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Navajo hogans (Indian huts) of timber and adobe, near the Grand Canon. 9487 Interpositive

Publisher:
Underwood & Underwood
Physical description:
Silver gelatin on glass
1 item, 5" x 8"
Type:
Photographs
Stereoscopic photographs
Place:
Arizona
Navajo Indians (Arizona)
Grand Canyon (Arizona)
Date:
1900-1910
Topic:
Indians of North America
Adobe
Dwellings
Hogans
Homes
Local number:
RSN 23355
Notes:
Currently stored in box 3.2.30 [205]
See more items in:
Underwood & Underwood Glass Stereograph Collection 1895-1921
Data Source:
Archives Center - NMAH
Visitor Tag(s):

People at a desert dwelling

Creator:
Unknown
Physical description:
1 4.25 x 6.5 in. print
Culture:
Navajo Indians ?
Indians of North America Southwest, New
Type:
Archival materials
Local number:
NAA INV 09967900
Summary:
The item is mounted in a photograph album. Several Navaho (?) are gathered around a hogan
Cite as:
Photo Lot 90-1, number 1381, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
George V. Allen photograph collection of American Indians and the American frontier circa 1860-1935
Data Source:
National Anthropological Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

The Vanishing Indian ca. 1920

Creator:
Sioux Super Films
Subject:
Black, Susan potter
Physical description:
reference one video cassette (15 minutes) silent b&w 3/4 inch
master one video cassette (15 minutes) silent b&w 3/4 inch
archival original one film reel silent b&w 35mm
Culture:
Ogalala
Navajo Indians
Pueblo Indians
Apache Indians
Hopi
Indians of North America Southwest, New
Type:
Motion pictures (visual works)
Collection descriptions
Place:
Taos
Idelafonza Pueblo, N.M
New Mexico
North America
United States
Arizona
Date:
ca 1920
Topic:
Ceramics
Dance--fancy dance--Pueblo
Pottery--pottery making
Dwellings--hogans--wick-i-ups
Garb--shawls--Navajo
Language and culture
Local number:
HSFA 77.5.1
Notes:
Title from credits (published work) - archival collection
Summary:
Incomplete edited film or films from the 1920s educational film series "The Vanishing Indian" produced by Sioux Super Films. Contents include scenes from an Oglala council meeting, a Navajo wedding and shots of hogans, Apache dwellings known as wick-i-ups, pottery making at San Ildefonso Pueblo, dance performance at Taos Pueblo, and shots of dwellings at Zuni, Tesuque, Taos, and Santa Clara pueblos. Footage includes the theatrical trailer promoting the series
Data Source:
Human Studies Film Archives
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Diagram plan of hogan, with names of parts of floor area ca. 1898

Creator:
Mindeleff, Cosmos 1863-
Matthews, Washington
Physical description:
1 drawing
Culture:
Navajo Indians
Indians of North America Southwest, New
Type:
Drawings
Collection descriptions
Date:
ca 1898
Topic:
Habitations--Navaho
Local number:
NAA MS 2096
Cite as:
Manuscript 2096, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
Numbered manuscripts 1850s-1980s (some earlier)
Data Source:
National Anthropological Archives
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Dwellings : a spiritual history of the living world / Linda Hogan

Author:
Hogan, Linda
Physical description:
159 p. ; 20 cm
Type:
Books
Date:
1996
1995
Topic:
Philosophy of nature
Notes:
"A Touchstone book."
Contents:
Feathers -- Bats -- Caves -- All my relations -- What holds the water, what hold the light -- Different yield -- Deify the wolf -- Creations -- Stories of water -- Kill hole -- Dwellings -- Voyagers -- Snake people -- Porcupine -- Waking up the rake -- Walking
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution Libraries
Visitor Tag(s):

Dwellings : a spiritual history of the living world / Linda Hogan

Spiritual history of the living world
Author:
Hogan, Linda
Physical description:
159 p. : ill. ; 21 cm
Type:
Books
Date:
1995
C1995
Topic:
Philosophy of nature
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution Libraries
Visitor Tag(s):

The hogan builders of Colorado / by Betty H. and Harold A. Huscher

Author:
Huscher, Betty H
Huscher, Harold A
Physical description:
92 p. : ill., map ; 24 cm
Type:
Books
Place:
Colorado
Date:
1943
1987
Topic:
Dwellings
Call number:
E78.C6 H87 1987
Notes:
Reprinted from Southwestern lore, volume 9, number 2, September, 1943
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution Libraries
Visitor Tag(s):

George Eastman House copies of photographs of American Indians, mid-19th - early 20th century

