014
Notes:
Planning for the establishment of the National Tribal Chairmenʹs Association took place in Pierre, North Dakota, in April 1971, and formal organization took place in Albuquerque in July 1971. The organization serves as a voice for elected Indian leaders of federally recognized tribes and promotes American Indian unity, observation of treaty and other rights, preservation of values, and progress in justice, social standing, education, economic well being, and political influence of all Indians of the United States. The organization no longer exists.
Summary:
The files are those of the Washington, D.C., office that were acculated primarily under William Youpee. Youpee served as the first president of the association and became its executive director in 1972. There are also files accumulated by Chinzu Toda, a Bureau of Indian Affairs employee who was on loan to the NTCA. In 1978, Kenneth E. Black became the executive director. Material created from 1978 to the end of the NTCA are in private hands.
Cite as:
Records of the National Tribal Chairmenʹs Association, Smithsonian Institution National Museum of the American Indian Archives
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution National Museum of the American Indian Archives
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Ales Hrdlicka Papers ca. 1887-1943

Creator:
Hrdlička, Aleš 1869-1943
Bohemian Circle in Washington
Smithsonian Institution Department of Anthropology Division of Physical Anthropology
Army Medical Museum (U.S.)
Correspondent:
Adams, W. I
Adler, Cyrus 1863-1940
Alderman, E.M
Alliot, Hector
Alvarez, Walter C
Ameghino, Florentino
Angell, James R
Abbott, William Louis 1860-1936
Absolon, Karel
Allyn, Harriet M
Lowie, Robert
Robinson, Edward G
Hemingway, Ernest
Ami, Henry
Anthony, R
Ashley-Montagu, Montague Francis
Atwood, Charles E
Avirette, John Allfred
Baer, John Leonard
Bell, Enoch
Martin, Fredericka I
Bingham, Hiram
Bingman, C.E
Blue, Ruppert
Bloomfield, Leonard 1887-1949
Bodding, P.C
Bogue, E.A
Bothwell, J.A
Bridges, Calvin B
Burlin, Natalie Curtis
Babcock, William H
Baldwin, Bird T
Barrus, Clara
Barry, J. Neilson
Bartashchell, A.W
Barton, James L
Bather, F.A
Bean, Robert Bennett
Benes, Edward
Betsche, Chris
Bell, Earl H
Bilgery, Conrad
Birket-Smith, Kaj
Bishop, Carl W
Black, Davidson
Boas, Franz 1858-1942
Bogoras, Waldemar G
Borbolla, F. Rubin I
Bowman, Isaiah
Boyd, William C
Boyle, Mary Elizabeth
Breasted, James Henry
Breton, Adela C
Breuil Abbe
Briggs, H.H
Brockett, Paul 1872-1946
Brown, A.R
Barnum, Brown
Bunak, V
Bunnell, Charles E
Bushnell, David Ives Jr 1875-1941
Cadbury, William W
Callendar, G.R
Campbell, W.W
Capitan, Louis
Castellanos, Abraham
Edison, Thomas A (Thomas Alva) 1847-1931
Celler, Emanuel
Chamberlain, Thomas C
Clark, G. Hardy
Clemens, James B
Colbert, L.O
Comas, Juan
Comer, George
Cameron, John
Candela, P.B
Carroll, Mitchell
Cattell, Jacque
Cattell, James McKeen
Chapman, John W Rev
Ciocco, Antonio
Cipriani, Lidio
United States Department of Agriculture
Academy of Natural Sciences Philadelphia
Alaskan Sportsman
American Anthropological Association
American Association for the Advancement of Science
American Committee for Protection of the Foreign Born
American Geographical Society
Journal of the American Medical Association
American Philosophical Society
United States Department of Commerce
American Association of Physical Anthropologists
Abbot, Charles Greeley
Subject:
Hyde Exploring Expedition (1902-1903)
Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York
Panama California Exposition physical anthropology exhibits
Peking Union Medical College
Royal Anthropological Society Huxley lecture
Army Medical Museum (U.S.)
American Association of Physical Anthropologists
International Congress of Americanists
Anthropological Society of Washington (Washington, D.C.)
American Anthropological Association
Washington Academy of Sciences (Washington, D.C.)
National Academy of Science
American Journal of Physical Anthropology
Institute of Population
American School in France for Prehistoric Studies
Committee on Anthropological Affairs
Physical description:
133 linear feet
Culture:
American Indian tuberculosis among
Chippewa Leech Lake
Chippewa White Earth
Dakota Indians
Pachamac Peru archeology
Apache Indians
Dakota Oglala
Shawnee Indians
Menominee Indians
Pima Indians
Huichol
Mohave Indians
Hupa Indians
Tarahumara Indians
Quinailt
Indians of North America Northeast
Ojibwa Indians
Indians of North America Northwest Coast of North America
Quinault Indians
Indians of North America Great Plains
Indians of North America Southwest, New
Oglala Indians
Indians of North America California
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Date:
1887
1887-1943
ca 1887-1943
Topic:
Old Americans
Trenton skeletal material
Fossils--man
Human evolution
Children--physical anthropology
Tuberculosis--American Indians
Huntington collection
Forensic anthropology
Immigration law--and physical anthropology
Children who run on all fours
Anthropometry
My Journeys, by A. Hrdlicka
Notes:
Ales Hrdlicka was born in Bohemia and came to America when he was thirteen. As a young man, he was trained in medicine at New York's Eclectic Medical College and the New York Homeopathic Medical College, receiving degrees from each. His first professional work was as a private practitioner, but he gave that up in 1894 when he joined the staff of the New York State Hospital for the Insane at Middletown. There, in addition to other duties, he began studies of the physical characteristics of inmates. This set in motion developments that would eventually lead him to become one of the world's most prominent anthropologists who has sometimes been referred to as "the founder of physical anthropology in America."
In 1896, in preparation for a research appointment with the Department of Anthropology in the Pathological Institute of the New York State hospitals, Hrdlicka went to Paris and studied with Leon Manouvrier. After his return to America, he worked for a short period with the Pathological Institute and came into contact with G.S. Huntington, of the College of Physicians and Surgeons in New York. Hrdlicka arranged and studied Huntington's large collection of skeletal material, thus gaining knowledge of a well-documented collection representing largely normal persons of European ancestry. He furthermore came to the attention of Frederic Ward Putnam, of the American Museum of Natural History, who arranged for his first anthropological field studies.
