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Miscellaneous vocabularies of 32 different tribes

Collector:
Bartlett, J. H
Husband, Bruce
Encinas Fr
Whipple, Amiel Weeks Lieutenant, U. S. Army
Brown, H. B
Heintzelman Major
Duralde, Martin
Informant:
Cawewas, Pedro
Peraza, Hieronymo
Alejo, Marcos
Ortiz, Santiago
A-he-ba-tu
Esteban
Colusio
Physical description:
183 numbered pages
Culture:
Kiowa Indians
Nahuatlan
Athapascan Indians
Tanoan Indians
Yuman Indians
Pujunan
Athapaskan
Siouan Indians
Serian
Piman Indians
Tanoan
Yuman
Wakashan Indians
Shoshonean Indians
Kulanapan
Otomian
Chitimachan
Attacapan
Mayan
San Luis Rey
Indians of North America California
Pomo Indians
Maidu Indians
Arctic peoples
Indians of North America Subarctic
Indians of North America Great Basin
Shoshoni Indians
Indians of North America Northwest Coast of North America
Indians of North America Great Plains
Indians of North America Southwest, New
Seri Indians
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Topic:
Dakota language; Mayo dialect (Piman); Kumiai language; Central Pomo language
Kiowa language
Seri language
Yaqui language
Opata language
Chiricahua language
Maricopa language
Yuma language
Maidu language
Makah language
Luiseño language
Comanche language
Chumash language
Cocopa language
Mohave language
Chitimacha language
Atakapa language
Tarahumara language
Pima Bajo language
Tewa language
Otomi language
Language and languages--Documentation
Local number:
NAA MS 1627
Summary:
On page 129-134, there is a Comanche vocabulary alongside with Spanish and Luiseno. Follows items called for in Smithsonian Institution Comparative Vocabulary. Some Comanche terms lacking.
Contents: Bartlett, John R. "Cochimi language of Lower California obtained through Mr Robinia of Guaymas, Sonora." No date. [post 1852] Autograph document. pages 215-218 in bound volume of vocabularies. Vocabulary written in "American Ethnological Society Circular Number 1, Indian Languages of America, June, 1852," a printed outline of 200 words. Negative microfilm on file. Heintzelman, Major S. P. Vocabulary of the Cocopa language. Fort Yuma, Colorado, April 19, 1854. Copy by Bartlett, pages 165-166. Heintzelmam, Major S. P. Vocabulary of the Mohavi or Hum-mock-havy taken by Major Heintzelman. Copy by Bartlett, pages 167-176. Copy in another hand in printed outline published by American Ethnological Society, pages 177-180. On negative Microfilm reel #37. Comanche San Luis Rey [Bartlett, John R.] San Luis Rey- Comanche comparative vocabulary. No informant or date is recorded for the Comanche vocabulary of about 150 words, pages 129-135. All pages are in the handwriting of George Gibbs, here not specifically attributed to Bartlett. However, penciled note on another copy of the Comanche vocabulary (Bureau of American Ethnology Manuscript Number 762) states "probably of J. R. Bartlett." Approximately 5 extra Comanche terms are listed in 1627 which were not copied into the manuscript filed under 762.
Contents: San Luis Rey Comanche [Bartlett, John R.] San Luis Rey- Comanche comparative vocabulary. San Luis Rey vocabulary of about 180 words, pages 128-135. May 10, 1852. All pages are copies in handwriting of George Gibbs, here not specifically attributed to Bartlett, but so attributed to Bartlett, but so attributed in another copy, namely, Bureau of American Ethnology Manuscript Number 772. According to the discussion, pages 128 and 135, vocabulary was recorded from Pedro Cawewas, an old man called the captain or chief of his tribe, about 150 of which now live where the mission of San Luis Rey is situated. Tiwa: Piro [Bartlett, John R.] Piro vocabulary of about 180 words, pages 53-54, and another copy, pages 67-68. "Language of the Piros," discussion, pages 55-59. No date. [Ca. October 2, 1852: date on "Tigua" (Piro ?) vocabulary immediately following on pages 63-65.] All pages are copies in handwriting of George Gibbs, here not specifically attributed to Bartlett, but so attributed in other copies, namely, Bureau of American Ethnology Numbers 458-b and 458-c. According to discussion, page 55, vocabulary was recorded from Hieronymo Peraza and Marcus Alejo, principal men of the pueblo of "Sinecu" [Senecu del Sur, Chihuahua] a few miles below El Paso de Norte, on the western bank of the Rio Grande. Tiwa: Senecu del Sur (Piro ?) [Bartlett, John R.] "Tigua" vocabulary of about 200 words, pages 63-65. October 2, 1852. Copy in handwriting of George Gibbs, here not specifically attributed to Bartlett, but was so attributed in other copies, namely, Bureau of American Ethnology Numbers 458-a and 458-c. Note following heading: "[Language of ?] Indians of Taos, in New Mexico (pronounced Tee-wa) [sic] taken from Santiago Ortiz (A-he-ba-tu) head chief of Senecu, Isleta, etc. [i. e. Senecu del Sur, Chihuahua; see Bureau of American Ethnology Bulletin 30, II, 509.]" Bartlet's Vocabularies ? 1. Pages 17-19 Sioux vocabulary, translated into Sioux by Bruce Husband, Fort Laramie, February 26, 1849. 2 pages. 2. Pages 21-24 Kiowa vocabulary, from Esteban, a Mexican captive for 7 years among the Comanches and Kiowas in Texas. 5 pages. 3. Pages 25-27 cf. Manuscript 1139- a copy of this. Ceris (Seri) vocabulary taken from a native at Hermosillo, January 1, 1852 (note by Gatschet says 1853). Informant- Colusio. 3 pages. 4. Pages 31-34 Yaqui vocabulary by Fr. Encinas of Ures, December 1851. 4 pages, including notes. 5. Pages 37-39 Opate (Nahuatlan) vocabulary, taken at Ures, Sonora. 3 pages. 6. Pages 43-45; 49-51. Apaches of the Coppermine, taken from Mangus Colorado July, 1851. 3 pages. (also duplicate copy). 7. Pages 53-59; 57 Piro (Tanoaan) vocabulary, taken from two Indians, Hieromymo Peraza and Marcus Alejo. 2 pages. Notes 5 pages. 8. Pages 63-65 "Tigua " [Tiwa] Indians of Taos in New Mexico vocabulary, taken from Santiago Ortiz, head chief of Senecu, Isleta, etc. 3 pages.
Contents: 9. Pages 71-73 Vocabulary of the language of the Coco-Maricopas of the river Gila (Yumian). 3 pages. 10. Pages 77-81; 85-92; Reel #21 Vocabulary of the Diegueno tribe, vocabulary, 8 pages; and 11. Los Angeles Indians, Diegueno tribe, vocabulary, 8 pages. 12. Pages 93-103 Yuman or Cuchan and Comiya (Comeya) vocabulary and notes, 11 pages, including extract from Lt Whipple's diary, October 7, 1849. 13. Pages 105-6; 109-10 13. Vocabulary in the Digger (Pujunan) [Maidu] language, from manuscript in the possession of J. B. Moore obtained by H. B. Brown. 4 pages. 14. Pages 113-116 Napa Valley (Digger) [Pujunan] vocabulary. 3 pages. 15. Pages 117-123 Makah of Cape Flattery and Diggers [Pujunan] of Napa Valley- vocabulary. 6 pages. 16. Pages 125-128 Kechi (Mission of San Luis Rey) vocabulary. Taken from Pedro Cawenas, May 10, 1852, San Luis Rey. Notes. 17. Pages 129-35 San Luis Rey and Comanche vocabulary. 7 pages. Taken from Pedro Cawewas. Includes notes. 18. Pages 137-39. San Luis Obispo vocabulary. 3 pages. 19. Pages 141-144 San Jose Indian vocabulary. 4 pages including notes.
Contents: Bartlett's vocabularies. 20. Pages 145-152 H'hana of Sacramento (Kulanapan) vocabulary, 6 pages. 21. Pages 155-159 Coluse (between Sacramento River and Clear Lake), vocabulary- 6 words only. Erroneously marked Athapaskan in Hewitt's hand. Actually Patwin and Wintun; see word for "Indian"- Note by M. R. Haas. 11/58. Items 21 ans 22: See Pitkin, Harvey and William Shipley, Comparative Survey of California Penutian, IJAL, Volume 24, Number 3, July, 1958, pages 174-88. (Reference from MRH). 22. Coluse and Noema vocabulary. 3 pages. 23. Page 163 Tehama vocabulary. 1 page. 24. Pages 165-66 Cocopa vocabulary. (Fort Yuma, Colorado, Mouth of the Colorado River). 2 pages. April 19, 1854. 25. Pages 167-180 Mohave vocabulary. Major Heintzelman. 14 pages including notes. 26. Pages 181-84 Otomi (Mexico) vocabulary. 3 pages. (1767 and 1826). 27. Pages 186-201 Chitimacha and Attacapa vocabularies and notes. 15 pages. (1848) 28. Pages 203-206 Maya vocabulary. From manuscript dictionary in possession of John Carter Brown. 3 pages. 29. Pages 207-210 Tarahumara vocabulary. 3 pages. (1787 and 1826). 30. Pages 211-214 Cahita (Sonora) vocabulary. 3 pages. 31. Pages 215-18 Cochimi (of Lower California), vocabulary. 3 pages. 32. Pages 219-221 Nevome (Pima of Sonora) vocabulary. 2 pages. (printed). 33. Pages 223-224 Letter to John R. Bartlett from George Gibbs re. to vocabularies. 3 pages.
Contents: Smith, Buckingham. "Vocabulary of the Nevome, As Spoken by the Pima of Moris, A Town of Sonora." 1861, and prior. Printed document. 2 pages. On pages 219 and 221 of this Manuscript. Published excerpt from History Magazine, July, 1861, pages 202-203. Contains grammatical notes, general vocabulary, and the Lord's Prayer in the Nevome dialect of Piman.
Cite as:
Manuscript 1627, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
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Numbered manuscripts 1850s-1980s (some earlier)
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National Anthropological Archives
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Kaivawit [Kaibab] vocabulary ca. 1870's

