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Marilyn Houlberg Nigeria Collection

Photographer:
Houlberg, Marilyn  Search this
Extent:
1,615 color slides (color, 35 mm)
circa 400 Photographic prints (3 x 5 inches, 5 x 7 inches)
1 box manuscripts (document genre)
52 Cassettes (Audiocassettes- music, lectures, field records, interviews)
1 Videocassette
1 cd-r (CD-ROM)
1 Notebook
Culture:
Yoruba (African people)  Search this
Ibibio (African people)  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Color slides
Photographic prints
Manuscripts (document genre)
Cassettes
Videocassettes
Cd-rs
Notebooks
Place:
Africa, West
Nigeria
Lagos (Nigeria)
Date:
circa 1973-circa mid-1980s
Summary:
This collection contains a variety of materials including (1,615) 35 mm color slides, circa 400 photographic prints, 1 box of manuscript materials, 1 notebook, 52 audio and 1 video cassettes, and 1 CD-ROM. Many of the slides and photographs were taken during Houlberg's field work in Nigeria (1973-1975) and depict Ibeji figures, wood carvings, Egungun masquerades and masks, twins, portraits, hairstyles, festivals, shrines, textiles, and peoples including the Yoruba, Ekoi, Ibibio, and Ogoni. The audiocassettes consist of lectures, music, field records, and interviews.
Scope and Contents:
This collection contains (1,615) 35 mm color slides, circa 400 photographic prints, 1 box of manuscript materials, 1 notebook, 52 audio and 1 video cassettes, and 1 CD-ROM. Many of the slides were taken during Houlberg's field work in Nigeria (1973-1975) and depict Ibeji figures, wood carvings, textiles, portraits, and peoples including the Yoruba, Ekoi, Ibibio, and Ogoni. The photographic prints include images of wooden figures, Ibeji figures, hair styles, masquerade masks, twins, portraits, and carvings by Awenke of Ketu, Yesufu Ejiboye, Ogunyomi Sona, and Awolowo Adelaku of Ikenne. Events documented include age grade processions, market scenes, the Agemo festival, and both Egungun masquerades and Gelede at Otu. There are also photographs of shrines which include the Abiku, Shango, Dada, Shoponu, and Odudua shrines. The photographs were primarily taken in Ilishan, Balufon, Ikenne, Lagos, the Field Museum (Chicago), and Akio, Ijebu.

The manuscript materials date to the 1980s and include correspondence related to Nigerian museum objects, correspondence with Susan Vogel about an Edan Ogboni photograph, articles about African art, exhibit catalogues, business cards, Nigerian and Haitian studio photography, travel brochures, and essays about styles of carving.

A few of the photographs were taken by Mark Schiltz.
Biographical / Historical:
Artist, anthropologist, and art historian Dr. Marilyn Hammersley Houlberg was born in Chicago, Illinois, in 1939. Houlberg received an Associate of Arts degree from Wright Junior College (1959) and a BFA from the University of Chicago (1963). After graduating, she traveled to North Africa and explored Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia, Libya, and Egypt. In 1964, Houlberg researched Haitian art, religion, and indigenous photography in Haiti and in 1965 was awarded a scholarship for graduate study from the University of Chicago. There she completed her MAT in Art History in 1967. Following graduation, Houlberg worked at the Nigerian Museum in Lagos, where she documented Yoruba sculpture, masquerades, religion, body art, and indigenous photography. She began her teaching career at the University of Chicago as a lecturer on African art and African civilization, working there from 1971 to 1973. At the University of London, Houlberg earned a Masters in Anthropology, producing the thesis Yoruba Twin Sculpture and Ritual (1973). She also extensively photographed her travels abroad in Yorubaland. Between 1974 and 1990, Houlberg taught at the University of Chicago, Columbia College, Kalamazoo College, and Northwestern University. From 1974 to 2008 she continued teaching at The School of the Art Institute of Chicago, lecturing on Yoruba art and ritual in West Africa and the New World, and the art and ritual of Vodou in Haiti. Houlberg has lectured worldwide at numerous museums and symposiums since 1972, including in Lagos, Nigeria; Jacmel, Haiti; Toronto, Canada; Salvador, Bahia, Brazil; and Cologne, Germany. Her essays have been published in several issues of African Arts. Some of Houlberg's significant publications include Arts of the Water Spirits of Haitian Vodou, in Sacred Waters: Arts for Mami Wata and Other Divinities in Africa and the Diaspora (2008) and Water Spirits of Haitian Vodou: Lasiren, Queen of Mermaids, in Mami-Wata: Arts for Water Spirits in Africa and the African-Atlantic World (2008). The exhibition Mami-Wata at the Smithsonian National Museum of African Art (2009) featured her photographs.
Related Materials:
The Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives also holds several other collections by Marilyn Houlberg: one collection documents Nigeria (EEPA 2005-002) and two others documents Haiti (EEPA 2012-004 and EEPA 2015-016).
Restrictions:
Use of original records requires an appointment. Contact Archives staff for more details.
Rights:
Permission to reproduce images from the Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives must be obtained in advance. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Egúngún (Cult)  Search this
Ere ibeji  Search this
Shrines  Search this
Citation:
Marilyn Houlberg Nigeria Collection, EEPA 2015-015, Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
EEPA.2015-015
Archival Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-eepa-2015-015

Gaston deHavenon Study Photographs

Extent:
124 Photographic prints ((1 box), black and white, 8 x 10 in.)
Container:
Box 1
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Photographic prints
Black-and-white photographs
Place:
Africa
Date:
circa 1970
Summary:
Photographs taken by Ed Brennan of African art objects collected by Gaston T. deHavenon from 1950 through 1970. The art objects were displayed in a loan exhibit held at the opening of the museum's enlarged galleries, 1971. The photographs were published in a one volume catalog entitled, The deHavenon Collection," by the Museum of African Art (now National Museum of African Art) and printed by S.D. Scott Printing Co., Inc., 1971.
Arrangement note:
Images indexed by negative number.
Restrictions:
Use of original records requires an appointment. Contact Archives staff for more details.
Rights:
For study purposes only. Permission to reproduce images from the Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives must be obtained in advance. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Wood-carving -- Africa -- Exhibitions  Search this
DeHavenon, Gaston T. -- Art collections  Search this
Sculpture, African -- Exhibitions  Search this
Genre/Form:
Black-and-white photographs
Photographic prints
Identifier:
EEPA.1995-016
Archival Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-eepa-1995-016