Collector:
George Eastman House
Photographer:
Barker, George 1844-1894
Beaman, Edward O
Bennett, G. C. 1846-1915
Bennett, H. H (Henry Hamilton) 1843-1908
Bierstadt, Charles 1819-1903
Bonine, Elias A. 1843-1916
Brown, William Henry 1844-1886
Brubaker, Christian B of Marquette, Michigan
Chase, D. B (Dana B.)
Chamberlain, W. G (William Gunnison)
Childs, B. F (Brainard F.) ca. 1841-1921
Conklin, E (Enoch)
Cross, W. R. (William R.)
Goff, O. S (Orlando Scott) 1843-1917
Harris, George H
Haynes, F. Jay (Frank Jay) 1853-1921
Ingersoll, T. W (Truman Ward) 1862-1922
Jackson, William Henry 1843-1942
Jarvis, J. F (John F.) b. 1850
Jones, James
Kent, J. H
Morrow, Stanley J
Lingley, B. L
Muybridge, Eadweard 1830-1904
O'Sullivan, Timothy H 1840-1882
Pratt, D. C
Rinehart, F. A (Frank A.)
Savage, C. R (Charles Roscoe) 1832-1909
Smillie, Thomas William 1843-1917
Upton, B. F (Benjamin Franklin)
Watkins, Carleton E. 1829-1916
Zimmerman, Charles A. 1844-1909
Jacoby, W. H (William H.) 1841-1905
Buehman, Henry 1851-1912
Alvord, Kellogg, & Campbell
Boyd and Braas
Boorne & May
Bell & Bro. (Washington, D.C.)
Caswell & Davy
Central Pacific Railroad Company
Continent Stereoscopic Company
E. & H.T. Anthony (Firm)
Henry L. Shepard & Co
Ingersoll View Company
Keystone View Company
Kilburn Brothers a
Liberty Brand Stereo Views
Littleton View Co
Lovejoy & Foster
Underwood & Underwood
Whitney & Zimmerman
Woodward Stereoscopic Company of Rochester, New York
Wilson & Havens
Creator:
Barnard, George N. 1819-1902
Publisher:
Forsyth, N. A (Norman A.) 1869-1949
Depicted:
Logan, John Alexander 1826-1886
Douglass, Frederick 1817?-1895
Smithsonian Institution
Subject:
Louisiana Purchase Exposition (1904 : Saint Louis, Mo.)
United States Darien Exploring Expedition (1870)
Physical description:
circa 248 copy prints
circa 248 35mm negatives
Culture:
Kiowa Indians depicted
Cheyenne Indians depicted
Dakota Indians depicted
Chiricahua Indians depicted
Navajo Indians depicted
Hopi Indians depicted
Zuni Indians depicted
Modoc Indians depicted
Apache Indians depicted
Sihasapa Indians depicted
Paiute Indians depicted
Arapaho Indians depicted
Comanche Indians depicted
Ute Indians depicted
Tuscarora Indians depicted
Winnebago Indians depicted
Taos Indians depicted
Duwamish Indians depicted
Kickapoo Indians depicted
Sarsi Indians depicted
Hunkpapa Indians depicted
Ojibwa Indians depicted
Indians of North America Great Basin
Indians of North America Northeast
Indians of North America Great Plains
Indians of North America Plateau
Indians of North America Southwest, New
Indians of North America Subarctic
Indians of North America Northwest Coast of North America
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Place:
Washington (D.C.)
Florida
Yellowstone National Park
Colorado
Yosemite National Park (Calif.)
Date:
mid-19th - early 20th century
Topic:
Dance
Dwellings
Pottery
Baskets
Soldiers
Local number:
NAA Photo Lot R79
Summary:
Copies of photogaphs selected from the George Eastman House collection by Bureau of American Ethnology archivist Margaret Blaker in 1962. Many of the photographs are individual or group portraits of American Indians and some highlight pottery, baskets, and cradleboards. There are also images of American Indian dwellings, including tipis and hogans; pueblos; dances; and an encampment during the Modoc War and Plains Indian prisoners at Fort Marion, Florida (1870s)
Expedition photos in the collection were made on T. O. Selfridge╩╣s Darien Expedition (1870-1871), the Wheeler surveys (1871-1874), and the Hayden Geological Survey (1871). The collection also includes portraits of Frederick Douglass, Sitting Bull, and John A. Logan; and images from Buffalo Bill's Wild West Show; Company F of New York's 140th Volunteer Infantry; and the Smithsonian in Washington, DC
Cite as:
Photo lot R79, George Eastman House copies of photographs of American Indians, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Data Source:
National Anthropological Archives
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The old hogan / by Margaret Kahn Garaway ; illustrated by Andrew Emerson Bia

Author:
Garaway, Maragaret Kahn
Bia, Andrew Emerson 1951-
Physical description:
32 p. : col. ill. ; 13 x 22 cm
Type:
Juvenile fiction
Place:
Southwest, New
Date:
1985
C1985
Topic:
Dwellings
Moving, Household
Call number:
PZ7.G1543 Ol 1985
Summary:
Members of a Navajo Indian family plan to move to a six-room house with electricity and running water, unaware that their excited talk is saddening the one-room hogan they will be leaving behind
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution Libraries
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Rethinking Navajo pueblitos / contributions by Michael P. Marshall and Patrick Hogan

Author:
Marshall, Michael P
Hogan, Patrick 1949-
United States Bureau of Land Management Farmington Resource Area Office
Physical description:
iii, 27, ix, 282 p. : ill., maps ; 28 cm
Type:
Books
Place:
New Mexico
Date:
1991
Topic:
Dwellings
Pueblos
Antiquities
Notes:
Title from cover
Contents:
Navajo-Pueblo interaction during the gobernador phase / Patrick Hogan -- The pueblito as a site complex / Michael P. Marshall, with assistance from Paul S. Grigg
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution Libraries
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Studio and outdoor portraits and views relating to the Shoshoni, Arapaho, Navaho, Pueblo, and [Apache] tribes 1881-82 ?