It was thus that Hrdlicka became a member of the Hyde Expeditions to the American Southwest and northern Mexico. In 1898, he traveled to Mexico with Carl Lumholtz to study the Tarahumaras, Huichols, and neighboring tribes. In subsequent years, he returned to Mexico and the Southwest alone and studied physical characteristics and medical conditions of several American Indian tribes. With this experience and examinations of the Trenton and Lansing skeletal material for Putnam, Hrdlicka came fully into the world of anthropology. In 1903, he was appointed head of the newly formed Division of Physical Anthropology in the United States National Museum.
In his position at the Smithsonian, Hrdlicka's contributions to American physical anthropology were great. His travels and field studies alone were impressive and important in his growth as an authority on the migration of man to the New World, human evolution, and the variations of man's physical form. In 1905, he returned to the Southwest for studies of Pima and Apache children and, in the following year, traveled to Florida to examine allegedly ancient remains of man. In 1908, he worked among a number of Indian tribes, including the Menominee, Oglala Dakota, Quinailt, Hupa, and Mohave, in a study of tuberculosis among them. In 1909, he traveled to Egypt with an expedition of the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York in order to study living Egyptians and to examine remains of Egypt's past population. The following year took him to Argentina, Peru, and Mexico. In the first of these, he again examined allegedly ancient remains of man. In Peru, he made a large collection of skeletal material near Trujillo, at Pachamac, and in the Chicama Valley.
Between 1912-1914, Hrdlicka undertook a physical anthropological exhibit for the Panama-California Exposition in San Diego and, for this, traveled to eastern Siberia, Mongolia, Peru, and Florida. He also examined fossil remains of man in Europe and directed field work of other anthropologists in South and East Africa, St. Lawrence Island in Alaska, the Philippines, eastern Siberia, and the Ukraine. In 1915, for the Department of Justice, he assessed the racial makeup of Chippewas on the Leech Lake and White Earth reservations in Minnesota and also studied Dakota Indians. In 1917, his field work was directed toward white American families with longtime residence in the United States. In 1918, he carried out a survey of ancient sites in eastern Florida for the Bureau of American Ethnology. In 1920, he traveled to Hawaii, Japan, Korea, and Manchuria in connection with an appointment to lecture at the Peking Union Medical College. As director of the American School for Prehistoric Studies in France, he again studied fossil remains of man in Europe in 1922 and 1923. In 1925, he carried out work in India, Ceylon, Java, Australia, South Africa, and Europe. In 1927, he was again in Europe to deliver the Huxley Memorial Lecture before the Royal Anthropological Society in Great Britain. Between 1929 and 1938, he traveled frequently to Alaska to carry on an anthropological survey. In 1939, he traveled to Russia and Siberia.
Beginning with much of the skeletal collection of the Army Medical Museum, which had been transferred to the Smithsonian in 1898 before he was appointed there, Hrdlicka amassed a bone collection that included, among many other specimens, the Huntington collection, casts of fossil remains of man, and a large and diverse North American collection. He also gathered a large collection of human brains. Over three hundred publications resulted from his study of this material, his field work, and his study of specimens in other museums. In addition, he was involved in many other activities. For United States government agencies, he provided services ranging from examinations of human remains for law enforcement officials to providing information and opinions concerning national origins and traits that were needed to interpret laws and form foreign policy. During World War II, he also advised government officials on policies to be pursued with certain national groups following the war.
In 1918, Hrdlicka founded the American Journal of Physical Anthropology and remained its editor until 1942. In 1928, he was the major force behind the organization of the American Association of Physical Anthropologists and served as its president in 1928-1932. He was also president of the Anthropological Society of Washington in 1907, the American Anthroplogical Association in 1925-1927, and the Washington Academy of Sciences in 1928-1929. He was chairman of Section H of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in 1918 and secretary of the Committee on Anthropology of the National Research Council in 1917. In addition, Hrdlicka was a member of the American Philosophical Society and the National Academy of Sciences. He represented the Smithsonian at several international gatherings of scholars, including meetings of the International Congress of Americanists.
Summary:
Hrdlicka's papers comprise a wide variety of materials but consist largely of correspondence, manuscripts of writings, physical anthropological tables and notes, and photographs. The material reflects his many professional interests and activities except for the earliest, for which the documents were destroyed by fire. Since he apparently made little distinction between his official and private activities, the papers incorporate many official records of the of the Smithsonian's Division of Physical Anthropology. This and other material show his wide-range of contacts with anthroplogists, especially physical anthropologists, and with many scholars in related sciences. Yet other material is personal and includes such documents as those relating to Hrdlicka's private property and correspondence with members of his family. Notably present is correspondence with his first wife, Marie Strickler. There are also documents that concern Hrdlicka's continued ties with Czechoslovakia (much of it in Czech) and his interests in Czech-American organizations, scientific development of Czechoslovakia, and his concern for its political fate, especially during World War II.
Cite as:
Ales Hrdlicka Papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Data Source:
National Anthropological Archives
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Irving Goldman Papers, 1935-1986