Barbara Jarocki collection

Curator of an exhibition:
Barbara Jarocki  Search this
Extent:
65 photographs (color, 4 x 6 inches)
1 postcard (color)
2 photographs (color, 5 x 7 inches)
Container:
Binder 1
Culture:
Africa  Search this
Dan (African people)  Search this
Senufo (African people)  Search this
Baule (African people)  Search this
Yoruba (African people)  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
photographs
postcards
Postcards
Photographs
Place:
Ivory Coast
Nigeria
New York (State)
Date:
1983
Summary:
The collection consists of one postcard and 67 photographs documenting the installation for and art objects in the exhibition "African Art from Nigeria and the Ivory Coast" (April 6-25, 1983), held at the Sarah Lawrence College Art Galley, and curated by Barbara Jarocki. The postcard is an invitation to the opening reception.
Scope and Contents:
The collection consists of one postcard and 67 photographs documenting the installation for and art objects in the exhibition "African Art from Nigeria and the Ivory Coast" (April 6-25, 1983), held at the Sarah Lawrence College Art Galley and curated by Barbara Jarocki. The postcard is an invitation to the opening reception.

Objects were primarily created by the Yoruba, Baule, and Dan peoples and include a ladle, Ibeji, top from a Champion Cultivator Staff (Daleu), a beaded sheath for Orisha Oko staff, hoes, a divination tray, headdresses, a beaded crown, a rhythm pounder and masks, particularly a four-faced helmet mask and a double face mask (Kpelie). Object materials include wood, animal skin, metal, beads, cowrie shells, and cloth. Major contributers to the exhibition include Paul and Ruth Tishman, Drs. Noble and Jean Endicott, Richard J. Faletti, and the Michael Oliver Gallery.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged into four series:

Series 1: Installation Photos, 1983 (22 photographs; Binder 1)

Series 2: Idenified Objects, 1983 (23 photographs; Binder 1)

Series 3: Unidentified Objects, 1983 (22 photographs; Binder 1)

Series 4: Printed Material, 1983 (1 item; Binder 1)
Biographical / Historical:
Barbara Jarocki curated numerous exhibits, including "African Art from Nigeria and the Ivory Coast" (April 6-25, 1983; Sarah Lawrence College) and "Cameroon: Art and Life Interwoven" (April-July, 1988; May Weber Museum of Cultural Arts, Chicago). A geneous donor, Jarocki and her husband, Robert Fudim, gave the artwork "Playing Card", circa 1770, to the Smithsonian Cooper Hewitt Museum.
Restrictions:
Use of original records requires an appointment. Contact Archives staff for more details.
Rights:
Permission to reproduce images from the Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives must be obtained in advance. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Ere ibeji  Search this
Works of art in situ  Search this
Clothing -- Headdresses  Search this
Wood-carving -- Africa -- Exhibitions  Search this
Masks, African  Search this
Genre/Form:
Postcards
Photographs
Citation:
Barbara Jarocki Collection, EEPA 2016-003, Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
EEPA.2016-003
See more items in:
Barbara Jarocki collection
Archival Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-eepa-2016-003

Chaim Gross Art Object photographs

Creator:
National Museum of African Art (U.S.)  Search this
Names:
Gross, Chaim, 1904-1991 -- Photographs  Search this
Extent:
448 negatives (photographic) (black & white, 120 mm.)
44 prints (visual works) (contact prints (1 volume), black & white, 8x10 in.)
227 negatives (photographic) (black & white, 35 mm.)
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Negatives (photographic)
Prints (visual works)
Black-and-white negatives
Negatives
Place:
Africa
Date:
1976
Summary:
Photographs of art objects and of Chaim Gross's art objects taken by Lisa Little and Delmar Lipp at the Museum of African Art, now the National Museum of African Art, for the exhibit entitled, "The Sculptor's Eye," 1976. Lisa Little images are all 120 mm while Delmar Lipp photographed solely 35 mm. The exhibit was held at Worcester Art Museum, Cincinnati Museum of Art and the University of Georgia Museum, 1976-1977.
Biographical/Historical note:
Chaim Gross (1904-1991) was an American sculptor and instructor in New York, N.Y. He was born in Kolomea, Austria and came to the United States in 1921. Gross was educated at the Beaux-Arts Institute of Design, the Art Students League of New York, and the Educational Alliance Art School. He was a professor of printmaking and sculpture at the Educational Alliance and the New School for Social Research in New York City, the Brooklyn Museum Art School, the MoMA art school, the Art Student's League and the New Art School.
Restrictions:
Use of original records requires an appointment. Contact Archives staff for more details.
Rights:
For study purposes only. Permission to reproduce images from the Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives must be obtained in advance. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Wood-carving -- Africa -- Exhibitions  Search this
Sculpture, African -- Exhibitions  Search this
Genre/Form:
Black-and-white negatives
Negatives
Identifier:
EEPA.XXXX-002
Archival Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-eepa-xxxx-002

Lockwood de Forest papers

Creator:
De Forest, Lockwood, 1850-1932  Search this
Names:
Heckscher Museum  Search this
Santa Barbara Museum of Art  Search this
Culin, Stewart, 1858-1929  Search this
De Forest, Robert W., 1848-1931 ((Robert Weeks))  Search this
Kemble, Meta  Search this
Korzybski, Alfred, 1879-1950  Search this
Lewis, Anne  Search this
Extent:
3.8 Linear feet
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Sketchbooks
Photographs
Drawings
Diaries
Place:
India -- description and travel
Date:
1858-1980
bulk 1870-1930
Summary:
The papers of New York and California based interior designer, architect, collector and painter Lockwood de Forest measure 3.8 linear feet and date from 1858 to 1980, bulk dates 1870 to 1930. The collection includes correspondence, writings, diaries, journals, exhibition files, personal business records, printed material, sketchbooks, drawings, and photographs.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of New York and California based interior designer, architect, collector and painter Lockwood de Forest measure 3.8 linear feet and date from 1858 to 1980, bulk dates 1870 to 1930. The collection includes correspondence, writings, diaries, journals, exhibition files, personal business records, printed material, sketchbooks, drawings, and photographs.