Photographer:
Baker and Johnston
Subject:
Washakie Shoshoni
Sharp Nose
Captain Jack
McDonald Lt
Physical description:
60 prints
Culture:
Apache Indians
Pueblo Indians
Shoshoni Indians
Arapaho Indians
Indians of North America Great Basin
Indians of North America Great Plains
Indians of North America Southwest, New
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Date:
1881-82
Topic:
Photographs
Shoshoni Indians
Habitations and other structures--brush lodge
Clothing--dance costume
Dance--Shoshoni
Camps
Navajo Indians
Habitations and other structures--hogan
Local number:
NAA MS 4502
Summary:
Contents: 4502:[Date: 1881-82 ?] Tribe: 1) Shoshoni Description: Washakie, seated. (Studio) See Copy Negative Number 42,021. 2) Shoshoni Washakie, standing (Studio). 3) Shoshoni Washakie and group of 11 (Studio) ("Washakie in Council."). 4) Shoshoni Washakie and group of 6. (Studio) ("Washakie and his head chiefs.") 5) Shoshoni Washakie and group of 15 near brush lodge. ("Washakie and family".) 6) Shoshoni Two men, mounted ("2nd Chief and Medicine man of Shoshones.") 7) Shoshoni Brave; Sundance Costume See Copy Negative Number 42,023-C. 8) Shoshoni Four women, child, baby in floral-decorated cradleboard. (Studio) 9) Shoshoni Woman from group (8), seated. (Studio) ("Flat Head squaw.") 10) Shoshoni Woman from group (8), with baby in cradleboard. (Studio.) 11) Shoshoni Two men in dance costume. (Studio) ("Two Shoshone Braves.") 12) Shoshoni Man in dance costume. (Studio) See Copy Negative Number 56,783. 13) Shoshoni Seven men in dance costume, standing, (Studio). 14) Shoshoni Group dancing before trading post, including some of same men and costumes as in group (13) [Same as Negative Number 1698 d]. 15) Shoshoni Woman from group (8), standing. (studio). 16) Tribe: Arapaho Description: Sharp Nose Date: [1881-82 ?] See Copy Negative Number BAE 188-b; SI 29,779. 17) Arapaho Camp scene; canvas tipis [1881-82 ?]. 18) Tribe: [Santa Clara ?] Description: Street or plaza scene; crowd on roofs of buildings and ruined church. ("Pueblo Indians.") Date: [1881-82 ?]. 19) Tribe: Navaho Description: View of hogan and four Indians Date: [1881-82 ?]. 20) Tribe: [Apache ?] Description: Six Indian scouts and 2 white men in dry ravine. ("Capt. Jack, Lt McDonald, and Scouts, N. M.") Date: [1881-82 ?] See copy Negative Number 46,503-A
Cite as:
Manuscript 4502, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Data Source:
National Anthropological Archives
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Hogans [microform] : Navajo houses & house songs / house poems from Navajo ritual translated and arranged by David P. McAllester ; photographs of Navajo houses by Susan W. McAllester

Author:
McAllester, David P (David Park) 1916-2006
McAllester, Susan W. 1919-
Physical description:
113 p. : ill. ; 23 x 27 cm
Type:
Microforms
Place:
Southwest, New
Date:
1980
C1980
Topic:
Navajo poetry--Translations into English
Dwellings
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution Libraries
Visitor Tag(s):

Hogans : Navajo houses & house songs / house poems from Navajo ritual translated and arranged by David P. McAllester ; photos. of Navajo houses by Susan W. McAllester

Author:
McAllester, David P (David Park) 1916-2006
McAllester, Susan W. 1919-
Physical description:
113 p. : ill. ; 23 x 27 cm
Type:
Books
Place:
Southwest, New
Date:
1980
C1980
Topic:
Navajo poetry--Translations into English
Dwellings
Call number:
PM2009.Z95 E5 1980X
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution Libraries
Visitor Tag(s):

Navaho Summer Hogan

Artist:
Laura Gilpin, born Colorado Springs, CO 1891-died Santa Fe, NM 1979
Printer:
Ansel Adams, born San Francisco, CA 1902-died Monterey, CA 1984
Medium:
gelatin silver print
Dimensions:
sheet: 11 x 13 7/8 in. (28.1 x 35.3 cm.)
Type:
Photography-Photoprint
Date:
ca. 1934
Topic:
Animal\sheep
Figure group\family
Animal\horse
Ethnic\Indian\Navajo
Landscape\season\summer
Architecture Exterior\domestic\hut
Credit Line:
Smithsonian American Art Museum, Museum acquisition
Object number:
1977.74.11
See more items in:
Smithsonian American Art Museum Collection
Data Source:
Smithsonian American Art Museum
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Defending the Dinetah : pueblitos in the ancestral Navajo homeland / Ronald H. Towner

