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Modern Comics No. 46

view Modern Comics No. 46 digital asset number 1
Maker:
Quality Comics
Physical Description:
paper (overall material)
Measurements:
overall: 7 1/2 in x 10 1/4 in; 19.05 cm x 26.035 cm
Object Name:
comic book
Date made:
1946
Description:
Modern Comics No. 46 was published by Quality Comics in February 1946. The cover art by Al Bryant features the military characters of Blackhawk and his Soldiers of Fortune reading a map of the world. This issue features the Blackhawks in "The Liberation of Sai Fan;" Choo Choo in "Busy Day for Choo Choo;" Death Patrol in "The Five Bat Boys;" Private Dogtag in "Civil Warrior;" Ezra in "The Dog Washer;" and P.T. Boat in "The Steel Fortress of Mauvino Island."
Modern Comics was a continuation of Military Comics, which was renamed after issue number 43 in October 1945 following the end of World War II. Each issue of Modern Comics featured a story about the Blackhawk Squadron and several other tales of action and adventure. The Squadron was led by the Polish pilot Blackhawk, who battled the Nazi army that killed his brother and sister. The rest of the squadron was a motley crew of international military men with specialized skills to help defeat the Axis powers.
Subject:
Comics
Comic Books
Popular Entertainment
Event:
World War II
Credit Line:
Gift of Olivia V. Crisson and Phillip M.S. Crisson in honor of Peter Bozzer
ID Number:
2013.0086.084
Catalog number:
2013.0086.084
Accession number:
2013.0086
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Culture and the Arts: Entertainment
Comic Books
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center

Modern Comics No. 48

view <i>Modern Comics</i> No. 48 digital asset number 1
Maker:
Quality Comics
Physical Description:
paper (overall material)
Measurements:
overall: 7 1/2 in x 10 1/4 in; 19.05 cm x 26.035 cm
Object Name:
comic book
Date made:
1946
Description:
Modern Comics No. 48 was published by Quality Comics in April 1946. The cover art by Al Bryant features the pilot Blackhawk firing a gun out of his cockpit, with his sidekick Chop-Chop next to him. This issue included the Blackhawk story “The Pirates of Peroo," as well as Choo Choo in "The Masquerade Messup," the Death Patrol in "The Runaway Iceberg," Private Dogtag in "The Rescue of Chief Standing Goat," Will Bragg in "Fishin' Fools," and Ezra in "The Adolescent Psychologist."
Modern Comics was a continuation of Military Comics, which was renamed after issue number 43 in October 1945 following the end of World War II. Each issue of Modern Comics featured a story about the Blackhawk Squadron and several other tales of action and adventure. The Squadron was led by the Polish pilot Blackhawk, who battled the Nazi army that killed his brother and sister. The rest of the squadron was a motley crew of international military men with specialized skills to help defeat the Axis powers.
Subject:
Comics
Comic Books
Popular Entertainment
Event:
World War II
Credit Line:
Gift of Olivia V. Crisson and Phillip M.S. Crisson in honor of Peter Bozzer
ID Number:
2013.0086.085
Catalog number:
2013.0086.085
Accession number:
2013.0086
See more items in:
Culture and the Arts: Entertainment
Comic Books
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center

