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Preamble to the Republic: Condolence, Wampum, and the Language of Peace

Creator:
National Museum of the American Indian
Type:
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2010-11-23T14:40:23.000Z
Metadata Updated:
2014-02-16T23:47:24.000Z
Topic:
Native Americans
American Indians
YouTube Category:
Education
Views:
1487
Video Title:
Preamble to the Republic: Condolence, Wampum, and the Language of Peace
Description:
When the United States was founded in 1789, American Indians had nearly 200 years of experience dealing with Europeans. During those years, Native people offered distinct protocols of diplomacy—ceremonies, forms of address, and material culture—that governed relations with the colonial powers. Benjamin Franklin published the record of treaties where these protocols formed the primary construct of negotiation. The oral traditions surrounding and informing the early protocols continue in living memory through elders and ceremonial cycles of the Haudenosaunee (Iroquois) longhouses. Their material legacy is found in the record of wampum and wampum belts of archeological, cultural and historical value. At Preamble to the Republic, three representatives from a distinguished traditional family spoke on the history, culture, and meaning of the Great Law of Peace, the clanmother system, and the symbology of the longhouse leadership culture as represented in wampum and other materials. A venerated elder of the Mohawk Nation at Akwesasne, Chief Jake Swamp is an internationally recognized spokesperson for the traditions of the Haudenosaunee (Iroquois) longhouse. Ceremonially released from duties as a chief of the Wolf Clan after nearly forty years, he continues his activism as president of the Tree of Peace Society, a global peace and environment initiative. His wife, Judy Swamp, is a traditional elder of the Mohawk Nation, and his son, Skahendowaneh Swamp, is an installed speaker of the longhouse, educator, and traditional artist. From July 1, 2010
Video Duration:
4822 seconds
See more by:
SmithsonianNMAI
YouTube Channel:
SmithsonianNMAI
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian
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National Congress of American Indians records, 1933-1990 (bulk 1944-1989)

Creator:
National Congress of American Indians
Subject:
Bronson, Ruth Muskrat
Curry, James E. 1907-1972
Deloria, Vine
Harjo, Suzan Shown
McNickle, D'Arcy 1904-1977
Peterson, Helen L
Snake, Reuben 1937-1993
Tonasket, Mel
Trimble, Charles E
Arrow, Inc
National Congress of American Indians
National Tribal Chairmen's Association
United Effort Trust
United States American Indian Policy Review Commission
United States Bureau of Indian Affairs
United States Indian Claims Commission
Physical description:
251 linear feet
Type:
Administrative records
Collection descriptions
Audiotapes
Clippings
Correspondence
Financial records
Photographs
Videotapes
Place:
United States
Date:
1933
1933-1990
bulk 1944-1989
20th century
1934-
Topic:
Alaska Natives--Land tenure
Indians of North America--Civil rights
Indians of North America--Economic conditions
Indians of North America--Government relations
Indians of North America--Legal status, laws, etc
Indians of North America--Politics and government
Indians of North America--Social conditions
Indian termination policy
Radioactive wastes--Management
Trail of Broken Treaties, 1972
Local number:
NMAI.AC.010
Notes:
The National Congress of American Indians (NCAI) is a major American Indian advocacy organization, designed to serve as a link between tribal governments and the United States government. NCAI was founded in 1944, in Denver, CO, as a membership organization for "persons of Indian blood." In 1955, group membership was limited to recognized tribes, committees, or bands. The organization is overseen by an Executive Council, which selects a five-member Executive Committee and an Executive Director. The Executive Director is then responsible for managing the organization's staff and overseeing its initiatives and everyday operations. Since 1944, NCAI has held annual conventions in the fall to elect officers and pass resolutions, which become the basis for the organization's policy positions. Beginning in 1977, a mid-year conference in May or June was added to provide further opportunities for in-depth exploration of issues
Since its inauguration, NCAI has worked on a wide variety of issues facing Indians in the US. Some of those issues include voting rights, land claims, education, economic development, natural resource protection and management, nuclear waste, repatriation, and government-to-government relations with the federal government. In 1954, NCAI organized an emergency conference to protest the US government's newly-announced termination policy. NCAI has also frequently worked closely with other Indian organizations, such as the Native American Rights Fund and National Tribal Chairmen's Association, and with various government bodies, such as the Bureau of Indian Affairs and Indian Health Service
Summary:
The NCAI records document the organization's work, particularly that of its office in Washington, DC, and the wide variety of issues faced by American Indians in the twentieth century. The bulk of the material relates to legislation, lobbying, and NCAI's interactions with various governmental bodies. A large segment also concerns the annual conventions and executive council and executive committee meetings. Finally, the records also document the operations of the NCAI, including personnel, financial, and fundraising material. The collection also includes the records of two of NCAI's Executive Directors, Charles E. "Chuck" Trimble (1972-1977) and Suzan Shown Harjo (1984-1989). Included are correspondence, publications, reports, administrative records, photographs, and audio and video recordings
Cite as:
National Congress of American Indians Records, National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center, Smithsonian Institution
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution National Museum of the American Indian Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

National Tribal Chairmen's Association records 1971-1978

Creator:
National Tribal Chairmenʹs Association
Youpee, William
Toda, Chinzu
Subject:
United States Indian Health Service
American Indian Movement
Advisory Commission on Intergovernment Relations
Association on American Indian Tradition and Cultural Activities
Physical description:
40 linear feet
Culture:
American Indians legal cases tribal government agriculture
Type:
Sound recordings
Letters
Printed material
Minutes
Lists
Date:
1971-1978
Topic:
Indian-government relations
Indian interest groups
Local number:
NMAI.AC.014
Notes:
Planning for the establishment of the National Tribal Chairmenʹs Association took place in Pierre, North Dakota, in April 1971, and formal organization took place in Albuquerque in July 1971. The organization serves as a voice for elected Indian leaders of federally recognized tribes and promotes American Indian unity, observation of treaty and other rights, preservation of values, and progress in justice, social standing, education, economic well being, and political influence of all Indians of the United States. The organization no longer exists
Summary:
The files are those of the Washington, D.C., office that were acculated primarily under William Youpee. Youpee served as the first president of the association and became its executive director in 1972. There are also files accumulated by Chinzu Toda, a Bureau of Indian Affairs employee who was on loan to the NTCA. In 1978, Kenneth E. Black became the executive director. Material created from 1978 to the end of the NTCA are in private hands
Cite as:
Records of the National Tribal Chairmenʹs Association, Smithsonian Institution National Museum of the American Indian Archives
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution National Museum of the American Indian Archives
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Engraved woodblock of the "Earliest map showing [the] location of the Cherokees, 1597"

