Smithsonian Institution

Search Results

Collections Search Center
66 documents - page 1 of 4

New England Holocaust Memorial, (sculpture)

view New England Holocaust Memorial, (sculpture) digital asset number 1
Sculptor:
Saitowitz, Stanley
Medium:
Granite, glass, steel, concrete, and coal
Type:
Sculptures-Outdoor Sculpture
Sculptures
Owner/Location:
Administered by City of Boston Office of Cultural Affairs Boston City Hall, Room 716 Boston Massachusetts 02201
Located Carmen Park Congress Street between North & Hanover Streets Boston Massachusetts
Date:
1995
Notes:
Save Outdoor Sculpture, Massachusetts survey, 1996.
Summary:
A memorial to the Holocaust consists of six steel tower-like structures placed at regular intervals along a straight pathway, each structure represents a concentration camp --Belzac, Auschwitz, Sobibor, Majdanek, Treblinka, and Chelmno. The towers have glass walls that are etched with one million 7-digit numbers that represent the identification numbers tattooed on Holocaust victims. The towers rise above a grate-covered pit that glows and steams with burning coals. Between the towers are markers inscribed with the history of the Holocaust. Leading to the towers on both ends of the walkway are tablets inscribed with names of contributors, project information, and Holocaust background. A time capsule is buried at one end of the memorial.
Topic:
History--Europe--Holocaust
Allegory--Place--Belzac
Allegory--Place--Auschwitz
Allegory--Place--Sobibor
Allegory--Place--Majdanek
Allegory--Place--Treblinka
Allegory--Place--Chelmno
Abstract--Geometric
Control number:
IAS MA000173
Data Source:
Art Inventories Catalog, Smithsonian American Art Museums

Holocaust Gates, (sculpture)

Holocaust Memorial Arch, (sculpture)
Sculptor:
Ciesluk, Karl
Medium:
Sculpture: bronzed jackets; Base: wrought iron
Culture:
Hebrew
Type:
Sculptures-Outdoor Sculpture
Sculptures-Arch
Sculptures-Gate
Sculptures
Owner/Location:
Free Public Library & Cultural Center of Bayonne, N.J Director's Office 697 Avenue C Mary Griffith Peters Sculpture Garden Bayonne New Jersey 07002
Date:
Modeled July-Sept. 1986. Dedicated April 24, 1988
Notes:
Save Outdoor Sculpture, New Jersey survey, 1996.
Summary:
Six authentic concentration camp jackets have been bronzed and are arranged semi-circular fashion against wrought iron bars over the gates at the entrance to the library.
Topic:
History--Europe--Holocaust
Ethnic
Dress
Allegory--Place--Treblinka
Allegory--Place--Auschwitz
Allegory--Place--Dachau
Allegory--Place--Majdanek
Allegory--Place--Buchenwald
Allegory--Place--Bergen-Belsen
Control number:
IAS NJ000210
Data Source:
Art Inventories Catalog, Smithsonian American Art Museums

Witness : images of Auschwitz / illustrations by David Olère, prisoner at Auschwitz 1943-1945 ; text by Alexandre Oler, his son

Author:
Olère, David 1902-1985
Oler, Alexandre 1930-
Subject:
Auschwitz (Concentration camp)
Physical description:
65 p. : ill ; 23 x 26 cm
Type:
Pictorial works
Date:
1998
[1998]
Notes:
Cover title.
"... this is an advance reading copy from an unedited manuscript. It is intended for review purposes only. The completed book will contain additional illustrations, including five paintings reproduced in full color"--P. [2] of cover.
Topic:
Holocaust, Jewish (1939-1945)
Call number:
N40.1.O457x O4 1998
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries

Last traces : the lost art of Auschwitz / photography and text by Joseph P. Czarnecki ; introduction by Chaim Potok

