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New England Holocaust Memorial, (sculpture)

Sculptor:
Saitowitz, Stanley
Medium:
Granite, glass, steel, concrete, and coal
Type:
Sculptures-Outdoor Sculpture
Sculptures
Owner/Location:
Administered by City of Boston Office of Cultural Affairs Boston City Hall, Room 716 Boston Massachusetts 02201
Located Carmen Park Congress Street between North & Hanover Streets Boston Massachusetts
Date:
1995
Topic:
History--Europe--Holocaust
Allegory--Place--Belzac
Allegory--Place--Auschwitz
Allegory--Place--Sobibor
Allegory--Place--Majdanek
Allegory--Place--Treblinka
Allegory--Place--Chelmno
Abstract--Geometric
Control number:
IAS MA000173
Notes:
Save Outdoor Sculpture, Massachusetts survey, 1996.
Summary:
A memorial to the Holocaust consists of six steel tower-like structures placed at regular intervals along a straight pathway, each structure represents a concentration camp --Belzac, Auschwitz, Sobibor, Majdanek, Treblinka, and Chelmno. The towers have glass walls that are etched with one million 7-digit numbers that represent the identification numbers tattooed on Holocaust victims. The towers rise above a grate-covered pit that glows and steams with burning coals. Between the towers are markers inscribed with the history of the Holocaust. Leading to the towers on both ends of the walkway are tablets inscribed with names of contributors, project information, and Holocaust background. A time capsule is buried at one end of the memorial.
Data Source:
Art Inventories Catalog, Smithsonian American Art Museums
Visitor Tag(s):

Holocaust Gates, (sculpture)

Holocaust Memorial Arch, (sculpture)
Sculptor:
Ciesluk, Karl
Medium:
Sculpture: bronzed jackets; Base: wrought iron
Culture:
Hebrew
Type:
Sculptures-Outdoor Sculpture
Sculptures-Arch
Sculptures-Gate
Sculptures
Owner/Location:
Free Public Library & Cultural Center of Bayonne, N.J Director's Office 697 Avenue C Mary Griffith Peters Sculpture Garden Bayonne New Jersey 07002
Date:
Modeled July-Sept. 1986. Dedicated April 24, 1988
Topic:
History--Europe--Holocaust
Ethnic
Dress
Allegory--Place--Treblinka
Allegory--Place--Auschwitz
Allegory--Place--Dachau
Allegory--Place--Majdanek
Allegory--Place--Buchenwald
Allegory--Place--Bergen-Belsen
Control number:
IAS NJ000210
Notes:
Save Outdoor Sculpture, New Jersey survey, 1996.
Summary:
Six authentic concentration camp jackets have been bronzed and are arranged semi-circular fashion against wrought iron bars over the gates at the entrance to the library.
Data Source:
Art Inventories Catalog, Smithsonian American Art Museums
Visitor Tag(s):

Witness : images of Auschwitz / illustrations by David Olère, prisoner at Auschwitz 1943-1945 ; text by Alexandre Oler, his son

Author:
Olère, David 1902-1985
Oler, Alexandre 1930-
Subject:
Auschwitz (Concentration camp)
Physical description:
65 p. : ill ; 23 x 26 cm
Type:
Pictorial works
Date:
1998
[1998]
Topic:
Holocaust, Jewish (1939-1945)
Call number:
N40.1.O457x O4 1998
Notes:
Cover title.
"... this is an advance reading copy from an unedited manuscript. It is intended for review purposes only. The completed book will contain additional illustrations, including five paintings reproduced in full color"--P. [2] of cover.
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
Visitor Tag(s):

Last traces : the lost art of Auschwitz / photography and text by Joseph P. Czarnecki ; introduction by Chaim Potok

Author:
Czarnecki, Joseph P
Physical description:
xv, 175 p. : ill. ; 26 cm
Type:
Books
Place:
Poland
Oswiecim
Date:
1989
20th century
Topic:
Mural painting and decoration
Auschwitz (Concentration camp) in art
Holocaust, Jewish (1939-1945), in art
Call number:
ND2812.P62 O834 1989X
ND2812.P62O834 1989X
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
Visitor Tag(s):

Médecins de la honte : la vérité sur les expériences médicales pratiquées à Auschwitz / Betty Truck, Robert-Paul Truck

Author:
Truck, Betty
Truck, Robert-Paul
Subject:
Auschwitz (Concentration camp)
Physical description:
188 p., [8] leaves of plates : ill. ; 21 cm
Type:
Books
Date:
1975
[1975]
Topic:
World War, 1939-1945--Atrocities
Human experimentation in medicine
Call number:
D804.G4 T74X
D804.G4T74X
Notes:
Includes index.
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
Visitor Tag(s):

Commandant of Auschwitz; autobiography. With an introd. by Lord Russell of Liverpool. Translated from the German by Constantine FitzGibbon

Author:
Höss, Rudolf 1900-1947
FitzGibbon, Constantine 1919-
Subject:
Auschwitz (Concentration camp)
Physical description:
285 p. illus. 22 cm
Type:
Books
Date:
1960
[1960, c1959]
Topic:
World War, 1939-1945--Prisoners and prisons, German
Call number:
D805.G3H553 1960X
Notes:
First published in Poland under the title: Wspomnienia.
Includes index.
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
Visitor Tag(s):

The bombing of Auschwitz : should the allies have attempted it? / edited by Michael J. Neufeld and Michael Berenbaum

Author:
Neufeld, Michael J. 1951-
Berenbaum, Michael 1945-
United States Holocaust Memorial Museum
Subject:
Auschwitz (Concentration camp)
Physical description:
xvii, 350 p. : ill. ; 25 cm
Type:
Congresses
Date:
2000
Topic:
World War, 1939-1945--Aerial operations
Notes:
Based on a symposium held April 30,1993 at the Smithsonian Institution, sponsored jointly by the National Air and Space Museum and the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum.
"Published in association with the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum."
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
Visitor Tag(s):

