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Portrait (Front) of Woman in Partial Native Dress 1901

view Portrait (Front) of Woman in Partial Native Dress 1901 digital asset number 1
Physical description:
1 photograph 008 in x 010 in
Culture:
Cathlamet
Indians of North America Northwest Coast of North America
Chinook Indians
Type:
Photographs
Date:
1901
Cite as:
BAE GN 03074A 06503400, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Local number:
NAA INV 06503400
OPPS NEG 03074 A
See more items in:
Glass Negatives of Indians (Collected by the Bureau of American Ethnology) 1850s-1930s
Data Source:
National Anthropological Archives

Portrait (Profile) of Woman in Partial Native Dress 1901

view Portrait (Profile) of Woman in Partial Native Dress 1901 digital asset number 1
Physical description:
1 photograph 008 in x 010 in
Culture:
Cathlamet
Indians of North America Northwest Coast of North America
Chinook Indians
Type:
Photographs
Date:
1901
Cite as:
BAE GN 03074B 06503500, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Local number:
NAA INV 06503500
OPPS NEG 03074 B
See more items in:
Glass Negatives of Indians (Collected by the Bureau of American Ethnology) 1850s-1930s
Data Source:
National Anthropological Archives

Concordance of the Athapascan languages; Chipwyan, Tacully, Klaskani, Willopah [Kwalhioqua ?], Upper Umpqua, Tootooten, Applegate Creek, Hopah, Haynarger

view Concordance of the Athapascan languages; Chipwyan, Tacully, Klaskani, Willopah [Kwalhioqua ?], Upper Umpqua, Tootooten, Applegate Creek, Hopah, Haynarger digital asset number 1
Creator:
Anderson, A.C
Physical description:
20 pages
Culture:
Athapascan Indians
Athapaskan
Arctic peoples
Indians of North America Subarctic
Chipewyan Indians
Montagnais Indians
Kwalhioqua
Clatskanie
Applegate Creek
Tututni Indians
Umpqua Indians
Hupa Indians
Indians of North America Northwest Coast of North America
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Notes:
Place and date of record not on manuscript; recorded at Cathlamet, Washington Territory, February 24, 1858, according to Pilling, Bureau of American Ethnology Bulletin 14.
Summary:
Consists of Comparative vocabulary, 4 double leaves; Appendix, 8 pages.
Cite as:
Manuscript 123, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Topic:
Chipewyan language
Hupa language
Athapascan languages
Language and languages--Documentation
Local number:
NAA MS 123
See more items in:
Numbered manuscripts 1850s-1980s (some earlier)
Data Source:
National Anthropological Archives

John Peabody Harrington papers: Quinault/Chehalis/Cowlitz/Yakima/Chinook/Chinook Jargon, 1942-1943

view John Peabody Harrington papers: Quinault/Chehalis/Cowlitz/Yakima/Chinook/Chinook Jargon, 1942-1943 digital asset number 1
Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody 1884-1961
Physical description:
1.66 linear feet (4 boxes)
Culture:
Indians of North America Northwest Coast of North America
Quinault Indians
Chehalis Indians
Cowlitz Indians
Yakama Indians
Chinook Indians
Type:
Field notes
Vocabulary
Manuscripts
Narratives
Place:
Washington (State), Western
Oregon
Date:
1942
1942-1943
Notes:
John P. Harrington conducted fieldwork in western Washington and northwestern Oregon from January to April 1942. In a report for that period Harrington explained the rationale behind his work on at least some of the many languages: "By studying the Salish much can be learned about the now extinct neighbors and predecessors of Athapascan tongue."
Harrington worked primarily with Emma Millet Stills Luscier (also spelled Lussier, and abbreviated Emma or Em.). She was the original source for most of the linguistic data and she reheard and commented on published and manuscript vocabularies or on the information given by other individuals. Other linguistic sources included Joe Peter, Minnie Case (Minnie, Min.), Lizzie Johnson (Lizzie, Liz.), Cleve Jackson (Mr. Jackson, Chief Jackson), and Harry Shale (Harry). George Sanders, Henry E. Franklin (Henry), and Sarah Farron Scarborough (abbreviated Mrs. Sc., sometimes misspelled ScabbIer) also provided some linguistic information.
Two residents were particularly helpful in supplying non-linguistic information regarding the Salish and Chinook. Benjamin Knight Bush (Ben, B.B.) of Bay Center had lived there most of his life and spoke Chinook jargon. He supplied biographical background information on his brother Lafayette Lincoln Bush (Lin.), who was the only non-Indian man Emma Luscier knew who could speak Chehalis. Another non-Indian who provided much of the historical background was the attorney John Bruce Polwarth (Polw.) of Cathlamet. Around 1934 he had written a history of Cathlamet County for the Sun newspaper. A few comments of a similar nature were added by the Reverend Nick Sivonen (NS) of Centralia.
Among the Indians who provided only nonlinguistic information were the Bay Center residents Mr. Lundquist, Mr. and Mrs. Paul Petit, and Mr. and Mrs. Edward D. Tyler. Those from Oakville were Silas Heck, John Vosper, Eliza Jane Elliott, and Emil Johnson. Maude K. Butler and her married daughter Julia Hanson provided Cathlamet information. A few comments from Joe Peter's wife appear in the Yakima / Cowlitz data. Nonlinguistic data and Tillamook equivalences were provided by Sammy Jackson and Clara Pearson.
Summary:
This subseries of the Alaska/Northwest Coast series contains Harrington's research on Quinault, Chehalis, Cowlitz, Yakama, Chinook, and Chinook Jargon. The material was collected by Harrington from January to April 1942 in western Washington and northwestern Oregon; some additional comments were added in 1943. Comprising mostly vocabulary, the bulk of the notes consists of Chehalis and Cowlitz data. Distinctions were not always made between the Upper and Lower forms of the languages. That is, forms were often simply labeled "Cheh." or "Cowl." At times Harrington used "L. Cheh." or "Shw. B." (Shoalwater Bay) to point out Lower Chehalis. Upper Chehalis forms were occasionally marked "Oakv. (Oakville) Chehalis." Cowlitz forms were distinguished by the abbreviations "LC" and "UC." When Upper Cowlitz terms were identical with those in Yakima, they were labeled "UC and Yak." There are lesser amounts of data on Quinault and Chinook. Quinault forms were abbreviated' 'Quin." Authentic Chinook forms were preceded by the labels "Chin." or "Real Chin.," whereas the trade language referred to as Chinook jargon was marked "Chinj." or "Jarg."
There are also notes on Harrington's observations on bilingualism among various Salish-speaking groups; two stories in English; biographical, ethnographic, and historical notes; records of placename trips; and notes on bibliographic sources on Chinook and Chinook Jargon.
Cite as:
Alaska/Northwest Coast: Quinault/Chehalis/Cowlitz/Yakima/Chinook/Chinook Jargon, John Peabody Harrington papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Topic:
Quinault language
Upper Chehalis language
Cowlitz language
Yakama language
Chinook language
Chinook jargon
Language and languages--Documentation
Linguistics
Ethnology
Names, Geographical
Local number:
Accession #1976-95
See more items in:
John Peabody Harrington papers: Alaska/Northwest Coast, 1910, 1933-1957
Data Source:
National Anthropological Archives
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