Creator:
Powell, John Wesley Major
Physical description:
146 pages
Culture:
Paiute Kaibab numbers
Paiute Kaibab implements
Paiute Kaibab utensils
Paiute Kaibab parts of body
Paiute Kaibab kinship
Paiute Kaibab dress
Paiute Kaibab weather
Paiute Kaibab winter moons
Paiute Kaibab bird names
Paiute Kaibab geography
Paiute Kaibab animal names
Paiute Kaibab reptile names
Paiute Kaibab fish names
Paiute Kaibab colors
Paiute Kaibab fruits
Paiute Kaibab tribe names
Paiute Kaibab personal names
Paiute Kaibab grammar
Paiute Kaibab supernatural beings
Paiute Kaibab time
Paiute Kaibab plants
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Date:
ca 1870s
Topic:
Tools and implements--Paiute
Kinship--Paiute
Clothing--Paiute
Weather--Paiute
Zoology--Paiute
Geography--Paiute
Colors--Paiute
Fruit--Paiute
Names, tribal--Paiute
Names, personal--Paiute
Atime--Paiute
Language and languages--Documentation
Local number:
NAA MS 1494
Summary:
Dictionary of Kaibab Paiute dialect of Ute. Extensive.
Contents: Persons Original page Number 1; Consecutive page Number in []. 1. Parts of the body 2, 2. Terms denoting relationship 5, 5. Numerals (including ordinals) 13, 14. Implements and utensils 14, 20. Dress and ornaments 20, 27. Firmament and meteorological phenomena 24, 31. Time 29, 36. Winter moons 30, 37. Geographical terms 31, 38. Geographic names 38, 50. Animals 40, 61. Birds 44, 64. Reptiles 47, 68. Insects 48, 69. Fish 49, 70. Colors 50, 71. Plants, fruits, etc. 51, 72. Names of tribes, and proper names 55, 76. Nouns 58, 79. Adjectives 70, 96. Comparison of adjectives 76, 102. Pronouns (including number and cases) 78, 104. Verbs 80, 109. Adverbs 100, 131. Prepositions 104, 135. Interjections 106, 137. Prefixes and suffixes 107, 138. Phrases 108, 139. Sprites, spirits, etc. 112, 144. Mythological 113, 145. "To be looked up" 114, 146.
Cite as:
Manuscript 1494, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
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Numbered manuscripts 1850s-1980s (some earlier)
Data Source:
National Anthropological Archives
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Vocabulary

Creator:
ANONYMOUS
Physical description:
6 pages
Culture:
Kwakiutl Indians
Indians of North America Northwest Coast of North America
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Topic:
Language and languages--Documentation
Local number:
NAA MS 984
Cite as:
Manuscript 984, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
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Numbered manuscripts 1850s-1980s (some earlier)
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National Anthropological Archives
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Vocabularies and notes based on material collected by Horatio Hale from enslaved African-Brazilians

Creator:
Hale, Horatio
Subject:
United States Exploring Expedition (1838-1842)
Physical description:
98 pages
Type:
Articles
Collection descriptions
Vocabulary
Place:
Africa
Topic:
Body decoration
Makonde language
Ndau language
Kongo language
Makhuwa language
Language and languages--Documentation
Linguistics
Local number:
NAA ACC 76-120 (part)
SI LIB MS 68 (part)
NAA MS 7235
Summary:
This manuscript probably represents what Horatio Hale originally intended to publish on southern Africa in his Philology and Ethnology that is one of the volumes of the report of the United States Exploring Expedition (Wilkes Expedition). It includes several vocabularies, comparative vocabularies, and notes on the location and appearance (especially the cicatrization and other body decoration) of African tribes.
Cite as:
Manuscript 7235, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Data Source:
National Anthropological Archives
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1 Page(s) matching your search term, top most relevant ones are shown: View entire completed project in transcription center