Auschwitz Survivors Tell Their Stories

Creator:
Smithsonian Magazine
Type:
Youtube videos
Uploaded:
2010-01-21T16:12:31.000Z
Youtube Category:
Education
Video Title:
Auschwitz Survivors Tell Their Stories
Description:
Read more at http://www.smithsonianmag.com/history-archaeology/Can-Auschwitz-Be-Saved.html From the moment they arrived at the concentration camp, Jews and other Holocaust victims were treated like animals, and only a lucky group survived the experience.
Views:
127,831
Video Duration:
5 min 48 sec
See more by:
SmithsonianMagazine
YouTube Channel:
SmithsonianMagazine
Data Source:
Smithsonian Magazine
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Inge Prokot : Opfer-Täter : Auschwitz, Terror, Krieg : Kölnische Galerie des Kölnischen Stadtmuseums, 22. März - 27. April 1997 = Victim-Culprit / mit Texten von Paul Celan ... [et al.] ; mit Beiträgen von Michael Euler-Schmidt, Günther Bernd Ginzel, Alphons Silbermann

Victim-culpritOpfer-Täter, victim-culprit
Author:
Prokot, Inge 1933-
Celan, Paul
Euler-Schmidt, Michael
Ginzel, Günther Bernd 1946-
Silbermann, Alphons
Subject:
Prokot, Inge 1933- Exhibitions
Auschwitz (Concentration camp)
Physical description:
79 p. : chiefly ill. (some col.) ; 30 cm
Type:
Exhibitions
In art
Date:
1997
1997]
Topic:
Holocaust, Jewish (1939-1945), in art
Call number:
ND588.P76 A4 1997
Notes:
Exhibition catalog.
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
Visitor Tag(s):

Dino Brugioni Collection 1950s-2000s

Creator:
Brugioni, Dino
Physical description:
27 cubic feet (30 boxes)
Type:
Photographic prints
Collection descriptions
Lectures
Interviews
Articles
Date:
1950
1950-2000
1950s-2000s
Topic:
Aerial photography
Aerial reconnaissance
Military intelligence
Cold War
Auschwitz (Concentration camp)
Cuban Missile Crisis, 1962
Local number:
2012-0004
Notes:
Dino Brugioni (b. 1921) is the former Chief of Information at the Central Intelligence Agency's (CIA) National Photographic Interpretation Center (NPIC). He flew a number of reconnaissance missions during World War II over North Africa, Italy and Germany, for which he received the Purple Heart and many other citations. After the war, Brugioni received BA and MA degrees in Foreign Affairs from George Washington University. In 1948, he joined the CIA and became an expert in Soviet industries. In 1955 Brugioni was selected as a member of the newly formed NPIC that would interpret Lockheed U-2, Lockheed SR-71 (Blackbird), and satellite photography. During Brugioni's 35 year career, he helped establish imagery intelligence as an national asset to solve intelligence problems. Brugioni's aerial reconnaissance work played a major role in discerning the US/USSR bomber and missile camps during the Cold War, and provided evidence for the Cuban Missile Crisis, the Vietnam War and the Yom Kippur War. After retirement, he encouraged the use of declassified photographic intelligence for historical research. Brugioni was one of the first historians to present photographic evidence of Auschwitz in the 1970s when he located film footage from a reconnaissance aircraft photographing a bombing run on a nearby Farben factory. Brugioni is also an authority on contrived or altered photography. He has written numerous books and articles on his field and received numerous citation and recommendations for his role in reconnaissance.
Summary:
This collection consists of 27 cubic feet of material relating to aerial reconnaissance, including the following types: aerial photography collected by Brugioni; lectures and interviews by Brugioni (on videotape); articles written by Brugioni; and the published secondary sources he collected to write those articles. The collection consists of five series. Series 1 consists of the binders created by Brugioni for his aerial reconnaissance research; Series 2 and 3 consists of subject folders relating to aerial reconnaissance; Series 4 consists of 700 scanned images of original photographs retained by Brugioni as well as copies of the following two reports: "The Holocaust Revisited: A Retrospective Analysis of the Auschwitz-Birkenau Extermination Complex," by Dino Brugioni and Robert Poirer, 1979 and "The Tighe Report," 1986; the last series consists of the videotaped lectures and interviews.
Cite as:
Dino Brugioni Collection, Accession 2012-0004, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution
Data Source:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
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Surviving visions : the art of Iri Maruki and Toshi Maruki : an exhibition at the Massachusetts College of Art, Boston, Massachusetts, March 30-April 28, 1988 / edited by Henry Isaacs and John Junkerman ; introduction by John W. Dower

Author:
Maruki, Iri 1901-1995-
Maruki, Toshi 1912-2000-
Isaacs, Henry
Junkerman, John
Massachusetts College of Art
Subject:
Maruki, Iri 1901-
Maruki, Toshi 1912-
Auschwitz (Concentration camp)
Physical description:
40 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 27 x 30 cm
Type:
Pictorial works
Exhibitions
In art
Place:
Hiroshima-shi (Japan)
Date:
1988
C1988
Topic:
World War, 1939-1945
Okinawa, Battle of, 1945 in art
In art
Call number:
ND1059.M3 A4 1988
N40.1.M3823S9 1988
Notes:
Title in Japanese on added t.p.: Ikitsuzukeru shikaku.
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
Visitor Tag(s):

The last expression : art and Auschwitz / edited by David Mickenberg, Corinne Granof, Peter Hayes

Art and Auschwitz
Author:
Mickenberg, David 1954-
Mary and Leigh Block Museum of Art
Davis Museum and Cultural Center
Brooklyn Museum of Art
Subject:
Auschwitz (Concentration camp)
Physical description:
xv, 272 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 31 cm
Type:
Exhibitions
In art
Place:
Europe
Date:
2003
C2003
20th century
Topic:
Concentration camp inmates as artists
Art, European
Notes:
Published in conjunction with a traveling exhibition held at the Mary and Leigh Block Museum of Art, Northwestern University, Evanston, Ill., Sept. 27-Dec. 8, 2002, the Davis Museum and Cultural Center, Wellesley College, Wellesley, Mass., Jan. 7-Feb. 14, 2003, and the Brooklyn Museum of Art, Brooklyn, N.Y., Mar. 7-June 15, 2003.
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
Visitor Tag(s):

