Skip to main content Smithsonian Institution

Search Results

Collections Search Center
475 documents - page 1 of 24

Pyrex Test Tubes: Corning Glass Orders

Collection Creator::
Knight, Harry H.  Search this
Container:
Box 2 of 20
Type:
Archival materials
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Accession T90017, Harry H. Knight Papers
See more items in:
Harry H. Knight Papers
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-sia-fat90017-refidd1e1478

Milt Jackson Innovative Lives Presentation

Creator:
Jerome and Dorothy Lemelson Center for the Study of Invention and Innovation.  Search this
Madewell, Steven  Search this
Interviewee:
Jackson, Milt  Search this
Extent:
2 electronic discs (dvd)
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Electronic discs (dvd)
DVDs
Interviews
Date:
October 2, 2010
Scope and Contents:
Collection documents inventor Milt Jackson who discusses his "re-invention" of the test tube. Jackson's test tube has a flat side that enables it to rest horizontally without a rack, and a bent end. Milt Jackson is the founder of the company Norwood-Cortez which provides computer systems design services.
Arrangement:
1 series.
Related Archival Materials:
Videohistory exists as .mov files (7.33 GB) in Lemelson Center. Originally shot in mini DV cassettes.
Provenance:
This videohistory was created by the Innovative Lives Program of the Jerome and Dorothy Lemelson Center for the Study of Invention and Innovation, October 2, 2010.
Restrictions:
Unrestricted research access on site by appointment.,Unprotected photographs must be handled with gloves.
Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
Test tubes  Search this
Inventors  Search this
Inventions  Search this
African American inventors  Search this
Genre/Form:
DVDs
Interviews -- 2000-2010
Citation:
Milt Jackson Innovative Lives Presentation, October 2, 2010, Archives Center, National Museum of American History.
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.1241
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmah-ac-1241

Folder 33 RG Test-tube Babies

Collection Creator::
Science Service  Search this
Container:
Box 16 of 33
Type:
Archival materials
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Accession 90-068, Science Service, Records
See more items in:
Records
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-sia-fa90-068-refidd1e9143

S. Ample Collection of Kitchen Sinks

Extent:
20 Linear feet
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Date:
placeholder
Scope and Contents:
Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velit esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur. Excepteur sint occaecat cupidatat non proident, sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollit anim id est laborum.

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velit esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur. Excepteur sint occaecat cupidatat non proident, sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollit anim id est laborum.
Arrangement:
Arranged in 2 series: Correspondence and Interviews
Provenance:
Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velit esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur. Excepteur sint occaecat cupidatat non proident, sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollit anim id est laborum
Restrictions:
Consult repository for terms of access.
Rights:
Consult repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Test tubes  Search this
Citation:
Test record, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
SI.Test
See more items in:
S. Ample Collection of Kitchen Sinks
Archival Repository:
{}
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-si-test
Additional Online Media:

2809, Test Tube (Tigers), June 26, 1990, U-matic S

Collection Creator::
National Zoological Park  Search this
Container:
Box 8 of 58
Type:
Archival materials
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Accession 16-064, National Zoological Park, Audiovisual Recordings
See more items in:
Audiovisual Recordings
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-sia-fa16-064-refidd1e1909

"What are the Ethical Implications of Test Tube Babies?," February 14, 1979

Collection Creator::
Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars. Office of Special Events  Search this
Container:
Box 1 of 2
Type:
Archival materials
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Accession 98-155, Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars. Office of Special Events, Records
See more items in:
Records
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-sia-fa98-155-refidd1e206

318949.136 Cyclegraph--not sure of what. GL 1733 is of is of Dr. Myrtelle Canavan, Assistant Pathologist of Mass., in the act of inoculating a test tube with typhoid germs. Very similar to 318949.1359.

Collection Creator:
Perkins, James Secor  Search this
Gilbreth, Frank Bunker, 1868-1924  Search this
Gilbreth, Lillian Moller, 1878-1972  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
undated
General note:
Category: surgical & dental study
Gilbreth image: GL 1738
Related captions: GL-1733 This is the best cyclegraph that I have ever seen in my life. It is of Dr. Myrtelle Canavan, Assistant Pathologist of Mass., in the act of inoculating a test tube with typhoid germs. Note that the care with which the operation must be done has caused the motions to be identical with those that denote grace and skill shown in other pictures.
Collection Restrictions:
The collection is open for research use. Viewing film portion of collection without reference copies requires special appointment, please inquire; listening to audio tape requires special arrangment. Do not use original materials when available on reference video or audio tapes.
Collection Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Collection Citation:
Frank and Lillian Gilbreth Collection, Archives Center, National Museum of American History
See more items in:
Frank and Lillian Gilbreth Collection
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmah-ac-0803-ref6392

318949.1359 Cyclegraph--not sure of what. GL 1733 is of is of Dr. Myrtelle Canavan, Assistant Pathologist of Mass., in the act of inoculating a test tube with typhoid germs. Very similar to 318949.1360

