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A survey of the contemporary Indians of Canada; a report on economic, political, educational needs and policies. Editor, H. B. Hawthorn

Author:
Hawthorn, Harry Bertram 1910-
Canada Indian Affairs Branch
Physical description:
2 v. 36 cm
Type:
Books
Place:
Canada
Date:
1966
1966-67
Topic:
Social conditions
Government relations
Call number:
E78.C2 H39
E78.C2 H39
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
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Survey of conditions of the Indians in the United States : hearings before a subcommittee of the Committee on Indian Affairs, United States Senate

Conditions of the Indians in the United States
Author:
United States Congress Senate Committee on Indian Affairs
Physical description:
leaves [192]-261 ; 33 cm
Type:
Books
Place:
United States
Date:
1930
1930]
Topic:
Economic conditions
Government relations
Indians, Treatment of
Call number:
E98.E2 U54 1930
Notes:
"Griffith L. Johnson, shorthand reporter."
Cover title.
Typescript.
Dec. 16, 1930?
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
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The cost of conquest : Indian decline in Honduras under Spanish rule / Linda Newson

Author:
Newson, Linda A
Physical description:
xvi, 375 p. : ill. ; 23 cm
Type:
Books
Place:
Honduras
Date:
1986
To 1838
Topic:
Population
Indians, Treatment of--History
Economic conditions
History
Call number:
F1505.3.P57N49 1986X
Notes:
Includes index.
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
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Strange reciprocity : mainstreaming women's work in Tepoztlán in the "decade of the new economy" / Sidney S. Perutz

Author:
Perutz, Sidney S. 1933-
Physical description:
xvii, 263 p. ; 24 cm
Type:
Books
Place:
Mexico
Tepoztlán
Tepoztlán (Mexico)
Date:
2008
C2008
Topic:
Indian women--Economic conditions
Women--Employment
Indians of Mexico--Commerce
Economic conditions
Contents:
Mainstreaming women's work processes : a strange reciprocity -- Articulating Tepozteca into commodity culture(s) -- Local/global constellations -- Women's work in and out of economic space and time -- Counting and measuring gender, 1990-2000 -- New economy housework -- Three primary feminized occupations -- Making the market system work, 1990-2000 -- Embedded in the market -- Fixed mercado trading -- A postindustrial market system -- Feminization and community survival strategies -- Gender mainstreaming insights
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
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"Enough to keep them alive" : Indian welfare in Canada, 1873-1965 / Hugh Shewell

Author:
Shewell, Hugh 1947-
Physical description:
xii, 441 p. ; 24 cm
Type:
Books
Place:
Canada
Date:
2004
C2004
Topic:
Public welfare
Economic conditions
Indian reservations
Social policy
Economic policy
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
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Indian reservations in the United States : territory, sovereignty, and socioeconomic change / Klaus Frantz

Author:
Frantz, Klaus
Physical description:
xxvi, 370 p. : ill., maps ; 23 cm
Type:
Books
Place:
United States
Date:
1999
C1999
Topic:
Indian reservations
Social conditions
Economic conditions
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
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Group portrait of National Congress of American Indians meeting, 1944

Subject:
National Congress of American Indians
Physical description:
1 print : silver gelatin
Culture:
Indians of North America
Type:
Photographs
Collection descriptions
Place:
Denver (Colo.)
Date:
1944
Local number:
NAA Photo Lot 75-33
Notes:
Founded in 1944, the National Congress of American Indians is a major American Indian organization which aims to "protect, preserve, and develop Indian land, mineral, timber, and human resources, serve legislative interest of Indian tribes, and increase health, education and economic conditions" (as outlined in the NCAI constitution). Its membership includes American Indian and Alaska Native tribal governments, tribal citizens, individuals, and Native and non-Native organizations as well as serving as an umbrella organization for many other Indian groups.
Summary:
Photograph depicting attendees at November 1944 meeting of National Congress of American Indians in Denver, Colorado.
Cite as:
Photo lot 75-33, Group portrait of National Congress of American Indians meeting, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Data Source:
National Anthropological Archives
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Report and recommendations to the President of the United States

