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"La Tierra Nueva en Aztlán"

Title: "La Tierra Nueva en Aztlán"
Artist:
Moya, Manuel
Physical Description:
cotton (overall material)
ink (overall material)
Measurements:
overall: 40.5 cm x 40 cm; 15 15/16 in x 15 3/4 in
average spatial: 18 in x 15 in; 45.72 cm x 38.1 cm
Object Name:
handkerchief
Place Made:
United States: New Mexico, Albuquerque
Date made:
1986
Subject:
Prisons
Latino
Civil Rights Movement
Native Americans
Cultures & Communities
Art
La Tierra Nueva en Aztlan
Mexican America
ID Number:
1991.0431.01
Catalog number:
1991.0431.01
Accession number:
1991.0431
Description:
The evolving civil rights movement of the 1950s, 1960s, and 1970s revolutionized the consciousness of young people across the United States. As in African American communities, a new sense of mobilization spread among Mexican Americans. Many adopted a more political identity—chicano and chicana—and explored their history, which was omitted from school textbooks. The Chicano movement sought to remedy the injustices experienced by many Mexican Americans, from substandard education and housing to working conditions. Many symbols and ideas of the Chicano movement were taken from the pre-Hispanic past, especially Aztec history. Aztlán, the original homeland in the Aztec migration stories, has an important place in Chicano mythology. As a symbolic reclamation of their place in American history, Chicanos locate Aztlán in the Southwest United States, in the area conquered during the Mexican-American War. The image shown here, by Manuel Moya, is an ink drawing done on a handkerchief known as a paño. Paños are graphic art works drawn on handkerchiefs by Chicano prisoners in California, Texas, and the Southwest. Titled, La Tierra Nueva en Aztlán, or The New Land in Aztlán, combines the images of the Aztec past with a Pancho Villa-like figure from the Mexican Revolution.
Location:
Currently not on view
See more items in:
Home and Community Life: Ethnic
Mexican America
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center
Visitor Tag(s):

Print

Subject:
Chief Willie Seaweed (Willie Siwid [Siwiti]/Chief Hilamas/The One Able To Set Things Right/Smoky Top/Kwaxitola), Kwakwaka'wakw (Kwakiutl), 1873-1967
Donor:
William R. Heick, Non-Indian, b. 1916
Format:
Silver gelatin print
Dimensions:
8 x 10 in.
Culture/People:
Kwakwaka'wakw (Kwakiutl)
Place:
Blunden Harbor (Blondin Harbor); Mount Waddington Regional District; British Columbia; Canada
Site Name:
Blunden Harbor (Blondin Harbor)
Date Created:
1951
Catalog Number:
P19648
Collection History:
In addition to his work as a fine art photographer, William R. Heick worked for many years with the Anthropology Department of the University of California at Berkeley on a series of American Indian documentary films. This print acquired by MAI, possibly from Mr. Heick, circa 1979.
Description:
Outdoor portrait of Chief Willie Seaweed or Heyhlamas or The One Able To Set Things Right or Siwiti posed on a dock wearing a carved wooden hat (NMAI 238252.000), button blanket, cedar fiber hoop around his neck, and holding a rattle and a copper (Museum of Civilization #VII E 735). Fishing boat and equipment behind him, and a wooded shore in the background
See more items in:
Photographic Collections
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian
Visitor Tag(s):

Jar

Artists/Makers:
Lela Gutierrez (Lela Naranjo Gutierrez), K'apovi (Santa Clara Pueblo), 1895-1966
Van Gutierrez (Evangelo Gutierrez), K'apovi (Santa Clara Pueblo), ca. 1870-1956
Donor:
Janet Nash Silver, Non-Indian, 1917-2009
Media/Materials:
Pottery, paint
Techniques:
Coiled/hand built, painted
Dimensions:
18 x 17.5 cm
Culture/People:
probably K'apovi (Santa Clara Pueblo) (attributed)
Object Type:
Containers and Vessels
Place:
Santa Clara Pueblo, Santa Clara Reservation; Rio Arriba County; New Mexico; USA (inferred)
Date Created:
1900-1930
Catalog Number:
25/1919
Collection History:
Formerly in the collection of Dr. Jay B. Nash (1886-1965, a pioneer in the study of physical education and Chairman of the American Civil Liberties Union's Committee on Indian Civil Rights) and Gladys Nash (1892-1972); inherited by their daughter Janet Nash Silver (1917-2009) and donated to MAI in 1984.
See more items in:
Modern and Contemporary Arts
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian
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Additional Online Media:

Indians of North America The Seminole [published] 95.1.7 RV 1993

Creator:
Nevison, Henry Producer
Henry Nevison; Producer, Director
Marty Moss-Coane; Narration
Harold Boihem; Editor
Dana Palermo, Rick Scott; Audio
Andrew Schlessinger, John Gerbec, Dana Palermo; producers
Physical description:
31 min sound color video
Culture:
Seminole Indians
Indians of North America
Indians of North America Southern States
Type:
Projected media
Collection descriptions
Place:
Seminole
North America
disintigration
United States, Florida
Date:
1993
Topic:
Land--acquisition of
Land--as a source of wealth
Land--as property
Land--reclamation
Land--reservations
Settlement--patterns
Boundaries--territorial
Conflict
War--Civil War--World War II
Warfare--guerrilla
Territorial--boundaries--exploitation
Territory--annexed consolidation of
Government--activities--agencies, relief
Government--care of dependent ethnic groups
Government--education--public
Government--expeditions
Government--military
Government--policies
Government--constitutions
Military--armed forces
Military--posts--tactics
Education--curriculum
Education--teachers in--theories of
Education--attitudes toward
Spiritualism
Missions--religious
Nature--ideas about
Descent--matrilineal
Assimilation--of ethnic groups
Bands--migratory
Hunting--buffalo
Horses
Cattle
Exploring--expeditions
Ownership--individual--collective
Culture--accomodation--adaptation
Culture--change
Culture--continuity
Culture
Culture--ideals
Treaties--peace--capitulation
Oil--wells--discovery
Cotton--cultivation of
Cloth--woven
Local number:
HSFA 95.1.7 RV
Summary:
Indians of North America Series: The Seminole. Edited film documents the history of the Seminole American Indians since the arrival of European settlers in Florida. Emphasis is placed on the creation of the Seminoles out of fragments of other tribes, the impact of expansionism and conflict with the U.S. government over land rights. Film addresses the war between the Seminoles and the U.S. government led by Florida governor and future president, Andrew Jackson, resulting in accession of Seminole land in Florida and the migration of many Seminoles to Oklahoma. Also explored are the influence of numerous government policies, treaties and laws involving the Seminole such as the 1887 Dawes Act, allotting land to individuals rather than to the tribe; the Indian Removal Act, forcing relocation of the Indian tribes westward, and educational policies such as forbidding Seminole school children to speak their tribal language. Other events impacting the Seminoles include the Civil War during which both sides rallied for Seminole support, the discovery of oil on Seminole territory in the 1920's, Indian recruitment during World War II, the establishment of Indian reservations. Footage sequences include: artist creating a sculpture; "chickees," Seminole houses with thatched roofs; the Green Corn Ceremony, where participants ingest herbal medicine to reinforce their bond with nature; black and white footage displaying cotton patchwork clothing designs for which the Seminoles are famous. interviews with elders and youths.
Data Source:
Human Studies Film Archives
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Address to the public of the Lake Mohonk Conference, ... in behalf of the civilization and legal protection of the Indians of the United States

Address of the Lake Mohonk Conference
Author:
Lake Mohonk Conference
Indian Rights Association
Physical description:
1 v. ; 23 cm
Type:
Periodicals
Date:
1883
Topic:
Government relations--Congresses
Call number:
E93.L19X
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
Visitor Tag(s):

Annual address to the public of the Lake Mohonk Conference, ... in behalf of the civilization and legal protection of the Indians of the United States

Address of the Lake Mohonk Conference
Author:
Lake Mohonk Conference
Indian Rights Association
Physical description:
1 v. ; 23 cm
Type:
Periodicals
Date:
1884
Topic:
Government relations--Congresses
Call number:
E93.L19X
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
Visitor Tag(s):