Friedl Dicker-Brandeis, Vienna 1898-Auschwitz 1944 : the artist who inspired the children's drawings of Terezin / written by Elena Makarova ; international coordinator, Regina Seidman Miller

Friedl
Author:
Makarova, Elena
Dicker, Friedl 1898-1944
Miller, Regina Seidman
Museum of Tolerance (Simon Wiesenthal Center)
Subject:
Dicker, Friedl 1899-1944
Theresienstadt (Concentration camp)
Physical description:
240 p. : ill. (chiefly col.) ; 30 cm
Type:
Exhibitions
In art
Date:
2001
C2001
Topic:
Jewish women artists
Concentration camp inmates as artists
Call number:
N40.1.D542 M35 2001
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
Visitor Tag(s):

After Auschwitz : responses to the Holocaust in contemporary art / edited by Monica Bohm-Duchen

Author:
Bohm-Duchen, Monica
Northern Centre for Contemporary Art (Sunderland, Tyne and Wear, England)
Physical description:
160 p. : ill. (some col.), map ; 28 cm
Type:
Exhibitions
Date:
1995
20th century
Topic:
Jewish art
Holocaust, Jewish (1939-1945), in art
Jews in art
Concentration camps in art
Art, British
Call number:
N7417.6 .A33 1995
Notes:
Published on the occasion of the travelling exhibition 'After Auschwitz: Responses to the Holocaust in contemporary art'.
Contents:
A kind of survivor / George Steiner -- The Nazi holocaust : its moral, historical and educational significance / Ronnie S. Landau -- The complexities of witnessing ; Art confronts the holocaust / Ziva Amishai-Maisels -- Memory and counter-memory : towards a social aesthetic of holocaust memorials / James E. Young -- Fifty years on / Monica Bohm-Duchen -- Artists' statements -- List of works in exhibition
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
Visitor Tag(s):

Überleben und widerstehen : Zeichnungen von Häftlingen des Konzentrationslagers Auschwitz 1940-46 : [Ausstellung] / Deutsch-Polnischen Gesellschaft der Bundesrepublik Deutschland e. V. und des Staatlichen Museums Oświęcim-Brzezinka ; Redaktion, Marina Stütz ; Übersetzung, Christine Kopka, Marina Stütz.]

Author:
Stütz, Marina
Kopka, Christine
Physical description:
85 p. : ill. ; 23 cm
Type:
Exhibitions
Place:
Auschwitz (Concentration camp) in art
Date:
1979
C1979
20th century
Topic:
Concentration camps in art
Art, Modern
Exhibitions
Call number:
NC95 .U14 1979
NC95.U14 1979
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
Visitor Tag(s):

Impossible to forget : the Nazi camps fifty years after / Michael Kenna ; texts by Pierre Borhan and Clément Chéroux

Author:
Kenna, Michael
Borhan, Pierre
Chéroux, Clément
Subject:
Kenna, Michael
Physical description:
127 p. : chiefly ill. ; 31 cm
Type:
Pictorial works
Place:
Europe
Date:
2001
C2001
Topic:
World War, 1939-1945--Concentration camps
World War, 1939-1945--Prisoners and prisons, German
Contents:
Camps in Austria, Belgium, Czechoslovakia, France, Germany, Holland, Italy, Latvia, and Poland: Auschwitz, Belzec, Bergen-Belsen, Breendonk, Birkenau, Buchenwald, Chelmno (Kulmhof), Dachau, Emsland (Papenburg), Flossenberg, Gross-Rosen, Gusen, (Lublin-)Majdanek, Mauthausen, Mittlebau-Dora, Natzweiler(-Struthof), Neuengamme, Plaszow, Ravensbrück, (Oranienburg-)Sachsenhausen, Salaspils, San Sabba, Sobibor, Stutthof, Theresiendstadt, Treblinka, Vught (S-Hertogenbosh), Westerbork
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
Visitor Tag(s):

Cosmogony of Desire

Diane von Fürstenberg
Artist:
Anh Duong, born 25 Oct 1960
Sitter:
Diane von Fürstenberg, born 31 Dec 1946
Medium:
Oil on canvas
Dimensions:
Stretcher: 243.8 × 182.9cm (96 × 72")
Type:
Painting
Place:
United States\New York\Kings\New York\Manhattan Island
Date:
2001
Topic:
Indeterminable
Diane von Fürstenberg: Visual Arts\Designer\Fashion Designer
Portrait
Credit Line:
National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution; Gift of Diane von Fürstenberg
Object number:
NPG.2015.3
Exhibition Label:
Born Brussels, Belgium
Forty years ago, Diane Von Fürstenberg designed the iconic wrap dress that continues to captivate women from Madonna to Michelle Obama, Beyoncé to Kate Middleton. With its zipperless, buttonless construction, the dress allows its liberated wearer to move comfortably from home to the workplace to the evening and still look powerful, polished, and feminine. Von Fürstenberg says, “It’s the dress that . . . paid my bills, gave me my fame, and allowed me to be free.” Born in Belgium to Jewish parents, Von Fürstenberg credits her mother, a former prisoner in the Auschwitz concentration camp, for teaching her that “fear is not an option.”
Von Fürstenberg and artist Anh Duong share a bond as feminists. Duong began the portrait by painting one eye on the canvas and then worked the rest of the body around it. Von Fürstenberg noticed that in that one eye, “she completely and totally captured me.”
Cosmogony of Desire
Diane von Fürstenberg nacida en 1946
Nacida en Bruselas, Bélgica
Hace cuarenta años, Diane von Fürstenberg diseñó el emblemático vestido cruzado que sigue cautivando a las mujeres desde Madonna hasta Michelle Obama, Beyoncé y Kate Middleton. Confeccionado sin zíper ni botones, el vestido permite a su liberada dueña ir con comodidad del hogar al lugar de trabajo y continuar hasta la noche viéndose siempre segura, refinada y femenina. Von Fürstenberg dice que “Es un vestido que [...] pagó mis cuentas, me trajo fama y me permitió ser libre”. Nacida en Bélgica de padres judíos, Von Fürstenberg agradece a su madre, quien estuvo prisionera en el campo de concentración de Auschwitz, que le enseñara que “el miedo no es una de mis opciones”.
Von Fürstenberg y la artista Anh Duong comparten el vínculo de ser feministas. Duong comenzó el retrato pintando un ojo y en torno a él trabajó el resto del cuerpo. Von Fürstenberg observa que en ese ojo “me captó por completo”.
Anh Duong (nacida en 1960)
Óleo sobre lienzo, 2001
Donación de Diane von Fürstenberg
See more items in:
National Portrait Gallery Collection
Exhibition:
Eye Pop: The Celebrity Gaze
On View:
NPG, South Gallery 126
Data Source:
National Portrait Gallery
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French Foreign Minister Briand Discovers Salomon Taking Photographs