Author:
Czarnecki, Joseph P
Physical description:
xv, 175 p. : ill. ; 26 cm
Type:
Books
Place:
Poland
Oswiecim
Date:
1989
20th century
Topic:
Mural painting and decoration
Auschwitz (Concentration camp) in art
Holocaust, Jewish (1939-1945), in art
Call number:
ND2812.P62 O834 1989X
ND2812.P62O834 1989X
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries

Médecins de la honte : la vérité sur les expériences médicales pratiquées à Auschwitz / Betty Truck, Robert-Paul Truck

Author:
Truck, Betty
Truck, Robert-Paul
Subject:
Auschwitz (Concentration camp)
Physical description:
188 p., [8] leaves of plates : ill. ; 21 cm
Type:
Books
Date:
1975
[1975]
Notes:
Includes index.
Topic:
World War, 1939-1945--Atrocities
Human experimentation in medicine
Call number:
D804.G4 T74X
D804.G4T74X
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries

Commandant of Auschwitz; autobiography. With an introd. by Lord Russell of Liverpool. Translated from the German by Constantine FitzGibbon

Author:
Höss, Rudolf 1900-1947
FitzGibbon, Constantine 1919-
Subject:
Auschwitz (Concentration camp)
Physical description:
285 p. illus. 22 cm
Type:
Books
Date:
1960
[1960, c1959]
Notes:
First published in Poland under the title: Wspomnienia.
Includes index.
Topic:
World War, 1939-1945--Prisoners and prisons, German
Call number:
D805.G3H553 1960X
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries

Dino Brugioni Collection 1950s-2000s

Creator:
Brugioni, Dino
Physical description:
27 cubic feet (30 boxes)
Type:
Photographic prints
Collection descriptions
Lectures
Interviews
Articles
Date:
1950
1950-2000
1950s-2000s
Notes:
Dino Brugioni (b. 1921) is the former Chief of Information at the Central Intelligence Agency's (CIA) National Photographic Interpretation Center (NPIC). He flew a number of reconnaissance missions during World War II over North Africa, Italy and Germany, for which he received the Purple Heart and many other citations. After the war, Brugioni received BA and MA degrees in Foreign Affairs from George Washington University. In 1948, he joined the CIA and became an expert in Soviet industries. In 1955 Brugioni was selected as a member of the newly formed NPIC that would interpret Lockheed U-2, Lockheed SR-71 (Blackbird), and satellite photography. During Brugioni's 35 year career, he helped establish imagery intelligence as an national asset to solve intelligence problems. Brugioni's aerial reconnaissance work played a major role in discerning the US/USSR bomber and missile camps during the Cold War, and provided evidence for the Cuban Missile Crisis, the Vietnam War and the Yom Kippur War. After retirement, he encouraged the use of declassified photographic intelligence for historical research. Brugioni was one of the first historians to present photographic evidence of Auschwitz in the 1970s when he located film footage from a reconnaissance aircraft photographing a bombing run on a nearby Farben factory. Brugioni is also an authority on contrived or altered photography. He has written numerous books and articles on his field and received numerous citation and recommendations for his role in reconnaissance.
Summary:
This collection consists of 27 cubic feet of material relating to aerial reconnaissance, including the following types: aerial photography collected by Brugioni; lectures and interviews by Brugioni (on videotape); articles written by Brugioni; and the published secondary sources he collected to write those articles. The collection consists of five series. Series 1 consists of the binders created by Brugioni for his aerial reconnaissance research; Series 2 and 3 consists of subject folders relating to aerial reconnaissance; Series 4 consists of 700 scanned images of original photographs retained by Brugioni as well as copies of the following two reports: "The Holocaust Revisited: A Retrospective Analysis of the Auschwitz-Birkenau Extermination Complex," by Dino Brugioni and Robert Poirer, 1979 and "The Tighe Report," 1986; the last series consists of the videotaped lectures and interviews.
Cite as:
Dino Brugioni Collection, Accession 2012-0004, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution
Topic:
Aerial photography
Aerial reconnaissance
Military intelligence
Cold War
Auschwitz (Concentration camp)
Cuban Missile Crisis, 1962
Local number:
2012-0004
Data Source:
National Air and Space Museum Archives