Jim Wallace photographs of Trail of Self Determination demonstration, 1976

Creator:
Wallace, Jim (James H.)
Physical description:
271 contact prints (proof sheets)
6 prints : silver gelatin
Culture:
Indians of North America
Type:
Photographs
Collection descriptions
Place:
White House (Washington, D.C.)
Date:
1976
Topic:
Demonstrations
Local number:
NAA Photo Lot 80-5
Notes:
Jim Wallace was a photographer and director of the Smithsonian Insitutionʹs Office of Printing and Photographic Services. He photographed several civil rights demonstrations throughout his career, beginning in the early 1960s when he was a student at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
Summary:
Photographs documenting a Trail of Self Determination demonstration in front of the White House on July 2-5, 1976. They include images of demonstrators, White House security, people on a tour, press badges, demonstration paraphenalia, and waste cleanup. The collection includes proof sheets and six prints from the proofs.
Cite as:
Photo lot 80-5, Jim Wallace photographs of Trail of Self Determination demonstration, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Data Source:
National Anthropological Archives
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Festival Recordings: El Bordo Stage: Guitarmaking Workshop: Border Stories: Paper Crafts Workshop [sound recording]

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Festival of American Folklife. Borderlands Program 1993 Washington, D.C
Performer:
Ramírez, Oscar 1944-
Strong, Arturo Carrillo 1930-
Bonaparte, Brad
Bernholz, Richard M. 1954-
Rogues, Maria G. Moroyoqui'd de
Physical description:
1 sound cassette : analog
Culture:
Mexicans
Indians of North America
Americans
Mohawk Indians
Type:
Musical sound recordings
Place:
United States
Washington (D.C.)
Durango
Mexico
Ciudad Juar̀ez (Durango, Mexico)
Texas
Arizona
New York
Tucson (Ariz.)
Presidio (Tex.)
Nogales (Nogales, Mexico)
Date:
1993
Topic:
Oral history
Storytelling
Musical instruments--Construction
Border patrols
Civil rights
Smuggling
Migrant workers
Borderlands
Paper flowers
Paper art
Local number:
FP-1993-CT-0094
FLP 89858
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records, 1967-2010 228797
Data Source:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
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National Congress of American Indians records, 1933-1990 (bulk 1944-1989)

Creator:
National Congress of American Indians
Subject:
Bronson, Ruth Muskrat
Curry, James E. 1907-1972
Deloria, Vine
Harjo, Suzan Shown
McNickle, D'Arcy 1904-1977
Peterson, Helen L
Snake, Reuben 1937-1993
Tonasket, Mel
Trimble, Charles E
Arrow, Inc
National Congress of American Indians
National Tribal Chairmen's Association
United Effort Trust
United States American Indian Policy Review Commission
United States Bureau of Indian Affairs
United States Indian Claims Commission
Physical description:
251 linear feet
Type:
Administrative records
Collection descriptions
Audiotapes
Clippings
Correspondence
Financial records
Photographs
Videotapes
Place:
United States
Date:
1933
1933-1990
bulk 1944-1989
20th century
1934-
Topic:
Alaska Natives--Land tenure
Indians of North America--Civil rights
Indians of North America--Economic conditions
Indians of North America--Government relations
Indians of North America--Legal status, laws, etc
Indians of North America--Politics and government
Indians of North America--Social conditions
Indian termination policy
Radioactive wastes--Management
Trail of Broken Treaties, 1972
Local number:
NMAI.AC.010
Notes:
The National Congress of American Indians (NCAI) is a major American Indian advocacy organization, designed to serve as a link between tribal governments and the United States government. NCAI was founded in 1944, in Denver, CO, as a membership organization for "persons of Indian blood." In 1955, group membership was limited to recognized tribes, committees, or bands. The organization is overseen by an Executive Council, which selects a five-member Executive Committee and an Executive Director. The Executive Director is then responsible for managing the organization's staff and overseeing its initiatives and everyday operations. Since 1944, NCAI has held annual conventions in the fall to elect officers and pass resolutions, which become the basis for the organization's policy positions. Beginning in 1977, a mid-year conference in May or June was added to provide further opportunities for in-depth exploration of issues.
Since its inauguration, NCAI has worked on a wide variety of issues facing Indians in the US. Some of those issues include voting rights, land claims, education, economic development, natural resource protection and management, nuclear waste, repatriation, and government-to-government relations with the federal government. In 1954, NCAI organized an emergency conference to protest the US government's newly-announced termination policy. NCAI has also frequently worked closely with other Indian organizations, such as the Native American Rights Fund and National Tribal Chairmen's Association, and with various government bodies, such as the Bureau of Indian Affairs and Indian Health Service.
Summary:
The NCAI records document the organization's work, particularly that of its office in Washington, DC, and the wide variety of issues faced by American Indians in the twentieth century. The bulk of the material relates to legislation, lobbying, and NCAI's interactions with various governmental bodies. A large segment also concerns the annual conventions and executive council and executive committee meetings. Finally, the records also document the operations of the NCAI, including personnel, financial, and fundraising material. The collection also includes the records of two of NCAI's Executive Directors, Charles E. "Chuck" Trimble (1972-1977) and Suzan Shown Harjo (1984-1989). Included are correspondence, publications, reports, administrative records, photographs, and audio and video recordings.
Cite as:
National Congress of American Indians Records, National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
National Congress of American Indians records 1933-1990 (bulk 1944-1989)
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution National Museum of the American Indian Archives
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United States of America : human rights and American Indians / Amnesty International