Maker:
Salomon, Erich
Physical Description:
paper (overall material)
Measurements:
overall: 28 cm x 35.7 cm; 11 1/32 in x 14 1/16 in
Object Name:
photograph
Place made:
France: Île-de-France, Paris
Date made:
1931-07
Subject:
Photography
Erich Salomon Collection
Photo History Collection
ID Number:
PG*008164.33
Catalog number:
8164.33
2002.0258.33
Accession number:
2002.0258
Description (Brief):
Gelatin silver print; Banquet at Quai d-Orsay, Paris. French Foreign Minister Briand discovers Salomon taking photographs. Left to right, Paul Reynaud, Minister of Colonial Affairs; Aristide Briand; Champetier de Rives, Minister of Pensions; Edouard Herriot; Leon Berard, Minister of Justice.
Description:
The Erich Salomon Collection consists of two groups of gelatin silver prints from 1927-1943, totaling 140 prints. There is a certain amount of duplication between the groups. Accession 2002.0258 was acquired in 1965 from Salomon’s friend, Peter Hunter. These prints were made from Salomon’s original negatives. Accession 2002.0259 was acquired in 1965 from Magnum. Subjects in the collection are mainly photographs of politicians, diplomats, business magnates, royalty; European and American.
Dr. Erich Salomon (1886-1944) was born to a prominent Jewish family in Berlin, Germany. He became a lawyer before the outbreak of World War I but was drafted into service. When he returned, his family had lost its fortune and he needed to work. Salomon became interested in photography and soon specialized in taking photographs where cameras were not allowed and without his subject’s knowledge.
Salomon became famous in 1928 when his photographs from the Johann Hein murder trial in Coburg, Germany were published in the Berliner Illustrirte newspaper [see images PG*008164.42 and PG*008164.47]. From that point, Salomon became a freelance photographer, gaining admittance to even the most secure meetings and banquets. Salomon was labeled the first “candid cameraman” and called himself a bildjournalist, still the German word for “photojournalist.”
Salomon first used the common journalist’s camera – a 13 x 18 cm Contessa Nettel – but it was too cumbersome for his purposes. He soon switched to the Ermanox, a small plate-loaded camera perfect for photographing in low lighting. Salomon mastered the technique and used it until 1932 when he traded it for the Leica.
In 1933 Adolf Hitler came to power in Germany. As Jews, Salomon and his family were forced to flee to Holland, his wife’s homeland, for protection. Based in The Hague, he had greater access to the political conferences but he also began taking photographs of cultural events, such as concerts. Salomon traveled to Britain and the United States as well. In 1943, while on the verge of immigrating to America, Salomon, his wife and one son were forced to go into hiding when the Nazis overtook Holland. They were eventually deported and died at the Auschwitz labor camp in July of 1944.
Salomon’s images survive to this day because of his foresight. In order to keep the negatives safe he hid them in three separate places in Holland during the war. The first group was placed in the Dutch Parliament library. The second, he buried in the chicken coup at a friend’s home. This group was critically damaged by the dampness, though many of the plates are still printable. The third was in the custody of friend Peter Hunter. In 1952, the collection was consolidated in Amsterdam. Beginning in the 1950s, there were a number of exhibitions of his work, including a 1958 traveling exhibition which was acquired by the Smithsonian.
Location:
Currently not on view
See more items in:
Culture and the Arts: Photographic History
Erich Salomon Collection
Photo History Collection
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center
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Missile, Surface-to-Surface, V-2 (A-4)