Creator:
Goldman, Irving 1911-2002
Correspondent:
Boas, Franz 1858-1942
Mead, Margaret 1901-1978
Physical description:
9.3 linear feet (26 boxes); 27 sound recordings
Culture:
Cubeo Indians
Kwakiutl Indians
Carrier Indians
Modoc Indians
Bella Coola Indians
Shuswap Indians
Tzotzil Indians
Polynesians
Indians of North America Northwest Coast of North America
Indians of North America Plateau
Type:
Field notes
Collection descriptions
Sound recordings
Photographs
Color slides
Place:
British Columbia
Chiapas (Mexico)
Vaupés (Colombia)
Date:
1935
1935-1986
1960-1990
Topic:
Cubeo language
Carrier language
Bella Coola language
Modoc language
Shuswap language
Tzotzil language
Linguistics
Language and languages--Documentation
Communism
Ethnology
Notes:
Irving Goldman (1911-2002) was born in Brooklyn, New York, and completed his B.S. from Brooklyn College in 1933 and his Ph.D. from Columbia University in 1941, where he focused his work on the Ulkcatcho Carrier of British Columbia. While at Columbia, Goldman was one of the last students of Frank Boas. Goldman was a member of the Communist party from 1936 - 1942. After graduating from Columbia, he served from 1942 - 1947 in various departments of the United States Government, primarily as a researcher. He was released in 1947 as a security risk. Goldman taught at Sarah Lawrence College, in Bronxville, NY from 1947-1981, where he also served on many faculty committees, as well as their Board of Trustees. During this time, Goldman continued his anthropological research. He spent 1955 in Chiapas, Mexico, studying the Tzotzil of Chamula Indians. He also did a library project on Polynesia, which led to his book "Ancient Polynesian Society" (1970), a key work in anthropological thought. During his time at Sarah Lawrence College, Goldman also published two other significant books: "The Cubeo: Indians of the Northwest Amazon" (1963) and "The Mouth of Heaven: An Introduction to Kwakiutl Religious Thought" (1975). In 1968, he returned to Vaupes to study the Cubeo, continuing his research there into the early 1980s. From 1980 - 1987, Goldman taught at the New School for Social Research in New York City. During the McCarthy Era, in 1953, Goldman was forced to testify before the Jenner Senate Committee, which investigated connections between academics and communism. He took his First Amendment right, which was a risky tactic, however Sarah Lawrence College decided not to fire him as he had admitted to being a party of the party, but avoided naming others who he knew had been members. Goldman died April 7, 2002. His final manuscript was published posthumously as "Cubeo Henewa Religious Thought: Metaphysics of a Northwestern Amazonian People" (2004).
Summary:
The focus of the collection is Irving Goldman's field research on the Cubeo Indians of Vaupes, Colombia. In addition to documentation from multiple trips to Cubeo, the collection also includes some materials relating to his work on the Modoc, the Ulkatcho Carrier, Polynesians, and Tzotzil of Chamula Indians of Chiapas, Mexico. The Cubeo materials include field notes, research notes, questionnaires and photographs that Goldman used in his publications, which include The Cubeo: Indians of the Northwest Amazon and Hehenewa of the Cuduiari: An Introduction to Cubean Religious Thought, which was published posthumously as Cubeo Hehenewa Religious Thought: Metaphysics of a Northwestern Amazonian People. Additional materials from his Cubeo research are 26 field recordings of music, interviews, and dances. Also in the collection is a sound recording relating to the Kwakiutl Indians. The work on Polynesia for his publication "Ancient Polynesian Society" consist of his reading notes. His Ulkatcho Carrier notes contain language material from his field research among the Ulkatcho, Nazko, and Quesnel, three Carrier bands in the Blackwater dialect group. His notes from his research in Chiapas contain ethnographic and linguistic notes on what appears to be Tzotzil. The Modoc materials also contain ethnographic and linguistic notes. The correspondence in the collection is a mix of professional and personal. This includes correspondence from former students and recommendations he wrote for them. In the writing series are notes and edits of chapters and manuscripts for his books, as well as articles that Goldman wrote and a couple of speeches he gave. The collection includes many photographs, most of which do not have descriptions of locations. The identified photographs include images from Vaupes and Chiapas, Mexico. There is one folder that includes some photographs of the Modoc, and another that contains pictures from the British Columbia Ulkatcho. nother important part of this collection is from his personal materials. Goldman was a Communist from 1936-1942, and in 1953 was brought before the Jenner Committee. The file Goldman kept of this investigation includes a transcript of his appearance in front of the Committee, as well as many newspaper clippings.
Cite as:
Irving Goldman Papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
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Irving Goldman Papers 1935-1986
Data Source:
National Anthropological Archives
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Additional Online Media:

Philip Drucker Papers 1933- ca. 1954

Creator:
Drucker, Philip 1911
Kroeber, A. L (Alfred Louis) 1876-1960
Beynon, William
Garfield, Viola Edmundson 1899-1983
Fast, Edward G
Beardsley, Richard King
Albert, John
Uyeharan, Harry K
Tobin, J.E
Thompson, George E
Heizer, Robert Fleming 1915-1979
Correspondent:
Caso y Andrade, Alfonso
Comas, Juan
Duff, William
Dávalos Hurtado, Eusebio
Kidder, Alfred II
McCall, Walter
Noguera, Eduardo
Opler, Morris Edward
Paul, William Lewis Sr
Rubin de la Borbolla, Daniel F
Scow, William
Sorenson, John
Stirling, Matthew Williams 1896-1975
Physical description:
17 boxes
Culture:
American Indian Northwest Coast
American Indian Oregon Coast
American Indian Southwest
Micronesians
Bellabella
Xaihais
Karok Indians
Papago
Likiep
Jaliut
Angaur
Haida Indians
Bellacoola
Yaqui Indians
Chinook
Yurok Indians
Alsea Indians
Coos Indians
Kwakiutl Indians
Nootka Indians
Tolowa
Tsimshian Indians
Diegueño Indians
Luiseño Indians
Clackamas Indians
American Indian California
Bikini
Wikeno
Haisla
Heiltsuk Indians
Karuk
Akwa'ala
Kili
Ebon
Samoan
Samoans
Indians of North America California
Paipai Indians
Indians of North America Northwest Coast of North America
Bella Coola Indians
Oowekeeno Indians
Indians of North America Plateau
Indians of North America Southwest, New
Tohono O'Odham Indians
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Place:
Meso-America
Mexico
Kili (Marshall Islands)
Date:
1933- ca 1954
Topic:
Archeology
Native Brotherhood, Northwest Coast Indians
Language and languages--Documentation
Local number:
NAA MS 4516
Summary:
Microfilm record includes: (2) Volumes II, VI; Negative microfilm on file (6/63). 320 frames for both. (44) Massett Haida tales, 12 pages on Negative reel number 29. (75) Negative microfilm on file. Approximately 125 frames. (76) Negative microfilm on file. Approximately 64 frames. (98) 6 pages typed only on negative reel number 29. Other material: a 1943 manuscript, Archeological Reconnaissance in the Tres Zapotes Region. 61 pages, 32 plates. Note with plates states that maps etc. (Figures 1-6) turned over to Cassedy October 9, 1942. Delivered by M.C.B. to Dr Stirling, December 13, 1957, to be sent on loan to Dr Robert J. Squier, Department of Anthropology, University of California, Berkeley 4, California.
Also found: Sketch of bird's-head mask (?) with handwritten caption, "A-waht-tok-sim." No date. 1 page. W. C. Sturtevant discovered sketch 12/26/68 between pages 96-97 (P-R section of Nootka vocabulary) in copy of Joseph Mariano Mozino Suarez de Figueroa, Nocticias de Nutka, Mexico, 1913; copy donated to Bureau of American Ethnology Library, January, 1956 and inscribed inside cover: "Phil Drucker 6/14/37." Filed with Drucker papers, pending identification. (No comparable material found 3/69 in Drucker file; secs. 2, 28, 32, 38 only checked.)
The processed material in this collection concerns work before 1955. Inlcuded are field notebooks, printed material, drafts of manuscripts, notes, catographic material, drawings, photograhs, writings, historical documents, and copies of United States government documents. Incorporated are notes (often comments and suggestion regarding Drucker's work) by Alfred Louis Kroeber, photographs of Nootka by R. Maynard, copies of papers by William Beynon and Viola Garfield, a catalog of an Alaskan Collection of Edward G. Fast, a field notebook relating to the British Columbia coast archeology survey by Richard King Beardsley, notes on Alsea by John Albert, and miscellaneous papers of various authors concerning Micronesia. The latter includes material by Harry K. Uyeharan on Angaur clan organization, J.E. Tobin on the Bikini, and George E. Thompson on education in American Samoa.
Cite as:
Manuscript 4516, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
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Numbered manuscripts 1850s-1980s (some earlier)
Data Source:
National Anthropological Archives
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The treaties made by the United States of America with other nations. Treaties made with Indian tribes between 1784 and 1786