Publisher:
Government Printing Office
Bureau of American Ethnology
Printer:
Government Printing Office
Author:
Royce, Charles C.
Block maker:
J. J. & Co.
Physical Description:
wood (overall material)
engraving (overall production method/technique)
Measurements:
overall: 15.1 cm x 19 cm x 2.3 cm; 5 15/16 in x 7 1/2 in x 7/8 in
Object Name:
block
map
Object Type:
Wood Engraving
Place made:
United States: District of Columbia, Washington
Associated Place:
United States: New York, New York
Date made:
1887
Subject:
Native Americans
Art
Measuring & Mapping
Communications
Cultures & Communities
Science & Mathematics
Wood Blocks for early Bureau of American Ethnology Publications, Graphic Arts Collection
Wood Engravings, Graphic Arts Collection
ID Number:
1980.0219.1531
Catalog number:
1980.0219.1531
Accession number:
1980.0219
Description:
This engraved woodblock of the “Earliest map showing [the] location of the Cherokees, 1597” was prepared by the Government Printing Office in Washington, D.C.; the image was published as Plate VII (p.128) in an article by Charles Royce (1845-1923) entitled “The Cherokee Nation of Indians: a narrative of their official relations with the colonial and federal governments” in the Fifth Annual Report of the Bureau of Ethnology to the Secretary of the Smithsonian, 1883-84.
Location:
Currently not on view
See more items in:
Culture and the Arts: Graphic Arts
Wood Blocks for early Bureau of American Ethnology Publications, Graphic Arts Collection
Wood Engravings, Graphic Arts Collection
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center
Visitor Tag(s):

Engraved woodblock of a "Basket with pendants"

Publisher:
Bureau of American Ethnology
Printer:
Government Printing Office
Author:
Holmes, William Henry
Physical Description:
wood (overall material)
engraving (overall production method/technique)
Measurements:
overall: 2.1 cm x 5.2 cm x 2 cm; 13/16 in x 2 1/16 in x 13/16 in
Object Name:
block
Object Type:
Wood Engraving
Place made:
United States: District of Columbia, Washington
Date made:
1888
Subject:
Native Americans
Communications
Cultures & Communities
Science & Mathematics
Art
Wood Blocks for early Bureau of American Ethnology Publications, Graphic Arts Collection
Wood Engravings, Graphic Arts Collection
ID Number:
1980.0219.0504
Accession number:
1980.0219
Catalog number:
1980.0219.0504
Description:
This engraved woodblock of “Basket with pendants” was prepared by the Government Printing Office in Washington, D.C; the print was published as Figure 313 (p.213) in an article by William H. Holmes (1846-1933) entitled “A Study of the Textile Art in its Relation to the Development of Form and Ornament” in the Sixth Annual Report of the Bureau of Ethnology to the Secretary of the Smithsonian,1884-85.
Location:
Currently not on view
See more items in:
Culture and the Arts: Graphic Arts
Wood Blocks for early Bureau of American Ethnology Publications, Graphic Arts Collection
Wood Engravings, Graphic Arts Collection
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center
Visitor Tag(s):

Engraved woodblock of a "Basket with pendant buckskin"

Publisher:
Bureau of American Ethnology
Printer:
Government Printing Office
Author:
Holmes, William Henry
Physical Description:
wood (overall material)
engraving (overall production method/technique)
Measurements:
overall: 6.2 cm x 5 cm x 2.3 cm; 2 7/16 in x 1 15/16 in x 7/8 in
Object Name:
block
Object Type:
Wood Engraving
Place made:
United States: District of Columbia, Washington
Date made:
1888
Subject:
Art
Native Americans
Cultures & Communities
Communications
Science & Mathematics
Wood Blocks for early Bureau of American Ethnology Publications, Graphic Arts Collection
Wood Engravings, Graphic Arts Collection
ID Number:
1980.0219.0850
Catalog number:
1980.0219.0850
Accession number:
1980.0219
Description:
This engraved woodblock of a “Basket with pendant buckskin” was prepared by the Government Printing Office in Washington, D.C.; the image was published as Figure 312 (p.213) in an article by William H. Holmes (1846-1933) entitled “A Study of the Textile Art in its Relation to the Development of Form and Ornament” in the Sixth Annual Report of the Bureau of Ethnology to the Secretary of the Smithsonian, 1884-85.
Location:
Currently not on view
See more items in:
Culture and the Arts: Graphic Arts
Wood Blocks for early Bureau of American Ethnology Publications, Graphic Arts Collection
Wood Engravings, Graphic Arts Collection
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center
Visitor Tag(s):

Engraved woodblock of hand signs for the letters 'S' through 'Y'

Publisher:
Bureau of American Ethnology
Printer:
Government Printing Office
Author:
Mallery, Garrick
Block maker:
Grottenthaler, V.
Physical Description:
wood (overall material)
engraving (overall production method/technique)
Measurements:
overall: 17.9 cm x 10.2 cm x 2.3 cm; 7 1/16 in x 4 in x 7/8 in
Object Name:
block
Object Type:
Wood Engraving
Place made:
United States: District of Columbia, Washington
Associated Place:
United States: Pennsylvania, Philadelphia
Date made:
ca 1880
Subject:
Communications
Art
Native Americans
Cultures & Communities
Science & Mathematics
Wood Blocks for early Bureau of American Ethnology Publications, Graphic Arts Collection
Wood Engravings, Graphic Arts Collection
ID Number:
1980.0219.1368
Catalog number:
1980.0219.1368
Accession number:
1980.0219
Description:
This engraved woodblock shows hand signs for the letters "S" through "Y." The illustration was used in a publication relating to the gesture-signs and signals of the North American Indians by Garrick Mallery; it was prepared and printed by the Government Printing Office in Washington, D.C. for the Bureau of American Ethnology in about 1880.
Location:
Currently not on view
See more items in:
Culture and the Arts: Graphic Arts
Wood Blocks for early Bureau of American Ethnology Publications, Graphic Arts Collection
Wood Engravings, Graphic Arts Collection
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center
Visitor Tag(s):