Author:
Towner, Ronald H. 1957-
Physical description:
xiii, 266 p. : ill., maps ; 21 cm
Type:
Books
Place:
New Mexico
Date:
2003
C2003
18th century
Topic:
Navajo architecture
Dwellings
History
Pueblos
Hogans
Dendrochronology
Ethnoarchaeology
Colonization
Antiquities
Contents:
Introduction -- Laying a foundation -- The Dinetah pueblito sites -- Temporal and spatial patterns of the pueblito site occupations -- Climate, the Navajo occupation, and abandonment of the Dinetah -- A new model of Navajo ethnogenesis
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution Libraries
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Indian Hogans in the California Sierras, (painting)

Painter:
Herzog, Hermann 1831-1932
Medium:
Oil on canvas
Culture:
Indian
Type:
Paintings
Date:
1874-1875
Topic:
Landscape--Mountain--Sierra Nevada Mountains
Figure group
Ethnic
Architecture exterior--Domestic--Hut
Architecture--Other--Campsite
Landscape--California
Control number:
IAP 61022667
Notes:
Kennedy Quarterly, V.12, No.3, 1973
Schriever, George, "American masters in the West: selections from the Anschutz Collection [exhibition]," 1976
Cunningham, Elizabeth, "Masterpieces of the American West: Selections from the Anschutz Collection," Denver, CO: A. B. Hirschfeld Press, 1983, no. 21
Data Source:
Art Inventories Catalog, Smithsonian American Art Museums
Visitor Tag(s):

Summer Hogan, (painting)

Painter:
Leigh, William R. 1866-1955
Medium:
Watercolor
Culture:
Indian
Type:
Paintings
Owner/Location:
Gilcrease Museum 1400 North Gilcrease Museum Road Tulsa Oklahoma 74127-2100
Date:
1950
Topic:
Landscape--Season--Summer
Figure group
Ethnic--Navajo
Architecture exterior--Domestic--Hut
Architecture--Other--Campsite
Occupation--Domestic--Cooking
Control number:
IAP 86560051
Notes:
Cummins, D. Duane, "William Robinson Leigh: Western Artist," Norman, OK: University of Oklahoma Press, 1980, pg. 163
Data Source:
Art Inventories Catalog, Smithsonian American Art Museums
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Indians of North America The Navajo [published] 95.1.7 RV 1993

Creator:
Nevison, Henry Producer
Henry Nevison; Producer, Director
Marty Moss-Coane; Narration
Harold Boihem; Editor
Dana Palermo, Rick Scott; Audio
Robin Buerki, Henry Nevison, Leon Skyharse Thomas; Video
Andrew Schlessinger, John Gerbec, Dana Palermo; producers
Physical description:
29 min sound color video
Culture:
Navajo Indians
Indians of North America
Indians of North America Southwest, New
Type:
Projected media
Collection descriptions
Place:
Navajo
North America
disintigration
United States, Texas, Mexico
Date:
1993
Topic:
Land--acquisition of
Land--as a source of wealth
Land--as property
Land--reclamation
Land--clearing for construction
Land--conservation policies
Land--reservations
Settlement--patterns
Exploitation
Warfare--surrender
Migration
World War II
Territorial--boundaries--exploitation
Territory--annexed consolidation of
Government--activities--agencies
Government--care of dependent ethnic groups
Government--education--public
Government--expeditions
Government--military
Government--policies
Political--authority
Political--reform
Political--system--philosopy
Military--armed forces
Military--posts--tactics
Education--curriculum
Education--teachers in--theories of
Education--attitudes toward
History--oral, as a method
Spiritualism
Missions--religious
Nature--ideas about
Descent--matrilineal
Assimilation--of ethnic groups
Trading--posts
Weaving--weavers
Weaving--looms--hand
Wool--production--blankets
Silversmiths
Dwellings--Hogans
Jewelry--manufacture
Hunting--buffalo
Animals--sheep
Animals--herding
Animals--cattle
Animals--grazing, round-ups of--ideas about--taming and domestication of
Agriculture--by-products--science--tools
Exploring--expeditions
Ownership--individual--collective
Culture--accomodation--adaptation
Culture--change
Culture--continuity
Culture
Culture--ideals
Local number:
HSFA 95.1.7 RV
Summary:
Indians of North America Series: The Navajo. Edited film documents the history of the Navajo with special emphasis on the transitions from a hunter gatherer society to farming and then to shepherding, the ever present conflict with the United States government and a discussion of the future of Navajo culture and traditions. Film addresses the issue of land seizure by the United States, The Republic of Texas and Mexico, focusing on the ultimate surrender of the Navajos to the U.S. Army in 1863, the forced "Long Walk" 250 miles to New Mexico, and their subsequent life on a reservation. Once on the reservation, film explores the educational policies for Navajo schoolchildren which included forbidding children to speak Navajo or openly discussing any aspect of tradition or culture, the effects of the Christian missionaries, the policies of the Bureau of Indian Affairs and the marketing of Navajo blankets and jewelry for the outside world. Footage depicts "Hogans," Navajo homes made of a thick branch framework covered with mud and earth; Navajo beadwork, blankets and jewelry; 1934 black and white government film; World War II footage of Navajo men in the armed services; schoolchildren on reservations; the site of the Navajo surrender to the U.S. Army in 1863; Navajo youth today in public schools. Interviews with various Navajos reveal the use of Navajo language for codes during World War II, the importance of respect and kindness to animals and nature, and the necessity to instill a knowledge and appreciation of Navajo culture and traditions in Navajo youth today
Data Source:
Human Studies Film Archives
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John Peabody Harrington papers: Navajo (part 1), 1935-1949

Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody 1884-1961
Young, Robert W. 1912-2007
Clark, Ann Nolan 1898-1995
La Farge, Oliver
Hoijer, Harry 1904-1976
Van Valkenburgh, Richard F
Physical description:
59 boxes
Culture:
Navajo Indians
Indians of North America Southwest, New
Type:
Field notes
Nomenclature
Dictionaries
Vocabulary
Manuscripts
Date:
1935
1935-1949
Topic:
Navajo language
Kiowa language
Tewa language
Carrier language
Athapascan languages
Language and languages--Documentation
Linguistics
Ethnology
Ethnobotany
Names, Geographical
Zoology
Local number:
Accession #1976-95
Notes:
Although John P. Harrington published brief articles on Navajo in 1911 and 1929, his most sustained work in this language spanned the years 1935 to 1946. Correspondence and reports indicate that during this period he was in the field from July to November 1939, and from August to mid-November 1940 at such places as Fort Wingate and Gallup, New Mexico, and Phoenix, Tuba CIty, and Window Rock, Arizona. His success in the field is due in no small part to his brilliant young collaborator, Robert W. Young, whom he first contacted in August 1936 and with whom he carried on an extensive correspondence into the mid-1940s. In fact their joint efforts in Navajo were accomplished mainly by mail
Harrington collaborated or corresponded with others, among whom were Ann Nolan Clark, Oliver La Farge, Francis Elmore, Harry Hoijer, William Hill, and Richard Van Valkenburgh. He also contacted various university professors and graduate students, some of whom taught at such programs as those directed by the Summer Institute of Linguistics (Camp Wycliffe) and the University of New Mexico School of American Research
Harrington consulted a wide array of secondary sources and reheard or compared data from them which he later combined with original notes. These include several hundred terms from then-unpublished manuscripts of Edward Sapir, and two of Harry Hoijer's publications--Chiricahua and Mescalero Apache Texts (1938) and "The Southern Athapascan Languages" (1938). He made extensive use of two works published by the Franciscan Fathers, An Ethnological Dictionary of the Navaho Language (1910) and A Vocabulary of the Navaho Language (1912). He turned to W. L. Jepson and Washington Matthews for botanical terms, and to Adrien G. Morice for Carrier comparisons. In a search for precise grammatical terminology, he consulted a score or more of grammars, dictionaries, and publications on language and linguistics in Latin, Greek, Indo-Germanic, and several Arabic languages. Most prominent are Walter A. Ripman's Latin Handbook (1930) and Alan H. Gairdner's publication on Arabic phonetics (1935)
He worked with many Navajo speakers, some of whom were well-educated. Mentioned frequently are Willietto Antonio, Chee Dodge, Howard Gorman, George E. Hood, Hoskie Naswood, Albert Sandoval (also called "Chic"), Charles Keetsie Shirley, and Sam Tilden
Summary:
This set of files contains Harrington's Navajo research. The materials consist of vocabulary, dictionary notes, grammar, rehearings of linguistic data, ethnobotany notes, ethnographic notes, texts, drafts and notes relating to primers, published and unpublished primers, unpublished and published papers, extracts from secondary sources, and miscellaneous notes
The vocabulary section contains terms extracted from Young and Morgan's The Navaho Language, which were reheard principally to obtain Kiowa and Hano (Arizona Tewa) equivalences. Information is occasionally included from Harrington's Apache and Tewa notes. A brief typed vocabulary contains scattered grammatical material. There is also a slipfile of terms based mainly on An Ethnological Dictionary of the Navaho Language. It contains annotations and relevant excerpts from Harrington-Young correspondence. Plant names wIth Young's annotations are based on W. L. Jepson's A Manual of Flowering Plants of California (1925) and Washington Matthews' The Navajo Names for Plants (1886). Of the twenty semantic categories, the sections on animals, animal parts, plants, and placenames are particularly substantial
The dictionary section consists of lexical terms from the Bureau of Indian Affairs' "Navajo Phrase Book," obtained from Willard Beatty and sent by Harrington to Young for rehearings. Navajo entries with Kiowa equivalences were apparently taken from a manuscript for a dictionary by Young. Two miscellaneous groups of entries are in Navajo/English
The material on Navajo grammar is extensive and includes notes, drafts of a manuscript, excerpts from secondary sources, correspondence between Young and Harrington, and slips. The file was for proposed publications ranging from introductory manuals to the structuring of a comprehensive Navajo grammar
A further substantial body of grammatical material is found on large slips. These include information from Young's voluminous correspondence, not otherwise interfiled. Part of this section is a further rehearing by Young of Morice's The Carrier Language. Another group of notes records comparisons with several southern Athapascan languages, evidently based on Young's notes, vocabulary items, correspondence, and other undocumented material. Harrington also used the slipfile format to index questions which he had earlier sent to Young
