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In the Harem [graphic]

Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin -1933
Subject:
Sevruguin, Antoin -1933
Smith, Myron Bement 1897-1970
Islamic Archives
Physical description:
1 photographic print : b&w ; 16.5.3 cm. x 22.7 cm
Type:
Gelatin silver prints
Photographic prints
Studio portraits
Place:
Asia
Iran
Date:
1880s-1928
Topic:
Clothing and dress
Portrait photography
Women
Local number:
FSA A.4 2.12.Up.19
Restrictions:
Access is by appointment only, Monday through Thursday 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Please contact the Archives to make an appointment: AVRreference@si.edu
Notes:
Title and summary note are provided by Shabnam Rahimi-Golkhandan, FSg curatorial research specialist.
Antoin Sevruguin is one of the early pioneers of commercial photography in Iran. He arrived in Iran from Tbilisi, Georgia in the mid 1870s to set up shop in Ala al-Dawla street in Tehran. From the early days, Sevruguin's studio was trusted both by the Qajar court and by foreign visitors to Iran. Highly regarded for their artistic ingenuity outside Iran, Sevruguin's photographs of 'ethnic types,' architecture and landscape, and depictions of daily life of Tehran found their way into foreign travelogues, magazines and books. As such, he stands alone in a relatively large group of early Iranian photographers for being recognized and celebrated outside the boundaries of the country. Antoin Sevruguin passed away in 1933, although his family studio continued for some time as a commercial enterprise.
Summary:
Joseph Upton purchased 66 black-and-white gelatin silver photoprints in 1928 from Antoin Sevruguin in Tehran (Iran), and subsequently donated them to the Committee for Islamic Culture, as reported in their official minutes of October 24, 1953.
- On recto of the print, scratched handwritten number (inked, probably by Antoin Sevruguin) reads, "895."
- On verso of the print, handwritten number (penciled) reads, "183."
- On verso of the print, handwritten caption (penciled, probably by Antoin Sevruguin) in French reads, "dans le Harem."
Cite as:
Myron Bement Smith Collection: Antoin Sevruguin Photographs. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C. Gift of Katherine Dennis Smith, 1973-1985
See more items in:
Myron Bement Smith collection 1899-1962
Myron Bement Smith Collection, Subseries 2.12: Antoin Sevruguin Photographs
Data Source:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

Grand Vizier Mirza Yusuf Ashtiyani, the Mustawfi al-Mamalik (1812-1885) [graphic]

Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin -1933
Subject:
Sevruguin, Antoin -1933
Smith, Myron Bement 1897-1970
Islamic Archives
Physical description:
1 photographic print : b&w ; 17.8 cm. x 23.3 cm
Type:
Gelatin silver prints
Photographic prints
Studio portraits
Place:
Asia
Iran
Date:
Ca. 1880
Topic:
Clothing and dress
Headgear
Portrait photography
Royalty (Nobility)
Local number:
FSA A.4 2.12.Up.10
Restrictions:
Access is by appointment only, Monday through Thursday 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Please contact the Archives to make an appointment: AVRreference@si.edu
Notes:
Title and summary note are provided by Shabnam Rahimi-Golkhandan, FSg curatorial research specialist.
Antoin Sevruguin is one of the early pioneers of commercial photography in Iran. He arrived in Iran from Tbilisi, Georgia in the mid 1870s to set up shop in Ala al-Dawla street in Tehran. From the early days, Sevruguin's studio was trusted both by the Qajar court and by foreign visitors to Iran. Highly regarded for their artistic ingenuity outside Iran, Sevruguin's photographs of 'ethnic types,' architecture and landscape, and depictions of daily life of Tehran found their way into foreign travelogues, magazines and books. As such, he stands alone in a relatively large group of early Iranian photographers for being recognized and celebrated outside the boundaries of the country. Antoin Sevruguin passed away in 1933, although his family studio continued for some time as a commercial enterprise.
Summary:
Joseph Upton purchased 66 black-and-white gelatin silver photoprints in 1928 from Antoin Sevruguin in Tehran (Iran), and subsequently donated them to the Committee for Islamic Culture, as reported in their official minutes of October 24, 1953.
- On verso of the print, handwritten number (penciled) reads, "244."
- On verso of the print, handwritten caption (penciled, probably by Antoin Sevruguin) in French reads, "Mostofi Mamalek Grand Vizir."
Cite as:
Myron Bement Smith Collection: Antoin Sevruguin Photographs. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C. Gift of Katherine Dennis Smith, 1973-1985
See more items in:
Myron Bement Smith collection 1899-1962
Myron Bement Smith Collection, Subseries 2.12: Antoin Sevruguin Photographs
Data Source:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

Reception at the Shah's Palace [graphic]

Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin -1933
Subject:
Sevruguin, Antoin -1933
Smith, Myron Bement 1897-1970
Islamic Archives
Physical description:
1 photographic print : b&w ; 23.2.8 cm. x 17.3 cm
Type:
Gelatin silver prints
Photographic prints
Place:
Asia
Iran
Date:
1880s-1928
Topic:
Clothing and dress
Headgear
Royalty (Nobility)
Local number:
FSA A.4 2.12.Up.57
Restrictions:
Access is by appointment only, Monday through Thursday 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Please contact the Archives to make an appointment: AVRreference@si.edu
Notes:
Title and summary note are provided by Shabnam Rahimi-Golkhandan, FSg curatorial research specialist.
Antoin Sevruguin is one of the early pioneers of commercial photography in Iran. He arrived in Iran from Tbilisi, Georgia in the mid 1870s to set up shop in Ala al-Dawla street in Tehran. From the early days, Sevruguin's studio was trusted both by the Qajar court and by foreign visitors to Iran. Highly regarded for their artistic ingenuity outside Iran, Sevruguin's photographs of 'ethnic types,' architecture and landscape, and depictions of daily life of Tehran found their way into foreign travelogues, magazines and books. As such, he stands alone in a relatively large group of early Iranian photographers for being recognized and celebrated outside the boundaries of the country. Antoin Sevruguin passed away in 1933, although his family studio continued for some time as a commercial enterprise.
Summary:
Joseph Upton purchased 66 black-and-white gelatin silver photoprints in 1928 from Antoin Sevruguin in Tehran (Iran), and subsequently donated them to the Committee for Islamic Culture, as reported in their official minutes of October 24, 1953.
- On recto of the print, handwritten number (inked, probably by Antoin Sevruguin) reads, "605."
- On verso of the print, handwritten caption (penciled, probably by Antoin Sevruguin) in French reads, "Invitation chez le Schah."
Cite as:
Myron Bement Smith Collection: Antoin Sevruguin Photographs. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C. Gift of Katherine Dennis Smith, 1973-1985
See more items in:
Myron Bement Smith collection 1899-1962
Myron Bement Smith Collection, Subseries 2.12: Antoin Sevruguin Photographs
Data Source:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

Mirza Abdul Vahab Khan Nizam al-mulk [graphic]

Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin -1933
Subject:
Sevruguin, Antoin -1933
Smith, Myron Bement 1897-1970
Islamic Archives
Physical description:
1 photographic print : b&w ; 17.1 cm. x 22.8 cm
Type:
Gelatin silver prints
Photographic prints
Studio portraits
Place:
Asia
Iran
Date:
1880s-1928
Topic:
Clothing and dress
Headgear
Regalia (Insignia)
Portrait photography
Royalty (Nobility)
Local number:
FSA A.4 2.12.Up.66
Restrictions:
Access is by appointment only, Monday through Thursday 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Please contact the Archives to make an appointment: AVRreference@si.edu
Notes:
Title and summary note are provided by Shabnam Rahimi-Golkhandan, FSg curatorial research specialist.
Antoin Sevruguin is one of the early pioneers of commercial photography in Iran. He arrived in Iran from Tbilisi, Georgia in the mid 1870s to set up shop in Ala al-Dawla street in Tehran. From the early days, Sevruguin's studio was trusted both by the Qajar court and by foreign visitors to Iran. Highly regarded for their artistic ingenuity outside Iran, Sevruguin's photographs of 'ethnic types,' architecture and landscape, and depictions of daily life of Tehran found their way into foreign travelogues, magazines and books. As such, he stands alone in a relatively large group of early Iranian photographers for being recognized and celebrated outside the boundaries of the country. Antoin Sevruguin passed away in 1933, although his family studio continued for some time as a commercial enterprise.
Summary:
Joseph Upton purchased 66 black-and-white gelatin silver photoprints in 1928 from Antoin Sevruguin in Tehran (Iran), and subsequently donated them to the Committee for Islamic Culture, as reported in their official minutes of October 24, 1953.
- On recto of the print, handwritten number (inked, probably by Antoin Sevruguin) reads, "83."
- On recto of the print, handwritten number (inked, probably by Antoin Sevruguin) reads, "690."
- On verso of the print, handwritten number (penciled) reads, "212."
- On verso of the print, handwritten number (penciled) reads, "184."
- On verso of the print, handwritten caption (penciled, probably by Antoin Sevruguin) in French reads, "Vieux ministre."
Cite as:
Myron Bement Smith Collection: Antoin Sevruguin Photographs. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C. Gift of Katherine Dennis Smith, 1973-1985
See more items in:
Myron Bement Smith collection 1899-1962
Myron Bement Smith Collection, Subseries 2.12: Antoin Sevruguin Photographs
Data Source:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

Photograph of a Painting Depicting Fath Ali Shah (reigned 1797-1834) [graphic]

Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin -1933
Subject:
Sevruguin, Antoin -1933
Qājār, Fatḥ ʻAlī Shāh Shah of Iran d. 1834
Smith, Myron Bement 1897-1970
Islamic Archives
Physical description:
1 photographic print : b&w ; 17.1 cm. x 22.9 cm
Type:
Gelatin silver prints
Photographic prints
Place:
Asia
Iran
Date:
1880s-1928
Topic:
Clothing and dress
Headgear
Portrait photography
Regalia (Insignia)
Royalty (Nobility)
Local number:
FSA A.4 2.12.Up.25
Restrictions:
Access is by appointment only, Monday through Thursday 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Please contact the Archives to make an appointment: AVRreference@si.edu
Notes:
Title and summary note are provided by Shabnam Rahimi-Golkhandan, FSg curatorial research specialist.
Antoin Sevruguin is one of the early pioneers of commercial photography in Iran. He arrived in Iran from Tbilisi, Georgia in the mid 1870s to set up shop in Ala al-Dawla street in Tehran. From the early days, Sevruguin's studio was trusted both by the Qajar court and by foreign visitors to Iran. Highly regarded for their artistic ingenuity outside Iran, Sevruguin's photographs of 'ethnic types,' architecture and landscape, and depictions of daily life of Tehran found their way into foreign travelogues, magazines and books. As such, he stands alone in a relatively large group of early Iranian photographers for being recognized and celebrated outside the boundaries of the country. Antoin Sevruguin passed away in 1933, although his family studio continued for some time as a commercial enterprise.
Summary:
Joseph Upton purchased 66 black-and-white gelatin silver photoprints in 1928 from Antoin Sevruguin in Tehran (Iran), and subsequently donated them to the Committee for Islamic Culture, as reported in their official minutes of October 24, 1953.
- On recto of the print, handwritten number (inked, probably by Antoin Sevruguin) reads, "742."
- On verso of the print, handwritten caption (penciled, probably by Antoin Sevruguin) reads, "Fatali Schah."
Cite as:
Myron Bement Smith Collection: Antoin Sevruguin Photographs. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C. Gift of Katherine Dennis Smith, 1973-1985
See more items in:
Myron Bement Smith collection 1899-1962
Myron Bement Smith Collection, Subseries 2.12: Antoin Sevruguin Photographs
Data Source:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