External Affairs Files, 1990-2004

Creator:
National Museum of the American Indian (U.S.) Office of the Director
Subject:
West, W. Richard
Physical description:
1 cu. ft. (1 record storage box)
Type:
Brochures
Collection descriptions
Clippings
Manuscripts
Date:
1990
1990-2004
Topic:
Indians of North America--Museums
Museum directors
Museums--Public relations
Local number:
SIA Acc. 12-080
Summary:
This accession consists of records documenting the tenure of W. Richard West, Director, 1990-2007. Materials pertain to communications and meetings with external organizations, societies, and museums; government bureaus, agencies, and bodies; and media. Materials include correspondence, memoranda, reports, brochures, and clippings
See more items in:
External Affairs Files 1983-2004 [National Museum of the American Indian (U.S.) Office of the Director]
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

Records, 1985-1995

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution Office of Government Relations
Subject:
Adams, Robert McC (Robert McCormick) 1926-
West, W. Richard
Abeyta, Pablita
Mims, A. Bradley
Rodgers, Mark W
Alexander Hamilton United States Custom House (New York, N.Y.)
Dulles International Airport
National Museum of the American Indian (U.S.)
United States Congress
National Air and Space Museum (U.S.)
Smithsonian Institution Office of Governmental Relations
All Roads Are Good: Native Voices on Life and Culture (Exhibition) (1994-2000: New York, N.Y.)
Pathways of Tradition: Indian Insights into Indian Worlds (Exhibition) (1992-1993: New York, N.Y.)
This Path We Travel: Celebrations of Contemporary Native American Creativity (Exhibition) (1994-1995: New York, N.Y.)
Physical description:
3 cu. ft. (3 record storage boxes)
Type:
Books
Collection descriptions
Brochures
Clippings
Manuscripts
Maps
Posters
Place:
Mall, The (Washington, D.C.)
National Mall (Washington, D.C.)
Date:
1985
1985-1995
Topic:
Budget process
Budget
Exhibitions
Indians of North America
Legislation
Museum buildings
Museum finance
Local number:
SIA Acc. 95-080
Summary:
These records consist of correspondence between Secretary Robert McC. Adams and various leaders of the United States Congress on matters such as funding for the establishment of the National Museum of the American Indian, the repatriation of Native American Indian artifacts at the National Mall, acquisition of the United States Customs House in New York City for its conversion to a museum, and constructing of new facilities for the National Air and Space Museum near Dulles International Airport. There are also copies of the Secretary's testimony before congressional committees; memoranda between the Secretary and Mark W. Rodgers, Director, Office of Government Relations; memoranda and notes between the Director and his staff, Senior Government Relations Officers, Pablita Abeyta and A. Bradley Mims; and correspondence between the Secretary and Richard West, Director, National Museum of the American Indian. Other records include bound volumes of budget justifications for fiscal years 1992 through 1996, posters and a map showing historical territories of Native Americans, national historical landmarks and parks in the United States, brochures, and newspaper and magazine articles
See more items in:
National Museum of the American Indian Records 1985-1994 [Smithsonian Institution Office of Government Relations]
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
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Ute Delegation

Artist:
Mathew Brady Studio, active 1844 - 1894
Sitter:
Alexander Cameron Hunt, 1825 - 1894
Pe-Ah
Chief Ouray, c. 1833 - 27 Aug 1880
Medium:
Albumen silver print
Type:
Photograph
Date:
1868
Topic:
Interior
Alexander Cameron Hunt: Politics and Government\Governor\Colorado
Chief Ouray: Native American\Leader\Chief
Portrait
Credit Line:
National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution
Object number:
NPG.93.372
Exhibition Label:
This three-part photograph shows eight members of the 1868 Ute delegation to Washington, D.C., standing alongside nine government officials. Because of growing complaints about settlers trespassing on traditional Ute lands, this group came together ostensibly to establish a definable Ute reservation in Colorado. Fourth from the right is Ouray, the individual whom U.S. authorities regarded as the tribe's principal spokesman. Fluent in English and Spanish, Ouray was best able to communicate with federal officials. His close association with Kit Carson-who traveled with the delegation but is not pictured here-and his reputation for being cooperative also made him the person with whom negotiators most wanted to deal. Although he was an important leader, Ouray had no such negotiating authority. Nevertheless, a treaty was signed during the Utes' visit that secured a relatively generous land apportionment. For the remainder of his life, Ouray struggled, often unsuccessfully, to have U.S. authorities honor the terms of this treaty.
See more items in:
National Portrait Gallery Collection
Data Source:
National Portrait Gallery
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Sand Creek Massacre: 11 Multigenerational Impacts - Gail Ridgley

Creator:
National Museum of the American Indian
Type:
Symposia
YouTube Videos
Uploaded:
2014-10-16T19:49:21.000Z
Metadata Updated:
2014-10-26T21:51:05.000Z
Topic:
Native Americans
American Indians
YouTube Category:
Education
Views:
19
Video Title:
Sand Creek Massacre: 11 Multigenerational Impacts - Gail Ridgley
Description:
Sand Creek Massacre: 150 Year Remembrance, jointly sponsored by the National Park Service and the National Museum of the American Indian, is a one day symposium that commemorates the sesquicentennial of the Sand Creek Massacre - a tragedy that occurred on November 29,1864. In this segment, Gail Ridgely speaks on "An Oral History of the 'Sand Creek Massacre' Painting which is Depicted on an Elk Hide by the Late Eugene Ridgley, Sr." Mr. Gail Ridgely is a member of the Northern Arapaho Tribe and received his MA degree from the University of South Dakota. His experiences include: school administration, tribal college president, immersion school director and tribal domestic violence facilitator. Mr. Ridgely is a U.S. Commission on Civil Rights Wyoming State Advisory Committee Member and he received a Cultural Freedom Award. He was recognized for Respected Achievement and Service to Native Education from the National Indian Education Association. The Sand Creek Massacre National Historic Site Study Act was signed in 1998 and through a Memorandum of Understanding, the National Park Service and tribes work together on Government-to-Govermment relations in the implementation of P.L. 105-243. Mr. Ridgely is a Northern Arapaho Sand Creek Massacre Representative and Descendant.
Video Duration:
678 seconds
See more by:
SmithsonianNMAI
YouTube Channel:
SmithsonianNMAI
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian
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George Catlin papers, 1821-1904, 1946