Collection Creator:
Perkins, James Secor  Search this
Gilbreth, Frank Bunker, 1868-1924  Search this
Gilbreth, Lillian Moller, 1878-1972  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
undated
General note:
Category: surgical & dental study
Gilbreth image: GL 1730
Related captions: GL-1733 This is the best cyclegraph that I have ever seen in my life. It is of Dr. Myrtelle Canavan, Assistant Pathologist of Mass., in the act of inoculating a test tube with typhoid germs. Note that the care with which the operation must be done has caused the motions to be identical with those that denote grace and skill shown in other pictures.
Collection Restrictions:
The collection is open for research use. Viewing film portion of collection without reference copies requires special appointment, please inquire; listening to audio tape requires special arrangment. Do not use original materials when available on reference video or audio tapes.
Collection Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Collection Citation:
Frank and Lillian Gilbreth Collection, Archives Center, National Museum of American History
See more items in:
Frank and Lillian Gilbreth Collection
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmah-ac-0803-ref9896

History of the Polymerase Chain Reaction Interviews

Extent:
11 videotapes.
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Interviews
Videotapes
Oral history
Date:
1992-1993
Introduction:
The Smithsonian Videohistory Program, funded by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation from 1986 until 1992, used video in historical research. Additional collections have been added since the grant project ended. Videohistory uses the video camera as a historical research tool to record moving visual information. Video works best in historical research when recording people at work in environments, explaining artifacts, demonstrating process, or in group discussion. The experimental program recorded projects that reflected the Institution's concern with the conduct of contemporary science and technology.

Smithsonian historians participated in the program to document visual aspects of their on-going historical research. Projects covered topics in the physical and biological sciences as well as in technological design and manufacture. To capture site, process, and interaction most effectively, projects were taped in offices, factories, quarries, laboratories, observatories, and museums. Resulting footage was duplicated, transcribed, and deposited in the Smithsonian Institution Archives for scholarship, education, and exhibition. The collection is open to qualified researchers.
Descriptive Entry:
Ramunas Kondratas, curator at the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History (NMAH), documented the discovery, development, commercialization, and applications of PCR technology. Three sessions were recorded May 14 and May 15, 1992 at Emeryville, California; September 25, 1992 at Alameda, California; and February 25, 1993 at Norwalk, Connecticut.

This collection consists of three interview sessions, totalling approximately 19:00 hours of recordings, and 346 pages of transcript. There are three generations of tape for each session: originals, dubbing masters, and reference copies. In total, this collection is comprised of 38 original Betacam videotapes, 19 dubbing master U-matic videotapes, and 11 reference copy VHS videotapes. The collection has been remastered digitally, with 38 motion jpeg 2000 and 38 mpeg digital files for preservation, and 38 Windows Media Video and 38 Real Media Video digital files for reference.

Several participants were also interviewed on audiotape. The audiotapes and transcripts complement the videotape sessions and are available through the Division of Medical Science, National Museum of American History.
Historical Note:
The Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) technique, invented in 1985 by Kary B. Mullis, allowed scientists to make millions of copies of a scarce sample of DNA. The technique has revolutionized many aspects of current research, including the diagnosis of genetic defects and the detection of the AIDS virus in human cells. The technique is also used by criminologists to link specific persons to samples of blood or hair via DNA comparison. PCR also affected evolutionary studies because large quantities of DNA can be manufactured from fossils containing but trace amounts.

Kary Mullis invented the PCR technique in 1985 while working as a chemist at the Cetus Corporation, a biotechnology firm in Emeryville, California. The procedure requires placing a small amount of the DNA containing the desired gene into a test tube. A large batch of loose nucleotides, which link into exact copies of the original gene, is also added to the tube. A pair of synthesized short DNA segments, that match segments on each side of the desired gene, is added. These "primers" find the right portion of the DNA, and serve as starting points for DNA copying. When the enzyme Taq DNA Polymeras from the bacterium, Thermus aquaticus is added, the loose nucleotides lock into a DNA sequence dictated by the sequence of that target gene located between the two primers.

The test tube is heated, and the DNA's double helix separates into two strands. The DNA sequence of each strand of the helix is thus exposed and as the temperature is lowered the primers automatically bind to their complementary portions of the DNA sample. At the same time, the enzyme links the loose nucleotides to the primer and to each of the separated DNA strands in the appropriate sequence. The complete reaction, which takes approximately five minutes, results in two double helices containing the desired portion of the original. The heating and cooling is repeated, doubling the number of DNA copies. After thirty to forty cycles are completed a single copy of a piece of DNA can be multiplied to hundreds of millions.

When completed manually, Mullis' PCR technique was slow and labor-intensive. Therefore, Cetus scientists began looking for ways in which to automate the process. Before the discovery of the thermostable Taq enzyme, scientists needed to add fresh enzyme to each cycle. The first thermocycling machine, "Mr. Cycle" was developed by Cetus engineers to address that need to add fresh enzyme to each test tube after the heating and cooling process. Purification of the Taq polymerase then resulted in the need for a machine to cycle more rapidly among different temperatures. In 1985, Cetus formed a joint venture with the Perkin-Elmer Corporation in Norwalk, Connecticut, and introduced the DNA Thermal Cycler. By 1988, Cetus was receiving numerous inquiries about licensing to perform PCR for commercial diagnostic purposes. On January 15, 1989, Cetus announced an agreement to collaborate with Hoffman-LaRoche on the development and commercialization of in vitro human diagnostic products and services based on PCR technology. Roche Molecular Systems eventually bought the PCR patent and associated technology from Cetus for $300,000,000.