Portrait of Ali Khan-i Zahir al-Dawla [graphic]

Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin -1933
Subject:
Sevruguin, Antoin -1933
Smith, Myron Bement 1897-1970
Islamic Archives
Physical description:
1 photographic print : b&w ; 17.1 cm. x 23 cm
Type:
Gelatin silver prints
Photographic prints
Studio portraits
Place:
Asia
Iran
Date:
1880s-1928
Topic:
Clothing and dress
Headgear
Portrait photography
Regalia (Insignia)
Royalty (Nobility)
Local number:
FSA A.4 2.12.Up.24
Restrictions:
Access is by appointment only, Monday through Thursday 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Please contact the Archives to make an appointment: AVRreference@si.edu
Notes:
Title and summary note are provided by Shabnam Rahimi-Golkhandan, FSg curatorial research specialist.
Antoin Sevruguin is one of the early pioneers of commercial photography in Iran. He arrived in Iran from Tbilisi, Georgia in the mid 1870s to set up shop in Ala al-Dawla street in Tehran. From the early days, Sevruguin's studio was trusted both by the Qajar court and by foreign visitors to Iran. Highly regarded for their artistic ingenuity outside Iran, Sevruguin's photographs of 'ethnic types,' architecture and landscape, and depictions of daily life of Tehran found their way into foreign travelogues, magazines and books. As such, he stands alone in a relatively large group of early Iranian photographers for being recognized and celebrated outside the boundaries of the country. Antoin Sevruguin passed away in 1933, although his family studio continued for some time as a commercial enterprise.
Summary:
Joseph Upton purchased 66 black-and-white gelatin silver photoprints in 1928 from Antoin Sevruguin in Tehran (Iran), and subsequently donated them to the Committee for Islamic Culture, as reported in their official minutes of October 24, 1953.
- On recto of the print, handwritten number (inked, probably by Antoin Sevruguin) reads, "675."
- On verso of the print, handwritten caption (penciled, probably by Antoin Sevruguin) in French reads, "Maître des Cérémonies."
Cite as:
Myron Bement Smith Collection: Antoin Sevruguin Photographs. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C. Gift of Katherine Dennis Smith, 1973-1985
See more items in:
Myron Bement Smith collection 1899-1962
Myron Bement Smith Collection, Subseries 2.12: Antoin Sevruguin Photographs
Data Source:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

Seven Armed Soldiers and Small Crowds of Spectators [graphic]

Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin -1933
Subject:
Sevruguin, Antoin -1933
Smith, Myron Bement 1897-1970
Islamic Archives
Physical description:
1 photographic print : b&w ; 22.3 cm. x 16.9 cm
Type:
Gelatin silver prints
Photographic prints
Place:
Asia
Iran
Date:
1880s-1928
Topic:
Architecture
Clothing and dress
Headgear
Military
Local number:
FSA A.4 2.12.Up.21
Restrictions:
Access is by appointment only, Monday through Thursday 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Please contact the Archives to make an appointment: AVRreference@si.edu
Notes:
Title and summary note are provided by Shabnam Rahimi-Golkhandan, FSg curatorial research specialist.
Antoin Sevruguin is one of the early pioneers of commercial photography in Iran. He arrived in Iran from Tbilisi, Georgia in the mid 1870s to set up shop in Ala al-Dawla street in Tehran. From the early days, Sevruguin's studio was trusted both by the Qajar court and by foreign visitors to Iran. Highly regarded for their artistic ingenuity outside Iran, Sevruguin's photographs of 'ethnic types,' architecture and landscape, and depictions of daily life of Tehran found their way into foreign travelogues, magazines and books. As such, he stands alone in a relatively large group of early Iranian photographers for being recognized and celebrated outside the boundaries of the country. Antoin Sevruguin passed away in 1933, although his family studio continued for some time as a commercial enterprise.
Summary:
Joseph Upton purchased 66 black-and-white gelatin silver photoprints in 1928 from Antoin Sevruguin in Tehran (Iran), and subsequently donated them to the Committee for Islamic Culture, as reported in their official minutes of October 24, 1953.
- On recto of the print, handwritten number (inked, probably by Antoin Sevruguin) reads, "243."
- On verso of the print, handwritten number (penciled) reads, "128."
- On verso of the print, handwritten caption (penciled, probably by Antoin Sevruguin) in French reads, "Poste persane."
Cite as:
Myron Bement Smith Collection: Antoin Sevruguin Photographs. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C. Gift of Katherine Dennis Smith, 1973-1985
See more items in:
Myron Bement Smith collection 1899-1962
Myron Bement Smith Collection, Subseries 2.12: Antoin Sevruguin Photographs
Data Source:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

Regiment of Soldiers [graphic]

Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin -1933
Subject:
Sevruguin, Antoin -1933
Smith, Myron Bement 1897-1970
Islamic Archives
Physical description:
1 photographic print : b&w ; 23 cm. x 16.7 cm
Type:
Gelatin silver prints
Photographic prints
Place:
Asia
Iran
Date:
1880s-1928
Topic:
Architecture
Clothing and dress
Headgear
Military
Local number:
FSA A.4 2.12.Up.29
Restrictions:
Access is by appointment only, Monday through Thursday 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Please contact the Archives to make an appointment: AVRreference@si.edu
Notes:
Title and summary note are provided by Shabnam Rahimi-Golkhandan, FSg curatorial research specialist.
Antoin Sevruguin is one of the early pioneers of commercial photography in Iran. He arrived in Iran from Tbilisi, Georgia in the mid 1870s to set up shop in Ala al-Dawla street in Tehran. From the early days, Sevruguin's studio was trusted both by the Qajar court and by foreign visitors to Iran. Highly regarded for their artistic ingenuity outside Iran, Sevruguin's photographs of 'ethnic types,' architecture and landscape, and depictions of daily life of Tehran found their way into foreign travelogues, magazines and books. As such, he stands alone in a relatively large group of early Iranian photographers for being recognized and celebrated outside the boundaries of the country. Antoin Sevruguin passed away in 1933, although his family studio continued for some time as a commercial enterprise.
Summary:
Joseph Upton purchased 66 black-and-white gelatin silver photoprints in 1928 from Antoin Sevruguin in Tehran (Iran), and subsequently donated them to the Committee for Islamic Culture, as reported in their official minutes of October 24, 1953.
- On recto of the print, handwritten number (inked, probably by Antoin Sevruguin) reads, "134."
- On verso of the print, handwritten number (penciled) reads, "97."
- On verso of the print, handwritten caption (penciled, probably by Antoin Sevruguin) in French reads, "régiment Lore."
Cite as:
Myron Bement Smith Collection: Antoin Sevruguin Photographs. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C. Gift of Katherine Dennis Smith, 1973-1985
See more items in:
Myron Bement Smith collection 1899-1962
Myron Bement Smith Collection, Subseries 2.12: Antoin Sevruguin Photographs
Data Source:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

Girls Weaving a Carpet [graphic]

Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin -1933
Subject:
Sevruguin, Antoin -1933
Smith, Myron Bement 1897-1970
Islamic Archives
Physical description:
1 photographic print : b&w ; 17 cm. x 22.6 cm
Type:
Gelatin silver prints
Photographic prints
Place:
Asia
Iran
Date:
1880s-1928
Topic:
Clothing and dress
Headgear
Textile crafts
Weavers
Women
Local number:
FSA A.4 2.12.Up.12
Restrictions:
Access is by appointment only, Monday through Thursday 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Please contact the Archives to make an appointment: AVRreference@si.edu
Notes:
Title and summary note are provided by Shabnam Rahimi-Golkhandan, FSg curatorial research specialist.
Antoin Sevruguin is one of the early pioneers of commercial photography in Iran. He arrived in Iran from Tbilisi, Georgia in the mid 1870s to set up shop in Ala al-Dawla street in Tehran. From the early days, Sevruguin's studio was trusted both by the Qajar court and by foreign visitors to Iran. Highly regarded for their artistic ingenuity outside Iran, Sevruguin's photographs of 'ethnic types,' architecture and landscape, and depictions of daily life of Tehran found their way into foreign travelogues, magazines and books. As such, he stands alone in a relatively large group of early Iranian photographers for being recognized and celebrated outside the boundaries of the country. Antoin Sevruguin passed away in 1933, although his family studio continued for some time as a commercial enterprise.
Summary:
Joseph Upton purchased 66 black-and-white gelatin silver photoprints in 1928 from Antoin Sevruguin in Tehran (Iran), and subsequently donated them to the Committee for Islamic Culture, as reported in their official minutes of October 24, 1953.
- On recto of the print, handwritten number (inked, probably by Antoin Sevruguin) reads, "491."
- On recto of the print, scratched handwritten number (inked, probably by Antoin Sevruguin) reads, "128."
Cite as:
Myron Bement Smith Collection: Antoin Sevruguin Photographs. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C. Gift of Katherine Dennis Smith, 1973-1985
See more items in:
Myron Bement Smith collection 1899-1962
Myron Bement Smith Collection, Subseries 2.12: Antoin Sevruguin Photographs
Data Source:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

Fishermen at a Landing [graphic]

Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin -1933
Subject:
Sevruguin, Antoin -1933
Smith, Myron Bement 1897-1970
Islamic Archives
Physical description:
1 photographic print : b&w ; 22.7 cm. x 16.5 cm
Type:
Gelatin silver prints
Photographic prints
Place:
Asia
Iran
Date:
1880s-1930
Topic:
Clothing and dress
Fishing
Headgear
Local number:
FSA A.4 2.12.Up.08
Restrictions:
Access is by appointment only, Monday through Thursday 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Please contact the Archives to make an appointment: AVRreference@si.edu
Notes:
Title and summary note are provided by Shabnam Rahimi-Golkhandan, FSg curatorial research specialist.
Antoin Sevruguin is one of the early pioneers of commercial photography in Iran. He arrived in Iran from Tbilisi, Georgia in the mid 1870s to set up shop in Ala al-Dawla street in Tehran. From the early days, Sevruguin's studio was trusted both by the Qajar court and by foreign visitors to Iran. Highly regarded for their artistic ingenuity outside Iran, Sevruguin's photographs of 'ethnic types,' architecture and landscape, and depictions of daily life of Tehran found their way into foreign travelogues, magazines and books. As such, he stands alone in a relatively large group of early Iranian photographers for being recognized and celebrated outside the boundaries of the country. Antoin Sevruguin passed away in 1933, although his family studio continued for some time as a commercial enterprise.
Summary:
Joseph Upton purchased 66 black-and-white gelatin silver photoprints in 1928 from Antoin Sevruguin in Tehran (Iran), and subsequently donated them to the Committee for Islamic Culture, as reported in their official minutes of October 24, 1953.
- On recto of the print, scratched handwritten number (inked, probably by Antoin Sevruguin) reads, "158."
- On recto of the print, scratched handwritten number (penciled) reads, "4??."
- On verso of the print, handwritten caption (penciled, probably by Antoin Sevruguin) in French reads, "Pahlévi."
Cite as:
Myron Bement Smith Collection: Antoin Sevruguin Photographs. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C. Gift of Katherine Dennis Smith, 1973-1985
See more items in:
Myron Bement Smith collection 1899-1962
Myron Bement Smith Collection, Subseries 2.12: Antoin Sevruguin Photographs
Data Source:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