Lockwood de Forest's professional correspondence includes letters regarding de Forest's wood carving business in India. Notable correspondents from friends and colleagues include Stewart Culin, Alfred Korzybski, and Purushottam M. Hutheesing & Sons. Also included are two letter books which contain copies of letters written by de Forest. There is a fair amount of correspondence with family members, especially de Forest's parents, his brother Robert, and his wife Meta Kemble. There are also a few folders of Meta Kemble de Forest's correspondence with family.

Writings include drafts of Lockwood de Forest's book Indian Domestic Architecture, along with essays and notes. Essays by de Forest are on assorted topics such as art, education, museums, furniture construction, and psychic research. There is also a draft of a Lockwood de Forest biography by Anne Lewis.

Diaries and journals kept by Lockwood de Forest and his wife Meta focus on travels abroad to Europe, the Middle East, and India.

Exhibition files consist of materials related to a Lockwood de Forest exhibition (1976) at the Heckscher Museum in New York and the Santa Barbara Museum of Art in California. Documentation includes correspondence, exhibition lists, inventories, and loan forms.

Personal business records include a wide range of financial and legal records. Financial records consist of ledgers, account records, receipts, invoices, and shipping records. Legal records include contracts, certificates, and deeds related to assets, properties, and businesses.

Printed material consists of exhibition catalogs, auction catalogs, magazines, books, announcements, event invitations, and clippings. Most of the material is about Lockwood de Forest, but there are some clippings and publications about his brother Robert and other subjects.

There are numerous sketchbooks usually depicting places de Forest visited in Europe and the Middle East. There are also a few loose drawings.

Photographs are of Lockwood de Forest, his wife, family, friends, colleagues, paintings, houses, wood carvings, and art objects.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as 8 series.

Series 1: Correspondence, 1858-1931 (0.9 linear feet; Boxes 1, 4)

Series 2: Writings, 1881-1976 (0.8 linear feet; Boxes 1-2, OV 5)

Series 3: Diaries and Journals, 1868-1890 (0.2 linear feet; Box 2)

Series 4: Lockwood de Forest Exhibition Files, 1974-1978 (0.1 linear feet; Box 2)

Series 5: Personal Business Records, 1869-1931 (0.3 linear feet; Box 2, OV 6)

Series 6: Printed Material, 1867-1980 (0.5 linear feet; Boxes 2-3)

Series 7: Sketchbooks and Drawings, 1869-1881 (0.4 linear feet; Box 3)

Series 8: Photographs, circa 1870-circa 1932 (0.2 linear feet; Box 3)
Biographical / Historical:
Lockwood de Forest (1850-1932) was an architect, interior designer, collector, landscape painter, and writer based in New York City and Santa Barbara, California.

Lockwood de Forest was born in New York City in 1850. His parents were Julia Weeks and Henry Grant de Forest. He was one of four children. In 1869, he went to Rome, Italy and began studying art under the tutelage of the American painter Frederic Edwin Church whom he met during his trip. Church continued to be de Forest's mentor after they returned to America. De Forest set up a studio in New York City and first exhibited his work in 1872. From 1875-1878, he went on two more trips abroad to Europe, the Middle East, and Africa.

In 1878, de Forest cofounded Associated Artists in New York along with Louis C. Tiffany, Candace Wheeler, and Samuel Coleman. The design firm closed around 1882 but was tremendously influential. He married Meta Kemble the same year that he began Associated Artists and the couple traveled to India where they stayed for the next two years. During that trip, de Forest met philanthropist Muggunbhai Hutheesing and together they established a woodcarving company and supplied Associated Artists with furniture and architectural objects.

Around 1882, De Forest opened his own business in New York City that managed the design and production of furniture and architectural accents, along with importing similar objects from India. In 1887, he purchased a house on 7 East 10th Street that he elaborately decorated with furnishings from India.

De Forest began spending winters in Santa Barbara, California starting in 1889. He eventually purchased a house and relocated there around 1922. While in California, he resumed painting with fervor and created many landscapes of the West Coast shorelines. De Forest died in Santa Barbara in 1932.
Provenance:
The Lockwood de Forest papers were donated in 1982 by Mrs. Lockwood de Forest III, daughter-in-law of Lockwood de Forest.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Rights:
The Lockwood de Forest papers are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Occupation:
Architects -- California -- Santa Barbara  Search this
Interior decorators -- California -- Santa Barbara  Search this
Painters -- California -- Santa Barbara  Search this
Topic:
Architects -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Art -- Collectors and collecting -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Interior decorators -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Wood-carving  Search this
Art -- Collectors and collecting -- California -- Santa Barbara  Search this
Painters -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sketchbooks
Photographs
Drawings
Diaries
Citation:
Lockwood de Forest papers, 1858-1980. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.defolock
See more items in:
Lockwood de Forest papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-defolock
Additional Online Media:

"Crystal forms" : an exhibition of stone/wood carvings and ceramics / by Oladapo Afolayan & Ibude Ikechukwu

Author:
Afolayan, Oladapo 1960-  Search this
Ikechukwu, Ibude  Search this
Nigeria National Museum (Lagos)  Search this
Subject:
Afolayan, Oladapo 1960-  Search this
Ikechukwu, Ibude Exhibitions  Search this
Physical description:
13 p. : ill., ports. ; 19 x 26 cm
Type:
Exhibitions
Date:
1994
1994]
20th century
Topic:
Sculpture, Nigerian  Search this
Pottery, Nigerian--Exhibitions  Search this
Call number:
NB1099.N53 A37 1994
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_557713

[During the Ẹfẹ ceremony, Oro Efe moves through the performance area guided by his attendants], Egbado area, town of Igbogila, Nigeria