Author:
United States Laws, statutes, etc
Physical description:
1 v. ; 21 cm
Type:
Treaties
Place:
United States
Date:
1796
1797
1796-1797]
Topic:
Law
Government relations
Legal status, laws, etc
Call number:
KF8203 1796b
Notes:
Cover title.
Extracted from The laws of the United States of America (Philadelphia : Printed by Richard Folwell, 1796-[1797]), v. 2: Acts passed at the first-second sessions of the second Congress (1791-1792). The treaties made by the United States of America, with other nations. Declaration of America, with other nations. Declaration of independence. Articles of confederation. And ordinance for the government of the territory of the United States north-west of the river Ohio.
Contains texts of treaties made with various Indian tribes between 1784 and 1786.
Side-notes.
Contents:
Articles of a treaty between the United States of America, and the Sachems and warriors of the Six Nations -- ... and the Sachems and warriors of the Wiandot, Delaware, Chippawa and Ottawa Nations -- ... and the head-men and warriors of the Cherokees -- ... and the Choctaw Nation -- ... and the Chickasaws -- ... and the chiefs and warriors of the Shawanoe Nation -- A treaty of peace and friendship between the United States of America, and the kings, chiefs and warriors of the Creek Nation of Indians -- Articles of agreement and confederation, between the United States of North America and the Delaware Nation -- Articles of a treaty between the United States of America, and the Sachems and warriors of the Wyandot, Delaware, Ottawa, Chippewa, Pattawatima and Sac Nations -- A treaty of peace and friendship between the President of the United States of America, and the chiefs and warriors of the Cherokee Nation of Indians -- Articles of a treaty between the United States of America, and the Cherokee Indians -- A treaty between the United States of America, and the tribes of Indians called the Six Nations -- A treaty between the United States and the Oneida, Tuscorora, and Stockbridge Indians -- A treaty of peace between the United States of America and the tribes of Indians called the Wyandots, Delawares, Shawanoes, Ottawas, Chipewas, Putawatimes, Miamis, Eelriver, Weeás, Kickapoos, Piankashaws, and Kaskaskias
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
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Intercourse with the Indians : letter from the Secretary of War, transmitting a report of persons charged with the disbursement of money, goods, or effects, for the benefit of the Indians, for the year ending September 30, 1837, &c

Author:
United States Auditor for War Department
Physical description:
165 p. ; 23 cm
Type:
Books
Date:
1838
1838]
Topic:
Government relations
Federal aid to Indians
Call number:
E93 .U485 1838
E93.U485X
Notes:
Caption title.
"May 3, 1838. Read, and laid upon the table."
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
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Regulations concerning the removal of the Indians

Author:
United States War Department Subsistence Dept
Cass, Lewis 1782-1866
Former owner:
Rind, William Alexander DSI
Physical description:
15, [18] p. 20 cm
Type:
Books
Date:
1832
1832]
1789-1869
Topic:
Government relations
Relocation
Call number:
E93 .U979r 1832
Notes:
Cover title.
Signed on p. 15 (1st group): Lew: [i.e. Lewis] Cass, Department of War, May 15, 1832.
Includes blank forms on 18 p. at end of volume.
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
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Reports of Major General W.S. Hancock upon Indian affairs : with accompanying exhibits

Author:
United States Army Department of the Missouri
Hancock, Winfield Scott 1824-1886
Physical description:
133 p. ; 25 cm
Type:
Books
Date:
1867
1867]
1866-1895
Topic:
Wars
Government relations
Call number:
E83.867 .U58X
E83.866 .U55X 1867
E83.867.U58X
Notes:
Cover title.
Contains reports and correspondence of Hancock and the various agencies of the Armys's Dept. of the Missouri.
Imprint from NUC pre-56, v. 610, p. 91.
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
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Correspondence on the subject of the emigration of Indians : between the 30th November, 1831, and 27th December, 1833, with abstracts of expenditures by disbursing agents, in the removal and subsistence of Indians, &c. &c. / furnished in answer to a resolution of the Senate, of 27th December, 1833, by the commissary general of subsistence

Author:
United States War Department Subsistence Dept
Gibson, George 1783-1861
United States 23d Congress, 1st session Senate
Physical description:
5 v. ; 24 cm
Type:
Books
Date:
1834
1834-1835
1789-1869
Topic:
Government relations
Relocation
Call number:
E93 .U979 1834
E93.U979X
Notes:
Commissary general of subsistence, George Gibson.
"Furnished in answer to a resolution of the Senate, of 27th December, 1833, by the Commissary General of Subsistence [G. Gibson]."
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
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Annual report of Colonel August V. Kautz, Eighth U.S. Infantry, Brevet Major-General, (Assigned) commanding Department of Arizona, for year 1876-77

Author:
United States Army Department of Arizona
Kautz, August V (August Valentine) 1828-1895
Physical description:
22 p. ; 19 cm
Type:
Books
Date:
1877
Topic:
Government relations
Call number:
E93 .U6 1877
Notes:
Cover title.
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
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Indians of North America The Iroquois [published] 95.1.7 RV 1993