Most of the rehearings of lingustic data are of Edward Sapir's linguistic terms by Young in 1940 and 1941. Though the copied materials may be similar in content, they do not appear to be exact duplicates of the Sapir linguistic holdings at the American Philosophical Society. Young also reheard terms from Hoijer's Chiricahua and Mescalero Apache Texts late in 1940. George E. Hood commented on Hoijer's "The Southern Athapascan Languages," possibly at about the same time. There are typed excerpts from Young's May 1938 letters regarding Morice's The Carrier Language and miscellaneous linguistic information given by Hood and reheard by Richard Long. Other miscellaneous rehearings are with Alfred Sanchez (abbreviated"Alf." or "Alfredo"), Willietto Antonio, George Hood, and Robert Young (September 1939); and with Howard Gorman, Albert Sandoval, and John Charles (1939). There is also a rehearing with Henry Tsosie of terms from Gladys A. Reichard and Adolph Dodge Bittany's Agentive and Causative Elements in Navaho (1940), including some excerpts from the book. Finally, in February 1941, he reheard the vocabulary of Pedro Bautista Pino with Howard Gorman; Young did not consider these terms to be Navajo
The files also contains Harrington's notes on Navajo names for plants, gathered from secondary sources and possibly original data from colleagues or friends. Young also annotated some of the notes
Harrington's ethnographic files includes notes, vocabulary, and illustrations on the structure of dwelling places as well as some information on the mythic origins of the Navajo. Many of the illustrations are by Charles Keetsie Shirley. On the same subject is a set of cards in Young's hand which was sent to Harrington at Fort Wingate in August 1939. At Harrington's request, Young also translated what appears to be a lesson on hogans, possibly a section of a proposed text for instructional purposes. A group of Chaco Canyon placenames were given by Ed Henry in June 1939; several others were extracted from various secondary sources. Other ethnographic subjects briefly covered are the Hoop and Pole game, a social and economic survey questionnaire, White Hat's funeral (1939), the Lord's Prayer as recorded by Berard Haile, and notes on Sandoval's sound recordings. Malcolm Farmer supplied nonlinguistic information and there is a small set of highly miscellaneous ethnographic and historical notes
The text section contains billingual texts that Young collected and sent to Harrington in 1936. They were written with interlinear translations and followed by a precis in English. Titles include: "Deer and Coyote," "Where the People Came Out," "A Wedding Ceremonial," and "The Woman Who Changed into a Bear." A recording session on October 31, 1949, with Dick Left, Richard Long, and Harry (not further identified) provided Navajo songs, ceremonies, and legends. Harrington's notes supply the identity of the discs and peripheral information such as the gestures accompanying the songs. Some linguistic annotations are interspersed. The discs described in the notes have not been located
Notes, drafts, and mockups from Harrington and Young's work creating Navajo primers are also present. During the course of their work together from 1937 to 1939, Harrington and Young prepared drafts for two primers, "Little Bear Primer" and "Spotted Dog Primer," a pre-primer (probably the so called "Doda Primer"), and a playbook or cut-out book. Despite an assurance that at least both of the major works were to be printed, neither of the primers were ever published. He and Young also served as translators for a set of four primers in the "Little Herder" series, and Harrington was also credited with developing the "Harrington-La Farge phonetic system" utilized in the three-volume set entitled Little Man's Family. Harrington and Young also helped translate Ann Nolan Clark's "Who Wants To Be a Prairie Dog?"
Other materials related to Harrington's writing include notes for his "Southern Peripheral Athapaskawan Origins, Divisions, and Migrations" and preliminary drafts and notes for the Navajo portion of "Earliest Navaho and Quechua" (1944) coauthored by Robert W. Young. There are also notes and drafts for his unpublished writings, among which include "Navaho Mouthmap," "The Indian Dog Comes into His Own,"and "What Light Can Navajo Throw on Indogermanic Reconstruction?"
Among his miscellaneous notes is a comparison of Navajo with other Indian languages. There are brief notes on trips made in 1940, a list of the names of non-Indians, miscellaneous correspondence, and notes which are neither linguistic nor ethnographic
Because of their long-term collaboration, Young's notes are inextricably intermixed with those of Harrington. Although some are labeled "Y," Young's unlabeled contributions can be identified through his handwriting and printing, and even with his style. Other hand-copied material is the work of B.A.E. assistant, Arvilla Johnson. Harrington's daughter Awona produced many of the copies in eighteen-point type
Cite as:
Southwest: Navajo, John Peabody Harrington papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
John Peabody Harrington papers: Southwest, 1907-1957
John Peabody Harrington papers: Navaho
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National Anthropological Archives
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John Peabody Harrington papers: Navajo (part 2), 1935-1949

Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody 1884-1961
Young, Robert W. 1912-2007
Clark, Ann Nolan 1898-1995
La Farge, Oliver 1901-1963
Hoijer, Harry 1904-1976
Van Valkenburgh, Richard F
Physical description:
59 boxes
Culture:
Navajo Indians
Indians of North America Southwest, New
Type:
Field notes
Nomenclature
Dictionaries
Vocabulary
Manuscripts
Date:
1935
1935-1949
Topic:
Navajo language
Kiowa language
Tewa language
Carrier language
Athapascan languages
Language and languages--Documentation
Linguistics
Ethnology
Ethnobotany
Names, Geographical
Zoology
Local number:
Accession #1976-95
Notes:
Although John P. Harrington published brief articles on Navajo in 1911 and 1929, his most sustained work in this language spanned the years 1935 to 1946. Correspondence and reports indicate that during this period he was in the field from July to November 1939, and from August to mid-November 1940 at such places as Fort Wingate and Gallup, New Mexico, and Phoenix, Tuba CIty, and Window Rock, Arizona. His success in the field is due in no small part to his brilliant young collaborator, Robert W. Young, whom he first contacted in August 1936 and with whom he carried on an extensive correspondence into the mid-1940s. In fact their joint efforts in Navajo were accomplished mainly by mail
Harrington collaborated or corresponded with others, among whom were Ann Nolan Clark, Oliver La Farge, Francis Elmore, Harry Hoijer, William Hill, and Richard Van Valkenburgh. He also contacted various university professors and graduate students, some of whom taught at such programs as those directed by the Summer Institute of Linguistics (Camp Wycliffe) and the University of New Mexico School of American Research
Harrington consulted a wide array of secondary sources and reheard or compared data from them which he later combined with original notes. These include several hundred terms from then-unpublished manuscripts of Edward Sapir, and two of Harry Hoijer's publications--Chiricahua and Mescalero Apache Texts (1938) and "The Southern Athapascan Languages" (1938). He made extensive use of two works published by the Franciscan Fathers, An Ethnological Dictionary of the Navaho Language (1910) and A Vocabulary of the Navaho Language (1912). He turned to W. L. Jepson and Washington Matthews for botanical terms, and to Adrien G. Morice for Carrier comparisons. In a search for precise grammatical terminology, he consulted a score or more of grammars, dictionaries, and publications on language and linguistics in Latin, Greek, Indo-Germanic, and several Arabic languages. Most prominent are Walter A. Ripman's Latin Handbook (1930) and Alan H. Gairdner's publication on Arabic phonetics (1935)
He worked with many Navajo speakers, some of whom were well-educated. Mentioned frequently are Willietto Antonio, Chee Dodge, Howard Gorman, George E. Hood, Hoskie Naswood, Albert Sandoval (also called "Chic"), Charles Keetsie Shirley, and Sam Tilden
Summary:
This set of files contains Harrington's Navajo research. The materials consist of vocabulary, dictionary notes, grammar, rehearings of linguistic data, ethnobotany notes, ethnographic notes, texts, drafts and notes relating to primers, published and unpublished primers, unpublished and published papers, extracts from secondary sources, and miscellaneous notes
The vocabulary section contains terms extracted from Young and Morgan's The Navaho Language, which were reheard principally to obtain Kiowa and Hano (Arizona Tewa) equivalences. Information is occasionally included from Harrington's Apache and Tewa notes. A brief typed vocabulary contains scattered grammatical material. There is also a slipfile of terms based mainly on An Ethnological Dictionary of the Navaho Language. It contains annotations and relevant excerpts from Harrington-Young correspondence. Plant names wIth Young's annotations are based on W. L. Jepson's A Manual of Flowering Plants of California (1925) and Washington Matthews' The Navajo Names for Plants (1886). Of the twenty semantic categories, the sections on animals, animal parts, plants, and placenames are particularly substantial
The dictionary section consists of lexical terms from the Bureau of Indian Affairs' "Navajo Phrase Book," obtained from Willard Beatty and sent by Harrington to Young for rehearings. Navajo entries with Kiowa equivalences were apparently taken from a manuscript for a dictionary by Young. Two miscellaneous groups of entries are in Navajo/English
The material on Navajo grammar is extensive and includes notes, drafts of a manuscript, excerpts from secondary sources, correspondence between Young and Harrington, and slips. The file was for proposed publications ranging from introductory manuals to the structuring of a comprehensive Navajo grammar
A further substantial body of grammatical material is found on large slips. These include information from Young's voluminous correspondence, not otherwise interfiled. Part of this section is a further rehearing by Young of Morice's The Carrier Language. Another group of notes records comparisons with several southern Athapascan languages, evidently based on Young's notes, vocabulary items, correspondence, and other undocumented material. Harrington also used the slipfile format to index questions which he had earlier sent to Young