Police Comics No. 15

view <i>Police Comics</i> No. 15 digital asset number 1
Maker:
Quality Comics
Physical Description:
paper (overall material)
Measurements:
overall: 7 1/2 in x 10 1/4 in; 19.05 cm x 26.035 cm
Object Name:
comic book
Date made:
1943
Description:
Police Comics No. 15 was published by Quality Comics in January 1943. The green cover has art credited to Gill Fox, with an image of the superhero Plastic Man as well as the Spirit, located in the lower left. This issue features Plastic Man in "The Weather Weapon," Manhunter in "The Slaughter Symphony," and the Spirit in "Mr. Midnight." Other stories feature the characters of Chic Carter, Dewey Drip, Dick Mace, 711, Super Snooper, and the Phantom Lady. This issue saw the death of 711, who was replaced in the next issue by a character named Destiny.
Police Comics was an anthology comic that featured the exploits of Plastic Man, Phantom Lady, The Spirit, Mouthpiece, Human Bomb, Firebrand, 711, and Manhunter in 127 issues published between August 1941 and October 1953. In issue 103, the book shifted from superhero tales to realistic detective stories of “suspense, mystery, and adventure” that featured Private Eye Ken Shannon and Treasury Department agent Pete Trask.
Subject:
Comics
Comic Books
Popular Entertainment
Event:
World War II
Credit Line:
Gift of Olivia V. Crisson and Phillip M.S. Crisson in honor of Peter Bozzer
ID Number:
2013.0086.086
Catalog number:
2013.0086.086
Accession number:
2013.0086
See more items in:
Culture and the Arts: Entertainment
Comic Books
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center

Police Comics No. 16

view <i>Police Comics</i> No. 16 digital asset number 1
Maker:
Quality Comics
Physical Description:
paper (overall material)
Measurements:
overall: 7 1/2 in x 10 1/4 in; 19.05 cm x 26.035 cm
Object Name:
comic book
Date made:
1943
Description:
Police Comics No. 16 was published by Quality Comics in February 1943. Gill Fox illustrated the cover that depicts Plastic Man capturing criminals by encircling them with his extendable arm. On the left side of the cover is The Spirit who says “I’m The Spirit! And Ebony and I are certainly a circus in this issue!” This issue features stories that included Plastic Man in "The Revenge of Chief Great Warrior;" Manhunter in "Wanted: Thor, Manhunter's Dog, Dead or Alive" and The Spirit in "Palyachi the Killer Clown."
Police Comics was an anthology comic that featured the exploits of Plastic Man, Phantom Lady, The Spirit, Mouthpiece, Human Bomb, Firebrand, 711, and Manhunter in 127 issues published between August 1941 and October 1953. In issue 103, the book shifted from superhero tales to realistic detective stories of “suspense, mystery, and adventure” that featured Private Eye Ken Shannon and Treasury Department agent Pete Trask.
Subject:
Comics
Comic Books
Popular Entertainment
Event:
World War II
Credit Line:
Gift of Olivia V. Crisson and Phillip M.S. Crisson in honor of Peter Bozzer
ID Number:
2013.0086.087
Catalog number:
2013.0086.087
Accession number:
2013.0086
See more items in:
Culture and the Arts: Entertainment
Comic Books
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center

Police Comics No. 17

view <i>Police Comics</i> No. 17 digital asset number 1
Maker:
Quality Comics
Physical Description:
paper (overall material)
Measurements:
overall: 7 1/2 in x 10 1/4 in; 19.05 cm x 26.035 cm
Object Name:
comic book
Date made:
1943
Description:
Police Comics No. 17 was published by Quality Comics in March 1943. Gill Fox illustrated the cover that depicts Plastic Man pushing a peace pipe into a Native American’s mouth. The cover also has an inset image of The Spirit saying “Hey, Fellows..Don’t Forget I’m The Spirit!” This issue features stories including Plastic Man in "Murder in Maniac Mansion," Manhunter in "Red Haired Kate," and the Spirit in "The Orphans."
Police Comics was an anthology comic that featured the exploits of Plastic Man, Phantom Lady, The Spirit, Mouthpiece, Human Bomb, Firebrand, 711, and Manhunter in 127 issues published between August 1941 and October 1953. In issue 103, the book shifted from superhero tales to realistic detective stories of “suspense, mystery, and adventure” that featured Private Eye Ken Shannon and Treasury Department agent Pete Trask.
Subject:
Comics
Comic Books
Popular Entertainment
Event:
World War II
Credit Line:
Gift of Olivia V. Crisson and Phillip M.S. Crisson in honor of Peter Bozzer
ID Number:
2013.0086.088
Catalog number:
2013.0086.088
Accession number:
2013.0086
See more items in:
Culture and the Arts: Entertainment
Comic Books
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center

