Smithsonian Institution

Search Results

Collections Search Center
26 documents - page 1 of 2

Charles Lindbergh and Alexis Carrel

Artist:
Samuel Johnson Woolf, 1880 - 1948
Sitter:
Charles Augustus Lindbergh, Jr., 4 Feb 1902 - 26 Aug 1974
Alexis Carrel, 1873 - 1944
Medium:
Oil on canvas
Dimensions:
76.2cm x 63.4cm (30" x 24 15/16"), Accurate
Type:
Painting
Date:
1938
Topic:
Clothing & Apparel\Dress Accessory\Eyeglasses
Equipment\Laboratory Equipment
Equipment\Laboratory Equipment\Beaker
Equipment\Laboratory Equipment\Test tube
Clothing & Apparel\Dress Accessory\Tie\Necktie
Nature & Environment\Animal\Bat
Alexis Carrel: Health and Medicine\Physician\Surgeon
Alexis Carrel: Science and Technology\Scientist\Biologist
Alexis Carrel: Nobel Prize
Charles Augustus Lindbergh, Jr.: Science and Technology\Scientist
Charles Augustus Lindbergh, Jr.: Military\Army\Officer\Brigadier General
Charles Augustus Lindbergh, Jr.: Literature\Writer\Novelist
Charles Augustus Lindbergh, Jr.: Science and Technology\Inventor
Charles Augustus Lindbergh, Jr.: Science and Technology\Aviator
Charles Augustus Lindbergh, Jr.: Society and Social Change\Reformer\Activist\Peace activist
Charles Augustus Lindbergh, Jr.: Pulitzer Prize
Charles Augustus Lindbergh, Jr.: Congressional Gold Medal
Portrait
Credit Line:
National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution
Object number:
NPG.87.TC2
Rights:
© Estate of S.J. Woolf
See more items in:
National Portrait Gallery Collection
Data Source:
National Portrait Gallery

Man, the unknown, by Alexis Carrel

Author:
Carrel, Alexis 1873-1944
Physical description:
xv p., 1 l., 346 p. 23 cm
Type:
Books
Date:
1935
Notes:
"First edition."
Topic:
Human beings
Call number:
GN24 .C314
GN24.C314
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries

Alexis Carrel (1873-1944)

Subject:
Carrel, Alexis 1873-1944
Rockefeller Institute for Medical Research
Type:
Black-and-white photographs
Summary:
Rockefeller Institute for Medical Research biologist and surgeon Alexis Carrel (1873-1944) won Nobel Prize in medicine in 1912. This is a reproduction of a magazine page.
Cite as:
Acc. 90-105 - Science Service, Records, 1920s-1970s, Smithsonian Institution Archives
Topic:
Biology
Medicine
Nobel Prizes
Local number:
SIA Acc. 90-105 [SIA2008-0370]
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution Archives

Alexis Carrel (1873-1944)

Subject:
Carrel, Alexis 1873-1944
Rockefeller Institute for Medical Research
Type:
Black-and-white photographs
Summary:
Rockefeller Institute for Medical Research biologist and surgeon Alexis Carrel (1873-1944) won Nobel Prize in medicine in 1912.
Cite as:
Acc. 90-105 - Science Service, Records, 1920s-1970s, Smithsonian Institution Archives
Topic:
Medicine
Nobel Prizes
Biology
Local number:
SIA Acc. 90-105 [SIA2008-0371]
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution Archives

Alexis Carrel (1873-1944)

Subject:
Carrel, Alexis 1873-1944
Rockefeller Institute for Medical Research
Type:
Black-and-white photographs
Summary:
Rockefeller Institute for Medical Research biologist and surgeon Alexis Carrel (1873-1944) won Nobel Prize in medicine in 1912. This is a copy of a studio photo inscribed to "Dr. Erwin F. Smith with my best regards, New York, January 14, 1927."
Cite as:
Acc. 90-105 - Science Service, Records, 1920s-1970s, Smithsonian Institution Archives
Topic:
Biology
Medicine
Nobel Prizes
Local number:
SIA Acc. 90-105 [SIA2008-0369]
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution Archives