Author:
United States Presidential Commission on Indian Reservation Economies
Physical description:
ii, 61, 132 p. : ill. ; 28 cm
Type:
Books
Date:
1984
[1984]
Topic:
Economic conditions
Indian reservations
Call number:
E98.E2 U57 1984
E98.E2U57 1984
Notes:
Cover title.
"November 1984."
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
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National Congress of American Indians records, 1933-1990 (bulk 1944-1989)

Creator:
National Congress of American Indians
Subject:
Bronson, Ruth Muskrat
Curry, James E. 1907-1972
Deloria, Vine
Harjo, Suzan Shown
McNickle, D'Arcy 1904-1977
Peterson, Helen L
Snake, Reuben 1937-1993
Tonasket, Mel
Trimble, Charles E
Arrow, Inc
National Congress of American Indians
National Tribal Chairmen's Association
United Effort Trust
United States American Indian Policy Review Commission
United States Bureau of Indian Affairs
United States Indian Claims Commission
Physical description:
251 linear feet
Type:
Administrative records
Collection descriptions
Audiotapes
Clippings
Correspondence
Financial records
Photographs
Videotapes
Place:
United States
Date:
1933
1933-1990
bulk 1944-1989
20th century
1934-
Topic:
Alaska Natives--Land tenure
Indians of North America--Civil rights
Indians of North America--Economic conditions
Indians of North America--Government relations
Indians of North America--Legal status, laws, etc
Indians of North America--Politics and government
Indians of North America--Social conditions
Indian termination policy
Radioactive wastes--Management
Trail of Broken Treaties, 1972
Local number:
NMAI.AC.010
Notes:
The National Congress of American Indians (NCAI) is a major American Indian advocacy organization, designed to serve as a link between tribal governments and the United States government. NCAI was founded in 1944, in Denver, CO, as a membership organization for "persons of Indian blood." In 1955, group membership was limited to recognized tribes, committees, or bands. The organization is overseen by an Executive Council, which selects a five-member Executive Committee and an Executive Director. The Executive Director is then responsible for managing the organization's staff and overseeing its initiatives and everyday operations. Since 1944, NCAI has held annual conventions in the fall to elect officers and pass resolutions, which become the basis for the organization's policy positions. Beginning in 1977, a mid-year conference in May or June was added to provide further opportunities for in-depth exploration of issues.
Since its inauguration, NCAI has worked on a wide variety of issues facing Indians in the US. Some of those issues include voting rights, land claims, education, economic development, natural resource protection and management, nuclear waste, repatriation, and government-to-government relations with the federal government. In 1954, NCAI organized an emergency conference to protest the US government's newly-announced termination policy. NCAI has also frequently worked closely with other Indian organizations, such as the Native American Rights Fund and National Tribal Chairmen's Association, and with various government bodies, such as the Bureau of Indian Affairs and Indian Health Service.
Summary:
The NCAI records document the organization's work, particularly that of its office in Washington, DC, and the wide variety of issues faced by American Indians in the twentieth century. The bulk of the material relates to legislation, lobbying, and NCAI's interactions with various governmental bodies. A large segment also concerns the annual conventions and executive council and executive committee meetings. Finally, the records also document the operations of the NCAI, including personnel, financial, and fundraising material. The collection also includes the records of two of NCAI's Executive Directors, Charles E. "Chuck" Trimble (1972-1977) and Suzan Shown Harjo (1984-1989). Included are correspondence, publications, reports, administrative records, photographs, and audio and video recordings.
Cite as:
National Congress of American Indians Records, National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
National Congress of American Indians records 1933-1990 (bulk 1944-1989)
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution National Museum of the American Indian Archives
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Social and economic survey of New York Indian reservations / conducted by Works Progress Administration ; sponsored by United States Indian Service, New York Agency ; co-sponsor State of New York Department of Social Welfare, Area Office No. 1

Author:
United States Works Progress Administration
United States Office of Indian Affairs
New York Department of Social Welfare
Physical description:
14 leaves ; 29 cm
Type:
Books
Place:
New York
Date:
1939
1939]
Topic:
Indian reservations--Social conditions--Statistics
Indian reservations--Economic conditions--Statistics
Indians, Treatment of
Reservations
Call number:
E78.N7 U58 1939
E78.N7U58 1939
Notes:
"December 1939."
"Work project no. 54297."
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
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Tiller's guide to Indian country : economic profiles of American Indian reservations / edited and compiled by Veronica E. Velarde Tiller