Creator:
Catlin, George 1796-1872
Seward, William Henry 1801-1872
Sully, Thomas 1783-1872
Clay, Henry 1777-1852
Physical description:
2.3 linear feet
Type:
Photogravures
Collection descriptions
Portraits
Date:
1821
1821-1904, 1946
Topic:
Art and race
Indians of North America
Portrait painters
Illustrators
Miniature painters
Painters
Ethnological illustrators
Ethnological painters
Local number:
AAA 5824-5825
aaa 1817
AAA catlgeor
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C., Research Center. Contact Reference Services for more information
Notes:
George Catlin (1796-1872) was a portrait painter, miniature painter, and ethnographer, best known for his paintings of the American Indian
Summary:
The collection comprises 2.3 feet of papers concerning George Catlin's creation and promotion of his famed "Indian Gallery" of paintings, drawings, and artifacts of North American Indians. Dating from 1821 through 1904, with one item dated 1946, the papers the papers include letters, notebooks and journals, receipt books and loose receipts, printed materials, and other documentation. The bulk of the collection focuses on Catlin's efforts to promote the sale of his gallery to the United States government through tours, including London and Paris, and petitions to various governments to purchase the Gallery. Among the rare printed catalogs and petitions in the collection are exhibition catalogs for the U.S., London, and Paris tours, the earliest dating from 1837. Letters and other documents include letters dating from the 1830s from Henry Clay, Thomas Sully, and William Henry Seward commending Catlin's work, as well as Catlin family correspondence and papers dating from 1821 through the 1870s
Of particular interest in the collection are letters to and from Catlin, including two written by Catlin during his early travels to the west in the 1830s. Other letters include ones from Henry Clay, John Adams Dix, Ralph Randolph Gurley, James Hall, William Henry Seward, Thomas Sully (illustrated), and Baron Friederich von Humbolt, among others. Most wish Catlin well and offer support in his endeavors to sell his collection
Also found within the collection are several notebooks and notes describing Native American ceremonies, name translations, customs, and other information pertinent to Catlin's catalog, two volume book, and exhibitions of the "Indian Gallery." There are also numerous loose receipts and account and receipt books documenting the 1840s London and Paris venues of the "Indian Gallery" exhibition. The collection also houses printed catalogs for the exhibitions, including a rare 1837 catalog for the first show in New York
Additional materials include certificates of authenticity testifying to the authenticity of Catlin's paintings from life of Native American sitters, announcements relating to exhibition openings, printed memorials and petitions to Congress, printed letters of support, envelopes and name cards, and handwritten tickets to Catlin lectures. Also found are a handwritten journal of Theodore B. Catlin, photogravures of Catlin, obituaries for Catlin, and printed reviews of the exhibitions
Cite as:
George Catlin papers, 1821-1946. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution
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George Catlin papers, 1821-1904, 1946
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
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Correspondence on the subject of teaching the vernacular in Indian schools : 1887-'88 / United States Indian Office

Teaching the vernacular in Indian schools
Author:
United States Office of Indian Affairs
Physical description:
27 p. ; 23 cm
Type:
Electronic resources
Place:
United States
Date:
1888
Topic:
Education
Native language and education
Government relations
Languages
Call number:
E97.5 .U55 1888
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution Libraries
Visitor Tag(s):

Scrapbook of illustrations and sample engravings ca. 1814-30

Artist:
Lewis, James Otto 1799-1858
Hary, John W
Publisher:
Lucas, Fielding, Jr
Subject:
Key-way-wo-wut
Going Cloud
O-Car-Gee-Wick
Clinton, De Witt
Cobbett, William
Thomson, James
Werner, Goliah
Bainbridge, William
American Fur Company
Physical description:
33 pages
Culture:
Chippewa
Eskimos
Arctic peoples
Indians of North America Subarctic
Indians of North America Northeast
Ojibwa Indians
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Place:
Castle Rock (Lake District, England)
Date:
ca 1814-30
Topic:
Doric Rock
Urn burial
Cave Rock
Chippewa
Mortuary customs
Habitations and other structures
American Indian
Pipe
Transportation
Bark preparation
Government and politics
Federal-Indian relations
Art, miscellaneous
Eskimos
Fishing
Language and languages--Documentation
Local number:
NAA MS 7135
Notes:
Lucas was an owner of a printing and publishing firm in Baltimore. In 1827, it issued Thomas L. McKenney's A Sketch of a Tour to the Lakes, which was illustrated after drawings by James Otto Lewis
Summary:
Some of the original watercolor and wash drawings are included in the scrapbook, including: Indian canoes, page 200 in McKenney's Sketch; View of the Urn, Lake Superior page 361; Grave of a Chippewa Child on the Island Opposite Fond du Lac (Minnesota) page 305; Cave Rock, South Shore of Lake Superior, page 364; Oblique View of the Doric Rock of Lake Superior (unpublished): Front View of the Doric Rock, page 225; Castle Rock, South Shore, Lake Superior, page 363; View of the Urn, Lake Superior (and the Monument), page 362; Skeleton of a Chippewa Indian's Lodge, page 418; Chippewa Lodge, of poles, covered with birch bark, unpublished; Chippewa Widow, page 292; Key-way-wo-wut, or Going Cloud, page 327, O-Car-Gee-Wick, page 314; Chippewa Chief with His Calumet and Pouch, page 331; Indian Dog Train, page 196; another view of Doric Rock, unpublished; another view of the Urn, unpublished; Front view of American Fur Company's Building, Fond du Lac, Minnesota, page 276, and a view of the gathering for the Treaty of Fond du Lac, 1826, page 311
Also a drawing by John W. Hary (?) showing how Eskimos at Hudson Bay caught fish. Other original, unidentified artwork, a certificate of membership in the Baltimore Beneficial Society, and samples of printing of bank papers are included. There are, in addition, engraved portraits and title pages and illustrations from publications. The portraits include De Witt Clinton, William Cobbett, James Thomson, Goliah Werner, and William Bainbridge. The materials from publications include items from The Chemist and National Recreations, or Holiday Amusements and Robert Stuart's Dictionary of Architecture and A Descriptive History of the Steam Engine (all printed by Knight and Lacy of London); Citizen of the World, Edwin and Anelina; The Works of Robert Bruns, The Works of Thomas Moore, Thackery's Vicar of Wakefield; and other unidentified publications
Cite as:
Manuscript 7135, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
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Scrapbook of illustrations and sample engravings ca. 1814-30 [Lewis, James Otto 1799-1858]
Data Source:
National Anthropological Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