Carrel flask

Physical Description:
glass (overall material)
Measurements:
average spatial: 1.6 cm x 10 cm x 3.8 cm; 5/8 in x 3 15/16 in x 1 1/2 in
Object Name:
carrel flask
Date made:
1930s-1950s
Description (Brief):
This object is a double arm Carrel flask with "12% liver" pencilled on its sandblasted spot.
From the 1920s through the 1950s biologists and medical researchers made a concerted effort to solve the problem of tissue culture—how to raise and maintain cells for scientific research. Part of the challenge was to create a home outside the body in which cells could survive.
Early methods of cell culture relied on the hanging-drop technique, in which tissue grew in a plasma clot suspended from a glass slide. The hanging-drop technique, however, posed several problems: cells in a clot were difficult to view under the microscope, cultures could not grow to a large size, and specimens were prone to contamination.
To address these issues, surgeon Alexis Carrel (1873–1944) of the Rockefeller Institute developed a new vessel for tissue culture, which came to bear his name. The Carrel flask featured an angled neck to prevent airborne particles from falling into the flask when it was open. Technicians could also sterilized the neck with a flame both before and after adding or removing nutrient broth.
The flask’s round flat base and in some cases, the use of thin, optically optimized glass facilitated the viewing of specimens under a microscope without removing them from their vessel.
This object was used in Dr. Wilton Earle’s (1902–1964) laboratory at the National Cancer Institute. Earle joined NCI in 1937 and served as head of its Tissue Culture Section from 1946 to 1964. He and his researchers were pioneers in the use of tissue culture for cancer research.
Sources:
Carrel, Alexis. “Tissue Culture and Cell Physiology.” Physiological Reviews 4, no. 1 (1924): 1–20.
Landecker, Hannah. Culturing Life: How Cells Became Technologies. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 2007.
National Museum of American History Accession Files 1991.0071 & 1997.0139
Subject:
Science & Scientific Instruments
Science & Mathematics
Health & Medicine
Science Under Glass
Credit Line:
Gift of the DeWitt Stetten, Jr. Museum of Medical Research, National Institutes of Health
ID Number:
1991.0071.10
Catalog number:
1991.0071.10
Accession number:
1991.0071
See more items in:
Medicine and Science: Biological Sciences
Science Under Glass
Exhibition:
History Highlights: Science Under Glass
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center

Additional Online Media:

Carrel flask

Physical Description:
glass (overall material)
Measurements:
average spatial: 3.5 cm x 7.7 cm x 5.2 cm; 1 3/8 in x 3 1/16 in x 2 1/16 in
Object Name:
carrel flask
Date made:
1930s-1950s
Description (Brief):
From the 1920s through the 1950s biologists and medical researchers made a concerted effort to solve the problem of tissue culture—how to raise and maintain cells for scientific research. Part of the challenge was to create a home outside the body in which cells could survive.
Early methods of cell culture relied on the hanging-drop technique, in which tissue grew in a plasma clot suspended from a glass slide. The hanging-drop technique, however, posed several problems: cells in a clot were difficult to view under the microscope, cultures could not grow to a large size, and specimens were prone to contamination.
To address these issues, surgeon Alexis Carrel (1873–1944) of the Rockefeller Institute developed a new vessel for tissue culture, which came to bear his name. The Carrel flask featured an angled neck to prevent airborne particles from falling into the flask when it was open. Technicians could also sterilized the neck with a flame both before and after adding or removing nutrient broth.
The flask’s round flat base and in some cases, the use of thin, optically optimized glass facilitated the viewing of specimens under a microscope without removing them from their vessel.
This object was used in Dr. Wilton Earle’s (1902–1964) laboratory at the National Cancer Institute. Earle joined NCI in 1937 and served as head of its Tissue Culture Section from 1946 to 1964. He and his researchers were pioneers in the use of tissue culture for cancer research.
Sources:
Carrel, Alexis. “Tissue Culture and Cell Physiology.” Physiological Reviews 4, no. 1 (1924): 1–20.
Landecker, Hannah. Culturing Life: How Cells Became Technologies. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 2007.
National Museum of American History Accession Files 1991.0071 & 1997.0139
Subject:
Science & Scientific Instruments
Science & Mathematics
Health & Medicine
Science Under Glass
Credit Line:
Gift of the DeWitt Stetten, Jr. Museum of Medical Research, National Institutes of Health
ID Number:
1991.0071.13
Catalog number:
1991.0071.13
Accession number:
1991.0071
See more items in:
Medicine and Science: Biological Sciences
Science Under Glass
Exhibition:
History Highlights: Science Under Glass
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center

