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Articles and notes

Type:
Articles and notes
Made in:
USA
Credit Line:
Gift of the Estate of Ethel Chase
Accession Number:
1969-26-10
Catalogue Status:
Research in Progress
Description:
Articles and notes from Handweaver and Craftsman
See more items in:
Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum Collection
Textiles Department
Data Source:
Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
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Short original articles

Author:
Fosberg, F. Raymond
Object Type:
Smithsonian staff publication
Electronic document
Year:
1981
Citation:
Atoll Research Bulletin, 255
Doi:
10.5479/si.00775630.255
Data source:
Smithsonian Libraries
Visitor Tag(s):

Articles of Faith

Object Name:
Book/Booklet
Media/Materials:
Paper, ink
Techniques:
Printed
Dimensions:
21.7 x 13.8 cm
Culture/People:
Cherokee
Object Type:
Indigenous Knowledge and Records
Place:
Tulsa; Tulsa County; Oklahoma; USA (inferred)
Date Created:
originally published: 1880; reprint: 2000-2003
Catalog Number:
26/1661
Collection History:
Purchased by Ann McMullen (NMAI staff member) in 2003 from the Museum of the Cherokee Indian Gift Shop (Cherokee, North Carolina).
See more items in:
Modern and Contemporary Arts
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian
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Merecord Co. decal article

Physical description:
Magazine : 1 p. : ill. ; 29 x 20 cm.
Type:
Printed/Published Materials
Date:
ca. 1940
Topic:
Decalomania
Display rooms and spaces
Record number:
(DSI-AAA)8564
Summary:
Page from an unidentified magazine showing a livingroom design in an article about Meyercord Company decalomania.
See more items in:
Arlene Taylor papers, [ca. 1938-1965]
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
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Merecord Co. decal article

Physical description:
Magazine : 1 p. : ill. ; 29 x 20 cm.
Type:
Printed/Published Materials
Date:
ca. 1940
Topic:
Decalomania
Display rooms and spaces
Record number:
(DSI-AAA)8565
Summary:
Page from an unidentified magazine showing a bedroom design with an article about Meyercord Company decalomainia.
See more items in:
Arlene Taylor papers, [ca. 1938-1965]
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
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Box For Small Articles

Donor Name:
Accession Number Unknown
Object Type:
Box
Place:
Not Given, Alaska, United States, North America
Topic:
Ethnology
Accession Number:
000000
USNM Number:
E49075-0
Specimen Count:
1
Record Last Modified:
13 Aug 2015
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Anthropology
Data Source:
NMNH - Anthropology Dept.
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Article 18: Freedom of Religion

Designer:
Woody Pirtle, b. 1945
Client:
Amnesty International
Medium:
Off-set lithograph on white wove paper
Culture:
American
Type:
graphic design
Poster
Object Name:
Poster
Date:
2002
Credit Line:
Gift of Woody Pirtle
Accession Number:
2009-34-6
Rights:
© Woody Pirtle, Pirtle Design
Catalogue Status:
Research in Progress
Description:
Background of candle tip and flame. Image is colored in yellow with white print. Vertically reading down at center is "Freedom of Religion". On top left corner is "Article 18" printed from the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.
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Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum Collection
Drawings, Prints, and Graphic Design Department
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Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
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Article 04: Freedom from Slavery

Designer:
Woody Pirtle, b. 1945
Client:
Amnesty International
Medium:
Off-set lithograph on white wove paper
Culture:
American
Type:
graphic design
Poster
Object Name:
Poster
Credit Line:
Gift of Woody Pirtle
Accession Number:
2009-34-12
Rights:
© Woody Pirtle, Pirtle Design
Catalogue Status:
Research in Progress
Description:
Background of two crossed chains. Image is colored in red with white print. Vertically reading down at center is "Freedon from Slavery". On top left corner is "Article 04" printed from the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.
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Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum Collection
Drawings, Prints, and Graphic Design Department
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Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
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Article 02: Freedom from Discrimination

Designer:
Woody Pirtle, b. 1945
Client:
Amnesty International
Medium:
Off-set lithograph on white wove paper
Culture:
American
Type:
graphic design
Poster
Object Name:
Poster
Date:
2002
Credit Line:
Gift of Woody Pirtle
Accession Number:
2009-34-13
Rights:
© Woody Pirtle, Pirtle Design
Catalogue Status:
Research in Progress
Description:
Background of crayons. Image is colored in purple with white print. Vertically reading down at center is "Freedom from Discrimination". On top left corner is "Article 02" printed from the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.
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Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum Collection
Drawings, Prints, and Graphic Design Department
Data Source:
Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
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James L. Prestini woodworking articles

Subject:
Prestini, James Libero
Physical description:
Clipping : 2 p. 28 x 22 cm. on notebook page
Type:
Printed/Published Materials
Date:
1946
Topic:
Wood-carvers
Wood-carving
Record number:
(DSI-AAA)8617
Summary:
Two clippings pasted onto a publicity notebook page.