Interviewees included scientists, engineers, and managers from Cetus Corporation, Roche Molecular Systems, and Perkin-Elmer Corporation. Norman Arnheim first became interested in the study of medicine in high school, as the result of a summer spent working at a hospital. He received his B.A. (1960) and M.A. (1962) from the University of Rochester, and his Ph.D. (1966) in Drosophila genetics from the University of California, Berkeley. A professor of molecular biology at the University of Southern California, Arnheim formerly worked at Cetus Corporation on PCR. John G. Atwood came to Perkin-Elmer Corporation in November 1948 with a masters' degree in electrical engineering from Columbia University (1948), and served as senior scientist for the biotechnology instrument group.

Peter Barrett received a B.S. in Chemistry from Lowell Technological Institute and a Ph.D. in Analytical Chemistry from Northeastern University. He joined Perkin-Elmer in 1970 as product specialist in the Instrument Division, was promoted to manager of the Applications Laboratory in 1982, and director of the Laboratory Robotics Department in 1985. In 1988, Barrett was named director of European Marketing and relocated to Italy. In 1989, he moved to Germany to set up the European Sales and Service Center. He returned to the U.S. in 1990 to serve as Division Vice-President of Instruments and was named Vice-President of the Life Sciences Division in 1991. In 1993, in conjunction with the merger with Applied Biosystems Incorporated, he moved to California to become Executive Vice-President, Applied Biosystems Division.

Joseph L. DiCesare received his Ph.D. in Biochemistry from the University of Rhode Island. In 1976, he accepted the position of Assistant Product Line Manager at Perkin-Elmer Corporation and was appointed Product Line Manager of the Gas Chromatography Division in 1983. In 1987, he was promoted to the position of Research and Development Applications Manager of the Biotechnology Division. Henry Anthony Erlich received his B.A. in biochemical sciences from Harvard University in 1965 and his Ph.D. in genetics from University of Washington in 1972. He served as a postdoctoral fellow in the Department of Biology at Princeton University from 1972 to 1975 and in the Department of Medicine at Stanford University from 1975 to 1979. He joined the Cetus Corporation in 1979 and was appointed Senior Scientist and Director of Human Genetics in 1981. After the dissolution of Cetus in 1991, Erlich transferred to Roche Molecular Systems to serve as director of Human Genetics.

A few years after graduating from high school, Fred Faloona began working as a research assistant under Kary B. Mullis at the Cetus Corporation, c. 1983. He assisted Mullis with the initial development and application of PCR. He followed Mullis to Xytronyx Incorporated in 1986 where he served as a Research associate working on DNA and RNA sequencing and further applications of PCR. In 1988, he returned to Cetus as a research assistant where he worked on the application of PCR to the discovery of new retroviruses and he further refined PCR detection techniques. In 1991, Faloona and a partner began Saddle Point System, a small company designing computer hardware and software.

David H. Gelfand completed his B.A. in Biology at Brandeis University in 1966. After receiving a Ph.D. in Biology from the University of California, San Diego in 1970, he began work as an assistant research biochemist at the University of California in San Francisco. He was offered the position of Director of Recombinant Molecular Research at Cetus in 1976 and was promoted to Vice-President of that division in 1979. He later accepted positions as Vice-President of Scientific Affairs and Director of Core Technology, PCR Division, in 1981 and 1988. In 1991, Gelfand also transferred to Roche Molecular Systems to serve as Director for the Program in Core Research.

Lawrence Allen Haff received his B.S. in Biochemistry from Michigan State University in 1969. After completing his Ph.D. in Biochemistry from Cornell University in 1974, Haff served as a research fellow in the biological laboratories of Harvard University. In 1976, he accepted the position of Senior Research Scientist at Pharmacia. He transferred to Millipore Corporation in 1982 to serve as Technical Research Manager developing and supporting high performance separation techniques. He joined the Perkin-Elmer Corporation in 1985 as principal scientist and research manager to help develop the DNA Thermal Cycler.

After receiving his B.S. in mechanical engineering from the University of California-Davis in 1978, David C. Jones worked as a stress engineer for the Boeing Commercial Aircraft Company. In 1980, he joined the Bio-Rad Laboratories designing and developing chromatography instruments. He accepted the position of Mechanical Engineer at Cetus Corporation in 1986 to work on thermocycling instrumentation. He also completed an M.B.A. in management from Golden State University in 1988.

Elena D. Katz was awarded her M.S. degree in Chemistry from Moscow University, Russia. From 1969 to 1972, she studied in the Ph.D. program at the Institute of Physical Chemistry of the Academy of Sciences in Moscow. In 1973, she was appointed Associate Researcher in the physical chemistry department of Moscow University. After moving to the United States, Katz became Senior Staff Scientist at Perkin-Elmer in 1977 working on various multidisciplinary projects utilizing liquid and gas chromatography. After 1985, Katz concurrently pursued a Ph.D. in Chemistry from the University of London. Shirley Kwok began her career as a research associate with the Assay Department of Cetus Corporation after graduating from the University of California, Berkeley, with a degree in microbiology. Kwok was part of a group of researchers devoted to the use of PCR to detect HIV in human cells, and held the position of Research Investigator for Hoffman-La Roche at Roche Molecular Systems.