Voyages du baron de Lahontan dans l'Amerique Septentrionale : qui contiennent une rélation des différens peuples qui y habitent : la nature de leur gouvernement, leur commerce, leurs coûtumes, leur religion, & leur maniére de faire la guerre : l'intérêt des François & des Anglois dans le commerce qu'ils font avec ces nations l'avantage que l'Angleterre peut retirer de ce païs, étant en guerre avec la France : le tout enrichi de cartes & de figures

Memoires de l'Amerique Septentrionale, ou, La suite des voyages de Mr. Le baron de LahontanSuite du voyage de l'Amerique, ou, Dialogues de Monsieur le baron de Lahontan et d'un sauvage d'un sauvage de l'Amerique
Author:
Lahontan, Louis Armand de Lom d'Arce baron de 1666-1715?
Former owner:
Dwight, Jonathan 1858-1929 DSI
Tucker, Marcia Brady DSI
Rau, Charles 1826-1887 DSI
Physical description:
3 v., [33] leaves of plates (11 folded) : ill. (etchings), maps ; 17 cm. (12mo)
Type:
Early works to 1800
Dictionaries
Glossaries, vocabularies, etc
Place:
Canada
Portugal
Denmark
Date:
1728
To 1763 (New France)
Topic:
French language--Algonquian
Algonquian languages--French
Wyandot language
Description and travel
History
Call number:
F1030 .L18 1728
F1030.L18 1728
Notes:
Tome 2 has title: Memoires de l'Amerique Septentrionale, ou, La suite des voyages de Mr. Le baron de Lahontan. T. 3 has title: Suite du voyage de l'Amerique, ou Dialogues de Monsieur le baron de Lahontan et d'un sauvage d'un sauvage de l'Amerique.
First edition, La Haye, 1708.
Imprint varies, t. 3: A Amsterdam : chez la Veuve de Boeteman, 1728.
"Dictionaire de la langue des sauvages": t. 2, p. 220-238.
The "Petit dictionaire" consists of a French-Algonquian vocabulary and a short French-Huron vocabulary.
Titles in red and black; woodcut title vignettes, head- and tail-pieces, initials.
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
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Vocabulary of "Miduan tribes"

Creator:
Merriam, C. Hart (Clinton Hart) 1855-1942
Physical description:
91 pages
Culture:
Maidu personal names
Maidu body parts (names)
Maidu animal names
Maidu bird names
Maidu plant names
Maidu Indians
Indians of North America California
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Topic:
Names, personal--Maidu
Zoology--Maidu
Botany--Maidu
Language and languages--Documentation
Local number:
NAA MS 4569-c
Summary:
Includes names of persons, parts of the body, 41 pages (also carbon copy); names of animals, birds, and plants, 50 pages.
Cite as:
Manuscript 4569-c, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
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Numbered manuscripts 1850s-1980s (some earlier)
Data Source:
National Anthropological Archives
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Vocabulary 1886

Collector:
McCaw, Samuel R
Physical description:
109 pages
Culture:
Salishan Indians
Indians of North America Plateau
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Date:
1886
Topic:
Language and languages--Documentation
Local number:
NAA MS 650
Summary:
Consists of 576 terms in Powell, partly filled.
Cite as:
Manuscript 650, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
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Numbered manuscripts 1850s-1980s (some earlier)
Data Source:
National Anthropological Archives
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Seneca Morphology and Dictionary

Author:
Chafe, Wallace L.
Object Type:
Smithsonian staff publication
Electronic document
Year:
1967
Citation:
Smithsonian Contributions to Anthropology, 4: 1-126.
Abstract:
This work is an extended description of the structure of words in the Seneca language. A description of the grammar of Seneca words has already been published in the International Journal of American Linguistics (Chafe, 1960, 1961 a). A major omission from that work, however, was a comprehensive list of the verb roots, noun roots, and particles of the language, with specification of their grammatical peculiarities and examples of their use. The present work is designed to fill that gap. Its chief purpose is to make available a Seneca dictionary, or lexicon. Since, however, the dictionary contains many references to paragraphs in the Seneca Morphology mentioned above, it was thought useful to republish that work as part of this volume. Republication seems all the more useful in view of the fact that the original Seneca Morphology is scattered through eight numbers of two different volumes of the journal. Minor revisions and corrections have been made, but extensive changes, however desirable they might have been, were out of the question because the references in the dictionary were already keyed to paragraph numbers in the original version, as were the references given in the Grammatical Commentary of Seneca Thanksgiving Rituals (Chafe, 1961 b).
Seneca is at present the native language of a few thousand persons, most of whom live on the Allegany, Cattaraugus, and Tonawanda Reservations in western New York State and on the Grand River Reserve in Ontario, Canada. There are few if any speakers now under 30 years of age. Seneca is historically important as the language of the Five (now Six) Nations of the Iroquois and as the language of Handsome Lake, the Iroquois prophet (Parker, 1913; for a history of the Seneca see Parker, 1926). Within the Iroquoian language family, Seneca is a member of the Northern Iroquoian subgroup, which includes also Cayuga, Onondaga, Oneida, Mohawk, and Tuscarora among the languages still spoken. Seneca is most closely related to Cayuga, but the two are different enough to be considered separate languages. The dialect differentiation within Seneca itself is minor. Earlier works on Seneca include several brief grammatical sketches (Voegelin and Preston, 1949, and Holmer, 1952, 1953, 1954) and texts (Hewitt, 1903, 1918). A list of still earlier sources is available in Pilling (1888).
The material on which this work is based was obtained during four summers of fieldwork, 1956-59, on the three New York reservations. It consists of an extensive corpus of Seneca words and texts, including formal speeches, legends, historical accounts, and conversations. I am deeply grateful for the assistance provided by numerous speakers of Seneca, above all by Solon Jones and Leroy Button of the Cattaraugus Reservation, Lena P. Snow, Tessie Snow, and Edward Curry of the Allegany Reservation, and Corbett Sundown and Betsy Carpenter of the Tonawanda Reservation. Appreciation is also due to William N. Fenton, Floyd G. Lounsbury, the Smithsonian Institution, Yale University, and especially to the New York State Museum and Science Service, under whose auspices the fieldwork was conducted. Both the Smithsonian Institution and the University of California provided support for the completion of the manuscript, and thanks are due to Karlena Glemser, Myra Rothenberg, and Aura Cuevas for their help in this regard.
The lexicon of a language is a vast terrain which no one could hope to explore fully during a few scattered field trips. Although grammatical analysis can perhaps lead to a point of diminishing returns after a reasonable period of investigation, I doubt that such a point has even been approached for the vocabularies of any languages except those few which have a long tradition of lexicography. Certainly the experience which I and others have had with American Indian languages refutes the ethnocentric myth that such languages are poor in their means of expression. What is given in the dictionary of this work is simply what I was able to obtain in a period that was totally inadequate for the purpose.
In making this lexical material available, I have had several possible uses of it in mind. I should say first that I have not intended that anyone should use it for learning to speak the Seneca language, although I would be very happy if someone were to find it helpful for that purpose. Above all I have wanted to provide data that can be used in comparative Iroquoian studies. Such work is stymied, as it is in most American Indian language families, by the absence of detailed lexical material. This is the first modern dictionary of any Iroquoian language, and I fervently hope that other and better ones will follow. Reconstruction, subgrouping, and the possible establishment of relationships outside the family cannot proceed without them. Second, the listing of roots with examples of their use will serve to elucidate the morphological patterns of the language beyond the few examples provided in the morphology, and to show something of the scope and frequency of constructions mentioned there. I regret the absence of syntactic examples; this compilation is a byproduct of a preoccupation with morphology. Examples of syntactic patterns as well as further morphological examples may be culled from my "Seneca Thanksgiving Rituals" and from Hewitt's texts. Finally, this material may prove useful in "language and culture" studies of various kinds.
Doi:
10.5479/si.00810223.4.1
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Smithsonian Libraries
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Vocabulary of the Indian Language of the Tou-tou-ten Tribe