The bombing of Auschwitz : should the allies have attempted it? / edited by Michael J. Neufeld and Michael Berenbaum

Author:
Neufeld, Michael J. 1951-
Berenbaum, Michael 1945-
United States Holocaust Memorial Museum
Subject:
Auschwitz (Concentration camp)
Physical description:
xvii, 350 p. : ill. ; 25 cm
Type:
Congresses
Date:
2000
Notes:
Based on a symposium held April 30,1993 at the Smithsonian Institution, sponsored jointly by the National Air and Space Museum and the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum.
"Published in association with the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum."
Topic:
World War, 1939-1945--Aerial operations
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries

Auschwitz Survivors Tell Their Stories

view Auschwitz Survivors Tell Their Stories digital asset number 1
Creator:
Smithsonian Magazine
Type:
Youtube videos
Uploaded:
2010-01-21T16:14:27.000Z
Video Title:
Auschwitz Survivors Tell Their Stories
Description:
Read more at http://www.smithsonianmag.com/history-archaeology/Can-Auschwitz-Be-Saved.html From the moment they arrived at the concentration camp, Jews and other Holocaust victims were treated like animals, and only a lucky group survived the experience.
Views:
242,658
Video Duration:
5 min 48 sec
Youtube Category:
Education
See more by:
SmithsonianMagazine
YouTube Channel:
SmithsonianMagazine
Data Source:
Smithsonian Magazine

Inge Prokot : Opfer-Täter : Auschwitz, Terror, Krieg : Kölnische Galerie des Kölnischen Stadtmuseums, 22. März - 27. April 1997 = Victim-Culprit / mit Texten von Paul Celan ... [et al.] ; mit Beiträgen von Michael Euler-Schmidt, Günther Bernd Ginzel, Alphons Silbermann

Victim-culpritOpfer-Täter, victim-culprit
Author:
Prokot, Inge 1933-
Celan, Paul
Euler-Schmidt, Michael
Ginzel, Günther Bernd 1946-
Silbermann, Alphons
Subject:
Prokot, Inge 1933- Exhibitions
Auschwitz (Concentration camp)
Physical description:
79 p. : chiefly ill. (some col.) ; 30 cm
Type:
Exhibitions
In art
Date:
1997
1997]
Notes:
Exhibition catalog.
Topic:
Holocaust, Jewish (1939-1945), in art
Call number:
ND588.P76 A4 1997
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries

Surviving visions : the art of Iri Maruki and Toshi Maruki : an exhibition at the Massachusetts College of Art, Boston, Massachusetts, March 30-April 28, 1988 / edited by Henry Isaacs and John Junkerman ; introduction by John W. Dower

Author:
Maruki, Iri 1901-1995-
Maruki, Toshi 1912-2000-
Isaacs, Henry
Junkerman, John
Massachusetts College of Art
Subject:
Maruki, Iri 1901-
Maruki, Toshi 1912-
Auschwitz (Concentration camp)
Physical description:
40 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 27 x 30 cm
Type:
Pictorial works
Exhibitions
In art
Place:
Hiroshima-shi (Japan)
Date:
1988
C1988
Notes:
Title in Japanese on added t.p.: Ikitsuzukeru shikaku.
Topic:
World War, 1939-1945
Okinawa, Battle of, 1945 in art
In art
Call number:
ND1059.M3 A4 1988
N40.1.M3823S9 1988
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries

The last expression : art and Auschwitz / edited by David Mickenberg, Corinne Granof, Peter Hayes