Author:
Amnesty International
Amnesty International USA
Physical description:
46 p. : ill., maps ; 28 cm
Type:
Books
Place:
United States
Date:
1992
[1992]
Topic:
Indians, Treatment of
Indian prisoners
Civil rights
Notes:
Cover title.
"November 1992."
"AI Index: AMR 51/31/92."
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
Visitor Tag(s):

National Congress of American Indians audio and film recordings 1952-1997

Creator:
National Congress of American Indians
Subject:
Harjo, Suzan Shown
Trimble, Charles E
Deloria, Vine
Tonasket, Mel
Delacruz, Joseph B
Physical description:
713 sound cassettes
442 sound tape reels 1/4 inch open reel
30 videocassettes (u-matic)
24 videoreels (1/2 inch)
10 videocassettes (vhs)
3 sound cartridges
1 videocassette (hi8)
1 dictaphone belt
Type:
Audio cassettes
Collection descriptions
Audiotapes
Audiovisual materials
Date:
1952
1952-1997
20th century
Topic:
Congresses and conventions
Indians of North America--Civil rights
Indians of North America--Economic conditions
Indians of North America--Government relations
Indians of North America--Social conditions
Open reel
Local number:
NMAI.AC.010.001
Notes:
The National Congress of America Indians, which describes itself as the oldest and largest American Indian and Alaskan Native organization in the United States, was founded on November 16, 1944, in Denver, CO. NCAI was intended to serve as a link between individual tribal councils and the United States government, by defining and helping to crystallize Indian thought on the administration of Indian affairs. The Congress also aimed to educate the general public about Indians, preserve Indian cultural values, protect treaty rights with the United States, and promote Indian welfare. Conventions have been held annually in the fall since the formation of the NCAI in 1944. Since 1977, mid-year conferences have been held in May or June of each year, to allow more frequent and thorough discussion of issues. The resolutions passed at these conventions are the basis for all policy of the Executive Committee and Executive Director between meetings. The conventions are also used for informational sessions and meetings of standing and special committees of NCAI. One or two-day workshops may also be held on special topics or Congressional issues of particular concern. The National Congress of American Indians is still active today, continuing its work of lobbying, support for tribal governments, and advocacy for American Indian issues.
Summary:
This collection of National Congress of America Indians Audio and Film Recordings contains materials created by and for NCAI to maintain a record of organizational proceedings and events between 1952 and 1997. Recorded in various formats, the bulk of this collection is on 1/4" open reel to reel tapes and sound cassettes. The collection also contains smaller numbers of EIAJ open reel videotapes, U-Matic, VHS and Hi-8 videocassettes and well as dictaphone belts and audio cartridges. The first series in this collection contains audio recordings from NCAI annual and mid-year convetions held in different locations all over the United States. The second series includes events hosted by NCAI or attended by NCAI representatives. These include executive council meetings, congressional hearings, intertribal institutes and a variety of workshops and meetings regarding economic, civil and educational issues facing indian country. Several larger events include the Arizona Intertribal Institute (1955), The National Indian Policy Conference (1974), LEAA Conference (1978), Environmental Protection Hearings and Seminars (1988) and the Senate Indian Affairs Special Investigations Subcommittee meetings (1989). A conference held in 1993 also documents the early history of NCAI with speakers such as Helen Peterson, John Rainer and Erma Hicks Walz.
Cite as:
National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
National Congress of American Indians records 1933-1990 (bulk 1944-1989)
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution National Museum of the American Indian Archives
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Nation to nation : treaties between the United States & American Indian Nations / general editor, Suzan Shown Harjo