Police Comics No. 22

view <i>Police Comics</i> No. 22 digital asset number 1
Maker:
Quality Comics
Physical Description:
paper (overall material)
Measurements:
overall: 7 1/2 in x 10 1/4 in; 19.05 cm x 26.035 cm
Object Name:
comic book
Date made:
1943
Description:
Police Comics No. 22 was published by Quality Comics in September 1943. Jack Cole illustrated the cover that depicts Plastic Man disarming a bad guy located behind him with a double-fisted head punch. The cover has an inset image of The Spirit. This issue features Plastic Man in "The Eyes Have It!" Manhunter in "Dr. Sackville," and The Spirit in "The Morger Boys." Other stories featured the characters Dewey Drip, Flatfoot Burns, The Human Bomb, Dick Mace, Burp The Twerp, Destiny, Super Snooper and Phantom Lady.
Police Comics was an anthology comic that featured the exploits of Plastic Man, Phantom Lady, The Spirit, Mouthpiece, Human Bomb, Firebrand, 711, and Manhunter in 127 issues published between August 1941 and October 1953. In issue 103, the book shifted from superhero tales to realistic detective stories of “suspense, mystery, and adventure” that featured Private Eye Ken Shannon and Treasury Department agent Pete Trask.
Subject:
Comics
Comic Books
Popular Entertainment
Event:
World War II
Credit Line:
Gift of Olivia V. Crisson and Phillip M.S. Crisson in honor of Peter Bozzer
ID Number:
2013.0086.089
Catalog number:
2013.0086.089
Accession number:
2013.0086
See more items in:
Culture and the Arts: Entertainment
Comic Books
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center

Police Comics No. 21

view <i>Police Comics</i> No. 21 digital asset number 1
Maker:
Quality Comics
Physical Description:
paper (overall material)
Measurements:
overall: 7 1/2 in x 10 1/4 in; 19.05 cm x 26.035 cm
Object Name:
comic book
Date made:
1943
Description:
Quality Comics published issue No. 21 of Police Comics in August 1943. Jack Cole illustrated the cover that depicts a knife protruding towards Plastic Man from a hole in the door while Plastic Man attempts to turn the knob. Behind Plastic Man is the Spirit saying “Look out, Plastic Man!” while Plastic Man replies “Quiet Spirit! You want ‘em to know we’re here?” This issue contained stories that featured Plastic Man in the "The Menace of Serpina," Manhunter in "The Blue Room of Blandings Castle," and Phantom Lady in "Phantom Lady Vs. the Spider Widow." Other stories featured The Spirit, Burp the Twerp, Destiny, Dick Mace, Super Snooper, and The Human Bomb.
Police Comics was an anthology comic that featured the exploits of Plastic Man, Phantom Lady, The Spirit, Mouthpiece, Human Bomb, Firebrand, 711, and Manhunter in 127 issues published between August 1941 and October 1953. In issue 103, the book shifted from superhero tales to realistic detective stories of “suspense, mystery, and adventure” that featured Private Eye Ken Shannon and Treasury Department agent Pete Trask.
Subject:
Comics
Comic Books
Popular Entertainment
Event:
World War II
Credit Line:
Gift of Olivia V. Crisson and Phillip M.S. Crisson in honor of Peter Bozzer
ID Number:
2013.0086.105
Catalog number:
2013.0086.105
Accession number:
2013.0086
See more items in:
Culture and the Arts: Entertainment
Comic Books
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center