Manufacturer:
Mittelwerk GMBH
Materials:
Steel; graphite jet vanes, some wooden construction elements in fuselage; aluminum tanks not present.
Dimensions:
Overall: 11 ft. 8 3/8 in. wide x 46 ft. 1 3/16 in. deep x 5 ft. 5 in. diameter x 44 ft. 5 3/16 in. long, 8427.9 lb. (356.6 x 1405.1 x 165.1 x 1354.3cm, 3822.9kg)
Type:
CRAFT-Missiles & Rockets
Country of Origin:
Germany
Credit Line:
Transferred from the U.S. Air Force
Inventory Number:
A19600342000
Rights:
Do not reproduce without permission from the Smithsonian Institution, National Air and Space Museum
Summary:
The German V-2 rocket was the world's first large-scale liquid-propellant rocket vehicle, the first long-range ballistic missile, and the ancestor of today's large rockets and launch vehicles. Called the A-4 (Aggregat 4) by German Army Ordnance, the rocket was dubbed V-2, or Vergeltungswaffe Zwei ("Vengeance Weapon Two"), by the Nazi Propaganda Ministry when its existence was publicly announced in November 1944, two months after first deployment as a weapon. Launched from mobile platforms, the missile had a maximum range of about 320 km (200 miles) and a one-ton warhead. At least 10,000 concentration camp workers died in the process of manufacturing it.
The U.S. Air Force officially transferred this V-2 to the Smithsonian on May 1, 1949. The National Air Museum moved it to its storage facility in Maryland in 1954 and, as the National Air and Space Museum, restored it in 1975-1976 for exhibition in its new Mall building.
Long Description:
The V-2 rocket, developed and used by the Germans during World War II, was the world's first large-scale liquid-propellant rocket vehicle, the first modern long-range ballistic missile, and the ancestor of today's large-scale liquid-fuel rockets and launch vehicles. Called the A-4 (Aggregat 4) by German Army Ordnance, the rocket was dubbed V-2, or Vergeltungswaffe Zwei ("Vengeance Weapon Two"), by Dr. Josef Goebbels' Propaganda Ministry when its existence was publicly announced in November 1944, two months after it was first deployed as a weapon. The Smithsonian Institution's V-2 was acquired in 1946 from the U.S. Army Air Forces, and was officially transferred on 1 May 1949 by what was now the U.S. Air Force. It was moved to the National Air Museum's storage facility in Suitland, Maryland in 1954, and was restored in 1975-76 for exhibition in the new National Air and Space Museum building.
Construction
The V-2 is cylindrical, tapering down towards the base, with four clipped rectangular fins, and tapering down toward the top with an ogival warhead ending in a sharp pointed nose. The design of the clipped fins was influenced by the need to ship a military missile through standard European rail tunnels. Overall, the rocket was shaped for supersonic flight, based on wind tunnel tests. The "dimpled" appearance of the rocket's skin, as is very evident in the Museum's specimen, is partly the result of spot welding, which, when cooled, especially around panels in place near ribs or stringers, contracted or shrunk unevenly, although the rocket's skin was also damaged by years of rough handling. The Museum's artifact has a combustion chamber, but lacks plumbing and many internal components such as the guidance and control systems. The tanks were removed to lessen the weight supported by the fins.
Liquid oxygen (lox) served as the oxidizer (the substance providing the oxygen for combustion) while an 75% alcohol/water mixture was the fuel (the substance to be burned). The water additive helped cool the motor, which developed maximum operating temperatures of about 4,900 F.
The rocket was mainly constructed of thin sheet steel, welded, riveted, and braced around a wooden framework in some sections. The nose cap was a fuse for detonating the explosive, 1,650 lbs of amatol, upon impact. Underneath the warhead was the instrument section, divided into four quadrants devoted to guidance and control, radio, and electrical systems. The center section of the rocket was two half shells containing the aluminum-magnesium alloy propellant tanks, the lox tank below and the larger fuel tank above. The lox tank was insulated with glass wool to keep the super-cold lox at its desired temperature and also to prevent overheating from leftover propellants. The tail section contained the motor and adjoining turbopump, steam-generator, and associated plumbing. The motor, comprising the combustion chamber and nozzle, was made of steel, while the pumps were of steel with aluminum-silicon alloy impellers and housings. The tanks for the hydrogen peroxide and potassium permanganate catalyst for driving the turbopumps were coated inside and out with an aluminum bronze alloy for corrosion protection.
History
The V-2 (A-4) evolved from secret experimental tests made between 1932 and 1934 by the German Army on smaller lox-alcohol liquid-fuel rockets, designated A-1 and A-2, of 300 kg (660 lbs.) thrust at the Army's Kummersdorf artillery range, south of Berlin. Two A-2s were successfully flown in December 1934, from Borkum Island in the North Sea. These were followed by the1,500 kg (3,300 lb.) thrust A-3, designed and built in 1935-1937, and the A-4 which was proposed in 1936 as a projected 25 metric-ton thrust (56,000 lb.) scale-up of the A-3. The A-4 was designed in detail in 1939-1941. The A-5, a redesign of the A-3 launched from 1938 to 1943, was also very important, as it was the test-bed for guidance systems after the failure of the four A-3 launches in 1937. It was. The moving spirits of the A-4's development were Dr. Wernher von Braun, Technical Director of the Peenemünde Army center from its inception until the end, and Captain (later Brigadier General) Walter R. Dornberger, who became involved in the Army's rocket development in 1931, and was the military head of the program from 1936 to 1943. During the last 18 months of the war he was responsible for training, supplying and servicing the operational V-2 rocket units.
In April, 1937, the rocket group of then about 90 men moved to a much larger, secret research facility built at the relatively remote site of Peenemünde on the island of Usedom, off the Baltic coast of Pomerania. Besides the A-4, other missiles, such as the Wasserfall, were developed here. A-4 development took place at Peenemünde-Ost (Peenemünde East). The Luftwaffe (Air Force) occupied Peenemünde West. The estimated cost of establishing Peenemünde-Ost was about RM 300 million (Reichmarks), or $70 million US (for 1990s dollars, multiply by about a factor of 10). By 1942, the personnel of Peenemünde-East had grown to a work force of about 5,000 which included engineers, technicians, scientists and all other personnel. In addition there were thousands of construction workers building the new A-4 Production Plant south of the test center; by 1943 this number included three thousand mostly East European forced laborers working construction. In addition, in the summer of 1943, 1300 SS concentration-camp workers who were to become the core of the production-line workforce were brought to Peenemünde and housed in the factory buildings. Gen. Dornberger and Arthur Rudolph, the chief engineer of the factory, were among those responsible for deciding to exploit concentration-camp labor in the rocket program; Wernher von Braun was aware of these decisions and found himself increasingly involved in the management of camp labor as time went on.
The first non-flight vehicles were finished and tested in 1940-41, and the first flight vehicles were completed in 1942. After two failed launches in June and August 1942, on 3 October 1942 Peenemünde launched its first successful A-4, the V4, or fourth test vehicle (the first was destroyed in a ground test before it was ever launched). This rocket attained an altitude of 60 miles and range of 125 miles in a 296 second flight, coming within 2.5 miles of its target and reaching a top speed of 3,300 mph. On 22 November 1942, Hitler ordered the mass production of the missile, and exactly one month later, Armaments Minister Speer founded the Special Committee A-4 to accelerate the process so that production might begin in summer 1943. Production required a large number of drawings to be prepared and special tools designed and built. Other A-4 factories were to be located at the Zeppelin Works in Friedrichshafen, and the Raxwerke near Wiener Neustadt, Austria.
After the damaging Royal Air Force bombing of the facility during the night of 17-18 August 1943, A-4 manufacturing was shifted to the underground plant of Mittelwerk at Nordhausen, in the Harz Mountains. Undoubtedly, the Museum's V-2 was also made there. After the RAF raid, smaller scale improvement developments were still carried out at Peenemünde. (Altogether, about 250 developmental V-4s were made at Peenemünde.)