Creator:
Nevison, Henry Producer
Henry Nevison; Producer, Director
Marty Moss-Coane; Narration
Harold Boihem; Editor
Henry Nevison, Dana Palermo; Audio
Rich Wilson; script writer
John Gerbec, Dana Palermo; producers
Physical description:
31 min sound color video
Culture:
Iroquois Indians
Seneca Indians
Mohawk Indians
Tuscarora Indians
Cayuga Indians
Oneida Indians
Onondaga Indians
Indians of North America
Indians of North America Northeast
Type:
Projected media
Collection descriptions
Place:
Iroquois
North America
disintigration
N orth America
United States, Canada, New York, Pennsylvania
Date:
1993
Topic:
Land--acquisition of
Land--as a source of wealth
Land--as property
Land--reclamation
Land--territory--boundaries
Land--reservations
Territorial--boundaries--exploitation
Territory--annexed consolidation of
Settlement--patterns
Exploring--expeditions
Contact--Quakers
Bands--migratory
Warriors--status of
Conflict
War--Revolutionary War
Armed forces
Military--enlistment--operations--posts--tactics
Treaties--capitulation--peace
Government--activities--agencies
Agencies--Bureau of Indian Affairs
Education--curriculum
Education--teachers in--theories of
Education--attitudes toward
History--oral, as a method
Spiritualism
Missions--religious
Nature--ideas about
Descent--matrilineal
Women--matriarchy
Women--status of
Women--power
Assimilation--of ethnic groups
Flood--control measures
Dreams--ideas about
Beads--as ornament
Agriculture
Agriculture--corn
Animals--buffalo--hunting
Animals--horses
Animals--cattle
Ownership--individual--collective
Culture--accomodation--adaptation
Culture--change
Culture--continuity
Culture
Culture--ideals
Cultural heroes--Eli Parker--Handsome Lake--Iroquois
Local number:
HSFA 95.1.7 RV
Summary:
Indians of North America Series: The Iroquois. Edited film documents the history of the Iroquois American Indians and their contributions to agriculture, the role of women in Iroquois society, the relationship with both Indians and non-Indians on Iroquois territory, and Iroquois philosophy on the land. Film explains the division of the League of the Iroquois into the six tribes of the Mohawks, Onondaga, Seneca, Tuscarora, Oneida, and Cayuga, situated in what is today Pennsylvania, New York and southern Canada. One major contribution cited is the harvesting of numerous types of corn, a skill which the Iroquois passed along to the European settlers along with other agricultural knowledge. Various themes explored include: the American Revolutionary War as a conflict dividing the Iroquois; matriarchy and the role of women in selecting the new chiefs; the Iroquois understanding of land as an unownable entity; friendly relations with nearby Quakers; impact of the U.S. Government land policies. Featured are tribal heroes such as Eli Parker, the first Indian elected head of the Bureau of Indian Affairs, and the spiritual leader Handsome Lake, who taught of the importance of dreams an visions and advocated a return to lost Iroquois rituals. Footage sequences include black and white photographs of Iroquois farming; beadwork used for belts and as symbols of peace; the longhouse as the site of religious worship; the site of the 1960 flood of the Kinzua Dam destroying Iroquois land and homes; interviews with elders and youths.
Data Source:
Human Studies Film Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

A survey of the contemporary Indians of Canada; a report on economic, political, educational needs and policies. Editor, H. B. Hawthorn

Author:
Hawthorn, Harry Bertram 1910-
Canada Indian Affairs Branch
Physical description:
2 v. 36 cm
Type:
Books
Place:
Canada
Date:
1966
1966-67
Topic:
Social conditions
Government relations
Call number:
E78.C2 H39
E78.C2 H39
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
Visitor Tag(s):