Military Comics No. 33

view <i>Military Comics</i> No. 33 digital asset number 1
Maker:
Quality Comics
Physical Description:
paper (overall material)
Measurements:
overall: 7 1/2 in x 10 1/4 in; 19.05 cm x 26.035 cm
Object Name:
comic book
Date made:
1944
Description:
Military Comics No. 33 was published by Quality Comics in October 1944. The cover art by Al Bryant depicts Blackhawk leading the Blackhawk Squadron, as well as Chop-Chop, into battle. This issue features the Blackhawks in “Let the Band Play Dixie,” the Sniper in “The Opium Gambit,” Private Dogtag in “If Wishes were Horses,” the short story “The Cow of China,” P.T. Boat in the “Lord of Longley,” and the Secret War News comic “Flying Commandoes Smash Jap Armies.”
Military Comics told “stories of the Army and Navy” and introduced the Blackhawk Squadron in issue No. 1 in August 1941. The Squadron was led by the Polish pilot Blackhawk, who battled the Nazi army that killed his brother and sister. The rest of the squadron was a motley crew of international military men with specialized skills to help defeat the Axis powers. World War II inspired many stories of patriotic heroes and Axis villains in American comic books that often encouraged supporting the war effort on its covers and throughout its pages. Military Comics was later renamed Modern Comics after issue number 43 in October 1945 following the end of World War II.
Subject:
Comics
Comic Books
Popular Entertainment
Event:
World War II
Credit Line:
Gift of Olivia V. Crisson and Phillip M.S. Crisson in honor of Peter Bozzer
ID Number:
2013.0086.083
Catalog number:
2013.0086.083
Accession number:
2013.0086
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Culture and the Arts: Entertainment
Comic Books
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center

Leading Comics No. 3

view <i>Leading Comics</i> No. 3 digital asset number 1
Maker:
D. C. Comics, Inc.
Physical Description:
paper (overall material)
Measurements:
overall: 7 1/2 in x 10 1/4 in; 19.05 cm x 26.035 cm
Object Name:
comic book
Date made:
1942
Description:
Leading Comics No. 3 was published by DC Comics in the summer of 1942 and sold for ten cents. The cover art by Mort Meskin features a lighthouse whose beams illuminate inset portraits of superheroes. Clockwise from the top, the heroes are Vigilante, Green Arrow and Speedy, The Crimson Avenger, Shining Knight, and Star-Spangled Kid and Stripesy. These heroes formed a team, the Seven Soldiers of Victory, which notably included two sidekicks—Green Arrow’s Speedy and the Star-Spangled Kid’s Stripesy.
This issue of Leading Comics introduced the antagonist Dr. Doome (not to be confused with Marvel’s more popular Dr. Victor von Doom) who invented a time machine to bring history’s greatest conquerors —Alexander the Great, Nero, Genghis Khan, Attila the Hun, and Napoleon Bonaparte—to the present. In each chapter of the issue, a hero defeats a villain. The Star-Spangled Kid and Stripesy take out Napoleon, Green Arrow and Speedy deal with Alexander the Great, Shining Knight defeats Genghis Khan, Vigilante deals with Attila the Hun, and Crimson Avenger stops Nero, before they all team up together to vanquish Dr. Doome.
Subject:
Comics
Comic Books
Popular Entertainment
Credit Line:
Gift of Olivia V. Crisson and Phillip M.S. Crisson in honor of Peter Bozzer
ID Number:
2013.0086.081
Catalog number:
2013.0086.081
Accession number:
2013.0086
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Culture and the Arts: Entertainment
Comic Books
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center

Leading Comics No.4

view <i>Leading Comics</i> No.4 digital asset number 1
Maker:
D. C. Comics, Inc.
Physical Description:
paper (overall material)
Measurements:
overall: 7 1/2 in x 10 1/4 in; 19.05 cm x 26.035 cm
Object Name:
comic book
Date made:
1942
Description:
Leading Comics No. 4 was published by DC Comics in the fall of 1942 and sold for ten cents. The cover art by Mort Meskin features the Seven Soldiers of Victory— the Star-Spangled Kid and Stripsey, The Crimson Avenger, Green Arrow and Speedy, The Vigilante and the Shining Knight—attacking a gigantic green head (The Sixth Sense) in a bell jar. In this issue each member of the Seven Soldiers of Victory defeated a prospective jewel thief before coming together to vanquish the Sixth Sense.
Like many “team titles” of the period, issues of Leading Comics featured a hero and his sidekick defeating a minor villain in an individual chapter before teaming up and defeating the “big bad” together in the end.
Subject:
Comics
Comic Books
Popular Entertainment
Credit Line:
Gift of Olivia V. Crisson and Phillip M.S. Crisson in honor of Peter Bozzer
ID Number:
2013.0086.082
Catalog number:
2013.0086.082
Accession number:
2013.0086
See more items in:
Culture and the Arts: Entertainment
Comic Books
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center