Wood Star clipping from the Chicago Tribune 21 Apr 1946.
Artist in Wood clipping from the Chicago Times 31 Mar 1946. Clippings form part of a publicity notebook.
See more items in:
James Prestini notebooks, 1936-1979
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
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Lander, Mars, Viking, Proof Test Article

Manufacturer:
Martin Marietta
Materials:
Aluminum, mixed metals, phenolics
Dimensions:
Approximate: 6 ft. tall x 10 ft. long x 10 ft. wide (182.88 x 304.8 x 304.8cm)
Type:
SPACECRAFT-Unmanned
Country of Origin:
United States of America
Credit Line:
Transferred from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration
Inventory Number:
A19790215000
Rights:
Do not reproduce without permission from the Smithsonian Institution, National Air and Space Museum
Summary:
This is the proof test article of the Viking Mars Lander. For exploration of Mars, Viking represented the culmination of a series of exploratory missions that had begun in 1964 with Mariner 4 and continued with Mariner 6 and Mariner 7 flybys in 1969 and a Mariner 9 orbital mission in 1971 and 1972. The Viking mission used two identical spacecraft, each consisting of a lander and an orbiter. Launched on August 20, 1975 from the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, Viking 1 spent nearly a year cruising to Mars, placed an orbiter in operation around the planet, and landed on July, 20 1976 on the Chryse Planitia (Golden Plains). Viking 2 was launched on September 9, 1975 and landed on September 3, 1976. The Viking project's primary mission ended on November 15, 1976, 11 days before Mars's superior conjunction (its passage behind the sun), although the Viking spacecraft continued to operate for six years after first reaching Mars. The last transmission from the planet reached Earth on November 11, 1982.
While Viking 1 and 2 were on Mars, this third vehicle was used on Earth to simulate their behavior and to test their responses to radio commands. Earlier, it had been used to demonstrate that the landers could survive the stresses they would encounter during the mission.
NASA transferred this artifact to the Museum in 1979.
Long Description:
“Life as we know it with its humanity is more unique than many have thought.”—President Lyndon B. Johnson, “Remarks Upon Viewing New Mariner 4 Pictures from Mars,” July 29, 1965.
Viking
Mars had long held a special fascination for humans who pondered the planets of the solar system—partly because of the possibility that life might either presently exist or at some time in the past have existed there. Astronomer Percival Lowell became interested in Mars during the latter part of the nineteenth century, and he built what became the Lowell Observatory near Flagstaff, Arizona, to study the planet. He argued that Mars had once been a watery planet and that the topographical features known as canals had been built by intelligent beings. The idea of intelligent life on Mars remained in the popular imagination for a long time, and only with the first photographs from Mars by Mariner 4 in 1965 were the hopes of many dashed that life might be present on Mars. This images showed a cratered, ­lunar-­like surface without structures and canals, nothing that even remotely resembled a pattern that intelligent life might produce. U.S. News and World Report announced at the time that “Mars is dead.”
Later spacecraft, especially Mariners 6 and 7, in 1969, reexcited curiosity and laid the groundwork for an eventual landing on the planet. Their pictures verified the Moon‑like appearance of Mars, but they also found that volcanoes had once been active on the planet, that the frost observed seasonally on the poles was made of carbon dioxide, and that huge plates indicated considerable tectonic activity in the planet’s past. Suddenly, Mars fascinated scientists, reporters, and the public once again, largely because of the possibility of past life that might have existed there.
The Viking mission that emerged from this excitement consisted of two identical spacecraft, each with a lander and an orbiter. Launched in 1975 from the Kennedy Space Center, Florida, Viking 1 spent nearly a year cruising to Mars, placed an orbiter in operation around the planet, and landed on July 20, 1976, on the Chryse Planitia (Golden Plains), with Viking 2 following in September 1976. These were the first sustained landings on another planet in the solar system. While one of the most important scientific activities of this project involved an attempt to determine whether there was life on Mars, the scientific data returned mitigated against the possibility. The two landers continuously monitored weather at the landing sites and found both exciting cyclical variations and an exceptionally harsh climate that prohibited the possibility of life. Atmospheric temperatures at the more southern Viking 1 landing site, for instance, was only as high as +7 degrees Fahrenheit at midday, but the predawn summer temperature was ‑107 degrees Fahrenheit. And the lowest predawn temperature was ‑184 degrees Fahrenheit, about the frost point of carbon dioxide.
Although the three biology experiments contained on the landers discovered unexpected and enigmatic chemical activity in the Martian soil, they provided no clear evidence for the presence of living microorganisms in soil near the landing sites. According to scientists, Mars was self‑sterilizing. They concluded that the combination of solar ultraviolet radiation that saturates the surface, the extreme dryness of the soil, and the oxidizing nature of the soil chemistry had prevented the formation of living organisms in the Martian soil.
The failure to find any evidence of life on Mars, past or present, devastated the optimism of scientists involved in the search for extraterrestrial life. Collectively, these missions led to the development of two essential reactions. The first was an abandonment by most scientists that life might exist elsewhere in the Solar System. Planetary scientist and JPL director Bruce Murray complained at the time of Viking about the lander being ballyhooed as a definite means of ascertaining whether or not life existed on Mars. The public expected to find it, and so did many of the other scientists involved in the project. Murray argued that “the extraordinarily hostile environment revealed by the Mariner flybys made life there so unlikely that public expectations should not be raised.” Murray believed that the legacy of failure to detect life, despite the billions spent and a succession of overoptimistic statements, would spark public disappointment and perhaps a public outrage. Murray was right. The immediate result was that NASA did not return to Mars for two decades. The Viking Program’s chief scientist, Gerald A Soffen, commented in 1992: “If somebody back then had given me 100 to 1 odds that we wouldn’t go back to Mars for 17 years, I would’ve said, ‘You’re crazy’.”
The second reaction, never accepted by scientists, found a powerful public life. Some asserted that a corrupt Federal government, and its mandarins of science, had found evidence of life beyond Earth but was keeping it from the public for reasons ranging from stupidity to diabolical plots. NASA has had to respond to these charges repeatedly thereafter. This issue first arose on 25 July 1976 when the Viking 1 orbiter took an image of the Cydonia region of Mars that looked like a human face. All evidence suggests that this was the result of shadows on the hills, and Gerry Soffen said so at a press conference, but some refused to accept this position. The “face” remains a sore point to the present, with Soffen being asked about it many times over the years. Always, he stated it was not the remnant of some ancient civilization but was a natural feature lit oddly in this one image but not in any others. As NASA stated officially in 2001, “The ‘Face on Mars’ has since become a pop icon. It has starred in a Hollywood film, appeared in books, magazines, radio talk shows—even haunted grocery store checkout lines for 25 years! Some people think the Face is bona fide evidence of life on Mars—evidence that NASA would rather hide, say conspiracy theorists. Meanwhile, defenders of the NASA budget wish there was an ancient civilization on Mars.”
The artifact in the National Air and Space Museum’s collection is a structural dynamics test article transferred from NASA.
See more items in:
National Air and Space Museum Collection
Location:
National Air and Space Museum, Washington, DC
Exhibition:
Boeing Milestones of Flight Hall
Data Source:
National Air and Space Museum
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[Marx Brothers Surrealist cartoons from Theatre Arts : article photocopy.]