James E. Curry papers 1935-1955

Creator:
Curry, James E. 1907-1972
Correspondent:
Paul, William L Jr
Subject:
Cohen, Henry
Cohen, Felix
Bingham, Jonathan
United States Bureau of Indian Affairs
National Congress of American Indians
Rosebud Sioux Tribe
Three Affiliated Tribes
Physical description:
121.7 linear feet
Culture:
Alaskan natives
Aleut (Akutan, Pribilof Islands)
Fort Sill Apache
San Carlos Apache
Arapaho Oklahoma
Assiniboine Fort Belknap Fort Peck
Bannock Fort Hall
Blackfeet
Cheyenne Northern Southern
Chickahominy
Chippewa Lac Courte Oreilles
Choctaw Indians
Cocopa Indians
Coeur d'Alene Indians
Croatan
Dakota Big Foot
Dakota Cheyenne River
Dakota Crow Creek
Dakota Devil's Lake
Dakota Flandreau
Dakota Fort Totten
Dakota Lower Brule
Standing Rock Agency
Eskimo Gambell Kiana
Flathead
Haida Kasaan
Hopi
Huron
Iroquois Indians
Kiowa Indians
Maricopa Gila River Salt River
Mohave Fort Mohave
Mohave Apache Fort McDowell
Navajo Indians
Papago
Paiute Fallon Fort McDermitt Moapa Pyramid Lake Shivwits Walker River Yerington
Pima Gila River Salt River
San Felipe
San Ildefonso
San Juan
San Ana
Sandia
Seminole Florida Oklahoma
Shawnee Eastern
Shoshoni Fort Hall
Taos Pyote clan
Tesuque
Tlingit Angoon Craig Juneau Kake Ketchikan Klawak Klukwan Taku Wrangell
Tsimshian Metlakatla
Ute Uintah-Ouray
Zuni Indians
Chickasaw Indians
Osage Indians
Kansa Indians
Umatilla Indians
Fox Indians
Mandan Indians
Arikara Indians
Hidatsa Indians
Crow Indians
Yaqui Indians
Creek Indians
Catawba Indians
Menominee Indians
Comanche Indians
Seri Indians
Sia
Washo Indians
Nez Percé Indians
Seneca
Omaha Indians
Cochiti Indians
Yavapai Indians
Delaware Indians
Sauk Indians
Yuma
Isleta Indians
Caddo Indians
Winnebago Indians
Laguna Indians
Jemez Indians
Colville Indians
Havasupai Indians
Kootenai Indians
Klamath Indians
Kickapoo Indians
Oto Indians
Spokan
Yakama Indians
Cocopa
Walapai
Quinaielt
Lummi Indians
Niska Indians
Stockbridge Indians
Wesort
Tillamook Indians
Missouri Indians
Nooksak
Coeur d'Alene
Dakota Big Foot Cheyenne River Crow Creek Devilʹs Lake Flandreau Fort Totten Lower Brule Mdewakanton Oglala Rosebud Santee Sisseton Wahpeton Standing Rock Yankton
Kalispel Indians
Muckleshoot Indians
Potowatomi
Type:
Letters
Collection descriptions
Clippings
Notes
Legal documents
Place:
Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians of North Carolina
Santa Clara
Date:
1935
1935-1955
Topic:
Indian claims
American Indians--credit
Local number:
NMAI.AC.015
Notes:
James E. Curry was trained in law in Chicago and practiced in that city from 1930 until 1936, serving part of that time as secretary of the local branch of the American Civil Liberties Union. From 1936 to 1938, he was an attorney with the United States Department of the Interior Bureau of Indian Affairs, being largely involved with matters of credit affecting Indians. From 1938 to 1942, he continued service with the Interior Department but worked in several capacities involving the Puerto Rico Reconstruction Administration, the department's Consumer Counsel Division, and the Puerto Rico Water Resources Authority.
In 1945, Curry returned to Washington and set up private practice, also maintaining for a time an office in Puerto Rico. In Washington, he became the attorney for the National Congress of American Indians and from that time until the 1950s his practice increasingly involved representation of American Indian tribes, mostly in claims against the federal government. In this work, for a time, he was involved in business relations with a New York Law firm that included Henry Cohen, Felix Cohen, and Jonathan Bingham.
He also often worked closely with lawyers who lived near the tribes he represented, William L. Paul, Jr., of Alaska, for example. This aspect of his practice--representing Indian tribes--was largely broken up during the early 1950s when the Commissioner of Indian Affairs began to use his powers to disapprove contracts between Curry and the tribes. In 1952 and 1953, his official relationship with the National Congress of American Indians was also ended. After this, while Curry continued until his death to act as a consultant in Indian claims with which he had earlier been involved, his career and life developed in a different direction.
Summary:
The material in the collection includes documents relating to many aspects of Curry's career but most of it relates to his work with Indian tribes and the National Congress of American Indians. For the most, the collection is made up of such materials as letters exchanged with government officials, Indians, and other attorneys; copies of legal documents; published government documents; notes; and clippings and other printed materials. Of particular significance is a subject file relating to Indian affairs.
It includes material concerning affairs of Alaskan natives and the Aleut (Akutan, Pribilof Islands), Apache (including Fort Sill, Jicarilla, Mescalero, San Carlos White Mountain), Arapaho (Southern), Assiniboine (Fort Belknap, Fort Peck), Bannock (including Fort Hall), Blackfeet, Caddo, Catawba, Cherokee (Eastern), Cheyenne (Northern, Southern), Chickahominy, Chickasaw, Chippewa (including Lac Courte Oreilles), Choctaw, Cochiti, Cocopa, Coeur d'Alene, Colville, Comanche, Creek, Croatan, Crow, Dakota (Big Foot, Cheyenne River, Crow Creek, Devil's Lake, Flandreau, Fort Totten, Lower Brule,
Mdewakanton, Oglala, Rosebud, Santee, Sisseton-Wahpeton, Standing Rock, Yankton), Delaware, Eskimo (including Gambell, Kiana), Flathead, Fox, Haida (including Kasaan), Havasupai, Hopi, Iroquois (Caughnawaga, Seneca, St. Regis), Isleta, Jemez, Kalilspel, Kansa (Kaw), Kickapoo, Kiowa, Klamath, Kutenai, Laguna, Lummi, Maricopa (Gila River, Salt River), Menominee, Missouria, Mohave (Fort Mohave), Mohave Apache (Fort McDowell), Muckleshoot, Navaho, Nez Perce, Niska, Nooksak, Omaha, Osage, Oto, Papago, Paiute (Fallon, Fort McDermitt), Moapa, Pyramid Lake, Shivwits, Walker River, Yerington),
Pima (Gila River, Salt River), Potowatomi, Quinaielt, San Felipe, San Ildefonso, San Juan, Santa Ana, Santa Clara, Sandia, Sauk, Seminole (Florida, Oklahoma), Seneca, Seri, Shawnee (Eastern), Shoshoni (including Fort Hall), Sia, Spokan, Stockbridge, Taos (Pyote clan), Tesuque, Three Affiliated Tribes (Mandan, Arikara, and Hidatsa), Tillamook, Tlingit (including Angoon, Craig, Juneau, Kake, Ketchikan, Klawak, Klukwan, Taku, Wrangell), Tsimshian (Metlakatla), Umatilla, Ute (including Uintah-Ouray), Walapai, Washo, Wesort, Winnebago, Wyandot, Yakima, Yaqui, Yavapai, Yuma, and Zuni.
There are also materials relating to Curry's work with the Bureau of Indian Affairs and National Congress of American Indians, and material that reflects his interest in conditions and events in given locations (often filed by state) and in organizations with interest in Indians. The material relating to Curry's work in Puerto Rico has been deposited in the Archivo General de Puerto Rico, Instituto de Cultura Puertorriquena, in San Juan.
Cite as:
Identification of specific item; Date (if known); James E. Curry papers, Box and Folder Number; National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center, Smithsonian Institution
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution National Museum of the American Indian Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