Indians at work

Author:
United States Bureau of Indian Affairs
United States Office of Indian Affairs
Subject:
United States Office of Indian Affairs
Physical description:
13 v. : ill. ; 26-28 cm
Type:
Periodicals
Place:
United States
Date:
1933
1945
[1933-1945]
Topic:
Industries
Indians, Treatment of
Government relations
Legal status, laws, etc
Call number:
E98.I5 I39
Notes:
"An emergency conservation news sheet for ourselves" (subtitle varies)
Title from cover
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution Libraries
Visitor Tag(s):

American Indian Chicago Conference Records 1960-1966

Creator:
Tax, Sol 1907-
Blatchford, Herbert
Talking Eagle, Lightfoot
Cherokee Printing Project
Field Foundation
National Congress of American Indians
United States. Department of the Interior
Correspondent:
Ablon, Joan
Bahti, Tom
Barrett, S. A (Samuel Alfred) 1879-1965
Bearskin, Ben
Berry, J. Brewton
Brough, Zara Ciscoe
Brown, John J
Burkhart, John N
Cameron, Herman E
Chafe, Wallace L
Chance, Norman A
Chandler, Henry P
Connolly, Thomas E
Cook, Dibben J
Couture, James W
Dailey, Dewey W
Davis, B. W
Debo, Angie
Deer, Ada
Deloria, Vine
Fischer, Ann
Forbes, Jack D
Frederiksen, Svend
Gaffney, Richard M
Getty, Harry T
Goetting, C
Gandy, Al
Hadley, J. Nixon
Hall, Robert L
Halseth, Odd Sigurd
Hilger, Marie Inez Sister 1891-1977
Holder, Preston
Hetzel, Theodore Brinton
Josephy, Alvin M
Keeler, W. W
Le Hurreau, Howard L
La Planat, Ed
Len-Portilla, Miguel
Lesser, Alexander
Levy, Jerrold E
Lurie, Nancy Oestreich
Mack, Irene
Madigan, La Verne
Malouf, Carling
Menninger, Karl
Merrill, Robert S
Midgett, Helen Parker
McNickle, D'Arcy
Nash, Philleo 1909-1987
Nader, Ralph
Ossinach, Kirkland
Paul, William L Sr
Pierce, Earl Boyd
Powell, Peter John Father
Providencia Sister F.C.S.P
Petersen, Helen
Dillon, Wilton Sterling
Rachlin, Carol K
Rainer, John C
Roessel, Robert A
Robinson, Georgeann 1917-1986
Rupp, Reynold J
McGhee, Calvin W
Rickard, William
Rietz, Robert W
Seller, Mary
Stewart, Omer C
Sturtevant, William C
Taylor, Walter W. Jr
Takes Gun, Frank
Talachy, Pat
Thomas, Robert K
Tom-pee-saw, Frank
Ervin, Sam J Jr
Wax, Murray
Welch, Earl
Welch, Rachel
Wesley, Clarence
Whistler, Rachel
White, Robert A
Yellowtail, Bob
Phelps-Stokes Fund
Schwartzhaupt Foundation
United States Department of the Interior Bureau of Indian Affairs
Wenner-Gren Foundation for Anthropological Research
Orrespondent:
La Farge, Oliver
Contributor:
Stanley, Sam
Mc, Lachlan, Bruce
Subject:
Tax, Sol 1907-
University of Chicago American Indian Chicago Conference
Physical description:
8 linear feet
Culture:
Cherokee language
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Date:
1960-1966
Topic:
Federal-Indian relations
American Indians--federal relations--population
Language and languages--Documentation
Local number:
NAA MS 4806
Notes:
The American Indian Chicago Conference (originally called the American Indian Charter Convention) was organized by University of Chicago anthropologist Sol Tax. Tax's idea, announced at the 1960 National Congress of American Indians convention, was to bring representatives of American Indian groups together to prepare statements about the conditions and needs of their people. Tax took the role of coordinator to initiate developments, assure that all Indian groups were represented, serve as or find expert advisers, and publicize results to the public and to those who formulate Indian policy. The University of Chicago was the sponsor for the meeting. Nancy Oestreich Lurie, of the University of Michigan, served as assistant coordinator
Tax, assisted by the National Congress of American Indians, formulated and circulated a proposed statement that served as a point from which discussions could take place. Tax also invited to Chicago a relatively small group of Indian leaders who then served as a steering committee. This preliminary meeting arranged several regional conferences where discussions could take place in preparation for a large meeting in Chicago in June 1961
Representatives at the large conference presented a cross section of the American Indian community and included urban Indian, traditional Indians, modern Indians, and Indians from both recognized and nonrecognized tribes. Several hundred people attended the meeting and 439 of these registered. These registered attendees represented 79 tribes
The outcome of the American Indian Chicago Conference was the Declaration of Indian Purpose, a lengthy document that dealt with problems and proposed approaches to solutions of the problems. In general, the declaration asked for a redirection of "the responsibility of the United States toward the Indian people in terms of a positive national obligation to modify or remove the conditions which produce the poverty and lack of social justice, as these prevail as the outstanding attributes of Indian life today." The declaration was presented to President John F. Kennedy by representatives of American Indian tribes in September 1962
Summary:
The records include a diary, announcements, minutes, correspondence, financial papers, registration materials, clippings, photographs, tape recordings, and printed and processed materials. Also included are a number of papers that were prepared for the use of members of the conference. Correspondents include Joan Ablon, Tom Bahti, Samuel Alfred Barrett, Ben Bearskin, Brewton Berry, Herbert Blatchford, Zara Ciscoe Brough, John J. Brown, John N. Burkhart, Herman E. Cameron, Wallace L. Chafe, Norman A. Chance, Henry P. Chandler, Thomas E. Connolly, Dibben J. Cook, James W. Couture, Cherokee Printing Project (with booklets in Cherokee), Dewey W. Dailey, B. W. Davis, Angie Debo, Ada Deer, Vine Deloria, Field Foundation, Ann Fischer
Jack D. Forbes, Svend Fredericksen, Richard M. Gaffney, Harry T. Getty, Ray C. Goetting, Al Gandy, J. Nixon Hadley, Robert L. Hall, Odd Sigurd Halseth, Marie Inez Hilger, Preston Holder, Theodore Brinton Hetzel, Alvin M. Josephy, W. W. Keeler, Oliver La Farge, Howard L. Le Hurreau, Ed La Planat, Miguel Len-Portilla, Alexander Lesser, Jerrold E. Levy, Lightfoot Talking Eagle, Nancy Oestreich Lurie, Irene Mack, La Verne Madigan, Carling Malouf, Karl Menninger, Robert S. Merrill, Helen Parker Midgett, D'Arcy McNickle, Philleo Nash, Ralph Nader, National Congress of American Indians, Kirkland Ossinach, William L. Paul, Sr., Earl Boyd Pierce, Peter John Powell, Sister Providencia, F.C.S.P., Helen Petersen
Phelps-Stokes Fund (Wilton Sterling Dillon), Carol K. Rachlin, John C. Rainer, Robert A. Roessel, Georgeann Robinson, Reynold J. Ruppe, Calvin W. McGhee, William Rickard, Robert W. Rietz, Schwartzhaupt Foundation, Mary Sellers, Omer C. Stewart, William Curtis Sturtevant, Walter Taylor, Frank Takes Gun, Pat Talachy, Robert K. Thomas, Frank Tom-pee-saw, United States Government (Congressmen, Department of the Interior, Bureau of Indian Affairs, including Sam J. Ervin, Jr.), Murray Wax, Earl Welch, Rachel Whistler, Robert A. White, and Bob Yellowtail
Among the records are materials that relate to the compilation by Tax, Bruce McLachlan, and Sam Stanley of the map "The North American Indian: The present Day Distribution of Indians in the United States." Included are population figures and narratives by Tax
Cite as:
Manuscript 4806, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Data Source:
National Anthropological Archives
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Publications of the Bureau of Catholic Indian Missions, January, 1879