Collector:
Marx, Groucho (Julius Henry) (comedian) 1890-1977
Artist:
Dalí, Salvador 1904-
Creator:
Theatre Arts (magazine)
Physical description:
ink on paper
1 item, 8.1" x 6.5"
Type:
Cartoons (humorous images)
Works of art
Articles
Place:
United States
Date:
1939
C1939
1930-1960
20th century
Topic:
Comedians
Entertainers
Surrealism
Local number:
AC0269-0000006 (AC scan)
AC0269-0000007 (AC scan)
Summary:
Photocopies of Salvador Dali artwork (drawings or prints) published in Theatre Arts.
Cite as:
Groucho Marx Collection, Archives Center, National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution
See more items in:
Groucho Marx Collection 1911-1978
Data Source:
Archives Center - NMAH
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Newpaper article on Joseph Lindon Smith and his work

Creator:
Berryman, Florence Seville, 1900-1992
Physical description:
1 article 37 x 16 cm.
Type:
Printed/Published Materials
Date:
1950 June 11
Topic:
Exhibitions
Painters
Record number:
(DSI-AAA)8872
Summary:
Newspaper article from the Sunday Star, Washington, D.C.
See more items in:
Joseph Lindon Smith papers, 1647-1965, bulk 1873-1965
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
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Magazine article featuring the Luxembourg House in New York

