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Balaenoptera edeni Anderson, 1878-9

Collector:
Collector Unknown
Ocean/Sea/Gulf:
Indian Ocean
Sex:
Unknown
Type Status:
Type
Place:
Durban, South Africa, Africa, Indian Ocean
Collection Date:
1912
Taxonomy:
Animalia Animalia Chordata Chordata Mammalia Mammalia Cetacea Cetacea Balaenopteridae Balaenopteridae
Published Name:
Balaenoptera edeni Anderson, 1878-9
Balaenoptera brydei Olsen, 1912
Other Numbers:
Whale Field Number 1 : No Number
USNM Number:
STR14316
Specimen Count:
1
Record Last Modified:
20 Sep 2011
See more items in:
Mammals
Vertebrate Zoology
Data Source:
NMNH - Vertebrate Zoology - Mammals Division
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Balaenoptera edeni Anderson, 1878-9

Collector:
Collector Unknown
Ocean/Sea/Gulf:
North Pacific Ocean
Sex:
Male
Place:
Tinian, Masalok Beach, Mariana Islands, North Pacific Ocean
Collection Date:
16 Feb 2005
Taxonomy:
Animalia Chordata Mammalia Cetacea Balaenopteridae
Published Name:
Balaenoptera edeni Anderson, 1878-9
Other Numbers:
Whale Field Number 1 : No Number
USNM Number:
STR18832
Specimen Count:
1
Notes:
Immature - ephyses loose; Furey e-mail 8 V 2014
From: Patricia Rosel - NOAA Federal [mailto:patricia.rosel@noaa.gov] Sent: Wednesday, November 26, 2014 2:19 PM To: Potter, Charley; Vollmer, Nicole (Nikki) Cc: lynsey Wilcox Subject: Tinian whale Hi Charley and Nikki, We (i.e., Lynsey) successfully sequenced the pieces of cellophane Nikki sent us from the Tinian whale stranding. The animal comes out as B. edeni brydei- i.e. the larger, more pelagic Bryde's whale species. Charley, do you intend to create a field number or a USNM number for this specimen? Right now it has no identifier at all and I am wondering what to call it. It would be good if we all used the same identifier to refer to it. best, Patty
Record Last Modified:
2 Dec 2014
See more items in:
Mammals
Vertebrate Zoology
Data Source:
NMNH - Vertebrate Zoology - Mammals Division
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Additional Online Media:

Genetic identity and ecology of Bryde's whales in the Hauraki Gulf, New Zealand / by Nicky Wiseman

Author:
Wiseman, Nicky
Physical description:
xv, 259 leaves : ill. (some col.), map ; 28 cm
Type:
Manuscripts
Theses
Place:
New Zealand
Hauraki Gulf
Date:
2008
C2008
Topic:
Bryde whale
Bryde whale--Molecular genetics
Call number:
QL737.C424 W57 2008
Notes:
Printout
"A thesis submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in Biological Sciences, The University of Auckland, New Zealand"
Summary:
Little long-term research has been conducted in the Hauraki Gulf on Bryde's whales; the least studied baleen whale. This thesis investigates this population using photoidentification and sighting records obtained from boat-based opportunistic surveys and genetic analyses of samples from living and 'stranded' whales. Samples from 'stranded' Bryde's whales have been collected since 1994 from the North Island of New Zealand. In addition, biopsy samples were collected from whales in the Hauraki Gulf. Fifty-two samples from 'stranded' and biopsied Bryde's whales identified 49 unique individuals using 12 polymorphic microsatellites. The sex ratio for both sample collection types were equal with 22 males : 23 females (the sex of four could not be determined). MtDNA D-loop analysis (~800 bp) identified the samples as being consistent with Balaenoptera brydei with 11 haplotypes defined by 16 variable sites. Comparisons with published sequences (373 bp) revealed three shared haplotypes between the North Pacific and Indian Oceans. However, an AMOVA (FST and "ST) showed high levels of differentiation between these oceans, likely resulting from ancestral gene flow. Between March 2001 and February 2006, 1,102 boat-based surveys were conducted during which there were 1,059 sightings over 521 days of Bryde's whales (including two birth-length calves) in the Gulf. Since whales with calves, were observed during all months this suggests that the Hauraki Gulf is an important area for breeding whales. The seasonal change in 'trip encounter rate' indicated that some whales leave the Gulf for part of the year. Whales in the Gulf were observed in shallower (12.1 to 59.8 m) and cooler (12 to 24.5oC) water than has generally been reported elsewhere. Balaenoptera brydei corresponds to the form described in the offshore waters of the western North Pacific. In contrast, their habitat use in the Hauraki Gulf was more consistent with the 'inshore' form from the coasts off South Africa
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
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