Art and Auschwitz
Author:
Mickenberg, David 1954-
Mary and Leigh Block Museum of Art
Davis Museum and Cultural Center
Brooklyn Museum of Art
Subject:
Auschwitz (Concentration camp)
Physical description:
xv, 272 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 31 cm
Type:
Exhibitions
In art
Place:
Europe
Date:
2003
C2003
20th century
Notes:
Published in conjunction with a traveling exhibition held at the Mary and Leigh Block Museum of Art, Northwestern University, Evanston, Ill., Sept. 27-Dec. 8, 2002, the Davis Museum and Cultural Center, Wellesley College, Wellesley, Mass., Jan. 7-Feb. 14, 2003, and the Brooklyn Museum of Art, Brooklyn, N.Y., Mar. 7-June 15, 2003.
Topic:
Concentration camp inmates as artists
Art, European
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries

Friedl Dicker-Brandeis, Vienna 1898-Auschwitz 1944 : the artist who inspired the children's drawings of Terezin / written by Elena Makarova ; international coordinator, Regina Seidman Miller

Friedl
Author:
Makarova, Elena
Dicker, Friedl 1898-1944
Miller, Regina Seidman
Museum of Tolerance (Simon Wiesenthal Center)
Subject:
Dicker, Friedl 1899-1944
Theresienstadt (Concentration camp)
Physical description:
240 p. : ill. (chiefly col.) ; 30 cm
Type:
Exhibitions
In art
Date:
2001
C2001
Topic:
Jewish women artists
Concentration camp inmates as artists
Call number:
N40.1.D542 M35 2001
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries

After Auschwitz : responses to the Holocaust in contemporary art / edited by Monica Bohm-Duchen

Author:
Bohm-Duchen, Monica
Northern Centre for Contemporary Art (Sunderland, Tyne and Wear, England)
Physical description:
160 p. : ill. (some col.), map ; 28 cm
Type:
Exhibitions
Date:
1995
20th century
Notes:
Published on the occasion of the travelling exhibition 'After Auschwitz: Responses to the Holocaust in contemporary art'.
Contents:
A kind of survivor / George Steiner -- The Nazi holocaust : its moral, historical and educational significance / Ronnie S. Landau -- The complexities of witnessing ; Art confronts the holocaust / Ziva Amishai-Maisels -- Memory and counter-memory : towards a social aesthetic of holocaust memorials / James E. Young -- Fifty years on / Monica Bohm-Duchen -- Artists' statements -- List of works in exhibition
Topic:
Jewish art
Holocaust, Jewish (1939-1945), in art
Jews in art
Concentration camps in art
Art, British
Call number:
N7417.6 .A33 1995
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries

Überleben und widerstehen : Zeichnungen von Häftlingen des Konzentrationslagers Auschwitz 1940-46 : [Ausstellung] / Deutsch-Polnischen Gesellschaft der Bundesrepublik Deutschland e. V. und des Staatlichen Museums Oświęcim-Brzezinka ; Redaktion, Marina Stütz ; Übersetzung, Christine Kopka, Marina Stütz.]

Author:
Stütz, Marina
Kopka, Christine
Physical description:
85 p. : ill. ; 23 cm
Type:
Exhibitions
Place:
Auschwitz (Concentration camp) in art
Date:
1979
C1979
20th century
Topic:
Concentration camps in art
Art, Modern
Exhibitions
Call number:
NC95 .U14 1979
NC95.U14 1979
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries

Gate Stolen From Dachau Concentration Camp Recovered in Norway

view Gate Stolen From Dachau Concentration Camp Recovered in Norway digital asset number 1
Creator:
SmithsonianMag RSS
Type:
Blog posts
Smithsonian staff publications
Blog posts
Published Date:
Tue, 06 Dec 2016 19:08:00 +0000
Blog Post Category:
Smart News
Smart News History & Archaeology
Description:

Last week, police in Bergen, Norway, recovered a piece of history far from its home, reports Henrik Pryser Libell and Melissa Eddy at The New York Times. Working on a tip, officials found a metal gate stolen from the Dachau concentration camp north of Munich bearing the infamous slogan Arbeit Macht Frei, which translates in English to “Work Sets You Free.”