Additional Online Media:

Carrel flask

Physical Description:
glass (overall material)
Measurements:
average spatial: 4.4 cm x 11.1 cm x 8.3 cm; 1 3/4 in x 4 3/8 in x 3 1/4 in
Object Name:
carrel flask
Date made:
1930s-1950s
Description (Brief):
From the 1920s through the 1950s biologists and medical researchers made a concerted effort to solve the problem of tissue culture—how to raise and maintain cells for scientific research. Part of the challenge was to create a home outside the body in which cells could survive.
Early methods of cell culture relied on the hanging-drop technique, in which tissue grew in a plasma clot suspended from a glass slide. The hanging-drop technique, however, posed several problems: cells in a clot were difficult to view under the microscope, cultures could not grow to a large size, and specimens were prone to contamination.
To address these issues, surgeon Alexis Carrel (1873–1944) of the Rockefeller Institute developed a new vessel for tissue culture, which came to bear his name. The Carrel flask featured an angled neck to prevent airborne particles from falling into the flask when it was open. Technicians could also sterilized the neck with a flame both before and after adding or removing nutrient broth.
The flask’s round flat base and in some cases, the use of thin, optically optimized glass facilitated the viewing of specimens under a microscope without removing them from their vessel.
This object was used in Dr. Wilton Earle’s (1902–1964) laboratory at the National Cancer Institute. Earle joined NCI in 1937 and served as head of its Tissue Culture Section from 1946 to 1964. He and his researchers were pioneers in the use of tissue culture for cancer research.
Sources:
Carrel, Alexis. “Tissue Culture and Cell Physiology.” Physiological Reviews 4, no. 1 (1924): 1–20.
Landecker, Hannah. Culturing Life: How Cells Became Technologies. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 2007.
National Museum of American History Accession Files 1991.0071 & 1997.0139
Subject:
Science & Scientific Instruments
Science & Mathematics
Health & Medicine
Science Under Glass
Credit Line:
Gift of the DeWitt Stetten, Jr. Museum of Medical Research, National Institutes of Health
ID Number:
1991.0071.16
Catalog number:
1991.0071.16
Accession number:
1991.0071
See more items in:
Medicine and Science: Biological Sciences
Science Under Glass
Exhibition:
History Highlights: Science Under Glass
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center

Additional Online Media:

Carrel flask

Physical Description:
glass (overall material)
Measurements:
overall: 3.5 cm; 1 3/8 in
Object Name:
Carrel flask
Date made:
1950s-1960s
Description (Brief):
Min Chueh Chang (1908–1991) used this Carrel flask in his laboratory at the Worchester Foundation for Experimental Biology. While Chang is perhaps best remembered for his role in the development of oral contraceptives in the early 1950s, he spent most of his career studying mammalian fertilization. His groundbreaking research with rabbits, hamsters, and other small mammals laid the foundation for the 1978 birth of the first human child conceived through in vitro fertilization.
In a 1959 paper detailing the procedure for rabbit in vitro fertilization, Chang described using Carrel flasks of 1.5 mL volume as the primary vessels for fertilization. Rabbit eggs and sperm united in the flask, placed on a gently rocking platform, and incubated for several hours. Eggs were then removed and transferred to a larger 8 mL Carrel flask and again incubated. These eggs were later removed and examined under a microscope to identify those which had been successfully fertilized, and had begun division and could therefore be implanted into recipient rabbit mothers.
From the 1920s through the 1950s biologists and medical researchers made a concerted effort to solve the problem of tissue culture—how to raise and maintain cells for scientific research. Part of the challenge was to create a home outside the body in which cells could survive.
Early methods of cell culture relied on the hanging-drop technique, in which tissue grew in a plasma clot suspended from a glass slide. The hanging-drop technique, however, posed several problems: cells in a clot were difficult to view under the microscope, cultures could not grow to a large size, and specimens were prone to contamination.
To address these issues, surgeon Alexis Carrel (1873–1944) of the Rockefeller Institute developed a new vessel for tissue culture, which came to bear his name. The Carrel flask featured an angled neck to prevent airborne particles from falling into the flask when it was open. Technicians could also sterilized the neck with a flame both before and after adding or removing nutrient broth.
The flask’s round flat base and in some cases, the use of thin, optically optimized glass facilitated the viewing of specimens under a microscope without removing them from their vessel.
Sources:
Carrel, Alexis. “Tissue Culture and Cell Physiology.” Physiological Reviews 4, no. 1 (1924): 1–20.
Chang, M. C. “Fertilization of Rabbit Ova in Vitro.” Nature 184, no. 4684 (1959): 466–67. doi:10.1038/184466a0.
Greep, Roy O. Min Chueh Chang 1908–1991. Washington D.C.: National Academies Press, 1995. http://www.nasonline.org/publications/biographical-memoirs/memoir-pdfs/chang-m-c.pdf.
Landecker, Hannah. Culturing Life: How Cells Became Technologies. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 2007.
National Museum of American History Accession File #1992.0555
Subject:
Science & Scientific Instruments
Science & Mathematics
Health & Medicine
Science Under Glass
ID Number:
1992.0555.050
Catalog number:
1992.0555.050
Accession number:
1992.0555
See more items in:
Medicine and Science: Biological Sciences
Science Under Glass
Exhibition:
History Highlights: Science Under Glass
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center