Workers Harvesting Rice [graphic]

Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin -1933
Subject:
Sevruguin, Antoin -1933
Smith, Myron Bement 1897-1970
Islamic Archives
Physical description:
1 photographic print : b&w ; 22.5 cm. x 16.8 cm
Type:
Gelatin silver prints
Photographic prints
Place:
Asia
Iran
Date:
1880s-1928
Topic:
Clothing and dress
Agriculture
Local number:
FSA A.4 2.12.Up.35
Restrictions:
Access is by appointment only, Monday through Thursday 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Please contact the Archives to make an appointment: AVRreference@si.edu
Notes:
Title and summary note are provided by Shabnam Rahimi-Golkhandan, FSg curatorial research specialist.
Antoin Sevruguin is one of the early pioneers of commercial photography in Iran. He arrived in Iran from Tbilisi, Georgia in the mid 1870s to set up shop in Ala al-Dawla street in Tehran. From the early days, Sevruguin's studio was trusted both by the Qajar court and by foreign visitors to Iran. Highly regarded for their artistic ingenuity outside Iran, Sevruguin's photographs of 'ethnic types,' architecture and landscape, and depictions of daily life of Tehran found their way into foreign travelogues, magazines and books. As such, he stands alone in a relatively large group of early Iranian photographers for being recognized and celebrated outside the boundaries of the country. Antoin Sevruguin passed away in 1933, although his family studio continued for some time as a commercial enterprise.
Summary:
Joseph Upton purchased 66 black-and-white gelatin silver photoprints in 1928 from Antoin Sevruguin in Tehran (Iran), and subsequently donated them to the Committee for Islamic Culture, as reported in their official minutes of October 24, 1953.
- On recto of the print, handwritten number (inked, probably by Antoin Sevruguin) reads, "369."
- On recto of the print, scratched handwritten number (penciled, probably by Antoin Sevruguin) reads, "???."
- On verso of the print, handwritten number (penciled) reads, "85."
- On verso of the print, handwritten caption (penciled, probably by Antoin Sevruguin) in French reads, "La culture du riz."
Cite as:
Myron Bement Smith Collection: Antoin Sevruguin Photographs. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C. Gift of Katherine Dennis Smith, 1973-1985
See more items in:
Myron Bement Smith collection 1899-1962
Myron Bement Smith Collection, Subseries 2.12: Antoin Sevruguin Photographs
Data Source:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

Peasant Scene [graphic]

Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin -1933
Subject:
Sevruguin, Antoin -1933
Smith, Myron Bement 1897-1970
Islamic Archives
Physical description:
1 photographic print : b&w ; 22.7 cm. x 16.7 cm
Type:
Gelatin silver prints
Photographic prints
Place:
Asia
Iran
Date:
1880s-1928
Topic:
Agriculture
Architecture
Clothing and dress
Domestic scenes
Local number:
FSA A.4 2.12.Up.14
Restrictions:
Access is by appointment only, Monday through Thursday 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Please contact the Archives to make an appointment: AVRreference@si.edu
Notes:
Title and summary note are provided by Shabnam Rahimi-Golkhandan, FSg curatorial research specialist.
Antoin Sevruguin is one of the early pioneers of commercial photography in Iran. He arrived in Iran from Tbilisi, Georgia in the mid 1870s to set up shop in Ala al-Dawla street in Tehran. From the early days, Sevruguin's studio was trusted both by the Qajar court and by foreign visitors to Iran. Highly regarded for their artistic ingenuity outside Iran, Sevruguin's photographs of 'ethnic types,' architecture and landscape, and depictions of daily life of Tehran found their way into foreign travelogues, magazines and books. As such, he stands alone in a relatively large group of early Iranian photographers for being recognized and celebrated outside the boundaries of the country. Antoin Sevruguin passed away in 1933, although his family studio continued for some time as a commercial enterprise.
Summary:
Joseph Upton purchased 66 black-and-white gelatin silver photoprints in 1928 from Antoin Sevruguin in Tehran (Iran), and subsequently donated them to the Committee for Islamic Culture, as reported in their official minutes of October 24, 1953.
- On recto of the print, handwritten number (inked, probably by Antoin Sevruguin) reads, "114."
- On verso of the print, handwritten caption (penciled, probably by Antoin Sevruguin) in French reads, "Maison paysane à Mazandéran."
Cite as:
Myron Bement Smith Collection: Antoin Sevruguin Photographs. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C. Gift of Katherine Dennis Smith, 1973-1985
See more items in:
Myron Bement Smith collection 1899-1962
Myron Bement Smith Collection, Subseries 2.12: Antoin Sevruguin Photographs
Data Source:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

Shepherd [graphic]

Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin -1933
Subject:
Sevruguin, Antoin -1933
Smith, Myron Bement 1897-1970
Islamic Archives
Physical description:
1 photographic print : b&w ; 22.8 cm. x 17.1 cm
Type:
Gelatin silver prints
Photographic prints
Place:
Asia
Iran
Date:
1880s-1928
Topic:
Clothing and dress
Headgear
Local number:
FSA A.4 2.12.Up.31
Restrictions:
Access is by appointment only, Monday through Thursday 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Please contact the Archives to make an appointment: AVRreference@si.edu
Notes:
Title and summary note are provided by Shabnam Rahimi-Golkhandan, FSg curatorial research specialist.
Antoin Sevruguin is one of the early pioneers of commercial photography in Iran. He arrived in Iran from Tbilisi, Georgia in the mid 1870s to set up shop in Ala al-Dawla street in Tehran. From the early days, Sevruguin's studio was trusted both by the Qajar court and by foreign visitors to Iran. Highly regarded for their artistic ingenuity outside Iran, Sevruguin's photographs of 'ethnic types,' architecture and landscape, and depictions of daily life of Tehran found their way into foreign travelogues, magazines and books. As such, he stands alone in a relatively large group of early Iranian photographers for being recognized and celebrated outside the boundaries of the country. Antoin Sevruguin passed away in 1933, although his family studio continued for some time as a commercial enterprise.
Summary:
Joseph Upton purchased 66 black-and-white gelatin silver photoprints in 1928 from Antoin Sevruguin in Tehran (Iran), and subsequently donated them to the Committee for Islamic Culture, as reported in their official minutes of October 24, 1953.
- On recto of the print, handwritten number (inked, probably by Antoin Sevruguin) reads, "506."
- On recto of the print, scratched handwritten number (inked, probably by Antoin Sevruguin) reads, "772."
- On verso of the print, handwritten caption (penciled, probably by Antoin Sevruguin) in French reads, "Le berger persan."
Cite as:
Myron Bement Smith Collection: Antoin Sevruguin Photographs. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C. Gift of Katherine Dennis Smith, 1973-1985
See more items in:
Myron Bement Smith collection 1899-1962
Myron Bement Smith Collection, Subseries 2.12: Antoin Sevruguin Photographs
Data Source:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

Lion Keepers [graphic]

Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin -1933
Subject:
Sevruguin, Antoin -1933
Smith, Myron Bement 1897-1970
Islamic Archives
Physical description:
1 photographic print : b&w ; 23 cm. x 16.8 cm
Type:
Gelatin silver prints
Photographic prints
Place:
Asia
Iran
Date:
1880s-1928
Topic:
Animals
Portrait photography
Local number:
FSA A.4 2.12.Up.11
Restrictions:
Access is by appointment only, Monday through Thursday 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Please contact the Archives to make an appointment: AVRreference@si.edu
Notes:
Title and summary note are provided by Shabnam Rahimi-Golkhandan, FSg curatorial research specialist.
Antoin Sevruguin is one of the early pioneers of commercial photography in Iran. He arrived in Iran from Tbilisi, Georgia in the mid 1870s to set up shop in Ala al-Dawla street in Tehran. From the early days, Sevruguin's studio was trusted both by the Qajar court and by foreign visitors to Iran. Highly regarded for their artistic ingenuity outside Iran, Sevruguin's photographs of 'ethnic types,' architecture and landscape, and depictions of daily life of Tehran found their way into foreign travelogues, magazines and books. As such, he stands alone in a relatively large group of early Iranian photographers for being recognized and celebrated outside the boundaries of the country. Antoin Sevruguin passed away in 1933, although his family studio continued for some time as a commercial enterprise.
Summary:
Joseph Upton purchased 66 black-and-white gelatin silver photoprints in 1928 from Antoin Sevruguin in Tehran (Iran), and subsequently donated them to the Committee for Islamic Culture, as reported in their official minutes of October 24, 1953.
- On recto of the print, handwritten number (inked, probably by Antoin Sevruguin) reads, "428."
- On verso of the print, handwritten caption (penciled, probably by Antoin Sevruguin) in French reads, "Loutis et Lion."
Cite as:
Myron Bement Smith Collection: Antoin Sevruguin Photographs. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C. Gift of Katherine Dennis Smith, 1973-1985
See more items in:
Myron Bement Smith collection 1899-1962
Myron Bement Smith Collection, Subseries 2.12: Antoin Sevruguin Photographs
Data Source:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

Two Men Washing Clothes on a Rock [graphic]

Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin -1933
Subject:
Sevruguin, Antoin -1933
Smith, Myron Bement 1897-1970
Islamic Archives
Physical description:
1 photographic print : b&w ; 22.2 cm. x 16.5 cm
Type:
Gelatin silver prints
Photographic prints
Place:
Asia
Iran
Date:
1880s-1928
Topic:
Domestic scenes
Local number:
FSA A.4 2.12.Up.13
Restrictions:
Access is by appointment only, Monday through Thursday 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Please contact the Archives to make an appointment: AVRreference@si.edu
Notes:
Title and summary note are provided by Shabnam Rahimi-Golkhandan, FSg curatorial research specialist.
Antoin Sevruguin is one of the early pioneers of commercial photography in Iran. He arrived in Iran from Tbilisi, Georgia in the mid 1870s to set up shop in Ala al-Dawla street in Tehran. From the early days, Sevruguin's studio was trusted both by the Qajar court and by foreign visitors to Iran. Highly regarded for their artistic ingenuity outside Iran, Sevruguin's photographs of 'ethnic types,' architecture and landscape, and depictions of daily life of Tehran found their way into foreign travelogues, magazines and books. As such, he stands alone in a relatively large group of early Iranian photographers for being recognized and celebrated outside the boundaries of the country. Antoin Sevruguin passed away in 1933, although his family studio continued for some time as a commercial enterprise.
Summary:
Joseph Upton purchased 66 black-and-white gelatin silver photoprints in 1928 from Antoin Sevruguin in Tehran (Iran), and subsequently donated them to the Committee for Islamic Culture, as reported in their official minutes of October 24, 1953.
- On recto of the print, handwritten number (inked, probably by Antoin Sevruguin) reads, "499."
- On verso of the print, handwritten caption (penciled, probably by Antoin Sevruguin) in French reads, "Lavage du ? à Ispahan."
Cite as:
Myron Bement Smith Collection: Antoin Sevruguin Photographs. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C. Gift of Katherine Dennis Smith, 1973-1985
See more items in:
Myron Bement Smith collection 1899-1962
Myron Bement Smith Collection, Subseries 2.12: Antoin Sevruguin Photographs
Data Source:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