Statistical supplement to the Annual report of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs / United States Department of the Interior

Author:
United States Office of Indian Affairs
Physical description:
v. ; 36 cm
Type:
Statistics
Date:
1939
Topic:
Government relations
Call number:
E93 .U583
E93.U583
Notes:
Description based on: 1941/42; title from cover.
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
Visitor Tag(s):

Survey of conditions of the Indians in the United States. Hearings before a subcommittee of the Committee on Indian Affairs, United States Senate, Seventieth Congress, second session[ ... Congress ... session] pursuant to S Res. 79, a resolution directing the Committee on Indian Affairs of the United States Senate to make a general survey of the condition of the Indians of the United States

Author:
United States Congress Senate Committee on Indian Affairs
Subject:
United States Bureau of Indian Affairs
Physical description:
v. tables, forms. 24 cm
Type:
Books
Date:
1929
1929-
Topic:
Government relations
Call number:
E93.U6773 1929X
Notes:
Subtitle varies.
Paged continuously.
Printed for the use of the Committee on Indian Affairs.
Lynn J. Frazier, chairman.
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
Visitor Tag(s):

Address to the public of the Lake Mohonk Conference, ... in behalf of the civilization and legal protection of the Indians of the United States

Address of the Lake Mohonk Conference
Author:
Lake Mohonk Conference
Indian Rights Association
Physical description:
1 v. ; 23 cm
Type:
Periodicals
Date:
1883
Topic:
Government relations--Congresses
Call number:
E93.L19X
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
Visitor Tag(s):

Annual address to the public of the Lake Mohonk Conference, ... in behalf of the civilization and legal protection of the Indians of the United States

Address of the Lake Mohonk Conference
Author:
Lake Mohonk Conference
Indian Rights Association
Physical description:
1 v. ; 23 cm
Type:
Periodicals
Date:
1884
Topic:
Government relations--Congresses
Call number:
E93.L19X
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
Visitor Tag(s):

The Indian act / Canada, Department of Mines and Resources, Indian Affairs Branch

Author:
Canada
Canada Indian Affairs Branch
Physical description:
70 p. ; 25 cm
Type:
Books
Place:
Canada
Date:
1947
[1947?] (
1947)
Topic:
Government relations
Legal status, laws, etc
Ethnic relations
Call number:
KE7704.5 .A2 1947
Notes:
Consolidated for office purposes only.
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
Visitor Tag(s):

Indians of the southeastern United States in the late 20th century / edited by J. Anthony Paredes

Author:
Paredes, J. Anthony (James Anthony) 1939-
Physical description:
xii, 240 p. : ill., maps ; 23 cm
Type:
Books
Place:
Southern States
Date:
1992
C1992
Topic:
Social conditions
Government relations
Call number:
E78.S65I53 1992X
Contents:
Indian Virginians on the move / Helen C. Rountree -- Adaptation and the contemporary North Carolina Cherokee Indians / Sharlotte Neely -- State-recognized Indians of North Carolina, including a history of the Waccamaw Sioux / Patricia Barker Lerch -- Contemporary Native Americans in South Carolina / Wesley DuRant Taukchiray and Alice Bee Kasakoff ; with photographs by Gene Joseph Crediford -- Seminoles and Miccosukees : a century in retrospective / Harry A. Kersey, Jr. -- Federal recognition and the Poarch Creek Indians / J. Anthony Paredes -- Choctaw self-determination in the 1980s / John H. Peterson, Jr. -- The Louisiana tribes : entering hard times / Hiram F. Gregory -- Overview of southeastern Indian tribes today / George Roth
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
Visitor Tag(s):

Desert drums; the Pueblo Indians of New Mexico, 1540-1928, by Leo Crane ..

Author:
Crane, Leo b. 1881
Physical description:
x p., 1 l., 393 p. front., plates, ports., fold. map. 24 cm
Type:
Books
Place:
New Mexico
Date:
1928
Topic:
Government relations
Call number:
E99.P9C8X
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
Visitor Tag(s):

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