Carrel flask

Physical Description:
glass (overall material)
Measurements:
overall: 3.1 cm x 1.6 cm; 1 7/32 in x 5/8 in
Object Name:
Carrel flask
Date made:
1950s-1960s
Description (Brief):
Min Chueh Chang (1908–1991) used this Carrel flask in his laboratory at the Worchester Foundation for Experimental Biology. While Chang is perhaps best remembered for his role in the development of oral contraceptives in the early 1950s, he spent most of his career studying mammalian fertilization. His groundbreaking research with rabbits, hamsters, and other small mammals laid the foundation for the 1978 birth of the first human child conceived through in vitro fertilization.
In a 1959 paper detailing the procedure for rabbit in vitro fertilization, Chang described using Carrel flasks of 1.5 mL volume as the primary vessels for fertilization. Rabbit eggs and sperm united in the flask, placed on a gently rocking platform, and incubated for several hours. Eggs were then removed and transferred to a larger 8 mL Carrel flask and again incubated. These eggs were later removed and examined under a microscope to identify those which had been successfully fertilized, and had begun division and could therefore be implanted into recipient rabbit mothers.
From the 1920s through the 1950s biologists and medical researchers made a concerted effort to solve the problem of tissue culture—how to raise and maintain cells for scientific research. Part of the challenge was to create a home outside the body in which cells could survive.
Early methods of cell culture relied on the hanging-drop technique, in which tissue grew in a plasma clot suspended from a glass slide. The hanging-drop technique, however, posed several problems: cells in a clot were difficult to view under the microscope, cultures could not grow to a large size, and specimens were prone to contamination.
To address these issues, surgeon Alexis Carrel (1873–1944) of the Rockefeller Institute developed a new vessel for tissue culture, which came to bear his name. The Carrel flask featured an angled neck to prevent airborne particles from falling into the flask when it was open. Technicians could also sterilized the neck with a flame both before and after adding or removing nutrient broth.
The flask’s round flat base and in some cases, the use of thin, optically optimized glass facilitated the viewing of specimens under a microscope without removing them from their vessel.
Sources:
Carrel, Alexis. “Tissue Culture and Cell Physiology.” Physiological Reviews 4, no. 1 (1924): 1–20.
Chang, M. C. “Fertilization of Rabbit Ova in Vitro.” Nature 184, no. 4684 (1959): 466–67. doi:10.1038/184466a0.
Greep, Roy O. Min Chueh Chang 1908–1991. Washington D.C.: National Academies Press, 1995. http://www.nasonline.org/publications/biographical-memoirs/memoir-pdfs/chang-m-c.pdf.
Landecker, Hannah. Culturing Life: How Cells Became Technologies. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 2007.
National Museum of American History Accession File #1992.0555
Subject:
Science & Scientific Instruments
Science & Mathematics
Health & Medicine
Science Under Glass
ID Number:
1992.0555.074
Catalog number:
1992.0555.074
Accession number:
1992.0555
See more items in:
Medicine and Science: Biological Sciences
Science Under Glass
Exhibition:
History Highlights: Science Under Glass
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center