Guide to Indian countryEconomic profiles of American Indian reservations
Author:
Tiller, Veronica E. Velarde
Malcolm Wiener Center for Social Policy Harvard Project on American Indian Economic Development
Subject:
Honoring Contributions in the Governance of American Indian Nations (Program)
Physical description:
xviii, 1120 p. : ill., maps ; 29 cm
Type:
Directories
Place:
United States
Date:
2005
Topic:
Indian reservations--Economic aspects
Economic conditions
Indian business enterprises
Notes:
"Featuring Honoring Nations from Harvard University's Project on American Indian Economic Development."
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
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Development of Indian resources, by Henry W. Hough

Author:
Hough, Henry W
Physical description:
xvii, 286 p. illus., fold. map, ports. 23 cm
Type:
Books
Date:
1967
1967]
Topic:
Economic conditions
Indian reservations
Call number:
E98.E2 H83
E98.E2H83
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
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Building the future : stories of successful Indian enterprises / prepared under an award from the Economic Development Administration, U.S. Dept. of Commerce

Stories of successful Indian enterprises
Author:
National Congress of American Indians
Physical description:
79, 8, 15 p. : ill ; 28 cm
Type:
Books
Place:
United States
Date:
2001
Topic:
Indian business enterprises
Economic conditions
Entrepreneurship
Call number:
E98.B87 B85 2001
Notes:
Cover title.
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
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Tiller's guide to Indian country : economic profiles of American Indian reservations / edited and compiled by Veronica E. Velarde Tiller

Economic profiles of American Indian reservations
Author:
Tiller, Veronica E. Velarde
Physical description:
xiv, 698 p. : ill., maps ; 29 cm
Type:
Directories
Place:
United States
Date:
1996
C1996
Topic:
Indian reservations--Economic aspects
Economic conditions
Indian business enterprises
Call number:
E93 .T55 1996
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
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The United States Government Building at the Centennial Exhibition, 1874-77

Author:
Miner, H. Craig
Subject:
Baird, Spencer Fullerton 1823-1887
Windrim, James H (James Hamilton) 1840-1919
Metcalfe, Henry b. 1847
Lyford, Stephen C
Goshorn, Alfred Traber 1833-1902
United States National Museum
Assistant Secretary of the Smithsonian
United States Congress
United States Centennial Commission
National Collections
Centennial Exhibition (1876 : Philadelphia, Pa.)
Physical description:
Number of pages: 17; Page numbers: 202-218
Date:
Winter 1972
Topic:
Budget
Exhibitions--Philadelphia (Pa.)
U.S. Government Building
Indians of North America
United States Government Exhibit
Architecture--Design and plans
Buildings
Finances
Architecture--Washington (D.C.)
Exhibition buildings
Architects
Architectural design
Construction (Buildings)
Artifacts
Public education
Public opinion
Education--Museums
Publisher:
Washington, DC: National Archives and Records Service of the General Services Administration
Category:
Smithsonian History Bibliography
Notes:
Four photographs accompany the article, which is footnoted.
Summary:
This article discusses the planning, funding and contents of the U. S. Government building erected as part of the United States Centennial Exhibition, which opened in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in May of 1876. An executive order in January 1874 created the Board on Behalf of United States Executive Departments to operate under the United States Centennial Commission, and charged it with the duty of collecting articles to reflect the government's facilities and resources in times of both war and peace. The six-member board was chaired by Colonel Stephen C. Lyford of the War Department, and included Assistant Secretary Spencer F. Baird of the Smithsonian Institution as a member.
The U. S. Congress wanted the United States Centennial Commission, directed by Alfred T. Goshorn, to be privately financed, but weak economic conditions in 1875 dictated approval of a $1.5 million appropriation. Even with funds still short, the board pushed for construction of its own building to separate materials that would be associated with the dignity of the government from those displayed by private contributors.
The board worked within the confines of a $150,000 budget to make the building a reality. Ground-breaking was held in July 1875, and the building, designed by architect James H. Windrim and constructed under the supervision of Henry Metcalfe, was transferred to the board in mid-February 1876. Though many cost-cutting measures resulted in a relatively plain and straight building, the final $80,817.71 cost exceeded the $64,007.61 contracted price. Building fixtures, fees and salaries brought the figure up to $111,400; small amounts were spent for landscaping, and two plaster bas-reliefs and lettering were added to the outside of the building.
Display space inside the building was allotted among the governmental entities involved, but through aggressive efforts by Spencer F. Baird, the Smithsonian Institution ended up controlling about two-thirds of the total exhibit area. Baird worked tirelessly to arrange transport of scientific displays and materials to the exhibition building, and bypassed his own board to appeal directly to the Centennial Commission for more exhibit space.
The author describes at length steps Baird took to assist the Interior Department in collecting Native American artifacts for display, and mentions Baird's intention of housing much of the government's collections in a future museum in Washington, D.C. Exhibits in the War Department display are recounted with descriptions and anecdotes concerning various armaments, and other displays, such as the Navy's collection of arctic materials and the Treasury Department's exhibit of empty liquor bottles, are mentioned.
When the exhibition closed in November 1876, Assistant Secretary Baird was eager to remove artifacts before they were scattered among individuals. He also actively collected objects brought to the exhibition by foreign governments as he made pleas to the U. S. Congress for a national museum to house all the articles.
The Government Building at the Centennial Exhibition had been constructed for a one-event purpose, and the author states that its contents may be said to represent the United States government as it chose to portray itself in the centennial year. He comments that the operation was a victim of bureaucratic red tape and inefficiency, and led many observers to feel that arrogance had created a government that was increasingly alienated from a somewhat anti-intellectual public.
The building was sold for $1,127.87 after the exhibition closed in November 1876. However, Spencer F. Baird's vision of a second Smithsonian Building in Washington, D.C., was realized when the U. S. National Museum was erected shortly thereafter. The new museum building was very similar in design to the Government Building, complete with Windrim's octagonal dome.
Contained within:
Prologue: The Journal of the National Archives Vol. 4, Number 4 (Journal)
Contact information:
Institutional History Division, Smithsonian Institution Archives, 600 Maryland Avenue, S.W., Washington, D.C. 20024-2520, SIHistory@si.edu
Data Source:
Smithsonian Archives - History Div
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National Congress of American Indians audio and film recordings 1952-1997