Creator:
Kautz, August Valentine
Physical description:
8 pages
Culture:
Tututni Indians
Indians of North America Northwest Coast of North America
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Topic:
Language and languages--Documentation
Local number:
NAA MS 199
Cite as:
Manuscript 199, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
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Numbered manuscripts 1850s-1980s (some earlier)
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National Anthropological Archives
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New voyages to North-America : Containing an account of the several nations of that vast continent : their customs, commerce, and way of navigation upon the lakes and rivers : the several attempts of the English and French to dispossess one another : with the reasons of the miscarriage of the former : and the various adventures between the French, and the Iroquese confederates of England, from 1683 to 1694. A geographical description of Canada, and a natural history of the country, with remarks upon their government, and the interest of the English and French in their commerce. Also a dialogue between the author and a general of the savages, giving a full view of the religion and strange opinions of those people : with an account of the author's retreat to Portugal and Denmark and his remarks on those courts. To which is added, a dictionary of the Algonkine language, which is generally spoke in North-America : illustrated with twenty three mapps and cutts / Written in French by the Baron Lahontan, lord lievtenant of the French colony at Placentia in Newfoundland, now in England. Done into English, in two volumes. A great part of which never printed in the original

Some new voyages to North-America
Author:
Lahontan, Louis Armand de Lom d'Arce baron de 1666-1716
Engraver:
Moll, Herman d. 1732
Physical description:
2 v., [23] leaves of plates (some folded) : ill., maps ; 20 cm. (8vo)
Type:
Early works to 1800
Glossaries, vocabularies, etc
Place:
Canada
Portugal
Denmark
Date:
1703
To 1763 (New France)
Topic:
Algonquin language
Wyandot language
Description and travel
History
Call number:
F1030 .L1813 1703
Notes:
Translation of: Nouveaux voyages de Mr. le baron de Lahontan dans l'Amerique septentrionale.
Vol. 2 has title: New voyages to North-America. Giving a full account of the customs, commerce, religion, and strange opinions of the savages of that country. With political remarks upon the courts of Portugal and Denmark, and the present state of the commerce of those countries ...
"The engravings are by H. Moll"--Sabin.
Title pages with double-rule borders.
Pagination of each v.: v. 1. [24], 280 p., [12] leaves of plates; v. 2. [2], 302, [16] p. (final p. is blank), [11] leaves of plates.
Includes index at end of v. 2.
Errata in v. 1, p. [24] (1st group).
Publisher's advertisement on p. [1] (3rd group) of v. 2.
Sabin 38644
Pilling, J.C. Bib. of the Algonquian languages, p. 290-291
Contents:
v. 1. Some new voyages to North-America (letters I-XXV). Memoirs of North-America. A table explaining some terms made use of in both volumes -- v. 2. A discourse of the habit, houses, complexion and temperament of the savages of North-America. A conference or dialogue between the author and Adario, a noted man among the savages. An appendix, containing some new voyages to Portugal and Denmark. A short dictionary of the most universal language of the savages. Index
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Smithsonian Libraries
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Vocabulary 1857 ?

Collector:
Gibbs, George
Physical description:
7 pages
Culture:
Kwakiutl Indians
Indians of North America Northwest Coast of North America
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Date:
1857
Topic:
Language and languages--Documentation
Local number:
NAA MS 977
Cite as:
Manuscript 977, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
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Data Source:
National Anthropological Archives
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Notes on sign language and miscellaneous ethnographic notes on Plains Indians 1934

Creator:
Scott, Hugh Lenox General
Dunbar, John Brown
He Dog
Red Feather
Whirling
Addressee:
Wissler, Clark
Subject:
Pitelesharo Chief
Brugiere, Johnny
Bureau of Indian Affairs
Physical description:
4 boxes
2,736 pages
Culture:
Dakota Indians
Blackfoot
Cheyenne Indians
Chippewa
American Indian Digger Indians
Flathead
Gros Ventre Indians (Montana)
Hopi
Kiowa Indians
Navajo Indians
Wichita Indians
Osage Indians
Apache Indians
Mandan Indians
Arikara Indians
Hidatsa Indians
Cree Indians
Crow Indians
Comanche Indians
Nez Percé Indians
Shoshoni Indians
Arapaho Indians
Atsina Indians
Bannock Indians
Ute Indians
Pawnee Indians
Delaware Indians
Slave
Chipewyan Indians
Caddo Indians
Assiniboine Indians
Sarsi Indians
Kiowa Apache Indians
Piegan Indians
Ponka
Yampa Indians
Indians of North America Subarctic
Indians of North America Great Basin
Indians of North America Northeast
Ojibwa Indians
Indians of North America Great Plains
Ponca Indians
Indians of North America Plateau
Salish Indians
Kootenai Indians
Indians of North America Southwest, New
Indians of North America Southern States
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Date:
1934
Topic:
Dakota Indians
Sign language
Marriage and family--berdache
Weapons--bow
Dance--calumet
American Indian
Rituals, formulas and ceremonies
Zoology--buffalo
Dance--grass
War--Battle of Little Bighorn
Medicine
Names, place
Dance--Ghost Dance
Religion--soul, concept of
Language and languages--Documentation
Local number:
NAA MS 2932
Summary:
Much of this material is relevant to the Dakotas. Includes: miscellaneous notes on Dakota history, bands, and sign for "Dakota," Autograph Document. Approximately 100 pages. (Box 2); account of the Battle of Little Big Horn by He Dog, Red Feather, and Whirling, Autograph Document. 7 pages. (Box 3); "The Custer Battle with the Sioux, Autograph Document. 10 pages. (Box 3); notes on sign language in general, its history and distribution, Autograph and Typescript Document, 1 box (Box 4).
Cite as:
Manuscript 2932, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
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Data Source:
National Anthropological Archives
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Arapaho vocabulary 1894-95