Author:
Bureau of Catholic Indian Missions (U.S.)
Brouillet, J. B. A (Jean Baptiste Abraham) 1813-1884
Seghers, Charles John 1839-1886
Subject:
Bureau of Catholic Indian Missions (U.S.)
Catholic Church Missions
Physical description:
1 v. (various pagings) ; 23 cm
Type:
Sources
Place:
United States
North America
Date:
1879
Topic:
Catholic schools
Missions
Government relations
Indians, Treatment of--History
Call number:
E98.M6 B95p 1879
Notes:
English and German
Title from cover
Spine title: Publications, 1873-1879
A collection of pamphlets issued by the Bureau of Catholic Indian Missions from 1873 to 1879
(cont.) [8.] Annals of the Catholic Indian missions of America [v. 1, no. 1-2; v. 2, no. 1-3 (1877-1879)] -- [9.] Management of the Catholic Indian Bureau of Washington / J.B.A. Brouillet [1878] -- [10.] [An important letter from the Bishop of Vancouver's Island to the Bureau of Catholic Indian Missions] / C.J. Seghers [1877] -- [11.] Statuten der zum Besten der Indianer errichteten katholischen Missions-Gesellschaft [1875?]
Contents:
[1.] Circular of the Catholic Commissioner for Indian Missions to the Catholics of the United States [1874] -- [2.] Petition of the Catholic Church for the agency of the Chippewas of Lake Superior [1873] -- [3.] Manual of Catholic Indian missionary associations [1875] -- [4.] Catholic Indian schools and churches, missionaries and teachers, their number and cost of their support [1875?] -- [5.] [Manual of Catholic Indian Missionary Associations] [1875] -- [6.] Official construction of President Grant's Indian Peace Policy [1875?] -- [7.] Report of the Treasurer of the Catholic Indian Mission Fund, from January, 1873, to December 1, 1876 / J.B.A. Brouillet [1876]
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution Libraries
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Lawrence "Larry" James Beck papers, 1938-1994

Creator:
Beck, Larry 1938-1994
Physical description:
6 linear feet (13 boxes, 1 half-sized box, 2 oversized boxes)
Culture:
Yupik Eskimos
Type:
Correspondence
Collection descriptions
Drawings
Negatives
Newsletters
Notes
Pamphlets
Photographs
Portfolios (groups of works)
Sketches
Slides (photographs)
Place:
North America
Washington (State)
Date:
1938
1938-1994
Topic:
Indian art
Inuit masks
Public sculpture, American
Sculptors
Local number:
NMAI.AC.017
Notes:
Lawrence "Larry" James Beck (1938-1994) was sculptor and mixed-media artist of Yup'ik descent. Born in Seattle, Washington to a non-Indian father and a Norwegian/Yup'ik mother, Beck originally studied engineering at the University of Washington before turning his attention to art. In 1964 he earned a B.A. in painting, followed by an M.F.A. in 1965
During the late 1960s and 1970s, Beck's work focused on his large scale, abstract pieces and established his reputation as a sculptor. His early works were comprised of found metals and objects assembled in a lyrical but humorous manner. During 1975-1980, he installed projects for Golden Gardens Park in Seattle, Highline Community College and Boeing (King County Airport). He also worked on a piece for the Occidental Park site in Seattle, but due to circumstances of the city it was never installed
In the early 1970s Beck visited the his ancestral homelands on the Alaskan coast and established a connection to Yup'ik culture. In 1973 he started to produce a new series of pieces called "Inukshuk", which is Inuit for sculpture presence. This term was also used for three major commissions that later followed and Beck continued to use Inuit terminology in his work. After the 1980 install of the Boeing sculpture, Beck experienced what he would call his sculpture career crisis. He became disappointed with public art and abandoned sculpture to focus on creating abstract Inuit Inua (spirit) masks. On March 27, 1994, Beck died of a heart attack in his home in Washington
Summary:
The Lawrence James Beck papers contain biographical materials, sculpture portfolios, art shows, notes, sketches and drawings, publications, correspondence and visual material including photos, slides and negatives of Beck's art
Series 1: Biographical and Personal, (undated, 1938-1994), contains resumes, personal articles and articles by Larry's friends, articles of interest to him, notes on his dreams, video tape transcription and notes on 'The Bank', the studio/home that he purchased in 1970 in Conway, Washington. Series 2: Correspondence, (undated, 1966-1994), contains correspondence pertaining to his artwork or shows, correspondence between Larry and family, also includes correspondence with the United States Government, as well as miscellaneous correspondence. Organized alphabetically and then chronologically
Series 3: Sculptures and shows, (undated, 1966-1994), contains art show information and art projects that Larry participated in. Series 4: Sketches, drawings, notes and ideas, (undated), contains handwritten notes on artwork, or ideas of what to produce, drawings of sculptures and various ideas about sculptures. Series 5: Publications, (undated, 1966-1995), contains pamphlets, newsletters, journals and non art related publications that were of interest to Larry
Series 6: Miscellaneous material, (undated), contains invoices of materials and non-art related purchases, shipping material receipts of artwork, resumes from other people and literature on producing sculpture. Series 7: Visual material, contains photographs, negatives and slides. All visual material is organized by influences to Larry's work, his sculptures, Larry's Native American art, family and people, and vacations and travel
Cite as:
Lawrence James Beck papers, 1938-1994, National Museum of the American Indian Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution National Museum of the American Indian Archives
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John Peabody Harrington papers: Tewa, 1908-circa 1949

Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody 1884-1961
Freire-Marreco, Barbara W (Barbara Whitchurch) 1879-1967
Physical description:
21 boxes
Culture:
Tewa Indians
Indians of North America Southwest, New
Type:
Field notes
Nomenclature
Dictionaries
Manuscripts
Narratives
Vocabulary
Date:
1908
1908-1949
1908-circa 1949
Topic:
Tewa language
Tiwa language
Language and languages--Documentation
Linguistics
Ethnology
Ethnobotany
Zoology
Names, Geographical
Names, Ethnological
Local number:
Accession #1976-95
Notes:
John P. Harrington's study of the Tewa languages began in July 1908 under the auspices of the School of American Archaeology (S.A.A.) in Santa Fe, and his interest in the Tewa Indians continued into the late 1940s. Accumulation and organization of notes fall generally into three time frames. The early period can be dated between 1908 and 1916 when Harrington worked first for the Museum of New Mexico as assistant curator, then for Edgar Lee Hewett of the S.A.A., and, from December 1914, as ethnologist for the Bureau of American Ethnology. Six of his publications are based on the notes from this period. In October 1910 he spent several weeks on a tour of Tewa country securing placenames from large numbers of informants. The principal informants for the entire early period are Ignacio Aguilar and Santiago Naranjo (also called "Jim")
Dating from a middle period in 1927, Harrington worked closely with Eduardo Cata in Washington. Cata was described by Harrington as an educated San Juan Tewa Indian. With the exception of one short period (from February to July 1946), Harrington was in Washington from early 1942 until April 1949. During this third period he published "Three Tewa Texts" (1947) based on stories from Cata. The texts may have been received from Cata during the middle period, but the notes represent a rehearing in the 1940s with David Dozier and an informant identified only as "0." Harrington knew David Dozier's father and in May 1944, he wrote self-introductory letters to the son, a fluent speaker of the Santa Clara dialect, who was then in the Indian Service. Harrington also reworked and reorganized much of his grammatical information during these years in Washington. Notes indicate that he may have planned to publish a Tewa grammar
Other Tewa speakers that Harrington worked with include Bert Fredericks, Manuel Vigil, Bernardo Sanchez, Joe Horner, Desiderio Naranjo, and Alfredo Montoya
Summary:
This subseries of the Southwest series contains Harrington's Tewa research. The files include field notes, vocabulary, linguistic and ethnographic notes, a dictionary, records of rehearings, texts, writings, and miscellanous notes
His field notebooks contain grammar, vocabulary, placenames, names of persons, relationship terms, and material culture; texts concerning Qwiqumat, other myths, and ethnohistory of early Southwest tribes, pueblos, clans, and religion; copies of the San Ildefonso census; and other miscellaneous ethnographic information
The vocabulary section of the Tewa files include a group of slips identified as Rio Grande vocabulary with some Santa Clara terms specified as such. There is a wide variety of terms, and animal and plant vocabularies were marked by Harrington "A" and "P" respectively (former B.A.E. MS 4678pt.) with some linguistic insertions. The information was collected during the early period. There is also a small file of Spanish loanwords in Tewa that Harrington copied from Eduardo Cata's material
His linguistic and ethnographic notes contain a few pages each of over twenty topics such as dances, estufas (kivas), pottery, societies, religion, superstitions, Tewa trails, and Tewa origins (former B.A.E. MS 4704pt.). Barbara Freire-Marreco collaborated in the accumulation of some of the material, most of which came from the many informants who contributed to the early notes. Some linguistic material is interspersed. There is a handwritten copy of the Nambe census of 1911, a description and rough sketches of the Black Mesa of San Ildefonso, and several references to Jemez, Spanish Cochiti, Spanish Hopi, Taos, Zuni, and Sia
A collection of linguistic and ethnographic terms remains in slipfile form (former B.A.E. MS 4704pt.). Some are in various Tewa dialects such as Nambe, San Ildefonso, San Juan, and Santa Clara. A few Taos comparisons are included. The largest group is related to animal parts and animal activities. Ethnographic information includes such topics as snakes, estufas, officers and government, plants, pottery, shrines, and societies. A small group is credited to Barbara Freire-Marreco
The dictionary (former B.A.E. MS. 4704pt.) was arranged by Cata in June 1927 from his field notes taken during the early period. Part is in alphabetic order, part is devoted to adjectives provided by Julian Martinez, and part covers adverbs from Santiago Naranjo. A second group is also arranged in alphabetic order but no sources are identified. Some related nonlexical and bibliographical material is interspersed
There are also materials from rehearings Harrington conducted with Santiago Naranjo in 1911, Eduardo Cata in 1927, and David Dozier and "O" in 1948-1949. Harrington and Cata developed a linguistic treatment of notes based on an unpublished dissertation on New Mexico Spanish by Aurelio H. Espinosa. Together they reworked geographic terms from Harrington's "The Ethnogeography of the Tewa Indians." Other miscellaneous rehearings with Cata were more grammatically oriented. Dozier and "O" provided substantial material on San Juan/Hano comparisons, although some of the notes may have been accumulated during a February 1946 visit to Albuquerque, where Harrington interviewed Mr. Shupla, a Hano speaker. This meeting may have resulted also in his proposed article "Hano . . . Same Word as Tano."
In the text section are three myths given by Juan Gonzales on September 1, 2, and 3, 1908 at the camp near the Stone Lions, rendered in Tewa and English with some linguistic notes. Also in both languages is an Ignacio Aguilar story recorded on September 23, 1909. Some stories probably obtained between 1908 and 1909 are in English only. Not all are complete and the continuity of some is broken due to repetitive material and interspersed corrections. There are two short Nambe myths. Eduardo Cata supplied thirteen texts in addition to the three published in 1947. These are in Tewa, most with either interlinear or parallel English translations. Harrington used pencils of different colors to insert orthographic corrections and later annotations. Whether the texts were obtained in 1927 when Cata was in Washington or during the 1940s is uncertain
Harrington's writing files contain notes and drafts for his unpublished and published writings. There are substantial notes accumulated for "A Brief Description of the Tewa Language" (1910) (former B.A.E. MS 4704pt.). Harrington's notes contain more extensive phonetic and morphological information than the final publication. Notes probably recorded in 1910 for "Ethnogeography" and "Ethnobotany" are intermixed and largely disorganized, although substantial in number (former B.A.E. MS 4704pt.). Additional information and some relevant correspondence for "Ethnogeography" is included (former B.A.E. mss. 3801 and 4704pt.), as well as some notes Harrington excerpted in 1946 from this publication. Drafts and notes for "Three Tewa Texts" include insertions of additional information provided by David Dozier and "O." There are also five sets of drafts for proposed articles. "Ablaut in the Tewa Language of New Mexico" (1912) is an elaboration of the phonetic material used in "A Brief Description of the Tewa Language." "Some Aspects of Tewa Indian Placenames" was written in 1920. Undated are "Hano, Indian Pueblo of Arizona, the Same Word as Tano" (former B.A.E. MS 4521pt.), "Santa Fe at Northern Edge of Tano Country," and "The Tewa Pueblos."
Among the writing files are also materials relating to "Phonetics of the Tewa Language," submitted or sold by Eduardo Cata to the B.A.E. (former MS 4704pt.). The title page, bill of sale, and notes in Harrington's handwriting, and some possibly in Cata's are on file. Informants Mr. and Mrs. "O" also contributed information. There are also two unpublished articles on Tewa tones that Harrington co-authored with David Dozier--"Tewa Tones" and "The 3 Tone Accents and the 1 Non-tone Accent of Tewa."
Also in this subseries are miscellaneous notes, mainly from the early period. Some of the information came from Ignacio Aguilar. There is a small selection of Jemez, Ute, and Taos equivalences. Also included are a diagram of Tewa color symbolism (former B.A.E. ms. 1790), a reproduction of a San Juan Pueblo religious painting, and a very short bibliography
Cite as:
Southwest: Tewa, John Peabody Harrington papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
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John Peabody Harrington papers: Southwest, 1907-1957
Data Source:
National Anthropological Archives
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Teriananda papers, 1972-1999