Richard Leath started with Cetus in 1980, after receiving a masters' degree in electrical engineering from Purdue University in 1974. Leath spent a decade developing machines like Mr. Cycle, and later worked as Senior Engineer at Maxwell Labs, Richmond, California, a firm which developed particle accelerators.

Kary B. Mullis received his B.S. in Chemistry from the Georgia Institute of Technology in 1966 and his Ph.D. in Biochemistry from the University of California-Berkeley in 1972. In 1973, he was awarded a post-doctoral fellowship in pediatric cardiology at the University of Kansas Medical School. He returned to California in 1977 and was awarded another fellowship in pharmaceutical chemistry from the University of California, San Francisco to research endorphins and the opiate receptor. He accepted the position of Scientist at Cetus in 1979 to work in the chemistry department researching oligonucleotide synthesis and chemistry. He transferred to the Department of Human Genetics in 1984 to conduct research on DNA technology. In 1986, Mullis accepted the position of Director of Molecular Biology at Xytronyx, Inc. researching DNA technology, photochemistry, and photobiology. He left Xytronyx in 1988 and then served as a private consultant to a variety of companies in the field of nucleic chemistry. Mullis won the Nobel Prize in chemistry in 1993 for his invention of the PCR technique.

Lynn H. Pasahow graduated from Stanford University in 1969 and received his law degree from the University of California at Berkeley School of Law in 1972. He joined the firm of McCutchen, Doyle, Brown, and Enersen in 1973, where he chaired the firm's intellectual property group. He had advised clients and handled complex litigation involving patent, copyright, trademark, trade secret, licensing, export-import, noncompetition, and trade regulation disputes, most involving biotechnology, computer hardware and software and other advanced technology products. He led the group of lawyers which successfully obtained a jury verdict upholding Cetus' landmark polymerase chain reaction patents against the Dupont Company challenge. Enrico Picozza began work with Perkin-Elmer in June 1985, shortly after receiving his degree from the University of Connecticut. He was a Senior Technical Specialist, devoted to specifying, developing, testing and evaluating instrumentation primarily for the PCR market.

Riccardo Pigliucci earned his degree in chemistry in Milan, Italy and graduated from the Management Program at the Northeastern University. He joined Perkin-Elmer in 1966 and held numerous management positions in analytical instrument operations in Europe as well as in the U.S. He was appointed General Manager of the U.S. Instrument Division in 1989 after serving as director of Worldwide Instrument Marketing since 1985. In 1988, Pigliucci was appointed a sector Vice-President in Connecticut Operations. The following year, he was elected corporate Vice-President of Perkin-Elmer Instruments. He became President of the Instrument Group in 1991 and was named Senior Vice-President of Perkin-Elmer Corporation in 1992. In 1993, he was elected President and Chief Operating Officer and also served as a Director of the Corporation.

After receiving his bachelors degree in Chemistry and Biology from the University of Washington in 1978, Randall K. Saiki served one year as a laboratory technician in their Department of Microbiology. In 1979, he transferred to Washington University to serve as a lab technician in the Biology Department. He joined the Cetus Corporation in late 1979 as a research assistant in the Recombinant DNA Group. In 1981, he was promoted to Research Associate in the Department of Human Genetics and was named Scientist in that department in 1989. Saiki transferred to Roche Molecular Systems in 1991 to serve as Research Investigator in the Department of Human Genetics. Stephen Scharf received a degree in bacteriology from University of California, Davis. He worked there as a biochemist for four and a half years until 1980, when he came to Cetus. Scharf was a Research Associate in the Department of Human Genetics at Cetus at the time PCR was developed and later served as Senior Scientist at Roche Molecular Systems.

Donna Marie Seyfried graduated from Lehigh University with a B.S. in Microbiology. Her professional career began as a microbiologist for the E.I. Dupont de Nemours Company. Seyfried joined Perkin-Elmer in 1985. From 1990 to 1993, she served as Business Director for Biotechnology Instrument Systems. In 1994, she was appointed Director of Corporate Business Development and Strategic Planning. She was responsible for managing the development, commercialization, and marketing of the PCR business as part of the Perkin-Elmer Cetus JointVenture, and the subsequent strategic alliance with Hoffman-LaRoche. She was also instrumental in the Perkin-Elmer Applied Biosystems merger.

After receiving his B.S. from Bates College in 1972 and his Ph.D. from Purdue University in 1976, John J. Sninsky accepted a postdoctoral fellowship from the Departments of Genetics and Medicine at the Stanford University School of Medicine. In 1981, he accepted an assistant professorship at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine. He joined the Cetus Corporation in 1984 as a Senior Scientist in the Department of Microbial Genetics. In 1985, he was appointed Director of the Diagnostics Program and of the Department of Infectious Diseases. In 1988, he was promoted to Senior Director of both of those departments. Sninsky transferred to Roche Molecular Systems in 1991 to serve as Senior Director for Research. Robert Watson, who joined Cetus in 1977, was a Research Investigator with Roche Molecular Systems, working on nucleic acid-based diagnostics.