Detective Comics No. 101

view <i>Detective Comics No. 101</i> digital asset number 1
Maker:
D. C. Comics, Inc.
Physical Description:
paper (overall material)
Measurements:
overall: 7 1/2 in x 10 1/4 in; 19.05 cm x 26.035 cm
Object Name:
comic book
Place made:
United States: New York, New York
Date made:
1945
Description:
Detective Comics No. 101 was published by DC Comics in July 1945 and sold for ten cents. Dick Sprang illustrated the yellow cover that features Batman and Robin in the foreground, with a criminal telling Alfred “Okay, Alfred, y’tracked me down! I’ll confess—I did it!” Alfred responds, “Did what old boy?!? I only wanted to urge you to back the 7th War Loan!” World War II era comics frequently promoted supporting the war effort and often contained stories of patriotic heroes while casting the Axis powers as enemies. In this issue of Detective Comics Batman stars in “The Tyrannical Twins,” Slam Bradley in the story “Shoplifter’s Holiday,” Air Wave in “A Talking Doll,” and the Boy Commandos in “Gangway, Tokyo.”
Detective Comics was an anthology comic featuring stories about characters including Batman, Robin, Slam Bradley, the Boy Commandos, Air Wave, Martian Manhunter, and Roy Raymond TV Detective. Batman was introduced in Detective Comics No. 27, and continued to star in the series even after receiving his own title.
Subject:
Batman
Comics
Comic Books
Popular Entertainment
Credit Line:
Gift of Olivia V. Crisson and Phillip M.S. Crisson in honor of Peter Bozzer
ID Number:
2013.0086.072
Catalog number:
2013.0086.072
Accession number:
2013.0086
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Culture and the Arts: Entertainment
Comic Books
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center

Detective Comics No. 96

view <i>Detective Comics No. 96</i> digital asset number 1
Maker:
D. C. Comics, Inc.
Physical Description:
paper (overall material)
Measurements:
overall: 7 1/2 in x 10 1/4 in; 19.05 cm x 26.035 cm
Object Name:
comic book
Place made:
United States: New York, New York
Date made:
1945
Description:
Detective Comics No. 96 was published by DC Comics in February 1945 and sold for ten cents. The yellow cover is credited to Jack Burnley and George Roussos and features an image of Batman jumping from a train and attacking criminals on a push cart while Robin rides on the front of the railroad engine. This issue features a Batman story titled “Alfred, Private Detective,” Slam Bradley in “Bargains in Burglary,” Air Wave in “Crime Goes into Mourning,” and the Boy Commandos in “The Sinister League.”
Detective Comics was an anthology comic, featuring stories about characters including Batman, Robin, Slam Bradley, the Boy Commandos, Air Wave, Martian Manhunter, and Roy Raymond TV Detective. Batman was introduced in Detective Comics No. 27, and continued to star in the series even as he got his own title.
Subject:
Batman
Comics
Comic Books
Popular Entertainment
Credit Line:
Gift of Olivia V. Crisson and Phillip M.S. Crisson in honor of Peter Bozzer
ID Number:
2013.0086.071
Catalog number:
2013.0086.071
Accession number:
2013.0086
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Culture and the Arts: Entertainment
Comic Books
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center