Creator:
Teriananda 1947-
Subject:
Peltier, Leonard
Physical description:
.83 linear feet (2 boxes)
Culture:
Navajo Indians
Hopi Indians
Type:
Letters
Collection descriptions
Reports
Clippings
Articles
Writings
Date:
1972
1972-1999
Topic:
Indians of North America
Indians of Mexico
Indians of Central America
Indians of South America
Indians of North America--Land tenure
Indians of North America--Civil rights
Indians of North America--Relocation
AIDS (Disease)
Naturopathy
Traditional medicine
Local number:
NMAI.AC.009
Notes:
Teriananda was born in Manhattan in 1947, where she grew up and has continued to live throughout her adult life. Teriananda's father, born in Brooklyn, became a financial officer and independent scholar; her mother, born in British Guiana (now Guyana), was a classical pianist who immigrated to the United States and later became an editorial assistant, working part-time during Teriananda's childhood. Her parents instilled in her a belief that she was "a citizen of the world." She studed ballet as a youngster, and as a teenager, immersed herself in the artistic and intellectual milieu of the Lower East Side and Greenwich Village. An improperly diagnosed back injury while she was a senior in high school resulted in severe back problems in the 1970s that have persisted throughout her life
Teriananda became interested in indigenous struggles in the 1970s, following a "back crisis" that almost took her life yet proved to be psychically transformative. In seeking to know who she was, she realized she needed to know where she was, and this led her to ask who the original inhabitants of the continent were. She soon became involved in activist struggles for indigenous rights and worked with a number of Native American groups during the 1970s and 1980s, including the International Treaty Council's attempts to found the United Nations permanent Working Group on Indigenous People, support for Yvonne Wanrow and Leonard Peltier, the issue of uranium contamination from mining on Native American land, and the problem of the Joint Land Use Area near Big Mountain on the Hopi and Navajo reservations
Teriananda also worked on issues surrounding the AIDS crisis after the death of several friends from the disease. She had become familiar with the possibilities of natural medicines, partly through contact with traditional Native teachers, and she became active promoting the benefits of nutritional, herbal and other natural therapies to sufferers of AIDS. As Teriananda's own health issues persisted and worsened, she turned to Tibetan Buddhism, and has devoted herself to artistic pursuits influenced by this spiritual path. Although she has cut back on her activism, due to health problems and family demands, Teriananda remains a committed political activist who stays informed of current issues and is determined to pass on the heritage of struggles for peace and justice to the next generation
Summary:
This collection, from the 1970s to the 1990s, is comprised of published and unpublished writings by Teriananda, as well as letters, reports, newspaper and magazine articles, group newsletters, flyers and announcements of political events, and news releases. The issues represented here, including support work for "The Longest Walk" campaign for justice for Leonard Peltier and the Big Mountain relocation, are indicative of the concerns in parts of Indian country in the United States and elsewhere during these decades
Series I, Writings (1978-1991) contains original writings by Teriananda, including an interview with Native American activist Bill Wahpepah, a report on the state of the natural world with an appendix of written materials Teriananda used to supplement the report, and a newsletter for the New York City Big Mountain Support group
Series II, Political Activities (undated; 1972-1996) consists of a variety of writings over more than two decades, including newsletters, reports, flyers, newspaper and magazine articles, and news releases, all of it relating to the political activities with which Teriananda has been involved in support of indigenous peoples. These include support for Latin American indigenous struggles, rain forest initiatives, the Black Hills, Leonard Peltier, the Longest Walk, which was enacted to protest and lobby against eleven bills before Congress which Indians felt would alter treaties between the U.S. government and various Indian tribes, and issues surrounding the Navajo relocation from the Hopi-Navajo Joint Use Area around Big Mountain
Cite as:
Teriananda papers, 1972-1999, National Museum of the American Indian Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution National Museum of the American Indian Archives
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