Creator:
Tallow, Stephen
Author:
Meeker, Louis L
Edson, Casper
Physical description:
7 pages
Culture:
Arapaho Indians
Indians of North America Great Plains
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Date:
1894-95
Topic:
Language and languages--Documentation
Local number:
NAA MS 1825
Summary:
Introduction, page 1, by Louis L. Meeker, Tallowʹs teacher, with notes on pronunciation, received from Casper Edson, full-blood Arapaho of Darlington, Oklahoma
Cite as:
Manuscript 1825, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
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Numbered manuscripts 1850s-1980s (some earlier)
Data Source:
National Anthropological Archives
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A.S. Gatschet Vocabularies and Other Linguistic Notes ca. 1881-1886

Creator:
Gatschet, Albert S (Albert Samuel) 1832-1907
Petroff, Ivan
Latham, R. G
Brown, J. Ross
McDonald, Furman
Hoffman, Walter James 1846-1899
W., H. D
Dalrymple, Edwin A Rev
Shea, John Gilmary
Buckingham-Smith
Marban, M. P. P. Pedro
Rohde
Bruhl
Pinart, Alphonse Louis
Pike, Albert Gen
Informant:
Tomazin, Ignatius
Porter, Pleasant
Naumoff
Kamilkoishin ?, Nicolai
Robertson, A. E Mrs
Correspondent:
Eells, M
Denison, James D
McCain, Frank
Informant ?:
Smith, Nimrod Tom
Physical description:
253 pages
Culture:
Chippewa
Yuman ?
American Indian California
Hoh
Eskimos
Chugach Eskimos
Eskimo Kuskwogmiut
Kiowa Indians
Yokuts Cholovone
Cherokee
Quechua
Koasati Indians
Catawba Indians
Chitimacha Indians
Seminole Indians
Yuchi Indians
Apalachee Indians
Beothuk Indians
Natchez Indians
Quileute
Klamath Indians
Hitchiti
Chemakum Indians
Woccon
Pamunkey Indians
Mojo
Indians of North America California
Yokuts Indians
Indians of North America Subarctic
Arctic peoples
Indians of North America Northeast
Ojibwa Indians
Indians of North America Northwest Coast of North America
Indians of North America Great Plains
Indians of North America Plateau
Indians of North America Southern States
Type:
Newsclippings
Collection descriptions
Place:
Alaska
Date:
ca 1881-1886
Topic:
Names, place
Names, tribal
Chemakum Indians
Numbers
Quileute Indians
Hoh
Chippewa
Cannibalism
Cherokee Indians
Klamath Indians
Folklore
Seminole Indians
Language and languages--Documentation
Local number:
NAA MS 1449
Summary:
Contains vocabularies and other linguistic notes on a variety of American Indian languages. Mainly transcripts by Gatschet from other sources; includes some material recorded by Gatschet, and a few original manuscripts sent to him by others.
Contents: Alaska: Ms Vocabulary 1449, pages 49-52. Petroff, Ivan. "Aliaskan Names, Ivan Petroff." 2 pages, in A. S. Gatschet's handwriting. List of Alaskan place and tribal names with notes on each. Apalachee: Ms Vocabulary 1449, pages 103-104. [Gatschet, A. S.] Apalachee [vocabulary], with Pl[easant] Porter [Creek inft.]." 2 pages, in Gatschet's handwriting. Comparison of Apalachee words with Creek. Gatschet indicates: "(Copied in Apal. book, July 1889)." Beothuk: Ms. Vocabulary 1449, pages 27-41. [Gatschet, A. S.] Beothuk vocabularies, notes, and bibliographic references. 14 1/2 pages, mostly in Gatschet's handwriting. (pages 27-28 and 35-36 are in R. G. Latham's hand.) Working notes for Gatschet's published article on Beothuk -- comment by M. R. Haas, 11/58. California (Yuman ?): Ms Vocabulary 1449, pages 122-123; 124 (?) Brown, J. Ross Extract from "J. Ross Brown. Sketch of the exploration of lower Cal. San Franc[isco ?], 1869. H. H. Bancroft & Co., 177 pp." 2 pages, in A. S. Gatschet's handwriting. Miscellaneous notes on lower California tribes and languages, with list of some of the tribes in the area and their approximate locations. California: Ms Vocabulary 1449, page 148. [Gatschet, A. S.] Bibliographic references relating to California. 1 page, in A. S. Gatschet's handwriting. Furman, McDonald Ms Vocabulary 1449 file: Catawba. Page 159 "An Indian's Petition." No date. Newsclipping. 1 slip. Ms Vocabulary 1449 Woccon and Catawba comparative vocabulary No date. Autograph document. 6 pages. Pages 87-89 and 93-94. Ms Vocabulary 1449, page 186a and ff. Eells, M. Comparison of numerals in Chemakum, Quileute, and Hoh, 1 page and accompanying letter to A. S. Gatschet, August 24, 1883, from M. Eells, Skokomish, Mason Co., Wash., 2 pages, handwritten. Ms Vocabulary pages 108-110. [Gatschet, A. S.] "Mtn. Cherokee's names (topographical). Nimrod Tom Smith [inft ?], 1/2 breed, in Swain Co., North Car., P. O. Quallatown...April 18, '82." 3 pages, in Gatschet's handwriting. List of Cherokee place names and locations. Chippewa: Ms Vocabulary 1449, pages 178-80. [Gatschet, A. S.] "Odjibwe - Local and tribal names. Ign. Tomazin [inft.], Jan. 31, '83." 3 pages, in Gatschet's handwriting. Also (page 180) short extract from Dorman, Primitive Superstitions, page 148, on Ojibwa cannibalism, in Gatschet's handwriting.