The gate was stolen in November 2014. According to Alison Smale at The New York Times, police at the time estimated that at least two adults must have been involved in the theft. Not only did they have to cut the six and a half foot metal gate loose, they would have also had to lift the 225-pound object over an outer gate. On discovering that the gate was missing, Gabriele Hammermann, the director of the Dachau Concentration Camp Memorial Site, voiced her disgust. “It was a terrible shock,” she told Smale. “This is the most important symbol of the concentration camp.”

It’s estimated that 200,000 people were imprisoned in Dachau. The total number who died there will likely never be known. The gate and its phrase were constructed by camp inmates. While the slogan “Arbeit macht frei” began as phrase extolling the Protestant work ethic, it took on a more sinister meaning under the Nazis. Barry Rubin at the Rubin Center explains that the phrase, which appeared at the gates of many concentration camps, was a promise to people entering what were thought to be work camps that if they worked hard and cooperated, they would eventually be released. But as the Nazi regime carried out genocide, murdering people at the camps and working them to death, the meaning of the phrase morphed. Work made people free by eventually bringing the release of death.

"It is a relief to me that this original evidence of the Nazis' cynicism and contempt for humans has been rediscovered,” Karl Freller, head of the Bavarian Memorial Foundation said in a statement, reports the AFP. The gate will be returned to the camp museum for restoration, though it is not known if it will be replaced at the entrance or put on display inside the museum to keep it away from other thieves.

It’s not the first time a gate bearing the words Arbeit macht frei has been stolen. Eddy reports that a sign carrying the phrase was stolen from Auschwitz in 2009 and recovered several days later cut in three pieces. Swedish neo-Nazi leader Anders Hoegstroem was jailed for two and a half years for the theft as were two Polish acomplices. That sign was repaired and hung in the Auschwitz museum, and a replica was placed above the camp’s gate.

Topic:
Custom RSS
See more post:
Smithsonian Article Database
Data Source:
SmithsonianMag RSS

Poland Is Searching For the Last Living Auschwitz Guards

view Poland Is Searching For the Last Living Auschwitz Guards digital asset number 1
Creator:
SmithsonianMag RSS
Type:
Blog posts
Smithsonian staff publications
Blog posts
Published Date:
Tue, 31 Jan 2017 14:58:02 +0000
Blog Post Category:
Smart News
Smart News History & Archaeology
Description:

The name Auschwitz is indelibly associated with the misery and terror of the Holocaust—and also with Poland, the country in which the horrors of Auschwitz took place. That doesn’t sit well with Poland, which has fought hard against the perception that it was responsible for the Holocaust. As SmartNews has reported in the past, the Polish government—now ruled by a right-wing, nationalistic party—has both banned the phrase “Polish death camps” and cracked down on a World War II museum it feels puts too little emphasis on the suffering of Poles during the war. Now, the BBC reports, Polish historians have put a database of known Auschwitz German commanders and guards online.

It’s the most detailed list of its kind and is the product of more than 30 years of archival research, Monika Scislowska reports for the Associated Press. It’s being released by the Polish government-affiliated Institute of National Remembrance and Commission for the Prosecution of Crimes Against the Polish Nation (IPN), a research institute created in the 1980s.

IPN chief Jarosław Szarek said that the database was unveiled as an attempt to prove that Auschwitz was not Polish-run. Though Poland did not design Auschwitz—and though the country was occupied by Nazi Germany throughout World War II—Polish nationals did denounce Jews, commit anti-Semitic pogroms, and even collaborate directly with the Nazis. However, the database in question focuses on members of the SS, the Nazi organization that saw Poles as racially inferior and sought to annihilate its culture and institutions. Indeed, the first prisoners at Auschwitz were Polish political dissidents and the Poles were the second-largest group killed in Auschwitz.

In the years that passed since January 27, 1945, when Soviet troops entered the death camp at Auschwitz and discovered a scene of harrowing brutality—the remnants of a camp used to exterminate Jews—Nazi hunters have searched for, and found, many of the people who participated in the murders of Auschwitz. But not all. As Scislowska reports, only 12 percent are estimated to have been brought to justice.