The initial cost of producing an A-4 rocket was 100,000 Reichmarks (warhead and guidance equipment not included); the average cost was later reduced to 75,110 RM. At Peenemünde, each A-4 took from 10,000-20,000 man-hours to produce, while at Mittelwerk the figure dropped to approximately 7,500. The rockets were made at Mittelwerk by 2,000 civilian technicians and approximately 10,000 prisoner laborers who lived in nearby barracks camp known as Dora, which became the main camp of Konzentrationslager Mittelbau in October 1944. The Dora prisoners lived in terrible conditions, especially during the first few months when the barracks had not been built, and prisoners were forced to live underground, and in the last few months of the war, when the food supply worsened and many prisoners from Auschwitz and other eastern camps were dumped into Mittelbau-Dora. Of the approximately 20,000 deaths in Mittelbau-Dora, about half can be ascribed to the V-2 program.
The V-1, a competing development launched by the Luftwaffe, was an air-breathing pulsejet-powered missile which inflicted a considerable amount of physical and psychological damage on Britain, Belgium and France. The V-2 was to be an even more decisive terror weapon, but the rocket was neither accurate, reliable, nor cost effective. On 7 September 1944 the first two operational rockets were fired against Paris, but both failed due to premature cutoffs. The first successful launch was made at 8:30 a.m. on 8 September and struck close to the Porte d'Italie. At 6:43 p.m. the same day, the missile was deployed against England and hit Chiswick, a suburb about six miles west of central London. In both operations the rockets were launched from the Hague-Wassenaar area of occupied Holland. Upon its introduction into the war, the weapon now became known as the V-2. During February-March, 1945, the heaviest period of rocket bombardment, the weekly average fired against England amounted to 60.
Figures vary in different sources, but during the remainder of the war 3,200 to 3,600 were sent towards Allied targets. In the U.K. they were mostly directed toward London; secondary targets were Southampton and Bristol. Out of these numbers, by one estimate, 1,115 reached the United Kingdom while 1,775 hit Continental targets. Of the latter, most were fired against Belgium, 1,610 striking Antwerp; between 80-100 against Liège, and a number against Brussels. Nineteen rockets hit Paris during its few days of V-2 bombardment. About 25% of the total rockets launched against the U.K. and Continental targets failed due to air bursts. About 600 V-2's were launched for training and experimental purposes.
Figures also differ as to the number of casualties and amount of property damage caused by the V-2, but the total number killed is variously estimated at about 5,500 ,while the number of seriously wounded is given as 6,500. The total number of houses and other buildings destroyed by both the V-1 and V-2 weapons, including greater London, Antwerp, and Liège, amounted to about 33,700. The V-2 was designed for use against cities and the only known pin-point tactical application was when 11 were fired against the Ludendorf Bridge at Remagen, Germany, during March 1945 in a German attempt to prevent the Allies from continuing to use the bridge after it had been inadvertantly seized by American troops on 7 March. A couple of missiles came remarkably close but did not hit the bridge. The last V-2 fired in combat took place on 29 March 1945.
Following the war, in an effort to acquire the know how of this clearly revolutionary new technology, the U.S. and other Allies scrambled to capture as much V-2 hardware, documents, and V-2 technicians as they could. This included the British, French and Soviets. The British, under Operation Backfire, succeeded in examining and experimentally test launching, with the assistance of German technicians, three V-2 rockets. The Backfire launches took place in the British zone of occupation, at a former Krupp armament proving ground at Altenwalde, near Cuxhaven, Germany, on the North Sea coast. The launches were made on 2, 3, and 15 October 1945. The last launch was known as Operation Clitterhouse and included foreign (U.S., French, and Soviet) observers. The data acquired from all the launches and contained in five illustrated manuals was shared with the U.S. The French obtained the services of Wolfgang Pilz and other V-2 researchers who helped them build their first liquid-fuel missiles. The French Veronique sounding rocket, which outwardly resembled the V-2, also resulted from these efforts.
On 5 May 1945, the Soviets captured Peenemünde, though it was largely destroyed or stripped of useful material by the evacuating Germans. The Soviets did, however, seize invaluable material from Nordhausen, which they occupied on 5 July, and set up rocket institutes in the region and reconstructed a number of V-2s in the repair facility of the Mittelwerk at Kleinbodungen. The top ranking man recruited by the Soviets was Helmut Gröttrup, an expert from Peenemünde in guidance and control. In October 1946, thousands of German engineers, scientists, technicians, and their families were forcibly deported to the USSR, among them several hundred members and their families from the East German rocket institutes. The Soviets already had considerable experience since the 1930s in the design and construction of liquid-fuel rockets, but like the Americans and others, they lacked experience in handling liquid-fuel rockets of the size of the V-2. The Russians launched their first reconstructed V-2 on 30 October 1947 at Kapustin Yar, 75 miles east of Stalingrad (now Volgograd).
They sought to greatly improve upon basic V-2 technology and from the later 1940's to early 1950's constructed several V-2 derivative engines. They also created about ten or more derivative V-2 rockets which included the R-1 (also designated 1R), V-1A (1VA), V-1C, V-1B (1VB), V-1E (1VE), V-1D (1VD), R-2 (2R), V-2A (2VA), and V-2B/C. The majority of the vehicles appear to have been essentially re-built V-2s using similar or much modified engines powered by the same lox-alcohol propellant, though they had successively elongated propellant tanks for "stretched" bodies and larger nose cones. The first successful R-1 launch took place on 17 September 1948, called by the Russians their first "national rocket," although still looking identical to the V-2 with a Meilerwagen as part of the handling equipment. In addition to affording design and handling experience, these rockets were used for upper atmospheric research and were thus called "geophysical rockets." The Soviets also launched numerous animals including rabbits and dogs for biological studies, with eventual space flight in mind. By the mid-1950s, the Soviets graduated to an entirely different generation of rockets but had clearly learned a great deal from their V-2 experience. It is relevant to note that the first two rockets given to their allies at the time, the Chinese, in 1956, were R-1s followed in 1958 by R-2s, both models obsolete V-2 derivative vehicles known in the West as the SS-1 (Scunner) and SS-2 (Sibling). The Chinese first launched their R-2, using a different fuel, on 5 November 1960 and called it the Dong Feng 1 (East Wind 1). The launch site was at Jiuquan, in the Gobi desert, in Gansu province, 1,000 miles west of Beijing. This was the beginning of the Chinese long-range missile and space launch vehicle development.
The Americans similarly planned to acquire V-2 technology almost as soon as it appeared. On 15 November 1944, a little more than two months after the first V-2s were fired against Paris and London, the U.S. Army Ordnance Corps awarded the General Electric Company a contract to prepare captured V-2's for flight tests and to develop missiles based upon German designs, with the overall name of Project Hermes. Upon the brief occupation of Mittelwerk by the U.S. Army in May1945, before the Soviet Army moved in, parts for about 100 V-2s were shipped to the U.S., including presumably the two that were eventually turned over to the Smithsonian.
During that period, the Americans were also fortunate in the surrender of Wernher von Braun and his key team members. Under Operation Paperclip (originally Operation Overcast), a total of 118 of these men were eventually sent to the U.S. where they were to greatly contribute to the development of ballistic missiles and later space program launch vehicles. Under Hermes, the U.S. used them to gain knowledge and experience in handling large-scale liquid-fuel rockets as well as conduct upper-atmospheric research experiments. To coordinate the experiments, a V-2 Upper Atmosphere Research Panel was established on 16 January 1947.