Chitimacha: Ms Vocabulary 1449, page 85 (top). [Gatschet, A. S.] "Shetimasha" vocabulary of 8 words, translated into French. 1/2 page, in A. S. Gatschet's handwriting. Eskimo: Ms Vocabulary 1449, page 45. Hoffman, Dr W. J. "Eskimo text obtained by Dr W. J. Hoffman, at San Francisco, Cal., from Naumoff, an Eskimo from Kadiak..." No date. 1 page in A. S. Gatschet's handwriting. Includes text and inter-linear translation, plus translation of same story from sign language. Note by Gatschet indicates that text is not in Kodiak dialect. Eskimo (Chugach) Ms Vocabulary 1449, pages 53-66. Petroff, Ivan "Vocabulary of Tchugatch-Inuit. Taken by Ivan Petroff, in June, 1881, at various places, chiefly at Nu'tchik or Port Etches, abt. 60 1/2 N. Lat. From full bloods. 14 pages, in A. S. Gatschet's handwriting. Also contains comparison with "Tchiglit" (Kopagmiut), in Gatschet's handwriting. "Partly entered in Mscr. vocab. Vol. 3." Eskimo (Kuskwogmiut): Ms Vocabulary 1449, pages 76-84; 85-86; 95-96. [Petroff, Ivan ?] "Kuskokvog-miut (Inuit) [vocabulary], from Nicolai Kamilkoishin [?] native of the tribe educated at the Russian Mission, Yukon R., at Ikomiut." 13 pages, in A. S. Gatschet's handwriting. Partly entered in Mscr. vocabulary, Volume IIId (note in Gatschet's handwriting.) Eskimo: Ms Vocabulary 1449, page 249. W--, H. D. "A curious race. The Mutes of northern Alaska. Their manner of living. Peculiar family relations - superstitions and queer customs." From the San Francisco Chronicle, Sunday November 14, 1886. 1 page, newsclipping. Hitchiti: Ms Vocabulary 1449, page 203 (bottom), 204 (bottom), 205. Robertson, Mrs A. E. "Acts. VIV, ii in Hitchiti" (page 203); "Hitchiti words from Mrs Robertson" (204); "Hitchiti verbs, by Mrs Robertson" (205). 3 pages, in A. S. Gatschet's handwriting. Kiowa: Ms Vocabulary 1449, page 26. Gatschet, A. S. "Phonetics of the Kayowe Language, by Albert S. Gatschet. Read before the A.A.A.S., Cincinnati, 1881." 1 page, clipping from published article. Note in margin in Gatschet's handwriting reads: "Science of Sept. 17, 1881. By John Michels, New York."
Klamath: Ms Vocabulary 1449, pages 133-136; 143-147. [Gatschet, A. S.] Queries relating to the Klamath language by Gatschet, with answers written in by various Indians from the Klamath Agency, Oregon (cf. letter of J. G. Dennison, page 142 of this manuscript). 9 pages, partially in Gatschet's handwriting. Klamath: Ms 1449, pages 137-142. Denison, James D. "Story of the birth of Aisis," a Klamath legend, and accompanying letter from J. G. Dennison to A. S. Gatschet, August 29, 1880, Klamath Agency, Oregon. 6 pages, handwritten. Klamath: Ms Vocabulary 1449, pages 149-152. McCain, Frank Letter to A. S. Gatschet, January 30, 1880, from Frank McCain, Klamath Indian Agency, Lake Co., Oregon, containing 22 word Klamath vocabulary. 4 pages, handwritten. Koasati: Ms Vocabulary 1449, pages 102; 204. Robertson, Mrs A. E. [and A. S. Gatschet] "Koassadi. Supplement to words by Mrs A. E. Robertson, copied in Vocab. No. 2, obtained from [---illeg.]"; short vocabulary of verbs "from vocab. Vol 2, Koassati of Mrs Robertson"; and passage from "Actorum XIV, 11, in Koasata." 2 pages, in A S. Gatschet's handwriting. Page 102 contains a short list of Koasati words (probably from Mrs Robertson) with corresponding Choctaw equivalents (supplied by Gatschet [?] from the "Ch. grammar"; passage from Acts XIV, ii in Koasati with inter-linear translation, presumably by Gatschet; and list of Koasati verbs, no source mentioned. Page 204 contains the same bible passage in Koasati, with slightly different English translation, and list of same verbs, identified as being from "vocab. Vol 2...of Mrs Robertson." Pamunkey: Ms Vocabulary 1449, page 46. Dalrymple, Rev Mr 17 word Pamunkey vocabulary collected by Rev Dalrymple in 1844 at King William County, Virginia. (Hist Mag., N. Y. II, page 182) and short note from J. G. Shea. 1 page, in A. S. Gatschet's handwriting. See National Anthropological Archives Manuscript 4069, referring to the original of the Dalrymple Manuscript in Maryland Historical Society, Baltimore.
Seminole: Ms Vocabulary 1449, page 182. [Buckingham-Smith, etc. ?] "Seminole Local Names. Buck. Smith, Beach, p. 125 (with Stidham)." 1 page, in A. S. Gatschet's handwriting. South America (Mojo): Ms Vocabulary 1449, page 187. Marban, M. P. P. Pedro "Moxo 6 Mojo. M.P.P. Pedro Marban, de la Compania de Jesus, Superior [ ]. Arte de la Lengua Moxa, con su vacabulario y cathecismo. Colegio de San Pablo (Lima), 1701. pages 664, etc." 1 page, in Gatschet's handwriting. Notes on Mojo language. South America (Miscellaneous): Ms Vocabulary 1449, page 128. Rohde, [ ] "Rohde on Sudamerika"...(1883-84)." 1 page, in A. S. Gatschet's handwriting. Miscellaneous extracts relating to South American Indian tribes. South America (Miscellaneous): Ms Vocabulary 1449, page 97-101. Miscellaneous notes on South America copied by Gatschet from various published sources. 5 pages, in Gatschet's handwriting. South America Peru: (Quechua): Ms Vocabulary 1449, page 239. Bruhl, -- "Inquiries by Bruhl on Kechua. Oct. 1885." 1 page, in A. S. Gatschet's handwriting. 9 word Quechua vocabulary. Yokuts (Cholovone): Ms Vocabulary 1449, pages 231-236. Pinart, Alph. L. "Yatchikumne [Cholovone, in Bureau of American Ethnology Bulletin 30], near Stockton, Cal. Alp. L. Pinart, 1880." 6 pages, in A. S. Gatschet's handwriting. Notes (written in French) on the various Cholovone dialects, and vocabulary with some words translated into English and some into Spanish. Yuchi and Natchez: Ms Vocabulary 1449, page 106 Pike, Gen Albert "Elements of Inflection [of the verb to have]. Yuchi (Pike, p.--) & Naktche." 1 page, in A. S. Gatschet's handwriting. Yuchi and Natchez: Ms Vocabulary 1449, page 107 Pike, Gen. Albert "Albert Pike's Vocabularies, 18.... Yuchi & Naktche." 1 page, in A. S. Gatschet's handwriting. Comparison of 33 words in Yuchi and Natchez. Yuchi: Ms Vocabulary 1449, pages 201-203. Robertson, Mrs A. E. "Yutchi [vocabulary] transliterated from mscr. of Mrs. Robertson, 1873 ?." 3 pages, in Gatschet's handwriting. Also contains passage from bible (Acts XIV, ii) apparently in Yuchi, with interlinear translation.
Cite as:
Manuscript 1449, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
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Numbered manuscripts 1850s-1980s (some earlier)
Data Source:
National Anthropological Archives
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Oneida vocabulary, verb conjugations, and the Lord's prayer in Oneida 1881