The full IPN database, which was compiled by historian Aleksander Lasik​, now contains over 25,000 records that cover personnel of multiple concentration camps. Of those, thousands relate to people who worked at Auschwitz—which was not a single camp, but a network of camps that both enslaved and killed Jews, Poles, political prisoners, Roma people, homosexuals, the mentally ill and disabled, and others. At least 1.3 million people are thought to have been deported to Auschwitz at some point between 1940 and 1945, 1.1 million of whom were murdered. The atrocities carried out by guards and commanders all happened less than 40 miles away from Krakow, one of Poland’s most important cities.  

The database, which is an attempt to find the approximately 200 German Auschwitz guards who are thought to still be alive today, is "a tool to fight lies," Szarek tells the BBC. "We're not expressing an opinion, we're presenting the cold, hard facts." But whether the database will affect public opinion about Poland—and its involvement in one of history’s most heinous episodes—remains to be seen.

Editor's Note, February 1, 2017: This story has been updated to clarify the history of Auschwitz, including the fact that Poles were the second-largest group killed at the camp.

Topic:
Custom RSS
See more post:
Smithsonian Article Database
Data Source:
SmithsonianMag RSS

Auschwitz Museum Finds Victim's Jewelry in False-Bottomed Mug

view Auschwitz Museum Finds Victim's Jewelry in False-Bottomed Mug digital asset number 1
Creator:
SmithsonianMag RSS
Type:
Blog posts
Smithsonian staff publications
Blog posts
Published Date:
Mon, 23 May 2016 19:21:05 +0000
Blog Post Category:
Smart News
Smart News History & Archaeology
Description:

When Nazis deported Jewish families to the concentration camps, they usually told their victims they were being "resettled" and that they could bring a few small suitcases of possessions. It was a calculated ruse—they knew the families would pack as many valuables as possible into their luggage to help fund their new lives. When they arrived at concentration camps, guards then rifled through their belongings to loot hidden jewelry, money and other valuable possessions. At the Auschwitz-Birkenau Memorial and Museum​, visitors can still see piles of pillaged suitcases with the names of the original owners written on the sides.

Recently, staff at the museum found that at least one family treasure made it though the camp undiscovered, according to a new press release. Under a false bottom in an enameled cup, staff members found a carefully hidden ring and a necklace. The cup was part of the institution's collection of 12,000 pieces of kitchenware, including jugs, cups and bowls that the Nazis looted from camp inmates.

While curators were working with the kitchenware in the museum’s main hall, the false bottom separated due to more than 70 years of degradation. “Under it…was a women’s ring made of gold and a necklace wrapped in a piece of canvas,” says museum staffer Hanna Kubik in the release.

Kubik says the ring, which has several stones mounted on it, and the chain, were tested and are consistent with gold used to make jewelry in Poland between 1921 and 1931. However, there are no markings or any way to trace the jewelry back to the individual or family that owned it.

The jewelry tells a story of tragedy but also hope. As museum director Piotr M. A. Cywiński says in the statement, “The hiding of valuable items—repeatedly mentioned in the accounts of survivors, and which was the reason for ripping and careful search of clothes and suitcases in the warehouse for looted items…proves on the one hand to the awareness of the victims as to the robbery nature of the deportation, but on the other hand it shows that the Jewish families constantly had a ray of hope that these items will be required for their existence.”

Much of the gold stolen from concentration camp victims, including gold teeth, was melted down and made into ingots, which were deposited into the so-called “Melmer Account” at the Reichsbank. Much of that gold was then funneled through Switzerland, which in 1998 began a $1.25 billion payout as part of a settlement with concentration camp victims and their descendants.

The museum reports that it will store the jewelry in its collection in the way in which the victim hid it, to serve as further testimony of the fate that awaited Jews who were deported to the concentration and extermination camp.