Detective Comics No. 102

view <i>Detective Comics</i> No. 102 digital asset number 1
Maker:
D. C. Comics, Inc.
Physical Description:
paper (overall material)
Measurements:
overall: 7 1/2 in x 10 1/4 in; 19.05 cm x 26.035 cm
Object Name:
comic book
Place made:
United States: New York, New York
Date made:
1945
Description:
Detective Comics No. 101 was published by DC Comics in August 1945 and sold for ten cents. Dick Sprang illustrated the yellow cover that depicts the Joker carrying a house on his back while he flees from a pursuing Batman and Robin. The cover features the caption “Batman and Robin face their fiercest foe the Joker in the adventure of ‘The House that was Held for Ransom.’” This issue also features the Slam Bradley story “Smash Your Baggage,” The Boy Commandos in “The Floating Evil,” and Air Wave in “Of Mice and Muggs.”
Detective Comics was an anthology comic featuring stories about characters including Batman, Robin, Slam Bradley, the Boy Commandos, Air Wave, Martian Manhunter, and Roy Raymond TV Detective. Batman was introduced in Detective Comics No. 27, and continued to star in the series even after receiving his own title.
Subject:
Batman
Comics
Comic Books
Popular Entertainment
Credit Line:
Gift of Olivia V. Crisson and Phillip M.S. Crisson in honor of Peter Bozzer
ID Number:
2013.0086.073
Catalog number:
2013.0086.073
Accession number:
2013.0086
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Culture and the Arts: Entertainment
Comic Books
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center

Detective Comics No. 108

view <i>Detective Comics</i> No. 108 digital asset number 1
Maker:
D. C. Comics, Inc.
Physical Description:
paper (overall material)
Measurements:
overall: 7 1/2 in x 10 1/4 in; 19.05 cm x 26.035 cm
Object Name:
comic book
Place made:
United States: New York, New York
Date made:
1945
Description:
Detective Comics No. 108 was published by DC Comics in February 1946 and sold for ten cents. George Russos illustrated the black cover that depicts the Batplane flying through the bat signal, with Batman and Robin in the foreground. The cover’s caption reads: “In this issue Batman and Robin trail Sky-Bandits in the jet-propelled Batplane!” This issue features Batman and Robin in the “The Goat of Gotham City,” Slam Bradley in “How High is Up?” Air Wave in “Second Childhood?” and the Boy Commandos in “The Miracle of Hoo-Dun-Dat.”
Detective Comics was an anthology comic featuring stories about characters including Batman, Robin, Slam Bradley, the Boy Commandos, Air Wave, Martian Manhunter, and Roy Raymond TV Detective. Batman was introduced in Detective Comics No. 27, and continued to star in the series even after receiving his own title.
Subject:
Batman
Comics
Comic Books
Popular Entertainment
Credit Line:
Gift of Olivia V. Crisson and Phillip M.S. Crisson in honor of Peter Bozzer
ID Number:
2013.0086.074
Catalog number:
2013.0086.074
Accession number:
2013.0086
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Culture and the Arts: Entertainment
Comic Books
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center

Comic Book, "Action Comics"

view Comic Book, "Action Comics" digital asset number 1
Publisher:
Action Comics
Author:
Siegel, Jerry
Artist:
Shuster, Joe
Maker:
Siegel, Jerry
Shuster, Joe
Action Comics
Physical Description:
paper (overall material)
ink (overall material)
Measurements:
overall: 10 in x 6 1/2 in; 25.4 cm x 16.51 cm
Object Name:
book, comic
comic book
Place Made:
United States: New York, New York
Date made:
1940
Date made:
1939
Description (Brief):
This is an "Action Comics" Comic Book featuring Superman.
Superman’s June 1938 appearance in Action Comics No. 1 gave birth to the superhero genre. Superman used his extraordinary powers to fight for “truth and justice.” The character’s popularity led to the creation of other costumed crime fighters such as Batman and Captain Marvel.
Location:
Currently not on view
Subject:
Superman
Comics
Expositions and Fairs
1939 exhibit
Popular Entertainment
Art
Event:
New York World's Fair (1939)
ID Number:
1988.3095.33
Catalog number:
1988.3095.33
.33
Nonaccession number:
1988.3095
See more items in:
Culture and the Arts: Entertainment
1939 exhibit
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center