Three Water Carriers [graphic]

Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin -1933
Subject:
Sevruguin, Antoin -1933
Smith, Myron Bement 1897-1970
Islamic Archives
Physical description:
1 photographic print : b&w ; 23.5 cm. x 17.3 cm
Type:
Gelatin silver prints
Photographic prints
Place:
Asia
Iran
Date:
1880s-1928
Topic:
Domestic scenes
Pottery
Local number:
FSA A.4 2.12.Up.56
Restrictions:
Access is by appointment only, Monday through Thursday 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Please contact the Archives to make an appointment: AVRreference@si.edu
Notes:
Title and summary note are provided by Shabnam Rahimi-Golkhandan, FSg curatorial research specialist.
Antoin Sevruguin is one of the early pioneers of commercial photography in Iran. He arrived in Iran from Tbilisi, Georgia in the mid 1870s to set up shop in Ala al-Dawla street in Tehran. From the early days, Sevruguin's studio was trusted both by the Qajar court and by foreign visitors to Iran. Highly regarded for their artistic ingenuity outside Iran, Sevruguin's photographs of 'ethnic types,' architecture and landscape, and depictions of daily life of Tehran found their way into foreign travelogues, magazines and books. As such, he stands alone in a relatively large group of early Iranian photographers for being recognized and celebrated outside the boundaries of the country. Antoin Sevruguin passed away in 1933, although his family studio continued for some time as a commercial enterprise.
Summary:
Joseph Upton purchased 66 black-and-white gelatin silver photoprints in 1928 from Antoin Sevruguin in Tehran (Iran), and subsequently donated them to the Committee for Islamic Culture, as reported in their official minutes of October 24, 1953.
- On recto of the print, handwritten number (inked, probably by Antoin Sevruguin) reads, "1398."
- On verso of the print, handwritten caption (penciled, probably by Antoin Sevruguin) in French reads, "Porteurs d'eau au village."
Cite as:
Myron Bement Smith Collection: Antoin Sevruguin Photographs. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C. Gift of Katherine Dennis Smith, 1973-1985
See more items in:
Myron Bement Smith collection 1899-1962
Myron Bement Smith Collection, Subseries 2.12: Antoin Sevruguin Photographs
Data Source:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

Mendicant Women [graphic]

Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin -1933
Subject:
Sevruguin, Antoin -1933
Smith, Myron Bement 1897-1970
Islamic Archives
Physical description:
1 photographic print : b&w ; 16.8 cm. x 22 cm
Type:
Gelatin silver prints
Photographic prints
Place:
Asia
Iran
Date:
1880s-1928
Topic:
Clothing and dress
Headgear
Local number:
FSA A.4 2.12.Up.43
Restrictions:
Access is by appointment only, Monday through Thursday 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Please contact the Archives to make an appointment: AVRreference@si.edu
Notes:
Title and summary note are provided by Shabnam Rahimi-Golkhandan, FSg curatorial research specialist.
Antoin Sevruguin is one of the early pioneers of commercial photography in Iran. He arrived in Iran from Tbilisi, Georgia in the mid 1870s to set up shop in Ala al-Dawla street in Tehran. From the early days, Sevruguin's studio was trusted both by the Qajar court and by foreign visitors to Iran. Highly regarded for their artistic ingenuity outside Iran, Sevruguin's photographs of 'ethnic types,' architecture and landscape, and depictions of daily life of Tehran found their way into foreign travelogues, magazines and books. As such, he stands alone in a relatively large group of early Iranian photographers for being recognized and celebrated outside the boundaries of the country. Antoin Sevruguin passed away in 1933, although his family studio continued for some time as a commercial enterprise.
Summary:
Joseph Upton purchased 66 black-and-white gelatin silver photoprints in 1928 from Antoin Sevruguin in Tehran (Iran), and subsequently donated them to the Committee for Islamic Culture, as reported in their official minutes of October 24, 1953.
- On recto of the print, handwritten number (inked, probably by Antoin Sevruguin) reads, "36."
- On verso of the print, handwritten number (penciled) reads, "174."
- On verso of the print, handwritten caption (penciled, probably by Antoin Sevruguin) in French reads, "Les Bohémiennes."
Cite as:
Myron Bement Smith Collection: Antoin Sevruguin Photographs. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C. Gift of Katherine Dennis Smith, 1973-1985
See more items in:
Myron Bement Smith collection 1899-1962
Myron Bement Smith Collection, Subseries 2.12: Antoin Sevruguin Photographs
Data Source:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

Portrait of a Merchant [graphic]

Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin -1933
Subject:
Sevruguin, Antoin -1933
Smith, Myron Bement 1897-1970
Islamic Archives
Physical description:
1 photographic print : b&w ; 16.5 cm. x 22.2 cm
Type:
Gelatin silver prints
Photographic prints
Studio portraits
Place:
Asia
Iran
Date:
1880s-1928
Topic:
Clothing and dress
Headgear
Portrait photography
Local number:
FSA A.4 2.12.Up.59
Restrictions:
Access is by appointment only, Monday through Thursday 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Please contact the Archives to make an appointment: AVRreference@si.edu
Notes:
Title and summary note are provided by Shabnam Rahimi-Golkhandan, FSg curatorial research specialist.
Antoin Sevruguin is one of the early pioneers of commercial photography in Iran. He arrived in Iran from Tbilisi, Georgia in the mid 1870s to set up shop in Ala al-Dawla street in Tehran. From the early days, Sevruguin's studio was trusted both by the Qajar court and by foreign visitors to Iran. Highly regarded for their artistic ingenuity outside Iran, Sevruguin's photographs of 'ethnic types,' architecture and landscape, and depictions of daily life of Tehran found their way into foreign travelogues, magazines and books. As such, he stands alone in a relatively large group of early Iranian photographers for being recognized and celebrated outside the boundaries of the country. Antoin Sevruguin passed away in 1933, although his family studio continued for some time as a commercial enterprise.
Summary:
Joseph Upton purchased 66 black-and-white gelatin silver photoprints in 1928 from Antoin Sevruguin in Tehran (Iran), and subsequently donated them to the Committee for Islamic Culture, as reported in their official minutes of October 24, 1953.
- On recto of the print, handwritten number (inked, probably by Antoin Sevruguin) reads, "492."
- On recto of the print, scratched handwritten number (penciled, probably by Antoin Sevruguin) reads, "50."
- On verso of the print, handwritten caption (penciled, probably by Antoin Sevruguin) in French reads, "marchand parse."
Cite as:
Myron Bement Smith Collection: Antoin Sevruguin Photographs. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C. Gift of Katherine Dennis Smith, 1973-1985
See more items in:
Myron Bement Smith collection 1899-1962
Myron Bement Smith Collection, Subseries 2.12: Antoin Sevruguin Photographs
Data Source:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