Editor:
Harjo, Suzan Shown
Physical description:
xiii, 258 pages : illustrations (chiefly color) ; 26 cm
Type:
Treaties
Place:
United States
Date:
2014
Topic:
History
Legal status, laws, etc
Government relations
Treaty-making power--History
Contents:
Introduction / Suzan Shown Harjo. -- American Indian land and American Empire : an interview with Philip J. Deloria / Suzan Shown Harjo -- Treaties with Native Nations : iconic historical relics or modern necessity? / Robert N. Clinton. -- Treaties as recognition of the nation-to-nation relationship / Matthew L.M. Fletcher -- Linking arms and brightening the chain : building relations through treaties / Richard W. Hill, Sr. -- The two-row wampum belt? / Mark G. Hirsch -- William Penn's treaty and the Shackamaxon elm tree / Arwen Nuttall -- Illegal state treaties / Mark G. Hirsch -- Unintended consequences : "Johnson v. M'Intosh" and Indian removal / Lindsay G. Robertson. -- Removal treaties : an interview with Carey N. Vicenti / Suzan Shown Harjo -- Avoiding removal : the Pokagon Band of Potawatomi Indians / Matthew L.M. Fletcher -- The Great Treaty Council at Horse Creek / Raymond J. DeMaillie. -- Language and world view at the Horse Creek Treaty / Arwen Nuttall -- "The Indians were the spoken word" : an interview with N. Scott Momaday / Suzan Shown Harjo -- Naal Tsoos Saní : the Navajo Treaty of 1868, nation building, and self-determination / Jennifer Nez Denetdale -- Treaties my ancestors made for me : a family treaty history / Suzan Shown Harjo -- The betrayal of "civilization" in United States-Native Nations diplomacy : Pawnee treaties and cultural genocide / James Riding In. -- American Indian scouts / Mark G. Hirsch -- "Civilization" and the Hupa flower dance ceremony / Lois J. Risling -- Rights guaranteed by solemn treaties. -- The game and fish were made for us : hunting and fishing rights in Native Nations' treaties / Hank Adams -- The anti-treaty movement in the Pacific Northwest and the Great Lakes / Suzan Shown Harjo -- River by river : treaty rights in Washington State : an interview with Susan Hvalsoe Komori / Suzan Shown Harjo -- "The fish helped to bring people together" : an interview with Zoltán Grossman / Suzan Shown Harjo -- Arthur Duhamel : treaty fisherman / Matthew L.M. Fletcher -- Rights we always had : an interview with Tina Kuckkahn / Suzan Shown Harjo -- From dislocation to self-determination : Native Nations and the United States in the twentieth-century. -- The treaty with the Lower Klamath, Upper Klamath, and Trinity River Indians-- and who we are today / Lois J. Risling -- Treaties and the United Nations declaration on the rights of indigenous peoples / Arwen Nuttall -- Modern treaties : an interview with Ben Nighthorse Campbell / Suzan Shown Harjo -- Treaties and contemporary American Indian cultures / W. Richard West, Jr
Summary:
"Nation to Nation explores the promises, diplomacy, and betrayals involved in treaties and treaty making between the United States government and Native nations. One side sought to own the riches of North America and the other struggled to hold on to traditional homelands and ways of life. The book reveals how the ideas of honor, fair dealings, good faith, rule of law, and peaceful relations between nations have been tested and challenged in historical and modern times. The book consistently demonstrates how and why centuries-old treaties remain living, relevant documents for both Natives and non-Natives in the 21st century"-- Provided by publisher.
"Approximately 368 treaties were negotiated and signed by U.S. commissioners and tribal leaders (and subsequently approved by the U.S. Senate) from 1777 to 1868. These treaties enshrine promises the U.S. government made to Indian people and recognize tribes as nations--a fact that distinguishes tribal citizens from other Americans, and supports contemporary Native assertions of tribal sovereignty and self-determination. Treaties are legally binding and still in effect. Beginning in the 1960s, Native activists invoked America's growing commitment to social justice to restore broken treaties. Today, the reassertion of treaty rights and tribal self-determination is evident in renewed tribal political, economic, and cultural strength, as well as in reinvigorated nation-to-nation relations with the United States"-- Provided by publisher.
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
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Indian tribes : a continuing quest for survival : a report / of the United States Commission on Civil Rights