On 15 March 1946 the static firing of a V-2 took place at the White Sands Proving Grounds, New Mexico, followed on 16 April with the first captured V-2 launch. The first successful land recovery of a V-2 nosecone by parachute was accomplished in February 1947. Altogether, there were 67 flights of V-2's at White Sands as well as at the Long Range Proving Ground, Cape Canaveral, Florida (later, U.S. Air Force Eastern Test Range and Kennedy Space Center). On 17 December 1946, a single stage V-2 reached a record altitude of 116 miles, the highest ever reached alone by this vehicle. The last captured V-2 flight was made at White Sands on 28 June 1951.
In Project Bumper, which comprised eight rounds, the V-2 also served to test the feasibility of a two-stage liquid-fuel rocket. The second stage was the smaller, American-made WAC-Corporal. On 24 February 1949, a V-2/WAC-Corporal rocket reached an altitude of 244 miles and speed of 5,150 miles per hour. The altitude record stood for many years and was perhaps first broken on 20 September 1956 when the first the U.S. Army's three-stage Jupiter-C test missile attained an altitude of 680 miles. On 24 July 1950 Bumper No. 8 was the first rocket successfully launched from Cape Canaveral. In this case the two-stage rocket was fired for velocity in a hypersonic aerodynamics test.
Among other notable V-2 flights were: a launch on 24 October 1946 in which motion picture cameras took films of Earth from a 65 mile altitude and covered 40,000 square miles; a series of flights, starting on 20 February 1947, known as Project Blossom, in which containers with fruit flies and various types of seeds were carried to test the effects of cosmic rays, the canisters with these life forms recovered by parachute; a U.S. Navy-sponsored flight up to 100 miles on 7 March 1947 in which the first photographs of Earth were taken at this height; a shipboard launch (under the name of Operation Sandy) from the U.S. aircraft carrier Midway, in the Atlantic, on 6 September 1947; and attempts to the carry live Air Force Aero Medical Laboratory monkeys, Albert I and II, on 18 June 1948 and 14 June 1949, to test the effects of acceleration and weightlessness. (Albert I who was anesthetized in preparation for the flight unfortunately died before the liftoff due to breathing problems. Albert II survived the flight to 83 miles and withstood peak forces of 5.5 g during acceleration as well as the brief period zero-gravity, but the parachute on the return capsule was defective and the high-speed descent of the capsule was fatal. Two other monkeys met the same fate.)
Acquisition
The Museum's specimen and another V-2 (now in La Coupole, in Wizernes, France) were part of the almost 1,400 enemy and Allied war time artifacts that were especially collected for the then National Air Museum under the direction of General of the Army Henry H. Arnold, Commanding General of the Army Air Forces, as "outstanding examples of aircraft and components" from World War II. The Air Force made the official transfer on 1 May 1949. In the meantime, the V-2s and the other artifacts were stored in a former plant of the Douglas Aircraft Company at Park Ridge, Illinois, at the present site of O'Hare International Airport, northwest of Chicago.
The actual history of the Army Air Forces' acquisition of both V-2s may never be known due to the loss of relevant documents. From an available photo of this specimen at Park Ridge, ca. 1948, showing the rocket in its combat camouflage colors, the vehicle was clearly an operational round, although as a result of the restoration of 1975-76, it now carries the black-and-white test-flight scheme similar to the one used on the rocket's first successful flight of 3 October 1942. The alternate black and white patterns of the fins aided tracking and determining the rocket's attitude during test launches. The "Woman in the Moon" logo of the original A-4/V4 was not painted on the NASM artifact, however.
Because of the enormous logistical problems and limited manpower available to handle all the Park Ridge material, not until late November 1954 did the V-2s travel by train from Chicago to Washington, D.C. They were then trucked to the Museum's storage facility at Suitland, Maryland, by February 1955. It was not until 1975 that the better of the two rockets underwent restoration, entailing 2,000 man-hours of work in preparation for the new National Air and Space Museum, which opened for the Bicentennial celebration on 1 July 1976. However, the display rocket lacked key parts. The thrust ring, graphite exhaust vanes, servo motors, potentiometers, chain and sprocket drive for the movements of the air rudders, and other tail section components, were provided by the Royal Air Force Museum at Hendon, England, while the launch stand (A19761038000) came from NASA Marshall Space Flight Center at Huntsville, Alabama. A section of one of the fins of the Museum's V-2 is purposely removed to permit viewing of the chain and sprocket drive.
The V-2 was normally carried into combat on a rocket trailer and hauled and erected into its upright vertical firing position by a Meilerwagen. There was also an array of related ground support vehicles which included a heavily armored fire control vehicle that ran on tank tracks, a tractor-pulled liquid oxygen transporter, and alcohol tankers. The Museum does not possess a Meilerwagen nor other V-2 support equipment in its collections.
The V-2 on display at the Smithsonian's National Air and Space Museum represents one of about twenty-one known examples of this rocket worldwide. Other extant V-2 rockets are at the following locations:
Australian Army Headquarters, Holsworthy, New South Wales
Australian War Memorial, Canberra
Point Cook Royal Australian Air Force Base, near Melbourne, Australia
La Coupole, Wizernes, France.
Deutsches Museum, Munich, Germany
Luftwaffenmuseum, Berlin, Germany
Wehrtechnische Studiensammlung, Koblenz, Germany
Legermuseum, Delft, The Netherlands
The Aerospace Museum, Cosford, U.K.
The Defence Explosive Ordnance Explosive Disposal School, Chattendon, U.K.
The Imperial War Museum, London, U.K.
Ministry of Technology Rocket Propulsion Establishment, Westcott, U.K.
The RAF Museum, Hendon (London), U.K.
The Science Museum, London, U.K.
Fort Bliss, El Paso, Texas
Kansas Cosmosphere and Space Center, Hutchinson, Kansas
U.S. Air Force Museum, Wright-Paterson Air Force Base, Ohio
U.S. Air Force Space and Missile Museum, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida
U.S. Space and Rocket Center, Huntsville, Alabama
White Sands Missile Range, near Alamogordo, New Mexico
Bibliography
Becklake, John, "Conservation of the German WW II Rocket Collection at the Aerospace Museum, Cosford, England," paper presented at the 49th International Astronautical Congress, 28 Sept. 2-Oct. 1998, Melbourne, Australia.
Béon, Yves. Planet Dora. Edited with an Introduction by Michael J. Neufeld (Boulder, CO, 1997).
DeVorkin, David H., Science with a Vengeance (New York, 1992).
Dornberger, Walter R., V-2 (New York, 1954).
Engle, Eloise and Arnold Lott, Man in Flight - Biomedical Achievements in Aerospace (1979), pp. 91, 93-94.
Garlinski, Josef, Hitler's Last Weapons (New York, 1978).
Harvey, Brian, The Chinese Space Programme (Chichester, 1998), pp. 5-6, 11-12.
Hölsken, Dieter, V-Missiles of the Third Reich - The V-1 and V-2 (Sturbridge, Mass., 1994) (Original edition: Die V-Waffen (Stuttgart, 1984)).
Huzel, Dieter, Peenemünde to Canaveral (Englewood Cliffs, NJ,1962).
Irving, David, The Mare's Nest (Boston, 1965).
Kennedy, Gregory P., Vengeance Weapon 2 (Washington, D.C., 1983).
Ley, Willy, Rockets, Missiles, and Space Travel (New York, 1959, and other edit.), pp. 290-294, 458-459.
Michel, Jean, Dora (New York, 1979).
Neufeld, Michael J., The Rocket and the Reich: Peenemünde and the Coming of the Ballistic Missile Era (New York, 1995).
Ordway, III, Frederick I. and Mitchell R. Sharpe, The Rocket Team (New York, 1979).
Ordway, III, Frederick I. and Ronald C. Wakeford, International Missile and Spacecraft Guide (New York, 1960), pp. 9, 70-72. 182-185.
Reisig, Gerhard H.R., Raketenforschung in Deutschland (Münster, 1997).
Winter, Frank H., Rockets into Space (Cambridge, Mass., 1990), pp. 56-60, 62, 76.
Originally written by Frank H. Winter; revised by Michael J. Neufeld, Aug. 3, 2000.
See more items in:
National Air and Space Museum Collection
Location:
National Air and Space Museum, Washington, DC
Exhibition:
Space Race
Data Source:
National Air and Space Museum
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Triumph over Tragedy, (sculpture)