Money dealer or "Sarraf" [graphic]

Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin -1933
Subject:
Sevruguin, Antoin -1933
Smith, Myron Bement 1897-1970
Islamic Archives
Physical description:
1 photographic print : b&w ; 12.2 cm. x 17.1 cm
Type:
Gelatin silver prints
Photographic prints
Place:
Asia
Iran
Date:
1880s-1928
Topic:
Clothing and dress
Headgear
Portrait photography
Street vendors
Local number:
FSA A.4 2.12.Up.01
Restrictions:
Access is by appointment only, Monday through Thursday 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Please contact the Archives to make an appointment: AVRreference@si.edu
Notes:
Title and summary note are provided by Shabnam Rahimi-Golkhandan, FSg curatorial research specialist.
Antoin Sevruguin is one of the early pioneers of commercial photography in Iran. He arrived in Iran from Tbilisi, Georgia in the mid 1870s to set up shop in Ala al-Dawla street in Tehran. From the early days, Sevruguin's studio was trusted both by the Qajar court and by foreign visitors to Iran. Highly regarded for their artistic ingenuity outside Iran, Sevruguin's photographs of 'ethnic types,' architecture and landscape, and depictions of daily life of Tehran found their way into foreign travelogues, magazines and books. As such, he stands alone in a relatively large group of early Iranian photographers for being recognized and celebrated outside the boundaries of the country. Antoin Sevruguin passed away in 1933, although his family studio continued for some time as a commercial enterprise.
Summary:
Joseph Upton purchased 66 black-and-white gelatin silver photoprints in 1928 from Antoin Sevruguin in Tehran (Iran), and subsequently donated them to the Committee for Islamic Culture, as reported in their official minutes of October 24, 1953.
- On recto of the print, handwritten number (inked, probably by Antoin Sevruguin) reads, "1057."
- On verso of the print, handwritten caption (penciled, probably by Antoin Sevruguin) in French reads, "Banquier."
- On verso of the print, handwritten caption (penciled) in English reads, "Banker."
- On verso of the print, additional handwritten caption (penciled) in English reads, "Please return to Mr. Upton. Modern Scribe. Persian."
Cite as:
Myron Bement Smith Collection: Antoin Sevruguin Photographs. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C. Gift of Katherine Dennis Smith, 1973-1985
See more items in:
Myron Bement Smith collection 1899-1962
Myron Bement Smith Collection, Subseries 2.12: Antoin Sevruguin Photographs
Data Source:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

Money dealers [graphic]

Creator:
Sevruguin, Antoin -1933
Subject:
Sevruguin, Antoin -1933
Smith, Myron Bement 1897-1970
Islamic Archives
Physical description:
1 photographic print : b&w ; 22.5 cm. x 16.5 cm
Type:
Gelatin silver prints
Photographic prints
Place:
Asia
Iran
Date:
1880s-1928
Topic:
Clothing and dress
Headgear
Architecture
Street vendors
Local number:
FSA A.4 2.12.Up.47
Restrictions:
Access is by appointment only, Monday through Thursday 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Please contact the Archives to make an appointment: AVRreference@si.edu
Notes:
Title and summary note are provided by Shabnam Rahimi-Golkhandan, FSg curatorial research specialist.
Antoin Sevruguin is one of the early pioneers of commercial photography in Iran. He arrived in Iran from Tbilisi, Georgia in the mid 1870s to set up shop in Ala al-Dawla street in Tehran. From the early days, Sevruguin's studio was trusted both by the Qajar court and by foreign visitors to Iran. Highly regarded for their artistic ingenuity outside Iran, Sevruguin's photographs of 'ethnic types,' architecture and landscape, and depictions of daily life of Tehran found their way into foreign travelogues, magazines and books. As such, he stands alone in a relatively large group of early Iranian photographers for being recognized and celebrated outside the boundaries of the country. Antoin Sevruguin passed away in 1933, although his family studio continued for some time as a commercial enterprise.
Summary:
Joseph Upton purchased 66 black-and-white gelatin silver photoprints in 1928 from Antoin Sevruguin in Tehran (Iran), and subsequently donated them to the Committee for Islamic Culture, as reported in their official minutes of October 24, 1953.
- On recto of the print, handwritten number (inked, probably by Antoin Sevruguin) reads, "110."
- On verso of the print, handwritten number (penciled) reads, "206."
- On verso of the print, handwritten caption (penciled, probably by Antoin Sevruguin) in French reads, "Banquier."
Cite as:
Myron Bement Smith Collection: Antoin Sevruguin Photographs. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C. Gift of Katherine Dennis Smith, 1973-1985
See more items in:
Myron Bement Smith collection 1899-1962
Myron Bement Smith Collection, Subseries 2.12: Antoin Sevruguin Photographs
Data Source:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

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