Carrel flask

Physical Description:
glass (overall material)
Measurements:
overall: 3.1 cm x 1.9 cm; 1 7/32 in x 3/4 in
Object Name:
Carrel flask
Date made:
1950s-1960s
Description (Brief):
Min Chueh Chang (1908–1991) used this Carrel flask in his laboratory at the Worchester Foundation for Experimental Biology. While Chang is perhaps best remembered for his role in the development of oral contraceptives in the early 1950s, he spent most of his career studying mammalian fertilization. His groundbreaking research with rabbits, hamsters, and other small mammals laid the foundation for the 1978 birth of the first human child conceived through in vitro fertilization.
In a 1959 paper detailing the procedure for rabbit in vitro fertilization, Chang described using Carrel flasks of 1.5 mL volume as the primary vessels for fertilization. Rabbit eggs and sperm united in the flask, placed on a gently rocking platform, and incubated for several hours. Eggs were then removed and transferred to a larger 8 mL Carrel flask and again incubated. These eggs were later removed and examined under a microscope to identify those which had been successfully fertilized, and had begun division and could therefore be implanted into recipient rabbit mothers.
From the 1920s through the 1950s biologists and medical researchers made a concerted effort to solve the problem of tissue culture—how to raise and maintain cells for scientific research. Part of the challenge was to create a home outside the body in which cells could survive.
Early methods of cell culture relied on the hanging-drop technique, in which tissue grew in a plasma clot suspended from a glass slide. The hanging-drop technique, however, posed several problems: cells in a clot were difficult to view under the microscope, cultures could not grow to a large size, and specimens were prone to contamination.
To address these issues, surgeon Alexis Carrel (1873–1944) of the Rockefeller Institute developed a new vessel for tissue culture, which came to bear his name. The Carrel flask featured an angled neck to prevent airborne particles from falling into the flask when it was open. Technicians could also sterilized the neck with a flame both before and after adding or removing nutrient broth.
The flask’s round flat base and in some cases, the use of thin, optically optimized glass facilitated the viewing of specimens under a microscope without removing them from their vessel.
Sources:
Carrel, Alexis. “Tissue Culture and Cell Physiology.” Physiological Reviews 4, no. 1 (1924): 1–20.
Chang, M. C. “Fertilization of Rabbit Ova in Vitro.” Nature 184, no. 4684 (1959): 466–67. doi:10.1038/184466a0.
Greep, Roy O. Min Chueh Chang 1908–1991. Washington D.C.: National Academies Press, 1995. http://www.nasonline.org/publications/biographical-memoirs/memoir-pdfs/chang-m-c.pdf.
Landecker, Hannah. Culturing Life: How Cells Became Technologies. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 2007.
National Museum of American History Accession File #1992.0555
Subject:
Science & Scientific Instruments
Science & Mathematics
Health & Medicine
Science Under Glass
ID Number:
1992.0555.075
Catalog number:
1992.0555.075
Accession number:
1992.0555
See more items in:
Medicine and Science: Biological Sciences
Science Under Glass
Exhibition:
History Highlights: Science Under Glass
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center

Carrel-Lindbergh Perfusion Pump

Inventor:
Lindbergh, Charles A.
Maker:
Hopf, Otto
Physical Description:
glass (overall material)
Measurements:
overall: 18 1/4 in x 7 1/4 in x 4 1/4 in; 46.355 cm x 18.415 cm x 10.795 cm
Object Name:
perfusion pump
Place made:
United States: New York, New York
Date made:
ca 1935
Description:
This perfusion pump was invented by aviator Charles Lindbergh and Dr. Alexis Carrel, recipient of the 1912 Nobel Prize for Physiology and Medicine for his work in vascular surgery.
The glass pump was used to preserve animal organs outside the body, by pushing "artificial blood" through the pump and into the organ by way of a tube connected to the organ's artery keeping the organ alive for weeks. The Lindbergh-Carrel perfusion pump led to the development of the heart-lung machine and the feasibility of stopping the heart for open-heart surgery.
Subject:
Science & Scientific Instruments
Science & Mathematics
Health & Medicine
Science Under Glass
Maker referenced:
Hallowell, Christopher. Charles Lindbergh's Artificial Heart
Credit Line:
Gift of Rockefeller Institute
ID Number:
MG*M-09361
Accession number:
224610
Catalog number:
M-09361
224610.13
See more items in:
Medicine and Science: Medicine
Science Under Glass
Exhibition:
History Highlights: Science Under Glass
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center