Topic:
Custom RSS
See more post:
Smithsonian Article Database
Data Source:
SmithsonianMag RSS

Auschwitz Museum Announces First Traveling Exhibition of Artifacts

view Auschwitz Museum Announces First Traveling Exhibition of Artifacts digital asset number 1
Creator:
SmithsonianMag RSS
Type:
Blog posts
Smithsonian staff publications
Blog posts
Published Date:
Wed, 26 Jul 2017 20:18:32 +0000
Blog Post Category:
Smart News
Smart News Arts & Culture
Smart News History & Archaeology
Smart News Travel
Description:

In 2016, more than 2 million people visited the Auschwitz-Birkenau State Museum in Oświęcim, Poland. The museum and accompanying memorial, which occupy the site where the Nazis murdered approximately 1.1 million prisoners, preserve Auschwitz’s history through powerful exhibitions—display cases fill the blocks that once housed inmates and highlight everything from mounds of hair and shoes taken from gas chamber victims to suitcases seized upon deportees’ arrival. Until now, the only way to experience the horrors of Auschwitz was a visit to the historic site, but beginning this December, artifacts from the museum will reach a global audience.

Today, the museum announced its first international exhibition: Subtitled "Not long ago. Not far away,” it will feature more than 1,150 original artifacts. According to Joanna Berendt of the New York Times, the exhibition, a joint venture between the museum and Spanish company Musealia, was developed to address rising anti-Semitism in Europe and educate younger generations increasingly out of touch with the history of the Holocaust.

Director of the Auschwitz-Birkenau State Museum Piotr M. A. Cywiński​ says in a press release, “Nothing can replace a visit to the authentic site of the biggest crime of the twentieth century, but this exhibition, which people in many countries will have the opportunity to see, can become a great warning cry for us all against building the future on hatred, racism, anti-Semitism and bottomless contempt for another human being.”

Seven years in the making, the exhibit draws on artifacts from the museum’s collection, as well as loans from international institutions such as the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, D.C., and the World Holocaust Remembrance Center in Jerusalem.

Items on display include camp barracks, a freight car representative of those used to deport Jews to camps and artifacts lent by survivors. Among these more personal artifacts is a blanket owned by Holocaust survivor Siegfried Fedrid. He says the single woolen blanket could keep himself and five others warm while in Dachau.

Musealia and museum officials hope taking the artifacts on the road will reach visitors who may never have the chance to visit Auschwitz in person. The scope of the traveling show certainly means it has the potential to reach millions—the exhibition launches in Madrid this December and will travel to seven European cities and seven North American cities over the next seven years.

Topic:
Custom RSS
See more posts:
Smithsonian Article Database
Data Source:
SmithsonianMag RSS

Impossible to forget : the Nazi camps fifty years after / Michael Kenna ; texts by Pierre Borhan and Clément Chéroux

Author:
Kenna, Michael
Borhan, Pierre
Chéroux, Clément, 1970-
Subject:
Kenna, Michael
Physical description:
127 p. : chiefly ill. ; 31 cm
Type:
Pictorial works
Place:
Europe
Date:
2001
C2001
Contents:
Camps in Austria, Belgium, Czechoslovakia, France, Germany, Holland, Italy, Latvia, and Poland: Auschwitz, Belzec, Bergen-Belsen, Breendonk, Birkenau, Buchenwald, Chelmno (Kulmhof), Dachau, Emsland (Papenburg), Flossenberg, Gross-Rosen, Gusen, (Lublin-)Majdanek, Mauthausen, Mittlebau-Dora, Natzweiler(-Struthof), Neuengamme, Plaszow, Ravensbrück, (Oranienburg-)Sachsenhausen, Salaspils, San Sabba, Sobibor, Stutthof, Theresiendstadt, Treblinka, Vught (S-Hertogenbosh), Westerbork
Topic:
World War, 1939-1945--Concentration camps
World War, 1939-1945--Prisoners and prisons, German
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries

Modify Your Search






or


Narrow By