Physical description:
Article : 4 p. : ill. ; 36 x 25 cm.
Type:
Printed/Published Materials
Place:
New York, N.Y.
Date:
between 1929 and 1947
Topic:
Interior design
Record number:
(DSI-AAA)11525
Summary:
This is an incomplete article from a magazine containing only four pages. Article and photographic illustrations are from the era when the house was inhabited by its first occupant, Secretary of Defense James Forrestal.
See more items in:
Harold Sterner papers, 1929-1978
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
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Newspaper article about Joseph Lindon Smith painting ancient Egyptian sculpture

Creator:
Boyd, Max
Subject:
Smith, Joseph Lindon
Physical description:
1 article : ill. ; 32 x 16 cm.
Type:
Printed/Published Materials
Date:
1948
Topic:
Painters
Sculpture
Record number:
(DSI-AAA)8871
Summary:
Newspaper article from the Providence Journal, Providence, R.I., 1948, about Joseph Lindon Smith and his work painting ancient Egyptian sculpture.
See more items in:
Joseph Lindon Smith papers, 1647-1965, bulk 1873-1965
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
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Article about Cecilia Beaux's physically moving art

Creator:
Philadelphia Bulletin
Subject:
Beaux, Cecilia
Physical description:
1 clipping 22 x 13 cm.
Type:
Printed/Published Materials
Date:
1914
Topic:
Exhibitions
Record number:
(DSI-AAA)8055
Summary:
Article measures 15 x 12 cm.
Identification on attachment (stamped): Argus Press clipping Bureau, Otto Spengler, Direcmor [sic], 352 Third Ave., New York.
See more items in:
Cecilia Beaux papers, 1863-1968
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
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"Room re-created", article from Ladies Home Journal

Subject:
Janeway, Carol
Physical description:
Clipping : 1 p. : ill. ; 35 x 27 cm.
Type:
Printed/Published Materials
Date:
ca. 1955
Topic:
Ceramics
Decorative arts
Record number:
(DSI-AAA)10102
Summary:
Henrietta Murdock's article features a photo of a blue and white sea-gull fireplace tile mural created by Carol Janeway.
See more items in:
Carol Janeway printed materials, 1948-1966
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
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Robsjohn-Gibbings article reprinted from Interior Design

Physical description:
Article : 11 p. : ill. ; 31 x 23 cm.
Type:
Printed/Published Materials
Date:
1961 May
Topic:
Furniture design
Illustrated periodicals
Record number:
(DSI-AAA)11453
Summary:
Only cover and page 4 opening have been scanned. Page 4 opening has five illustrations, captioned (in counterclockwise order): 1936, the first showroom at 515 Madison Avenue, mosaic floor, Greek klismos chairs, Greek accessories ; 1937, an office chair in birch, the oak chair is strapped in leather ; 1938, the famous Robsjohn-Gibbings chair, in walnut with linen upholstery ; 1939, showroom of jeweler Paul Flato, California, paneling is birch, strapped leather chairs ; 1940, gallery in residence now belonging to Conrad Hilton in California, James Dolena, architect.
One photograph is credited to Richard Garrison, and two to Maynard L. Parker, the rest uncredited.
See more items in:
Terence Harold Robsjohn-Gibbings papers, 1898-1977, bulk 1915-1977
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
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Article 26: Everyone has the Right to an Education

Designer:
Woody Pirtle, b. 1945
Client:
Amnesty International
Medium:
Off-set lithograph on white wove paper
Culture:
American
Type:
graphic design
Poster
Object Name:
Poster
Date:
2002
Credit Line:
Gift of Woody Pirtle
Accession Number:
2009-34-2
Rights:
© Woody Pirtle, Pirtle Design
Catalogue Status:
Research in Progress
Description:
Background of book pages being opened. Image is colored in green with white print. Vertically reading down at center is "Everyone Has the Right to Education". On top left corner is "Article 26" printed from the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.
See more items in:
Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum Collection
Drawings, Prints, and Graphic Design Department
Data Source:
Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
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Article 16: Everyone has the right to Marry

Designer:
Woody Pirtle, b. 1945
Client:
Amnesty International
Medium:
Off-set lithograph on white wove paper
Culture:
American
Type:
graphic design
Poster
Object Name:
Poster
Date:
2002
Credit Line:
Gift of Woody Pirtle
Accession Number:
2009-34-5
Rights:
© Woody Pirtle, Pirtle Design
Catalogue Status:
Research in Progress
Description:
Background of a ring standing up on it's edge. Image is colored in purple with white print. Vertically reading down at center is "Everyone has the Right to Marry". On top left corner is "Article 16" printed from the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.
See more items in:
Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum Collection
Drawings, Prints, and Graphic Design Department
Data Source:
Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
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