Carrel-Lindbergh perfusion pump

Inventor:
Lindbergh, Charles A.
Maker:
Hopf, Otto
Physical Description:
glass (overall material)
Measurements:
overall: 45 cm x 20 cm x 11 cm; 17 23/32 in x 7 7/8 in x 4 11/32 in
Object Name:
pump
perfusion pump
Place made:
United States: New York, New York
Date made:
ca 1935
Description:
This perfusion pump was invented by aviator Charles Lindbergh and Dr. Alexis Carrel, recipient of the 1912 Nobel Prize for Physiology and Medicine for his work in vascular surgery.
The glass pump was used to preserve animal organs outside the body, by pushing "artificial blood" through the pump and into the organ by way of a tube connected to the organ's artery keeping the organ alive for weeks. The Lindbergh-Carrel perfusion pump led to the development of the heart-lung machine and the feasibility of stopping the heart for open-heart surgery.
Subject:
Medical
Artificial Organs
Artificial Hearts
Health & Medicine
Related Publication:
Hallowell, Christopher. Charles Lindbergh's Artificial Heart
Credit Line:
Georgetown University
ID Number:
MG*M-12298
Accession number:
279576
Catalog number:
M-12298
See more items in:
Medicine and Science: Medicine
Artificial Hearts
Exhibition:
Exhibit:
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center

Carrel-Lindbergh Perfusion Pump

Inventor:
Lindbergh, Charles A.
Maker:
Hopf, Otto
Physical Description:
glass (overall material)
Measurements:
overall: 18 in x 7 1/2 in x 4 1/8 in; 45.72 cm x 19.05 cm x 10.4775 cm
Object Name:
perfusion pump
Place made:
United States: New York, New York
Date made:
ca 1935
Description:
This perfusion pump was invented by aviator Charles Lindbergh and Dr. Alexis Carrel, recipient of the 1912 Nobel Prize for Physiology and Medicine for his work in vascular surgery.
The glass pump was used to preserve animal organs outside the body, by pushing "artificial blood" through the pump and into the organ by way of a tube connected to the organ's artery keeping the organ alive for weeks. The Lindbergh-Carrel perfusion pump led to the development of the heart-lung machine and the feasibility of stopping the heart for open-heart surgery.
Subject:
Science & Scientific Instruments
Science & Mathematics
Health & Medicine
Science Under Glass
Maker referenced:
Hallowell, Christopher. Charles Lindbergh's Artificial Heart
Credit Line:
Georgetown University
ID Number:
MG*M-12299
Catalog number:
M-12299
Accession number:
279576
See more items in:
Medicine and Science: Medicine
Science Under Glass
Exhibition:
History Highlights: Science Under Glass
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center

Additional Online Media:

Cahiers de la Fondation française pour l'étude des problèmes humains ..

Author:
Fondation Alexis Carrel
Physical description:
v. diagrs. 24 cm
Type:
Periodicals
Date:
1945
1945-
Call number:
506.44.F66
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries

The immortalists : Charles Lindbergh, Dr. Alexis Carrel, and their daring quest to live forever / David M. Friedman

Charles Lindbergh, Dr. Alexis Carrel, and their daring quest to live forever
Author:
Friedman, David M. 1949-
Subject:
Lindbergh, Charles A (Charles Augustus) 1902-1974
Carrel, Alexis 1873-1944
Physical description:
337 p., [8] p. of plates : ill., ports. ; 24 cm
Type:
Books
Place:
United States
Date:
2007
C2007
20th century
Summary:
The true story of how, 75 years ago, two men--one the most famous man in the world, the other thought by many to be the world's smartest--searched for a scientific path to a life without death. In 1927 Lindbergh was the first person to fly non-stop from New York to Paris, a feat most people then thought impossible. In 1930, Lindbergh met Alexis Carrel, then regarded as the most brilliant doctor who ever lived. Lindbergh's sister-in-law suffered from a heart condition that her doctors deemed hopeless, and he didn't understand why they could not simply replace her heart with a mechanical pump. Carrel himself was pursuing similar ideas, and a friendship and scientific partnership began, attempting to build a machine that could keep whole organs alive. They thought that this process could potentially render certain chosen human beings immortal.--From publisher description.
Topic:
Immortality
Life spans (Biology)--Research
Preservation of organs, tissues, etc--Research
Medical technology--Research
Medical technology--History
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries

Oil Flask for Carrel-Lindbergh Perfusion Pump

Designer:
Lindbergh, Charles A.
Physical Description:
glass (overall material)
Measurements:
overall: 18 3/8 in x 6 3/4 in x 5 in; 46.6725 cm x 17.145 cm x 12.7 cm
Object Name:
oil flask for perfusion pump
Place made:
United States: New York, New York
Date made:
ca 1935
Description (Brief):
This oil flask, designed by Charles Lindbergh, was used in conjunction with the Lindbergh-Carrel perfusion pump (see record MG*M-09361) in experiments at Rockefeller Institute to keep small animal organs alive outside of the body. The organ was kept sterile within the inner chambers of the perfusion pump while a nutrient-rich fluid was pumped into the organ’s artery. The oil flask provided the pulsating power for the system. When connected to the pump, the flask operated like an oil piston to drive the nutrient solution through the animal organ. The flask, like the perfusion pump, was made from Pyrex glass by master glassblower Otto Hopf, who worked at Rockefeller Institute at the time Alexis Carrel (1873–1944) was carrying out his investigations in tissue and organ culture.
The oil flask consists of two chambers and seven openings. When in operation it was partially filled with oil and connected through rubber tubing to a gas cylinder, an air tank, and several perfusion pumps. Pulses of air entered the outer chamber of the flask at the lower valve, driving oil up through the inner chamber and compressing the control gas, which entered the upper chamber at one of the top valves. This compressed gas transmitted pulses of pressure to the perfusion pumps, which drove the perfusion fluid through the pump and to the animal organ resting in the upper chamber. The oil flask was designed to operate three perfusion pumps, a configuration that was utilized by Lindbergh and Carrel in their experiments. Lindbergh describes in detail the perfusion pump, oil flask, and the apparatus assembly in his 1935 article “An Apparatus for the Culture of Whole Organs” and in the 1938 book The Culture of Organs.
Sources:
Carrel, Alexis, and Charles A. Lindbergh. The Culture of Organs. New York: P.B. Hoeber, Inc., 1938.
Lindbergh, C. A. “An Apparatus for the Culture of Whole Organs.” The Journal of Experimental Medicine 62.3 (1935): 409–31. PMC. Web. 14 July 2015. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2133279/
Location:
Currently not on view
Subject:
Science & Scientific Instruments
Science & Mathematics
Health & Medicine
Science Under Glass
Maker referenced:
Hallowell, Christopher. Charles Lindbergh's Artificial Heart
Credit Line:
Gift of Rockefeller Institute
ID Number:
MG*M-09362
Catalog number:
M-09362
224610.14
Accession number:
224610
See more items in:
Medicine and Science: Medicine
Science Under Glass
Data Source:
National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center

Letter [manuscript]

Author:
Carrel, Alexis 1873-1944
Donor:
Burndy Library DSI
Physical description:
1 item (2 p.)
Type:
Manuscripts
Date:
1912
Summary:
A.L.S. (1912 Oct. 20, New York) to Mr. Downer declining an invitation to a celebration in Carrel's honor ; in French.
Call number:
MSS306 A
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries

Wound treatment, past to present : with reference to Karl v. Reichenbach, Joseph Lister, Louis Pasteur, Alexis Carrel and others / by Karel B. Absolon

Wound treatment
Author:
Absolon, Karel B
Physical description:
166 p. : ill. (some col.), map, ports. ; 23 cm
Type:
Books
Date:
1999
Topic:
Wounds and injuries--Treatment--History
Call number:
RD93 .A27 1999
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries

Human biology and racial welfare; contributors: Walter B. Cannon, Alexis Carrell, Edmund V. Cowdry [and others] ... Edited by Edmund V. Cowdry ... with an introduction by Edwin R. Embree ..

Author:
Cowdry, E. V (Edmund Vincent) 1888-1975
Physical description:
xviii, 612 p. illus., diagrs. 24 cm
Type:
Books
Date:
1930
Topic:
Human beings
Biology
Evolution
Call number:
QH368 .C87
QH368.C87
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries

Modify Your Search






or


Narrow By
Filter results to a specific time period.