Photographer:
Drewal, Henry John  Search this
Collection Creator:
Drewal, Henry John  Search this
Drewal, Margaret Thompson  Search this
Extent:
1 Slide (col.)
Culture:
Yoruba (African people)  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Slides
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Nigeria
Date:
1978
Scope and Contents:
This photograph was taken by Dr. Henry Drewal while conducting research among the Yoruba of southwestern Nigeria in 1977-1978. At the time Dr. Drewal was on a National Endowment for the Humanities Fellowship for Independent Study and Research.
Publication title reads, "Oro Efe in performance. In a headdress adorned with woodpeckers, snakes, and a leopard and in a costume covered with geometric and representational images, Oro Efe moves through the performance area guided by his attendants. Igbogila, 1978."
Local Numbers:
EEPA 1992-028-00422
Exhibitions Note:
"For This World and Beyond: African Art from the Fred and Rita Richman Collection, " held by the High Museum of Art, Atlanta, Georgia, 2002.
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original records requires an appointment. Contact Archives staff for more details.
Collection Rights:
Permission to reproduce images from the Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives must be obtained in advance. Copyright held by John and Margaret Drewal. To publish images from this collection, permission must be given by Henry and Margaret Drewal. Contact Archives staff for further information. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Gelede -- Photographs  Search this
Efe (masquerades)  Search this
Works of art in situ  Search this
Masks  Search this
Headdresses -- headgear -- Africa  Search this
Clothing and dress -- Africa  Search this
Wood-carving  Search this
Masquerades  Search this
Ceremonial objects  Search this
Genre/Form:
Color slides
Collection Citation:
Henry and Margaret Drewal Photographs, EEPA 1992-028, Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
EEPA.1992-028, Item EEPA D00422
See more items in:
Henry and Margaret Drewal photographs
Archival Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-eepa-1992-028-ref3228

George Sugarman papers

Creator:
Sugarman, George, 1912-1999  Search this
Names:
Honegger, Gottfried, 1917-  Search this
Jaffe, Shirley, 1923-  Search this
Kushner, Robert, 1949-  Search this
Extent:
12.22 Linear feet
21.83 Gigabytes
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Gigabytes
Drawings
Interviews
Photographs
Sound recordings
Date:
1912-2001
Summary:
The papers of painter and sculptor George Sugarman measure 12.22 linear feet and 21.83 GB and date from 1912 to 2001, with the bulk of the material dating from 1959 to 1999. The collection documents Sugarman's career as a sculptor primarily through correspondence, project files, exhibition files, writings, and photographs. The collection also includes address and appointment books, business and financial records, and printed material. A partially processed addition consisting of audio (3 sound cassettes) and video recordings (1 video reel, 1/2", 11 videocassettes, 7 U-matic and 4 VHS), and one Super 8 mm motion picture film, as well as digital copies of the film and video recordings, includes lectures by Sugarman, documentaries about Sugarman and his sculptures, and radio and television appearances by Sugarman.
Scope and Content Note:
The papers of painter and sculptor George Sugarman measure 12.22 linear feet and 21.83 GB and date from 1912 to 2001, with the bulk of the material dating from 1959 to 1999. The collection documents Sugarman's career as a sculptor primarily through correspondence, project files, exhibition files, writings, and photographs. The collection also includes address and appointment books, business and financial records, and printed material. A partially processed addition consisting of audio (3 sound cassettes) and video recordings (1 video reel, 1/2", 11 videocassettes, 7 U-matic and 4 VHS), and one Super 8 mm motion picture film, as well as digital copies of the film and video recordings, includes lectures by Sugarman, documentaries about Sugarman and his sculptures, and radio and television appearances by Sugarman.

The bulk of the collection consists of correspondence with family members, friends, artists, and scholars, reflecting Sugarman's diverse influences and interests. The project files and exhibition files illustrate Sugarman's prolific career as an artist and document Sugarman's numerous projects and exhibitions abroad, particularly in Japan.

The writings by Sugarman are noteworthy as they reveal the integral relationship between Sugarman's philosophical theories about art and his actual works of art. The business and financial records mainly document expenses incurred while working on various projects and exhibitions and while traveling. Maps, clippings, and brochures from Sugarman's many travels are included as well as exhibition catalogs and announcements for Sugarman and others. The collection also contains photographs of George Sugarman and his artwork, dating mostly from the 1970s.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged into ten series. Series are arranged by type of material; materials within series are arranged alphabetically by name or by type of material and then chronologically. Series 10 is unprocessed.

Series 1: Biographical Materials, 1912-2000, n.d. (Box 1; 9 folders)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1959-2001, n.d. (Boxes 1-3, OV 8; 2.9 linear feet)

Series 3: Project Files, 1968-1997, n.d. (Boxes 3-4; 1 linear foot)

Series 4: : Exhibition Files, 1965-1993, n.d. (Boxes 4-5, OV 8; 0.6 linear feet)

Series 5: Writings, 1951-1992, n.d. (Box 5; 0.2 linear feet)

Series 6: Address and Appointment Books, 1972-1997, n.d. (Boxes 5-6; 0.3 linear feet)

Series 7: Business and Financial Records, 1962-1998, n.d. (Box 6; 0.4 linear feet)

Series 8: Printed Material, 1954-1999, n.d. (Boxes 6-7, OV 8; 1.2 linear feet)

Series 9: Photographs, 1966-1981, n.d. (Box 7; 0.2 linear feet)

Series 10: Sound and Moving Image Material, 1972-1990 (Box 9, FC 10; 1.2 linear feet, ER01-ER13; 21.83 GB)
Biographical Note:
George Sugarman was a painter and sculptor who disliked labels because he believed they oversimplified the complexity of art, and Sugarman's artwork, like the artist himself, resists classification and oversimplification. Although he was influenced by Surrealist imagery, Cubist ideas of space, Baroque sculpture, and Abstract Expressionism, Sugarman's sculptures also display a musical quality, reflecting his interest in jazz music and improvisation. Sugarman was a pioneer in the use of color in sculpture and is probably best known for his large, polychrome aluminum sculptures.

Sugarman made the decision to become an artist relatively late in life. Born in New York on May 11, 1912, he studied at City College in New York and graduated with a B.A. in 1934. After serving in the United States Navy from 1941 until 1945, he attended evening classes at Museum of Modern Art. At the age of 39, George Sugarman traveled to Paris to study painting under the GI Bill of Rights. While in Paris, he decided to study sculpture with Ossip Zadkine and began creating wood carvings and terra-cotta sculptures. Over the next few years, Sugarman traveled to Italy and Spain, studying Baroque sculpture and architecture. He was particularly attracted to the work of Bernini and to Bernini's use of space.

Sugarman returned to New York in 1955 and began working with laminated wood. In order to support himself, he accepted a job teaching carpentry at a private school. He joined the Brata Gallery in 1957 and helped found the New Sculpture Group. A few years later, Sugarman received major recognition of his work by winning second prize in sculpture at the Pittsburgh International Exhibition. Sugarman went on to win a Longview Foundation Grant, a Ford Foundation Grant for his work at the Tamarind Lithography Workshop, and a grant from the National Endowment for the Arts.