Creator:
Smith, Erminnie A Mrs
Collector:
Hewitt, J. N. B (John Napoleon Brinton) 1859-1937
Informant:
Cornelius Rev
Physical description:
153 pages
Culture:
Iroquois Oneida vocabulary
Iroquois Oneida verb conjugations
Iroquois Oneida Lord's Prayer
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Date:
1881
Topic:
Lord's Prayer--Iroquois--Oneida
Language and languages--Documentation
Local number:
NAA MS 377
Notes:
Informant: "Rev. Cornelius, a half breed Oneida."
Summary:
Recorded in schedule of John Wesley Powell's Introduction to the Study of Indian Languages 1880 in Hewitt's handwriting except title page. The Lord's Prayer in Oneida with a literal English translation appears on pages 228-229, and the final 9 pages are titled, "Conjugation of the Verb."
Cite as:
Manuscript 377, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
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Numbered manuscripts 1850s-1980s (some earlier)
Data Source:
National Anthropological Archives
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Quinault vocabulary July, 1896

Creator:
Wickersham, James
Informant:
Sampson, James
Physical description:
10 pages
Culture:
Quileute
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Date:
July, 1896
Topic:
Language and languages--Documentation
Local number:
NAA MS 1858
Summary:
Also letter of Wickersham to J. W. Powell, transmitting original and letterpress copy. Tacoma, Washington. August 24, 1896. 1 page.
Cite as:
Manuscript 1858, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
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Numbered manuscripts 1850s-1980s (some earlier)
Data Source:
National Anthropological Archives
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John Peabody Harrington papers: Cakchiquel, 1922

Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody 1884-1961
Physical description:
12 boxes
Culture:
Cakchikel Indians
Indians of Central America Guatemala
Type:
Field notes
Dictionaries
Vocabulary
Date:
1922
Topic:
Cakchikel language
Quiché language
Mayan languages
Language and languages--Documentation
Linguistics
Grammar, Comparative and general
Local number:
Accession #1976-95
Summary:
This subseries of the Mexico/Central America/South America series contains Harrington's Cakchiquel research. His notes on the language are relatively brief. They were recorded during the course of his fieldwork on Quiche with Cipriano Alvaredo and William Gates at the latter's home near Charlottesville, Virginia, in 1922.
There are several sets of numbered pages labeled "B. Cak. notes" and "B. Cak. Gram." These consist of vocabulary and phrases with glosses (mostly in Spanish) and some Quiche (Q.) equivalences. There is also a section of sixteen pages based on a rehearing of Flores' 1753 grammar. Differences between the Quiche, Cakchiquel, and Tzutujil forms are noted here.
Harrington's grammatical notes, labeled "Cak. Grammar," probably dates from 1948. It consists merely of a few observations following heading sheets. The format is based largely on an examination of the Diccionario cakchiquel-espanol by Saenz. There is a large section on phonetics in which reference is made to Gates' Maya Grammar. Most of the forms were excerpted from the records which Harrington made with Cipriano Alvaredo (Cip.) in 1922.
There are also several files relating to Harrington's study of the "Annals of Cakchiquel," composed by Francisco E. Arana Xahila. The first, designated as "Cak. Annals Text," contains a complete transcription of the history dated 1922. The text consists almost entirely of straight dictation from Cipriano Alvaredo, based, evidently, on a rehearing of Brinton's published version of the original folio. There are only a few notations on phonetics and little interlinear translation in this 260-page document. This is followed by 119 pages of a typed English translation of the text copied from Brinton through section 164 (the end of Brinton's CakchiqueI text). A note to Althea "Letty" Warren appears at the top of the first page. A final file contains a 536-page handwritten version of the Cakchiquel text which Harrington's copyist, Marta J. Herrera, made in the early 1930s. Two transcriptions are given, one above the other. The top version was copied directly from Brinton (Br.), through paragraph thirty four (page 100). The second is a modification of the transcription which Harrington first recorded in 1922.
Cite as:
Mexico/Central America/South America: Cakchiquel, John Peabody Harrington papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
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John Peabody Harrington papers: Mexico/Central America/South America, circa 1907-1960
Data Source:
National Anthropological Archives
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Copy of Manuscript 199, Vocabulary of the Indian Language of the Tou-tou-ten Tribe, by George Gibbs

Creator:
Kautz, August Valentine
Copyist:
Gibbs, George
Physical description:
6 pages
Culture:
Tututni Indians
Indians of North America Northwest Coast of North America
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Topic:
Language and languages--Documentation
Local number:
NAA MS 200
Cite as:
Manuscript 200, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
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Numbered manuscripts 1850s-1980s (some earlier)
Data Source:
National Anthropological Archives
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John Peabody Harrington papers: Quiche, 1922-1948