Thomas J. White graduated from John Hopkins University in 1967 with a B.A. in Chemistry. After serving for four years as a Peace Corps volunteer in Liberia, he received his Ph.D. in Biochemistry from the University of California, Berkeley in 1976. In 1978, he joined the Cetus Corporation as a scientist, and was promoted to Director of Molecular and Biological Research and Associate Director of Research and Development in 1981. He was appointed Vice-President of Research in 1984. He transferred to Roche Diagnostics Research in 1989 to serve as Senior Director and in 1991 was appointed Vice-President of Research and Development of Roche Molecular Systems and Associate Vice-President of Hoffman-LaRoche, Incorporated. Joseph Widunas, who graduated from the University of Illinois with a degree in engineering in 1975, came to Cetus in 1981 as a sound engineer. Later, as Director of new product development for Colestech Corporation, Hayward, California, he was instrumental in the development of the second Mr. Cycle prototype, "Son of Mr. Cycle."

Timothy M. Woudenberg received his B.S. in Chemistry from Purdue University in 1980. He worked as an electronics design engineer for Mulab Incorporated from 1980 to 1982. He served as a teaching and research assistant at Tufts University from 1982 to 1987 and there completed his Ph.D. in Physical Chemistry in 1988. He joined Perkin-Elmer in 1987 as an engineer in the Instrument Division of the Biotechnology Department.

Also interviewed were Perkin-Elmer's Robert P. Regusa, biotechnology systems engineering manager for the biotechnology group responsible for the development of the thermocycler instrumentation; Robert L. Grossman, an engineer at Perkin-Elmer, involved with the design and manufacture of the thermocycler line; Senior Marketing Specialist Leslie S. Kelley; as well as Cetus' Senior Scientist, Richard Respess.
Topic:
History of science and technology  Search this
Molecular biology  Search this
Biotechnology  Search this
Bioengineering  Search this
Scientific apparatus and instruments  Search this
Patents  Search this
Genre/Form:
Interviews
Videotapes
Oral history
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 9577, , History of the Polymerase Chain Reaction Interviews
Identifier:
Record Unit 9577
See more items in:
History of the Polymerase Chain Reaction Interviews
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-faru9577

In the Laboratory, (painting)

Painter:
Alexander, Henry 1860-1894  Search this
Subject:
Price, Thomas  Search this
Medium:
Oil on canvas
Type:
Paintings
Owner/Location:
Metropolitan Museum of Art 5th Avenue at 82nd Street New York New York 10028 Accession Number: 39.46
Date:
Ca. 1885-1887
Topic:
Portrait male--Waist length  Search this
Dress--Accessory--Eye wear  Search this
Occupation--Science--Chemist  Search this
Architecture interior--Science--Laboratory  Search this
Architecture interior--Detail--Window  Search this
Architecture exterior--Commericial--What Cheer House  Search this
Control number:
IAP 36120264
Data Source:
Art Inventories Catalog, Smithsonian American Art Museums
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_ari_42046

Minutes

Creator::
Smithsonian Institution. Board of Regents  Search this
Extent:
8.70 cu. ft. (9 document boxes) (7 12x17 boxes) (1 16x20 box)
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Manuscripts
Date:
1846-1995
Descriptive Entry:
These records are the official minutes of the Board. They are compiled at the direction of the Secretary of the Smithsonian, who is also secretary to the Board, after approval by the Regents' Executive Committee and by the Regents themselves. The minutes are edited, not a verbatim account of proceedings. For reasons unknown, there are no manuscript minutes for the period from 1857 through 1890; and researchers must rely on printed minutes published in the Annual Report of the Smithsonian Institution instead. Minutes are transferred regularly from the Secretary's Office to the Archives. Minutes less than 15 years old are closed to researchers. Indexes exist for the period from 1907 to 1946 and can be useful.
Historical Note:
The Smithsonian Institution was created by authority of an Act of Congress approved August 10, 1846. The Act entrusted direction of the Smithsonian to a body called the Establishment, composed of the President; the Vice President; the Chief Justice of the United States; the secretaries of State, War, Navy, Interior, and Agriculture; the Attorney General; and the Postmaster General. In fact, however, the Establishment last met in 1877, and control of the Smithsonian has always been exercised by its Board of Regents. The membership of the Regents consists of the Vice President and the Chief Justice of the United States; three members each of the Senate and House of Representatives; two citizens of the District of Columbia; and seven citizens of the several states, no two from the same state. (Prior to 1970 the category of Citizen Regents not residents of Washington consisted of four members). By custom the Chief Justice is Chancellor. The office was at first held by the Vice President. However, when Millard Fillmore succeeded to the presidency on the death of Zachary Taylor in 1851, Chief Justice Roger Brooke Taney was chosen in his stead. The office has always been filled by the Chief Justice since that time.