In the 1960s, Sugarman began working on large painted-aluminum sculptures and completed his first outdoor sculpture at the Xerox Building in El Segundo, Calif. in 1969. Many of Sugarman's outdoor sculptures generated intense controversy, particularly his sculpture for the Edward A. Garmatz Federal Building and Courthouse in Baltimore, but he was devoted to his belief in the social as well as aesthetic importance of public art. Sugarman saw public sculpture as a "metaphor for the human condition" and as a way to transcend what he called the "indoor eye," the eye which views art in isolation from its physical and social environment.

Sugarman taught at the Graduate School of Hunter College in New York City from 1960 until 1970 and served as visiting Associate Professor at the Yale University Graduate School of Art from 1967 to 1968. Sugarman was a prolific artist, participating in numerous one-man shows, group exhibitions, and competitions all over the world, yet recognition of his talent came almost a decade later in the United States than in Europe. His works are in major collections including the Museum of Modern Art, the Whitney Museum of American Art, and the Art Institute of Chicago. George Sugarman died on August 25, 1999.
Related Material:
The transcript and audiotapes of an interview with George Sugarman conducted by Paul Cummings in 1974 for the Archives of American Art's Oral History Program is available at the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Separated Material:
The Archives of American Art also holds materials lent for microfilming. Reel N70-50 and N70-51 includes biographical material, an essay about George Sugarman, exhibition catalogs and announcements dating from 1954 to 1960, a certificate, writings by Sugarman, and correspondence dating 1953-1970. The originals of most of these materials were included in later donations. Reel N70-50 also contains a substantial number of photographs of Sugarman's natural wood sculptures from the late 1950s, his early works in wood, clay, and plaster dating from 1951 to 1958, his drawings and paintings from the late 1960s, installations and works in progress from 1960 to 1970, and photographs of Sugarman working in the studio in the 1960s. There are also twelve sketchbooks and loose pages dating from 1943 to 1958, which document Sugarman's travels to the South Pacific, New York City, France, Spain, and North Africa. Lent material not included in later gifts remain with the lender and are not described in the collection container inventory.
Provenance:
In 1970, George Sugarman lent material to the Archives of American Art for microfilming. In 1980 and 1983, George Sugarman donated portions of the material previously lent, along with additional materials. Additional materials were donated by Sugarman's niece, Arden Sugarman Eilopolous, in 1999 and 2000. In 2006, the Sugarman Foundation via Arden Sugarman donated the audio and video recordings.
Restrictions:
The collection is open for research. Microfilmed portion must be consulted on microfilm. Use of unmicrofilmed portion requires an appointment and is limited to the Washington, D.C. research facility.
Rights:
The George Sugarman papers are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Sculptors -- New York (State) -- New York -- Interviews  Search this
Sculpture, Modern -- 20th century -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Genre/Form:
Drawings
Interviews
Photographs
Sound recordings
Citation:
George Sugarman papers, 1912-2001. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.sugageor
See more items in:
George Sugarman papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-sugageor
Additional Online Media:

Aklama : Hilfsgeister der Ewe und Dangme aus der Studiensammlung Horst Antes = Aklama : helping spirits of the Ewe and Dangme from the study collection of Horst Antes / Nii O. Quarcoopome ; mit Beiträgen von Wolf-Dieter Dube [and four others] ; Fotos von Rémi Bazan ; herausgegeben von der Studienstiftung Horst Antes = Nii O. Quarcoopome ; with essays by Wolf-Dieter Dube [and four others] ; photos by Rémi Bazan

Title:
Aklama : helping spirits of the Ewe and Dangme from the study collection of Horst Antes
Author:
Quarcoopome, Nii O.  Search this
Contributor:
Dube, Wolf Dieter  Search this
Illustrator:
Bazan, Rémi  Search this
Issuing body:
Studienstiftung Horst Antes  Search this
Host institution:
St. Annen-Museum  Search this
Subject:
Antes, Horst 1936- Art collections  Search this
Physical description:
503 pages : illustrations (chiefly color) ; 33 cm
Type:
Exhibitions
Pictorial works
Place:
Africa, West
Date:
2016
Topic:
Wood sculpture, African  Search this
Figure sculpture  Search this
Wood sculpture--Private collections  Search this
Ceremonial objects  Search this
Adangme (African people)--Rites and ceremonies  Search this
Ewe (African people)--Rites and ceremonies  Search this
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_1067538

Mask

Donor Name:
Emperor Of Japan  Search this
Commodore Matthew C. Perry  Search this
Culture:
Kran  Search this
Object Type:
Mask
Place:
Liberia, Africa
Accession Date:
1859-Mar-09
Topic:
Ethnology  Search this
Accession Number:
199043
USNM Number:
E4967-0
See more items in:
Anthropology
Data Source:
NMNH - Anthropology Dept.
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmnhanthropology_8467846
Additional Online Media:

for colored girls who have considered suicide / when the rainbow is enuf

Published by:
Playbill, American, founded 1884  Search this
Subject of:
Dr. Ntozake Shange, American, 1948 - 2018  Search this
Used by:
Booth Theatre, American, founded 1913  Search this
Medium:
ink on paper, metal
Dimensions:
9 x 5 5/8 x 1/8 in. (22.9 x 14.3 x 0.3 cm)
Type:
magazines (periodicals)
playbills
Place used:
New York City, New York, United States, North and Central America
Date:
November 1977
Topic:
African American  Search this
Drama (Theatre)  Search this
Feminism  Search this
Gender  Search this
Identity  Search this
Sexuality  Search this
Women  Search this
Credit Line:
Collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture, Gift of Dow B. Ellis
Object number:
2012.152.1213
Restrictions & Rights:
Playbill used by permission. All rights reserved, Playbill Inc.
See more items in:
National Museum of African American History and Culture Collection
Classification:
Documents and Published Materials-Published Works
Memorabilia and Ephemera
Exhibition:
A Changing America: 1968 and Beyond
On View:
NMAAHC (1400 Constitution Ave NW), National Mall Location, Concourse 1, C1 053
Data Source:
National Museum of African American History and Culture
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmaahc_2012.152.1213
1 Page(s) matching your search term, top most relevant are shown: View entire project in transcription center
  • View <I>for colored girls who have considered suicide / when the rainbow is enuf</I> digital asset number 1
Additional Online Media:

Figural group

Maker:
Kongo artist  Search this
Medium:
Wood
Dimensions:
H x W x D: 29 x 43.5 x 11 cm (11 7/16 x 17 1/8 x 4 5/16 in.)
Type:
Sculpture
Geography:
Boma, Democratic Republic of the Congo
Date:
Late 19th-early 20th century
Topic:
Status  Search this
foreigner  Search this
male  Search this
Credit Line:
Gift of Marcia Hersey in memory of Irwin Hersey
Object number:
2010-12-1
See more items in:
National Museum of African Art Collection
Data Source:
National Museum of African Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmafa_2010-12-1

Masked performers wearing pair of male and female Chi wara headdresses, Bamako (national district), Mali

Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Collection Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Extent:
1 Slide (col.)
Culture:
Bamana (African people)  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Slides
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Mali
Date:
1971
Scope and Contents:
"In Antilopes du soleil, his 1980 survey of ci wara, Dominique Zahan classifies this corpus of works in group I, which comprises pairs that overtly emphasize the differentiation of the male and female forms. Zahan notes that the social distinctions between men and women that suffuse Bamana society are referenced in the antelope sculptures through sexual attibutes: the male's penis and the infant carried by the female. Female ci wara headdress are also generally smaller than the males. The fawn depicted on her back is invariably a miniature representation of either the adult male or female. The fundamental differences underlying the designs of the male and female headdresses in this style derive from the fact that they are modeled on different species of animal. The head, neck, ears, and horns of the male form draw upon features of the roan antelope, known as dage, and its lower part refers to the aardvark. The female form is inspired by the oryx antelope." [La Gamma A., 2002: Genesis: Ideas of Origin in African Sculpture. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. Yale University Press, New Haven and London]. This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon was on assignment for Westinghouse Film and traveled to Africa from October 26, 1970 to end of March 1971.
Local Numbers:
E 1 BMB 4 EE 71
General:
Title is provided by EEPA staff based on photographer's notes.
Exhibitions Note:
"Convergence," organized and held by Morgan State University on view from December 14, 2002 thru April 13, 2003. LL03-0015
Local Note:
Caption: Bamana Chi-wara (antelope) headdress dancers, near Bamako, Mali. Photograph by Eliot Elisofon, April, 1971. Image no. EEPA 3366. Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art, Smithsonian Institution.
48
Frame value is 33.
Slide No. E 1 BMB 4 EE 71
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original records requires an appointment. Contact Archives staff for more details.
Collection Rights:
Permission to reproduce images from the Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives must be obtained in advance. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Rites and ceremonies -- Africa  Search this
Dance  Search this
Masquerades  Search this
Masks  Search this
Wood-carving  Search this
Animals in art  Search this
Animals in art -- antelopes  Search this
Animals in art -- Composite animals  Search this
Headdresses -- headgear -- Africa  Search this
Genre/Form:
Color slides
Collection Citation:
Eliot Elisofon Field Collection, EEPA 1973-001, Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
EEPA.1973-001, Item EEPA EECL 3366
See more items in:
Eliot Elisofon Field collection
Archival Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-eepa-1973-001-ref19738

Masked performers wearing pair of male and female Chi wara headdresses, Bamako (national district), Mali

Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Collection Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Extent:
1 Slide (col.)
Culture:
Bamana (African people)  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Slides
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Mali
Date:
1971
Scope and Contents:
"In Antilopes du soleil, his 1980 survey of ci wara, Dominique Zahan classifies this corpus of works in group I, which comprises pairs that overtly emphasize the differentiation of the male and female forms. Zahan notes that the social distinctions between men and women that suffuse Bamana society are referenced in the antelope sculptures through sexual attibutes: the male's penis and the infant carried by the female. Female ci wara headdress are also generally smaller than the males. The fawn depicted on her back is invariably a miniature representation of either the adult male or female. The fundamental differences underlying the designs of the male and female headdresses in this style derive from the fact that they are modeled on different species of animal. The head, neck, ears, and horns of the male form draw upon features of the roan antelope, known as dage, and its lower part refers to the aardvark. The female form is inspired by the oryx antelope." [La Gamma A., 2002: Genesis: Ideas of Origin in African Sculpture. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. Yale University Press, New Haven and London]. This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon was on assignment for Westinghouse Film and traveled to Africa from October 26, 1970 to end of March 1971.
Local Numbers:
E 1 BMB 4.1 EE 71
General:
Citation source: Archives staff.
Title is provided by EEPA staff based on photographer's notes.
Exhibitions Note:
Contexual image in "African Masks from the Noel Collection" held by the Tubman African American Museum in Macon, Georgia, 2003. LL03-0069
Local Note:
48
Frame value is 32.
Slide No. E 1 BMB 4.1 EE 71
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original records requires an appointment. Contact Archives staff for more details.
Collection Rights:
Permission to reproduce images from the Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives must be obtained in advance. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Rites and ceremonies -- Africa  Search this
Dance  Search this
Masquerades  Search this
Masks  Search this
Wood-carving  Search this
Animals in art  Search this
Animals in art -- antelopes  Search this
Animals in art -- Composite animals  Search this
Headdresses -- headgear -- Africa  Search this
Genre/Form:
Color slides
Collection Citation:
Eliot Elisofon Field Collection, EEPA 1973-001, Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
EEPA.1973-001, Item EEPA EECL 3367
See more items in:
Eliot Elisofon Field collection
Archival Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-eepa-1973-001-ref19739

Drummers accompanying masked performers with male and female Chi wara headdresses, Bamako (national district), Mali

Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Collection Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Extent:
1 Slide (col.)
Culture:
Bamana (African people)  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Slides
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Mali
Date:
1971
Scope and Contents:
"In Antilopes du soleil, his 1980 survey of ci wara, Dominique Zahan classifies this corpus of works in group I, which comprises pairs that overtly emphasize the differentiation of the male and female forms. Zahan notes that the social distinctions between men and women that suffuse Bamana society are referenced in the antelope sculptures through sexual attibutes: the male's penis and the infant carried by the female. Female ci wara headdress are also generally smaller than the males. The fawn depicted on her back is invariably a miniature representation of either the adult male or female. The fundamental differences underlying the designs of the male and female headdresses in this style derive from the fact that they are modeled on different species of animal. The head, neck, ears, and horns of the male form draw upon features of the roan antelope, known as dage, and its lower part refers to the aardvark. The female form is inspired by the oryx antelope." [La Gamma A., 2002: Genesis: Ideas of Origin in African Sculpture. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. Yale University Press, New Haven and London]. This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon was on assignment for Westinghouse Film and traveled to Africa from October 26, 1970 to end of March 1971.
Local Numbers:
E 1 BMB 6 EE 71
General:
Citation source: Archives staff.
Title is provided by EEPA staff based on photographer's notes.
Exhibitions Note:
"The World Journey: Art in African Art," held by the Speed Art Museum, Louisville, KY, , beginning August, 20, 2002. LL01-0212.
"African Art from the Permanent Collection," exhibited by the Neuberger Museum of Art, beginning in November, 2001. LL02-0040.
Local Note:
48
Frame value is 6.
Slide No. E 1 BMB 6 EE 71
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original records requires an appointment. Contact Archives staff for more details.
Collection Rights:
Permission to reproduce images from the Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives must be obtained in advance. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Rites and ceremonies -- Africa  Search this
Dance  Search this
Masquerades  Search this
Masks  Search this
Wood-carving  Search this
Animals in art  Search this
Animals in art -- antelopes  Search this
Animals in art -- Composite animals  Search this
Headdresses -- headgear -- Africa  Search this
Musical instruments  Search this
Music  Search this
Genre/Form:
Color slides
Collection Citation:
Eliot Elisofon Field Collection, EEPA 1973-001, Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
EEPA.1973-001, Item EEPA EECL 3369
See more items in:
Eliot Elisofon Field collection
Archival Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-eepa-1973-001-ref19741

Three masked performers, one wearing male horizontal Chi wara headdress, the two others wearing double-headed horizontal Chi wara headdresses, both referred to as n'gonzon koun, Bamako (national district), Mali

Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Collection Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Extent:
1 Slide (col.)
Culture:
Bamana (African people)  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Slides
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Mali
Date:
1970
Scope and Contents:
"Headdresses of this kind are distinctive for their formal qualities as well as for their idiosyncratic construction. All other related Bamana sculptural genres are monoxylic (carved from a single piece of wood), but these works are invariably carved as two separate units - the head and the body - which are subsequently joined together at the neck either with iron staples, U-shaped nails, or metal or leather collars attached with nails. The especially complex, tiered horizontal headdress is exceptional for its expression of pentup corporeal power. It gives compelling evidence that horizontal headdress were not modeled on a single animal found in nature but rather represent an abstract force expressed through an amalgam of zoomorphic features. Here the animal in the lower half, which appears to be an aardvark, is more fully realized than in others because of the inclusion of its head. It is possible this work was commissioned by a voluntary communal labor association known as gonzon. Gonzon owned headdresses called n'gonzon koun, or 'anteater head,' which were sculpturally identical to those used by the ci wara association of the same community. They were not danced in the field, however, as were ci wara headdresses, but rather in the village on occasions when the gonzon performed charitable farmwork." [La Gamma A., 2002: Genesis: Ideas of Origin in African Sculpture. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. Yale University Press, New Haven and London]. This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon traveled to Africa from March 17, 1970 to July 17, 1970.
Local Numbers:
E 1 BMB 12.1 EE 70
General:
Citation source: Archives staff.
Title is provided by EEPA staff based on photographer's notes.
Exhibitions Note:
"West African Permanent Exhibit," held by Sinclair Community College at the Learning Resource Center Library in Dayton, Ohio, beginning 2001. LL01-0003
Local Note:
Frame value is 16.
Slide No. E 1 BMB 12.1 EE 70
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original records requires an appointment. Contact Archives staff for more details.
Collection Rights:
Permission to reproduce images from the Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives must be obtained in advance. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Rites and ceremonies -- Africa  Search this
Masquerades  Search this
Masks  Search this
Animals in art  Search this
Animals in art -- Aardvark  Search this
Animals in art -- antelopes  Search this
Animals in art -- Composite animals  Search this
Wood-carving  Search this
Headdresses -- headgear -- Africa  Search this
Dance  Search this
Genre/Form:
Color slides
Collection Citation:
Eliot Elisofon Field Collection, EEPA 1973-001, Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
EEPA.1973-001, Item EEPA EECL 3381
See more items in:
Eliot Elisofon Field collection
Archival Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-eepa-1973-001-ref19754

Three masked performers, one wearing male horizontal Chi wara headdress, the two others wearing double-headed horizontal Chi wara headdresses, both referred to as n'gonzon koun, Bamako (national district), Mali

Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Collection Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Extent:
1 Slide (col.)
Culture:
Bamana (African people)  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Slides
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Mali
Date:
1970
Scope and Contents:
"Headdresses of this kind are distinctive for their formal qualities as well as for their idiosyncratic construction. All other related Bamana sculptural genres are monoxylic (carved from a single piece of wood), but these works are invariably carved as two separate units - the head and the body - which are subsequently joined together at the neck either with iron staples, U-shaped nails, or metal or leather collars attached with nails. The especially complex, tiered horizontal headdress is exceptional for its expression of pentup corporeal power. It gives compelling evidence that horizontal headdress were not modeled on a single animal found in nature but rather represent an abstract force expressed through an amalgam of zoomorphic features. Here the animal in the lower half, which appears to be an aardvark, is more fully realized than in others because of the inclusion of its head. It is possible this work was commissioned by a voluntary communal labor association known as gonzon. Gonzon owned headdresses called n'gonzon koun, or 'anteater head,' which were sculpturally identical to those used by the ci wara association of the same community. They were not danced in the field, however, as were ci wara headdresses, but rather in the village on occasions when the gonzon performed charitable farmwork." [La Gamma A., 2002: Genesis: Ideas of Origin in African Sculpture. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. Yale University Press, New Haven and London]. This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon traveled to Africa from March 17, 1970 to July 17, 1970.
Local Numbers:
E 1 BMB 14.2 EE 70
General:
Citation source: Archives staff.
Title is provided by EEPA staff based on photographer's notes.
Exhibitions Note:
"West African Permanent Exhibit," held by Sinclair Community College at the Learning Resource Center Library in Dayton, Ohio, beginning 2001. LL01-0003
Local Note:
Frame value is 13.
Slide No. E 1 BMB 14.2 EE 70
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original records requires an appointment. Contact Archives staff for more details.
Collection Rights:
Permission to reproduce images from the Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives must be obtained in advance. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Rites and ceremonies -- Africa  Search this
Masquerades  Search this
Masks  Search this
Animals in art  Search this
Animals in art -- Aardvark  Search this
Animals in art -- antelopes  Search this
Animals in art -- Composite animals  Search this
Wood-carving  Search this
Headdresses -- headgear -- Africa  Search this
Dance  Search this
Genre/Form:
Color slides
Collection Citation:
Eliot Elisofon Field Collection, EEPA 1973-001, Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
EEPA.1973-001, Item EEPA EECL 3387
See more items in:
Eliot Elisofon Field collection
Archival Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-eepa-1973-001-ref19761