More Fun Comics No. 81

view <i>More Fun Comics</i> No. 81 digital asset number 1
Maker:
D. C. Comics, Inc.
Physical Description:
paper (overall material)
Measurements:
overall: 7 1/2 in x 10 1/4 in; 19.05 cm x 26.035 cm
Object Name:
comic book
Place made:
United States: New York, New York
Date made:
1942
Description:
More Fun Comics No. 81 was published by DC Comics in July 1942 and sold for 10 cents per copy. George Papp illustrated the cover, which depicts Green Arrow and Speedy dodging bullets fired by pursuing gangsters. The cover inset features Superman with two soldiers and reads “Superman Says: Buy Defense Stamps! Help National Defense!” World War II era comics frequently promoted supporting the war effort by telling stories of patriotic heroes fighting real world Axis enemies. This issue features Green Arrow in "Adventures of the Bankrupt Heroes," Doctor Fate in "Hall of Lost Heirs," Radio Squad in "Strange Accidents," Aquaman in "Champ of the Waves," Johnny Quick in "Code for Conspirators," and the Spectre in "Case of the Scholarly Spendthrift."
This anthology comic series was published as New Fun in February 1935, More Fun in January 1936, and More Fun Comics from March 1936 until November 1947. In issue no. 108 of More Fun Comics the series phased out superheroes in order to switch to an all-humor format.
Subject:
Comics
Comic Books
Popular Entertainment
Credit Line:
Gift of Olivia V. Crisson and Phillip M.S. Crisson in honor of Peter Bozzer
ID Number:
2013.0086.076
Catalog number:
2013.0086.076
Accession number:
2013.0086
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Culture and the Arts: Entertainment
Comic Books
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center

More Fun Comics No. 82

view <i>More Fun Comics</i> No. 82 digital asset number 1
Maker:
D. C. Comics, Inc.
Physical Description:
paper (overall material)
Measurements:
overall: 7 1/2 in x 10 1/4 in; 19.05 cm x 26.035 cm
Object Name:
comic book
Place made:
United States: New York, New York
Date made:
1942
Description:
DC Comics published issue No. 82 of More Fun Comics in August 1942. George Papp illustrated the cover that depicts Green Arrow and Speedy battling a gangster with a tommy gun. Green Arrow has disarmed the tommy gun by shooting three arrows into the barrel. This issue’s stories featured Green Arrow in "Robin Hood's Revenge," Doctor Fate in "Luck for Sale," Radio Squad in "Puzzle of the Devil Deaths," and Aquaman in "King of Convict Island.' Other stories feature Clancy the Cop, Johnny Quick, and the Spectre.
The More Fun Comics anthology comic series began as New Fun in February 1935, changed to More Fun in January 1936, before becoming More Fun Comics from March 1936 until November 1947. Superheroes were phased out of More Fun Comics in issue no. 108 as the series switched to an all-humor format.
Subject:
Comics
Comic Books
Popular Entertainment
Credit Line:
Gift of Olivia V. Crisson and Phillip M.S. Crisson in honor of Peter Bozzer
ID Number:
2013.0086.107
Catalog number:
2013.0086.107
Accession number:
2013.0086
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Culture and the Arts: Entertainment
Comic Books
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center