The Regents of the Smithsonian have included distinguished Americans from many walks of life. Ex officio members (Vice President) have been: Spiro T. Agnew, Chester A. Arthur, Allen W. Barkley, John C. Breckenridge, George Bush, Schuyler Colfax, Calvin Coolidge, Charles Curtis, George M. Dallas, Charles G. Dawes, Charles W. Fairbanks, Millard Fillmore, Gerald R. Ford, John N. Garner, Hannibal Hamlin, Thomas A. Hendricks, Garret A. Hobart, Hubert H. Humphrey, Andrew Johnson, Lyndon B. Johnson, William R. King, Thomas R. Marshall, Walter F. Mondale, Levi P. Morton, Richard M. Nixon, Nelson A. Rockefeller, Theodore Roosevelt, James S. Sherman, Adlai E. Stevenson, Harry S. Truman, Henry A. Wallace, William A. Wheeler, Henry Wilson.

Ex officio members (Chief Justice) have been: Roger B. Taney, Salmon P. Chase, Nathan Clifford, Morrison R. Waite, Samuel F. Miller, Melville W. Fuller, Edward D. White, William Howard Taft, Charles Evans Hughes, Harlan F. Stone, Fred M. Vinson, Earl Warren, Warren E. Burger.

Regents on the part of the Senate have been: Clinton P. Anderson, Newton Booth, Sidney Breese, Lewis Cass, Robert Milledge Charlton, Bennet Champ Clark, Francis M. Cockrell, Shelby Moore Cullom, Garrett Davis, Jefferson Davis, George Franklin Edmunds, George Evans, Edwin J. Garn, Walter F. George, Barry Goldwater, George Gray, Hannibal Hamlin, Nathaniel Peter Hill, George Frisbie Hoar, Henry French Hollis, Henry M. Jackson, William Lindsay, Henry Cabot Lodge, Medill McCormick, James Murray Mason, Samuel Bell Maxey, Robert B. Morgan, Frank E. Moss, Claiborne Pell, George Wharton Pepper, David A. Reed, Leverett Saltonstall, Hugh Scott, Alexander H. Smith, Robert A. Taft, Lyman Trumbull, Wallace H. White, Jr., Robert Enoch Withers.

Regents on the part of the House of Representatives have included: Edward P. Boland, Frank T. Bow, William Campbell Breckenridge, Overton Brooks, Benjamin Butterworth, Clarence Cannon, Lucius Cartrell, Hiester Clymer, William Colcock, William P. Cole, Jr., Maurice Connolly, Silvio O. Conte, Edward E. Cox, Edward H. Crump, John Dalzell, Nathaniel Deering, Hugh A. Dinsmore, William English, John Farnsworth, Scott Ferris, Graham Fitch, James Garfield, Charles L. Gifford, T. Alan Goldsborough, Frank L. Greene, Gerry Hazleton, Benjamin Hill, Henry Hilliard, Ebenezer Hoar, William Hough, William M. Howard, Albert Johnson, Leroy Johnson, Joseph Johnston, Michael Kirwan, James T. Lloyd, Robert Luce, Robert McClelland, Samuel K. McConnell, Jr., George H. Mahon, George McCrary, Edward McPherson, James R. Mann, George Perkins Marsh, Norman Y. Mineta, A. J. Monteague, R. Walton Moore, Walter H. Newton, Robert Dale Owen, James Patterson, William Phelps, Luke Poland, John Van Schaick Lansing Pruyn, B. Carroll Reece, Ernest W. Roberts, Otho Robards Singleton, Frank Thompson, Jr., John M. Vorys, Hiram Warner, Joseph Wheeler.

Citizen Regents have been: David C. Acheson, Louis Agassiz, James B. Angell, Anne L. Armstrong, William Backhouse Astor, J. Paul Austin, Alexander Dallas Bache, George Edmund Badger, George Bancroft, Alexander Graham Bell, James Gabriel Berrett, John McPherson Berrien, Robert W. Bingham, Sayles Jenks Bowen, William G. Bowen, Robert S. Brookings, John Nicholas Brown, William A. M. Burden, Vannevar Bush, Charles F. Choate, Jr., Rufus Choate, Arthur H. Compton, Henry David Cooke, Henry Coppee, Samuel Sullivan Cox, Edward H. Crump, James Dwight Dana, Harvey N. Davis, William Lewis Dayton, Everette Lee Degolyer, Richard Delafield, Frederic A. Delano, Charles Devens, Matthew Gault Emery, Cornelius Conway Felton, Robert V. Fleming, Murray Gell-Mann, Robert F. Goheen, Asa Gray, George Gray, Crawford Hallock Greenwalt, Nancy Hanks, Caryl Parker Haskins, Gideon Hawley, John B. Henderson, John B. Henderson, Jr., A. Leon Higginbotham, Jr., Gardner Greene Hubbard, Charles Evans Hughes, Carlisle H. Humelsine, Jerome C. Hunsaker, William Preston Johnston, Irwin B. Laughlin, Walter Lenox, Augustus P. Loring, John Maclean, William Beans Magruder, John Walker Maury, Montgomery Cunningham Meigs, John C. Merriam, R. Walton Moore, Roland S. Morris, Dwight W. Morrow, Richard Olney, Peter Parker, Noah Porter, William Campbell Preston, Owen Josephus Roberts, Richard Rush, William Winston Seaton, Alexander Roby Shepherd, William Tecumseh Sherman, Otho Robards Singleton, Joseph Gilbert Totten, John Thomas Towers, Frederic C. Walcott, Richard Wallach, Thomas J. Watson, Jr., James E. Webb, James Clarke Welling, Andrew Dickson White, Henry White, Theodore Dwight Woolsey.
Topic:
Museums -- Administration  Search this
Museum trustees  Search this
Genre/Form:
Manuscripts
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 1, Smithsonian Institution. Board of Regents, Minutes
Identifier:
Record Unit 1
See more items in:
Minutes
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-faru0001
2 Page(s) matching your search term, top most relevant are shown: View entire project in transcription center
  • View Minutes digital asset number 1
  • View Minutes digital asset number 2
Additional Online Media:

Scrapbook

Collection Creator:
Jones, William  Search this
Container:
Box 1
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
bulk 1943 - 1946
Collection Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Collection Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests
Collection Citation:
William Jones World War II Scrapbook, NASM.2006.0067, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
William Jones World War II Scrapbook
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nasm-2006-0067-ref506
1 Page(s) matching your search term, top most relevant are shown: View entire project in transcription center
  • View Scrapbook digital asset number 1

The Lizard's Tale 106: Island Test Tubes, Part 2

Creator:
Smithsonian Channel  Search this
Type:
Youtube videos
Uploaded:
2018-12-19T23:00:01.000Z
Youtube Category:
Entertainment  Search this
See more by:
smithsonianchannel
YouTube Channel:
smithsonianchannel
Data Source:
Smithsonian Channel
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_dYmvh43emzU

The Lizard's Tale 105: Island Test Tubes, Part 1

Creator:
Smithsonian Channel  Search this
Type:
Youtube videos
Uploaded:
2018-12-19T23:00:02.000Z
Youtube Category:
Entertainment  Search this
See more by:
smithsonianchannel
YouTube Channel:
smithsonianchannel
Data Source:
Smithsonian Channel
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_1CeHCx63nXE

[In Arabic or Persian]

Collection Creator:
Princeton University  Search this
Extent:
1 Poster (1/4 size; Monochrome, 49.5 x 37 cm)
Container:
Box 4, Folder 11
Type:
Archival materials
Posters
Place:
Great Britain
Image:
Main Image: Photograph of three scientists at a table with test tubes and a microscope

Other Image(s): British Flag with writing under it
Local numbers:
Princeton Poster# 4968
General:
Artist(s): Anon
Series:
GPD 377/36/6
Printing Info:
Specimen of British War Literature
Collection Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Collection Rights:
Copyright status of items varies. Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
War production  Search this
World War, 1939-1945  Search this
Genre/Form:
Posters
Collection Citation:
Princeton University Posters Collection, Archives Center, National Museum of American History.
See more items in:
Princeton University Poster Collection
Princeton University Poster Collection / Series 4: World War Two / Great Britain
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmah-ac-0433-ref12408

A New Gene Editing Tool Could Make CRISPR More Precise

Creator:
Smithsonian Magazine  Search this
Type:
Blog posts
Smithsonian staff publications
Blog posts
Published Date:
Mon, 21 Oct 2019 15:00:37 +0000
Topic:
Custom RSS  Search this
See more posts:
Smithsonian Article Database
Data Source:
Smithsonian Magazine
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:posts_5e987eff705e551bec188785d1e494c9

Purity.more than a catchword. [Print advertising.] Hospital management publications

Creator:
Procter & Gamble Company  Search this
Collection Creator:
Procter & Gamble Company  Search this
Leyendecker, J. C., 1874-1951  Search this
Smith, Jessie Willcox, 1863-1935  Search this
Elliott, Elizabeth Shippen Green  Search this
Extent:
1 Item (b&w, 31 x 21.5 cm.)
Container:
Box 21, Folder 12
Type:
Archival materials
Print advertising
Date:
1956
Scope and Contents:
Caption: "Purity..more than a catchword". Man in laboratory working with test tubes and beakers.
Published Jan. & Feb. 1956.
Local Numbers:
245709

Ivorydata4 1566

0307910371 (Scan No.)
Restrictions:
Unrestricted research use on site by appointment. Reproduction restrictions due to copyright.
Collection Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
Chemists  Search this
Hospitals  Search this
Men  Search this
Purity  Search this
Genre/Form:
Print advertising
Collection Citation:
Ivory Soap Collection, 1883-1998, undated; Archives Center, National Museum of American History. Gift of Procter & Gamble.
See more items in:
Ivory Soap Advertising Collection
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmah-ac-0791-ref2781