East Texas Holocaust Memorial, (sculpture)
Sculptor:
Gissen, Linda 1937-
Medium:
Sculpture: bronze and copper; Base: marble
Culture:
Hebrew
Type:
Sculptures-Outdoor Sculpture
Sculptures
Owner/Location:
Congregation Beth El 1010 Charleston Drive Tyler Texas 75703
Date:
Dedicated April 18, 1993
Topic:
History--Europe--Holocaust
Ethnic
History--Europe--World War II
Figure group
Religion--Judaism
Control number:
IAS TX000050
Notes:
Save Outdoor Sculpture, Texas survey, 1993.
Summary:
A monument to the Jewish victims of the Holocaust consisting of five concentric circles, mounted one above the other to form a cone shape. Each ring is made up of small figures portraying such landmark events as the anti-Semitic Nuremburg Laws enacted by Germany in the early 1930's; the Nazis infamous book-burning rituals; and the shattering devastation of "Kristallnacht." Soaring flames and barbed wire are symbolic of imprisonment, torture, and genocide. At the top of the memorial is a figure holding aloft a torah, and the topmost scene is of children playing. The scenes that follow are of increasing horror. The concentration camps are symbolically represented by the front gates of Auschwitz, emblazoned with the words "Arbeit Macht Frei" (work makes you free). Also represented are the death trains transporting prisoners. At one level is a depiction of the German troops' mass arrests of the Jews, and at another level are the Allied armies, liberating the camps which contain the skeletal survivors. Hope and promise for the future are symbolized by a depiction of barbed wire transforming into branches of laurel and olive trees.
Data Source:
Art Inventories Catalog, Smithsonian American Art Museums
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