Masked performer wearing vertical Chi wara headdress, Bougouni village, Mali

Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Collection Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Extent:
1 Slide (col.)
Culture:
Bamana (African people)  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Slides
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Mali
Date:
1970
Scope and Contents:
"In the Bamana world, objects such the antelope headdresses always come in pairs -one male and one female- symbolizing the union of mythical half-animal, half-human beings that taught their ancestors to farm, and the productive union of men and women throughout time." [Wooten S., 2004: Where is my Mate? The Importance of Complementarity: A Bamana Headdress (Ciwara). See the Music, Hear the Dance, Prestel]. During his trip to Mali, Elisofon visited the village of Bougouni, in the Bamana region. This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon traveled to Africa from March 17, 1970 to July 17, 1970.
Local Numbers:
E 1 BMB 20.2 EE 70
General:
Citation source: Archives staff.
Title is provided by EEPA staff based on photographer's notes.
Exhibitions Note:
"West African Permanent Exhibit," held by Sinclair Community College at the Learning Resource Center Library in Dayton, Ohio, beginning 2001. LL01-0003
Local Note:
Frame value is 18.
Slide No. E 1 BMB 20.2 EE 70
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original records requires an appointment. Contact Archives staff for more details.
Collection Rights:
Permission to reproduce images from the Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives must be obtained in advance. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Rites and ceremonies -- Africa  Search this
Masquerades  Search this
Masks  Search this
Wood-carving  Search this
Dance  Search this
Animals in art  Search this
Animals in art -- antelopes  Search this
Animals in art -- Composite animals  Search this
Textile crafts  Search this
Headdresses -- headgear -- Africa  Search this
Genre/Form:
Color slides
Collection Citation:
Eliot Elisofon Field Collection, EEPA 1973-001, Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
EEPA.1973-001, Item EEPA EECL 3396
See more items in:
Eliot Elisofon Field collection
Archival Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-eepa-1973-001-ref19771

Kanaga and dyomo masqueraders during the Dama ceremony, Sanga, Mali

Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Collection Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Extent:
1 Slide (col.)
Culture:
Dogon (African people)  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Slides
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Mali
Date:
1970
Scope and Contents:
"The kanaga mask is part of a costume traditionally worn only for the dances of the Dama funerary ceremonies,and is accompanied by particular drum rythms from particular drums which generate specific dances. Only initiated, circumcised members of the all-male Awa secret society dance the kanaga." [Harris M., 1989: Visual tropes: The Kanaga Mask of the Dogon people of West Africa, Yale University]. During his trip to Mali, Elisofon visited the Dogon people in Sanga (Sangha), a group of thirteen villages lying east of Bandiagara at the top of an escarpment. This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon traveled to Africa from March 17, 1970 to July 17, 1970.
Local Numbers:
E 1 DGN 4.5 EE 70
General:
Citation source: Archives staff.
Title is provided by EEPA staff based on photographer's notes.
Exhibitions Note:
"West African Permanent Exhibit," held by Sinclair Community College at the Learning Resource Center Library in Dayton, Ohio, beginning 2001. LL01-0003
Local Note:
16
Frame value is 12.
Slide No. E 1 DGN 4.5 EE 70
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original records requires an appointment. Contact Archives staff for more details.
Collection Rights:
Permission to reproduce images from the Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives must be obtained in advance. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Masquerades  Search this
Clothing and dress -- Africa  Search this
Masks  Search this
Animals in art  Search this
Animals in art -- Rabbits  Search this
Wood-carving  Search this
Genre/Form:
Color slides
Collection Citation:
Eliot Elisofon Field Collection, EEPA 1973-001, Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
EEPA.1973-001, Item EEPA EECL 3488
See more items in:
Eliot Elisofon Field collection
Archival Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-eepa-1973-001-ref19873

Blacksmith-sculptor producing vertical Chi wara headdress out of a solid mass of wood, Bamako region, Mali

Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Collection Photographer:
Elisofon, Eliot  Search this
Extent:
1 Slide (col.)
Culture:
Bamana (African people)  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Slides
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Mali
Date:
1971
Scope and Contents:
"Blacksmith-sculptors (numuw) produce the wooden Ciwara headdresses, and a wide range of important items for individual farmers and for farming communities. According to Bamana oral tradition, smiths played an instrumental role in the development of the farming way of life. The original smith is said to have fashioned the first farming tools and created the first Ciwara headdresses to honor the beings that brought agriculture to the Bamana." "In the Bamana world, objects such the antelope headdresses always come in pairs -one male and one female- symbolizing the union of mythical half-animal, half-human beings that taught their ancestors to farm, and the productive union of men and women throughout time." [Wooten S., 2004: Where is my Mate? The Importance of Complementarity: A Bamana Headdress (Ciwara). See the Music, Hear the Dance, Prestel]. This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon was on assignment for Westinghouse Film and traveled to Africa from October 26, 1970 to end of March 1971.
Local Numbers:
H 1 BMB 1 EE 71
General:
Citation source: Archives staff.
Title is provided by EEPA staff based on photographer's notes.
Exhibitions Note:
"Convergence," organized and held by Morgan State University on view from December 14, 2002 thru April 13, 2003.
Local Note:
49
Frame value is 18.
Slide No. H 1 BMB 1 EE 71
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original records requires an appointment. Contact Archives staff for more details.
Collection Rights:
Permission to reproduce images from the Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives must be obtained in advance. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Artists  Search this
Animals in art  Search this
Wood-carving  Search this
Tools  Search this
Genre/Form:
Color slides
Collection Citation:
Eliot Elisofon Field Collection, EEPA 1973-001, Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
EEPA.1973-001, Item EEPA EECL 6751
See more items in:
Eliot Elisofon Field collection
Archival Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-eepa-1973-001-ref23493

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