Marilyn Church Courtroom Drawings

Creator:
Church, Marilyn  Search this
Names:
Black Liberation Army.  Search this
FALN.  Search this
WorldCom (Firm).  Search this
Berkowitz, David Richard, 1953-  Search this
Carter, Rubin, 1937-  Search this
Chapman, Mark David  Search this
Combs, Sean John  Search this
Galella, Ron  Search this
Hinckley, John, Jr.  Search this
Kennedy, Caroline, 1957-  Search this
Milken, Michael  Search this
Mitchell, John N. (John Newton), 1913-1988  Search this
Onassis, Jacqueline Kennedy, 1929-1994  Search this
Quinlan, Karen Ann  Search this
Shakur, Tupac, 1971-1996  Search this
Shields, Brooke  Search this
Stans, Maurice H., 1908-1998  Search this
Stewart, Martha  Search this
Vicious, Sid  Search this
Westmoreland, William C. (William Childs), 1914-  Search this
Whitehead, Mary Beth  Search this
Williams, Harrison A.  Search this
Extent:
1.5 Cubic feet (3 map-folders)
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Courtroom illustrations
Date:
1975-2004.
Scope and Contents note:
Thirty-eight courtroom drawings by artist Marilyn Church. The drawings depict scenes from some of the most famous and notorious cases in the city of New York: Tupac Shakur's 1994 trial for sexual abuse; Sean John Combs's 2001 trial for assault and weapons violations; Sid Vicious's (John Simon Ritchie) pre-trial hearing for murder in 1978; Rubin "Hurricane" Carter's 1976 re-trial for murder; John Hinckley, Jr.'s 1982 trial for attempting to assassinate President Ronald Reagan; Mark David Chapman's 1981 trial for the murder of John Lennon; Kevin King's 1982 trial for harassing Caroline Kennedy; photographer Ron Galella's trial for stalking Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis; Brooke Shields's 1981 case against photographer Gary Gross; David "Son of Sam" Berkowitz's 1978 murder trial; the 1990 trial of five youths charged with assaulting a jogger in Central Park; Bernhard Goetz's 1987 trial for attempted murder and assault; Michael Milken's 1990 trial for securities violations; the 2002 trial of executives of WorldCom; Martha Stewart's 2004 trial for conspiracy and obstruction of justice charges; John Gotti's 1992 trial for racketeering, murder and numerous other charges; Joseph Quinlan's petition to the court to discontinue keeping his daughter, Karen Ann Quinlan, alive by means of a respirator; the 1978 negligence lawsuit of a Florida couple named Del Zio against Columbia Presbyterian Medical Center over one of the first attempts at conceiving a "test tube baby"; the 1987 custody dispute regarding "Baby M", who was born to a surrogate mother, Mary Beth Whitehead; the 1974 trial of John Mitchell and Maurice Stans for their roles in the Watergate conspiracy; New Jersey Senator Harrison A. Williams's 1981 trial for conspiracy and bribery following the FBI's "Abscam" sting operation; General William Westmoreland's 1982 lawsuit against CBS; the FALN's (Fuerzas Armadas de Liberacion Nacional) 1997 hearing on charges of terrorism; the 1983-1984 trial of several members of the Black Liberation Army for robbery of a Brinks armored car (a series of trials that came to be referred to as the "Brinks trials"); the 1993 trial of four defendants in the 1993 World Trade Center bombing; and the "Landmarks Terror Trial", in which ten Arab immigrants were tried for a plot to blow up a wide range of New York City landmarks.
Arrangement:
1 series.
Biographical/Historical note:
New York-based courtroom artist.
Provenance:
Collection donated by Marilyn Church in 2008.
Restrictions:
Unrestricted research access on site by appointment.
Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
Trials (Murder)  Search this
Trials (Sex crimes)  Search this
Trials -- New York (N.Y.)  Search this
World Trade Center Bombing, New York (N.Y.), 1993  Search this
Trials (Assassination)  Search this
Trials (Assault and battery)  Search this
Surrogate mothers  Search this
Terrorism -- United States  Search this
Trials (Conspiracy)  Search this
Trials (Attempted murder)  Search this
Trials (Bribery)  Search this
Central Park Jogger Rape Trial -- 1990 -- New York (N.Y.)  Search this
Courtroom art  Search this
Trials (Malpractice)  Search this
Trials (Custody of children)  Search this
Courts -- New York (N.Y.)  Search this
Fertilization in vitro  Search this
Courtroom artists -- New York (N.Y.)  Search this
Genre/Form:
Courtroom illustrations
Citation:
Marilyn Church Courtroom Drawings, 1975-2004, Archives Center, National Museum of American History.
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.1137
See more items in:
Marilyn Church Courtroom Drawings
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmah-ac-1137
Additional Online Media:

How Tiny, Microbe-Propelled Bots Could Deliver Drugs in Our Bodies

Creator:
Smithsonian Magazine  Search this
Type:
Blog posts
Smithsonian staff publications
Blog posts
Published Date:
Wed, 25 Sep 2019 18:35:33 +0000
Topic:
Custom RSS  Search this
See more posts:
Smithsonian Article Database
Data Source:
Smithsonian Magazine
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:posts_b092259c86ccb049dbfbe46c918cd7de

Lumetron Colorimeter

Maker:
Photovolt Corp.  Search this
Physical Description:
wood (overall material)
plastic (overall material)
leather (overall material)
Measurements:
overall: 6 in x 15 in x 6 in; 15.24 cm x 38.1 cm x 15.24 cm
Object Name:
colorimeter
Place made:
United States: New York, New York City
Credit Line:
Gift of Mr. Darrell F. Corti
ID Number:
2011.0131.01
Catalog number:
2011.0131.01
Accession number:
2011.0131
Model number:
400-A
Serial number:
16356
See more items in:
Work and Industry: Agriculture
Food
FOOD: Transforming the American Table 1950-2000
Exhibition:
Food: Transforming the American Table 1950-2000
Exhibition Location:
National Museum of American History
Data Source:
National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmah_1409799

Modify Your Search






or


Narrow By