Creator:
National Congress of American Indians
Subject:
Harjo, Suzan Shown
Trimble, Charles E
Deloria, Vine
Tonasket, Mel
Delacruz, Joseph B
Physical description:
713 sound cassettes
442 sound tape reels 1/4 inch open reel
30 videocassettes (u-matic)
24 videoreels (1/2 inch)
10 videocassettes (vhs)
3 sound cartridges
1 videocassette (hi8)
1 dictaphone belt
Type:
Audio cassettes
Collection descriptions
Audiotapes
Audiovisual materials
Date:
1952
1952-1997
20th century
Topic:
Congresses and conventions
Indians of North America--Civil rights
Indians of North America--Economic conditions
Indians of North America--Government relations
Indians of North America--Social conditions
Open reel
Local number:
NMAI.AC.010.001
Notes:
The National Congress of America Indians, which describes itself as the oldest and largest American Indian and Alaskan Native organization in the United States, was founded on November 16, 1944, in Denver, CO. NCAI was intended to serve as a link between individual tribal councils and the United States government, by defining and helping to crystallize Indian thought on the administration of Indian affairs. The Congress also aimed to educate the general public about Indians, preserve Indian cultural values, protect treaty rights with the United States, and promote Indian welfare. Conventions have been held annually in the fall since the formation of the NCAI in 1944. Since 1977, mid-year conferences have been held in May or June of each year, to allow more frequent and thorough discussion of issues. The resolutions passed at these conventions are the basis for all policy of the Executive Committee and Executive Director between meetings. The conventions are also used for informational sessions and meetings of standing and special committees of NCAI. One or two-day workshops may also be held on special topics or Congressional issues of particular concern. The National Congress of American Indians is still active today, continuing its work of lobbying, support for tribal governments, and advocacy for American Indian issues.
Summary:
This collection of National Congress of America Indians Audio and Film Recordings contains materials created by and for NCAI to maintain a record of organizational proceedings and events between 1952 and 1997. Recorded in various formats, the bulk of this collection is on 1/4" open reel to reel tapes and sound cassettes. The collection also contains smaller numbers of EIAJ open reel videotapes, U-Matic, VHS and Hi-8 videocassettes and well as dictaphone belts and audio cartridges. The first series in this collection contains audio recordings from NCAI annual and mid-year convetions held in different locations all over the United States. The second series includes events hosted by NCAI or attended by NCAI representatives. These include executive council meetings, congressional hearings, intertribal institutes and a variety of workshops and meetings regarding economic, civil and educational issues facing indian country. Several larger events include the Arizona Intertribal Institute (1955), The National Indian Policy Conference (1974), LEAA Conference (1978), Environmental Protection Hearings and Seminars (1988) and the Senate Indian Affairs Special Investigations Subcommittee meetings (1989). A conference held in 1993 also documents the early history of NCAI with speakers such as Helen Peterson, John Rainer and Erma Hicks Walz.
Cite as:
National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
National Congress of American Indians records 1933-1990 (bulk 1944-1989)
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution National Museum of the American Indian Archives
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The politics of Indianness : case studies of native ethnopolitics in Canada / edited by Adrian Tanner