Creator:
Harrington, John Peabody 1884-1961
Gates, William 1863-1940
Physical description:
12 boxes
Culture:
Quiché Indians
Indians of Central America Guatemala
Type:
Field notes
Vocabulary
Dictionaries
Folklore
Date:
1922
1922-1948
Topic:
Quiché language
Cakchikel language
Esselen language
Mayan languages
Language and languages--Documentation
Linguistics
Phonetics
Local number:
Accession #1976-95
Notes:
For approximately eighteen days from late November to mid-December 1922, Harrington interviewed Cipriano Alvaredo (abbreviated "Cip."), a native of Guatemala. This study was undertaken with the close cooperation of William Gates, founder of The Maya Society, at his home in Charlottesville, Virginia. Gates had brought the "peasant farmer" to the United States the preceding July and prepared for their joint sessions by reviewing Domingo Basseta's Vocabulario de lengua quiche with Alvaredo shortly before Harrington's arrival.
Together they reexamined the dictionary, word by word with Harrington recording Alvaredo's commentary in phonetic script. Alvaredo then dictated the entire "Popul Vuh" (P.V.), a Quiche text which deals with the mythology and historical traditions of the ancient Maya tribe. They also recorded some seventy pages of another native text, the "Annals of Cakchiquel." In addition, some grammatical work was undertaken based on Brasseur de Bourbourg's Grammaire de la langue quichee.
Four days were spent making phonetic tracings on the Rousselot kymograph, which Harrington had brought with him. Under the direction of Professor Charles A. Hoxie of the General Electric Company, pitch studies were made using the pallophotophone, an instrument which records vibrations on film. A series of motion pictures was also taken.
Harrington had intermittent plans to return to his early study of Quiche. In 1937 and 1938 he proposed that Edgar L. Hewett publish a new edition of the "Popul Vuh" text to be coauthored by himself and Robert W. Young. In 1943, 1944, and 1947 he corresponded with Dr. Henry McComas, brother-in-law of William Gates; Edward Brown Allen; and M. Wells Jakeman of Brigham Young University regarding publication of the text, this time in mimeograph format. None of these proposals resulted in the preparation of a new manuscript. It appears that all publication plans were abandoned for lack of funds.
Summary:
This subseries of the Mexico/Central America/South America series contains Harrington's Quiche research. The materials consist of linguistic notes, documents from the files of William Gates, grammar, records relating to the "Popul Vuh," and miscellaneous notes.
The linguistic notes contains material elicited from Cipriano Alvaredo. The contents include Quiche (Q.) vocabulary as well as phrases and short texts, including a Quiche poem. Some terms were evidently elicited as a rehearing of Cakchiquel words (labeled "Cak.") excerpted from Brinton's published version of the "Annals of Cakchiquel" and lexical items extracted from Brasseur de Bourbourg's version of the "Popul Vuh." There is extensive commentary on the phonetics of the language, much of which makes reference to kymograph tracings (abbreviated "Tr.;" see "Documents from the Files of William Gates," Items 1 and 2), to the alphabet pronounced into the pallophotophone, and to vowels pronounced for the motion picture footage. Many notes deal with regressive assimilation and diphthongs. Pages 21 to 24 contain notes in the hand of William Gates and sheets 58 and 59 provide a summary by him of the work which he undertook with Harrington and Alvaredo. Also included are a few miscellaneous notes on early English and the science of language. A portion of the notes, dated December 24, 1922 and labeled "Esselen," may be a rehearing of the Esselen vocabulary compiled and published by A. L. Kroeber. It is not clear whether Harrington was utilizing this source merely as an aid to elicitation or for comparative purposes.
The files of William Gates is comprised of numbered documents based on the work which Gates undertook with Harrington and Alvaredo. Each subsection is preceded by an index card drafted by Gates. Section 1, consisting of twelve pages of kymographic tracings of Quiche words, is followed by 210 pages of photostatic copies of mounted tracings, which are arranged in book form. These are followed by India ink copies of the tracings. Part 3 contains field notes recorded by Harrington; some of these notes duplicate material filed under "Linguistic Notes." Section 4 is a bound checklist (nineteen pages) by Gates of kymographic cylinders made at Auburn Hill. Section 5 is a bound typescript (220 pages) of Vocabulario de lengua quiche, by Domingo Basseta. Gates recorded commentary which he obtained from Alvaredo in the margins in pencil. He recorded any annotations provided by Harrington in ink and labeled them "JPH." A related typescript, labeled as item 6, presents Harrington's transcription of the Basseta vocabulary. There is no item number 7. Section 8 is a five-page typed carbon of an article by Gates titled "Modern Linguistic Apparatus." It includes a discussion of the work undertaken with Harrington and Alvaredo using the kymograph and the pallophotophone. Additional notes on the second device are filed as item 9. Also in Gates' hand is a "list of words for study of accent," classified as item 10. Sections 11 and 12 consist of correspondence. The first concerns work with Alvaredo on the kymograph and the pallophotophone. The second contains letters exchanged between Alvaredo and Gates in Quiche, Spanish, and English. The final numbered section, part 13, includes photographs and a newspaper article from the Washington Star, January 1923. Also from Gates' files are several unnumbered items: a letter to Harrington from E. B. Allen regarding a plan to publish Maya material; notes on phonetics, presumably taken from a notebook by Gates, and interleaved with heading sheets by Harrington; and a brochure on the Gates Collection which was to be put up for sale in New York.
Grammatical notes on the Quiche language are arranged in four sections. The first part consists of a draft of a grammar under the heading "Quiche Grammar and Restored Popul Yuh Text wIth Translation." Material on hand includes notes and an outline for the proposed paper, interspersed with slips from Harrington's early fieldwork. Topics covered encompass phonetics, interjections, verbs, numerals, adjectives, adverbs, and prepositions. A great deal of data were excerpted from the works of Brasseur de Bourbourg (abbreviated "Bras.") and Basseta, as well as from the Diccionario cakchiquel-espanol (abbreviated "Cak-dict."), compiled by Carmelo Saenz de Santa Maria. A second rough draft for a grammar of Quiche comprises the second section. A typed manuscript of 421 pages (former B.A.E. ms. 4781) titled "Quiche Grammar" was submitted to the bureau on March 25, 1948. Although it was prepared for publication as B.A.E. Bulletin 167, it was never released by the editor's office. This version of the grammar consists of textual descriptions and illustrative examples covering phonetics and morphology. A selection from the first part of the "Popul Vuh" is appended at the end of the grammar. Interlinear translations and notes accompany the native text. The two remaining sections of grammatical material consist of slipfiles, which Harrington compiled during the course of his fieldwork in 1922. The first set of slips, labeled "Quiche appendix -not yet put into typewriting," was to be the source of the semantic vocabulary for the first draft of the grammar. The second group, termed by Harrington "Rejects 1947 & Jan. 1948," constitutes the residue of his files after he had removed all slips which he intended to use in the body of his grammar or the appendix.
Harrington considered the "Popul Vuh" to be "the most remarkable manuscript survival . . . from ancient times in all the Maya area." The records he accumulated which relate to this literary work are of several types. The first is a file of a 491-page transcription of the text as dictated by Cipriano Alvaredo in December 1922. It contains occasional interlinear translations in a mixture of Spanish and English with some annotations on orthography. A second set of notes consists of copies of the text which Harrington and his associate John T. Linkins made from January to March in 1948. Quiche, French, and Spanish versions of the text are interfiled: they continue only through chapter five. The Quiche text and French translation were extracted from Brasseur de Bourbourg and the two Spanish translations and some additional notes from Adrian Recinos and Villacorta and Rodas. Related documents include commentary from Brasseur de Bourbourg and Villacorta and Rodas which was not incorporated into the previous file. There are also miscellaneous notes on various secondary sources.
The remaining material in this subseries include a typed vocabulary from an unidentified written source, excerpts from Aleman's Quiche grammar, and notes on a meeting which Harrington had with William Gates on September 13, 1935.
Cite as:
Mexico/Central America/South America: Quiche, John Peabody Harrington papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
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John Peabody Harrington papers: Mexico/Central America/South America, circa 1907-1960
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National Anthropological Archives
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Copy of Manuscript 199, Vocabulary of the Indian Languages of the Tou-tou-ten Tribe, by George Gibbs

Creator:
Kautz, August Valentine
Copyist:
Gibbs, George
Physical description:
10 pages
Culture:
Tututni Indians
Indians of North America Northwest Coast of North America
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Topic:
Language and languages--Documentation
Local number:
NAA MS 200-a
Summary:
With 2 pages of notes on local tribal divisions written in another hand.
Cite as:
Manuscript 200-a, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
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Numbered manuscripts 1850s-1980s (some earlier)
Data Source:
National Anthropological Archives
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