Most of the rehearings of lingustic data are of Edward Sapir's linguistic terms by Young in 1940 and 1941. Though the copied materials may be similar in content, they do not appear to be exact duplicates of the Sapir linguistic holdings at the American Philosophical Society. Young also reheard terms from Hoijer's Chiricahua and Mescalero Apache Texts late in 1940. George E. Hood commented on Hoijer's "The Southern Athapascan Languages," possibly at about the same time. There are typed excerpts from Young's May 1938 letters regarding Morice's The Carrier Language and miscellaneous linguistic information given by Hood and reheard by Richard Long. Other miscellaneous rehearings are with Alfred Sanchez (abbreviated"Alf." or "Alfredo"), Willietto Antonio, George Hood, and Robert Young (September 1939); and with Howard Gorman, Albert Sandoval, and John Charles (1939). There is also a rehearing with Henry Tsosie of terms from Gladys A. Reichard and Adolph Dodge Bittany's Agentive and Causative Elements in Navaho (1940), including some excerpts from the book. Finally, in February 1941, he reheard the vocabulary of Pedro Bautista Pino with Howard Gorman; Young did not consider these terms to be Navajo
The files also contains Harrington's notes on Navajo names for plants, gathered from secondary sources and possibly original data from colleagues or friends. Young also annotated some of the notes
Harrington's ethnographic files includes notes, vocabulary, and illustrations on the structure of dwelling places as well as some information on the mythic origins of the Navajo. Many of the illustrations are by Charles Keetsie Shirley. On the same subject is a set of cards in Young's hand which was sent to Harrington at Fort Wingate in August 1939. At Harrington's request, Young also translated what appears to be a lesson on hogans, possibly a section of a proposed text for instructional purposes. A group of Chaco Canyon placenames were given by Ed Henry in June 1939; several others were extracted from various secondary sources. Other ethnographic subjects briefly covered are the Hoop and Pole game, a social and economic survey questionnaire, White Hat's funeral (1939), the Lord's Prayer as recorded by Berard Haile, and notes on Sandoval's sound recordings. Malcolm Farmer supplied nonlinguistic information and there is a small set of highly miscellaneous ethnographic and historical notes
The text section contains billingual texts that Young collected and sent to Harrington in 1936. They were written with interlinear translations and followed by a precis in English. Titles include: "Deer and Coyote," "Where the People Came Out," "A Wedding Ceremonial," and "The Woman Who Changed into a Bear." A recording session on October 31, 1949, with Dick Left, Richard Long, and Harry (not further identified) provided Navajo songs, ceremonies, and legends. Harrington's notes supply the identity of the discs and peripheral information such as the gestures accompanying the songs. Some linguistic annotations are interspersed. The discs described in the notes have not been located
Notes, drafts, and mockups from Harrington and Young's work creating Navajo primers are also present. During the course of their work together from 1937 to 1939, Harrington and Young prepared drafts for two primers, "Little Bear Primer" and "Spotted Dog Primer," a pre-primer (probably the so called "Doda Primer"), and a playbook or cut-out book. Despite an assurance that at least both of the major works were to be printed, neither of the primers were ever published. He and Young also served as translators for a set of four primers in the "Little Herder" series, and Harrington was also credited with developing the "Harrington-La Farge phonetic system" utilized in the three-volume set entitled Little Man's Family. Harrington and Young also helped translate Ann Nolan Clark's "Who Wants To Be a Prairie Dog?"
Other materials related to Harrington's writing include notes for his "Southern Peripheral Athapaskawan Origins, Divisions, and Migrations" and preliminary drafts and notes for the Navajo portion of "Earliest Navaho and Quechua" (1944) coauthored by Robert W. Young. There are also notes and drafts for his unpublished writings, among which include "Navaho Mouthmap," "The Indian Dog Comes into His Own,"and "What Light Can Navajo Throw on Indogermanic Reconstruction?"
Among his miscellaneous notes is a comparison of Navajo with other Indian languages. There are brief notes on trips made in 1940, a list of the names of non-Indians, miscellaneous correspondence, and notes which are neither linguistic nor ethnographic
Because of their long-term collaboration, Young's notes are inextricably intermixed with those of Harrington. Although some are labeled "Y," Young's unlabeled contributions can be identified through his handwriting and printing, and even with his style. Other hand-copied material is the work of B.A.E. assistant, Arvilla Johnson. Harrington's daughter Awona produced many of the copies in eighteen-point type
Cite as:
Southwest: Navajo, John Peabody Harrington papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
John Peabody Harrington papers: Southwest, 1907-1957
John Peabody Harrington papers: Navaho
Data Source:
National Anthropological Archives
Visitor Tag(s):

Additional Online Media:

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