Author:
Tanner, Adrian
Physical description:
x, 321 p. : ill. ; 23 cm
Type:
Case studies
Place:
Canada
Date:
1983
C1983
Topic:
Indians of North America--Government relations
Indians of North America--Politics and government
Indians of North America--Ethnic identity
Contents:
Canadian Indians and the politics of dependency / Adrian Tanner -- Negotiating identity / Tord Larsen -- The Bluefish River incident / Harald Beyer Broch -- Representation and leadership of a provincial Indian association / Noel Dyck
Summary:
Examines political attempts by regional and local groups of Indians to improve their social and economic conditions. Includes case studies of the Dene of the NWT, the Micmac of Nova Scotia and the Indians of the western provinces.
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
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The Indian industrial development program : a new industrial opportunity / United States Department of the Interior, Bureau of Indian Affairs

Author:
United States Bureau of Indian Affairs
Physical description:
[12] p. : ill., map ; 26 cm
Type:
Books
Date:
1964
[1964]
Topic:
Industries
Employment
Economic conditions
Call number:
E98.I5 U55 1964
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
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Reservation "capitalism" : economic development in Indian country / Robert J. Miller

Author:
Miller, Robert J
Physical description:
xii, 208 pages ; 24 cm
Type:
Books
Place:
United States
Date:
2012
©2012
Topic:
Economic conditions
Economic development
Gambling on Indian reservations
Indian business enterprises
Contents:
Historic American Indian economies and property rights -- Euro-American impacts on American Indian economies -- Current economic activity in Indian country -- Tribal gaming -- Attracting investments -- Indian entrepreneurship -- Creating reservation economies
Summary:
"This unique book investigates the history and future of American Indian economic activities and explains why tribal governments and reservation communities must focus on creating sustainable privately and tribally owned businesses if reservation communities and tribal cultures are to continue to exist.
American Indians are the poorest people in the United States, and their reservations are the most poverty-stricken; as a result, they suffer from numerous social pathologies that accompany these economic conditions. Tragically, most tribal communities were historically prosperous, comprising healthy, vibrant societies sustained over hundreds or thousands of years.
Native American peoples suffer from health, educational, infrastructure, and social deficiencies that most Americans who live outside of tribal lands are wholly unaware of and would not tolerate. By creating sustainable economic development on reservations, however, gradual, long-term change can be effected, thereby improving the standard of living and sustaining tribal cultures.
Reservation "Capitalism": Economic Development in Indian Country supplies the true history, present-day circumstances, and potential future of Indian communities and economics. It provides key background information on indigenous economic systems and property rights regimes in what is now the United States, and explains how the vast majority of native lands and natural resource assets were lost. The book focuses on strategies for establishing privately and publicly owned economic activities on reservations and creating economies where reservation inhabitants can be employed, live, and buy the necessities of life, thereby enabling complete tribal self-sufficiency and self-determination."--Pub. desc.
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
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Survival skills of the North American Indians / Peter Goodchild

Author:
Goodchild, Peter
Physical description:
234 p. : ill. ; 26 cm
Type:
Books
Place:
North America
Date:
1984
C1984
Topic:
Industries
Economic conditions
Handicraft
Survival
Call number:
E98.I5G66 1984X
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
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