Author:
United States Commission on Civil Rights
Physical description:
xi, 192 p. : ill. ; 26 cm
Type:
Books
Date:
1981
Topic:
Civil rights
Legal status, laws, etc
Call number:
KF8210.C5 U52
KF8210.C5U52
Notes:
"June 1981."
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
Visitor Tag(s):

A statement of facts intended to show the imperative necessity for the extension of civil law over the Indian Territory and the reservations

Imperative necessity for the extension of civil law over the Indian Territory and the reservations
Physical description:
52 p. ; 24 cm
Type:
Books
Date:
188u
188-?]
Topic:
Legal status, laws, etc
Civil rights
Indian reservations--Government policy
Call number:
KF8205 .S73 1880z
Notes:
Caption title.
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
Visitor Tag(s):

Cohen's handbook of federal Indian law

Author:
Cohen, Felix S. 1907-1953
Physical description:
xxxviii, 647 p. ; 27 cm
Type:
Treaties
Date:
2005
C2005
Topic:
Legal status, laws, etc
Contents:
History and background of federal Indian policy -- Principles of interpretation -- Indian tribes, Indians, and Indian country -- Indian tribal governments -- Tribal/federal relationship -- Tribal/state relationship -- Civil jurisdiction -- Taxation -- Criminal jurisdiction -- Environmental regulation in Indian country -- Indian child welfare act -- Indian gaming -- Federal Indian liquor laws -- Civil rights -- Tribal property -- Individual Indian property -- Natural resources -- Hunting, fishing, and gathering rights -- Water rights -- Tribal cultural resources -- Economic development -- Government services for Indians
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
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The militarization of Indian country / Winona LaDuke with Sean Cruz

Author:
LaDuke, Winona
Cruz, Sean Aaron
Honor the Earth (Organization)
Physical description:
xviii, 78 p. : ill., maps ; 23 cm
Type:
Books
Place:
United States
Date:
2011
C2011
Topic:
Government relations--History
Civil rights--History
Indians of North America--Relocation--History
Indian soldiers--History
Indian veterans--History
Armed Forces
Indians
History
Call number:
E93 .L33 2011
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
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From tribal village to global village : Indian rights and international relations in Latin America / Alison Brysk

Author:
Brysk, Alison 1960-
Physical description:
xxv, 370 p. ; 24 cm
Type:
Books
Place:
Latin America
Date:
2000
Topic:
Civil rights
Government relations
Indians, Treatment of
Race relations
Politics and government
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
Visitor Tag(s):

American pentimento : the invention of Indians and the pursuit of riches / Patricia Seed

Author:
Seed, Patricia
Physical description:
xii, 299 p. : maps ; 24 cm
Type:
Books
Place:
America
Europe
Date:
2001
C2001
Topic:
Land tenure
Colonization
Civil rights
Land tenure--Government policy--History
Right of property--History
Colonies
Administration
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
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Indian life and Canadian law : a report on the Ontario north

Author:
Canadian Civil Liberties Education Trust
Physical description:
43 p. : ill. ; 18 cm
Type:
Books
Place:
Ontario
Date:
1974
Topic:
Indians of North America--Civil rights
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
Visitor Tag(s):

Broken landscape : Indians, Indian tribes, and the constitution / Frank Pommersheim

Author:
Pommersheim, Frank
Subject:
United States Supreme Court History
Physical description:
x, 414 p. ; 25 cm
Type:
Books
Place:
United States
Date:
2009
Topic:
Legal status, laws, etc--History
Constitutional history
Government relations
Politics and government
Civil rights--History
Tribal government
Sovereignty
Contents:
Introduction : a new challenge to old assumptions -- Early contact : from colonial encounters to the Articles of Confederation -- Second opportunity : the structure and architecture of the constitution -- The Marshall trilogy : foundational but not fully constitutional? -- Lone Wolf v. Hitchcock : the birth of plenary power, incorporation, and an extraconstitutional regime -- Elk v. Wilkins : exclusion, inclusion, and the ambiguities of citizenship -- Indians and the First Amendment : the illusion of religious freedom? -- Indian law jurisprudence in the modern era : a common law approach without constitutional principle -- International law perspective : a new model of Indigenous nation sovereignty? -- Conclusion : imagination, translation, and constitutional convergence
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
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