More Fun Comics No. 83

view <i>More Fun Comics</i> No. 83 digital asset number 1
Maker:
D. C. Comics, Inc.
Physical Description:
paper (overall material)
Measurements:
overall: 7 1/2 in x 10 1/4 in; 19.05 cm x 26.035 cm
Object Name:
comic book
Place made:
United States: New York, New York
Date made:
1942
Description:
More Fun Comics No. 83 was published by DC Comics in September 1942 and sold for 10 cents per copy. George Papp illustrated the cover, which depicts Green Arrow and Speedy battling a giant octopus underwater. The cover inset features an American flag along with the text “Keep it Flying!” This issue features Green Arrow in "The Five Arrows," Doctor Fate in "The Two Fates," Radio Squad in "The Case of the Talking Ghost," Aquaman in "Thomas Jefferson's Treasure," Johnny Quick in "Mercury Messenger Service," and the Spectre in "Leatherpusher Law."
This anthology comic series was published as New Fun in February 1935, More Fun in January 1936, and More Fun Comics from March 1936 until November 1947. In issue no. 108 of More Fun Comics the series phased out superheroes in order to switch to an all-humor format.
Subject:
Comics
Comic Books
Popular Entertainment
Credit Line:
Gift of Olivia V. Crisson and Phillip M.S. Crisson in honor of Peter Bozzer
ID Number:
2013.0086.077
Catalog number:
2013.0086.077
Accession number:
2013.0086
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Culture and the Arts: Entertainment
Comic Books
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center

All-Star Comics No. 18

view <i>All-Star Comics</i> No. 18 digital asset number 1
Maker:
D. C. Comics, Inc.
Physical Description:
paper (overall material)
Measurements:
overall: 7 1/2 in x 10 in; 19.05 cm x 25.4 cm
Object Name:
comic book
Date made:
1943
Description:
All-Star Comics No. 18 was published by DC Comics in the fall of 1943. The cover features members of the "Justice Society of America," including Wonder Woman, Hawkman, Hourman, Dr. Mid-Nite, Atom, Johnny Thunder, Spectre, Starman, and Sandman.
The story of No. 18 is "Insects turn to Crime!" which featured a master criminal named the King Bee who created a race of men-insects.
Introduced in All-Star Comics No. 3, The Justice Society of America was the first team of superheroes to be featured in comic books. The group was popular in the 1940s, and after their prominence faded a decade later several group members were reinvented and brought together again as the Justice League of America. Several Justice Society of America members went on to have their own titles, such as the Flash, the Green Lantern and Wonder Woman.
Location:
Currently not on view
Subject:
Comic Books
Comics
Popular Entertainment
Credit Line:
Gift of Olivia V. Crisson and Phillip M.S. Crisson in honor of Peter Bozzer
ID Number:
2013.0086.001
Catalog number:
2013.0086.001
Accession number:
2013.0086
See more items in:
Culture and the Arts: Entertainment
Comic Books
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center

All-Star Comics No. 19

view <i>All-Star Comics</i> No. 19 digital asset number 1
Maker:
D. C. Comics, Inc.
Physical Description:
paper (overall material)
Measurements:
overall: 7 1/2 in x 10 in; 19.05 cm x 25.4 cm
Object Name:
comic book
Date made:
1943
Description:
All Star Comics No. 19 was published by DC Comics in the winter of 1943. The “Crimes Set to Music” cover features the superhero Wonder Woman playing the piano while other members of the "Justice Society of America," including Johnny Thunder, Hourman, Dr. Midnite, The Spectre, The Atom, Dr. Fate, Starman, and a silhouette of Hawkman, gather around.
The “Crimes Set to Music” issue saw the Justice Society team up to track down a kidnapped Hawkman, with each member saving a musician in the process. The team frees Hawkman from his captor, a failed composer intending to kill his more successfull peers.
Introduced in All-Star Comics No. 3, The Justice Society of America was the first team of superheroes to be featured in comic books. The group was popular in the 1940s, and after their prominence faded a decade later several group members were reinvented and brought together again as the Justice League of America. Several Justice Society of America members went on to have their own titles, such as the Flash, the Green Lantern and Wonder Woman.
Location:
Currently not on view
Subject:
Comic Books
Comics
Popular Entertainment
Credit Line:
Gift of Olivia V. Crisson and Phillip M.S. Crisson in honor of Peter Bozzer
ID Number:
2013.0086.002
Catalog number:
2013.0086.002
Accession number:
2013.0086
See more items in:
Culture and the Arts: Entertainment
Comic Books
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center

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