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Jane and Michael Stern Collection

Creator:
Stern, Michael, 1946-  Search this
Stern, Jane  Search this
Extent:
17 Cubic feet (41 boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Ephemera
Trade literature
Articles
Notes
Menus
Cookbooks
Brochures
Correspondence
Slides (photographs)
Writings
Business records
Postcards
Date:
1890-2008
Summary:
The collection documents Jane and Michael Stern's travels across the United States collecting data for their books on American material culture subjects, with particular emphasis on food and dining.
Scope and Contents:
The collection primarily consists of the raw materials amassed by Jane and Michael Stern as they traveled the United States, researching for their books on American material culture subjects, with particular emphasis on food and dining. These materials include writings, jottings and notes from their various stops while traveling; photographs and slides of places they visited; vintage postcards collected in their travels; paper ephemera such as take-out menus, placemats, etc.; large quantities of trade literature such as product cookbooks (some dating back to the 1920s), food packaging and brochures on food-related subjects, under headings such as "Meat, Fish, Game", "Parties, Etiquette, How-To", "Baking" and numerous others; trade literature on other material culture subjects the Sterns wrote books about with headings which include Rodeo, Cowboys, Indians" and many others; correspondence; business records, articles and clippings.
Arrangement:
Series 1: Research Documentation, 1975-2015, undated

Series 2: Product Cookbooks, and Trade Literature, 1890-1993, undated

Series 3: Photographs, Slides, and Transparencies, 1947-2008, undated

Series 4: Subject Files, 1910-1995

Series 5: Vintage Postcards, undated
Biographical / Historical:
The Sterns are authors who compiled a popular series of books called Roadfood, in which they provide recommendations of restaurants, truck stops, diners, delis, bakeries and other food-related establishments in each United States. state serving classic American regional specialties. They are also authors of books about other American material culture subjects including truckers, cowboys, kitsch, and dog shows. They are frequent guests on public radio, and are regular contributors to magazine columns.
Related Materials:
Archives Center Business Americana Collection, dates

Archives Center Cookbook Collection, dates

Carolyn and Donald Grepke Paper Doll Collection, dates

Warshaew Collection of Buiness Americana, dates
Provenance:
Collection donated by Jane and Michael Stern, 2016.
Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
Automobile travel -- United States  Search this
Diners -- United States  Search this
Bakeries -- United States  Search this
Restaurants -- United States  Search this
Truck stops -- United States  Search this
Cowboys -- United States  Search this
Roads -- United States  Search this
Delicatessens -- United States  Search this
Dining  Search this
Dog shows -- United States  Search this
Truck drivers -- United States  Search this
Rodeos -- United States  Search this
Food -- United States  Search this
Local foods -- United States  Search this
Kitsch -- United States  Search this
Material culture -- United States  Search this
Genre/Form:
Ephemera -- 20th century
Ephemera -- 21st century
Trade literature
Articles -- 21st century
Notes -- 20th century
Menus -- 20th century
Cookbooks -- 21st century
Brochures -- 20th century
Correspondence -- 21st century
Brochures -- 21st century
Cookbooks -- 20th century
Slides (photographs) -- 20th century
Writings
Business records -- 20th century
Articles -- 20th century
Postcards -- 20th century -- United States
Correspondence -- 20th century
Menus -- 21st century
Citation:
Jane and Michael Stern Collection, circa. 1920-2015, Archives Center, National Museum of American History.
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.1392
See more items in:
Jane and Michael Stern Collection
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmah-ac-1392
Additional Online Media:

Marshall -- Orlean House

Landscape architect:
Arentz, Richard  Search this
Provenance:
The Warrenton Garden Club  Search this
Collection Creator:
Garden Club of America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Place:
Orlean House (Marshall, Virginia)
United States of America -- Virginia -- Fauquier County -- Marshall
Scope and Contents:
The folder includes worksheets, site plans, and plant lists.
General:
The land was included in the 12-square mile grant given in colonial times to the Sixth Lord Thomas Fairfax, who deeded his Manor of Leeds, named for his father's estate in England, to his heir Denny Martin Fairfax. Orlean House is within the 588-acre tract granted by Fairfax to John Winn Smith in September 1760, whose descendants built the first frame house in 1795, to which a larger stone addition was appended in 1812. That house, the oldest structure in the area, now has gardens added by the current owners beginning in 2003 under the guidance of Richard Arentz, ASLA. Their favorite part of the 18-acre property is the shade garden that connects the formal arrival court at the end of the long entrance drive to the sectors used for outdoor entertaining, which include a swimming pool edged by a wildflower meadow. The shade garden includes an understory of sweet woodruff and periwinkle, tulips and narcissus, herbaceous perennials including hellebores, hosta, autumn fern, astilbe, sedge and bleeding heart, flowering shrubs including Exbury and Delaware Valley white azaleas, English boxwood, winter hazel and hydrangea, and fringe trees.
Remnants of earlier gardens are few but include many daffodil fields, old boxwood and mature trees. Orlean House was included in the Virginia Historic Garden Week tour in 2011, and the 21st century gardens continue to develop as they age. An historic barn and corn crib dating from the early days of farming are still standing on the property and are in good condition.
Persons associated with the garden include Lord Thomas Fairfax and Denny Martin Fairfax (owners before 1760); John Winn Smith and descendants (former owners, 1760-1829); William W., James and Elizabeth Payne (former owners, 1829-1834); Albert S. and Thomas M. Hirst (former owners, 1834-1873); Marshall H. and Ludwell Lake (former owners, 1873-circa 1882); William H. and Hattie L. Tripplett and Eppa Hunton Jr., (former owners, 1885 - 1898); Edward S. and Mary E. Halley (former owners, 1898-1913); H.N. and Eliza J. Brown (former owners, 1913-1924); Mr. and Mrs. Charles R. Kengla, Mason B. Payne and Mr. and Mrs. Murray A. Russell (former owners, 1924-1927); Josephine L Woolf (former owner, 1927-1940); Frank and Gertrude Henius (former owners, 1940-1943); Bolton and Florence Love (former owners, 1943-1976); John and Louise Merryman (former owners, 1976-1984); William and Catherine Osier (former owners, 1984-1998); Jennifer Austell-Wolfson and family (former owners, 1998-2003); Richard Arentz, ASLA (landscape architect, 2003-present).
Related Materials:
Orlean House related holdings consist of 1 folder (9 35mm slides (photographs); 4 digital images + 1 reference print)
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Topic:
Gardens -- Virginia -- Marshall  Search this
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, Garden Club of America collection.
Identifier:
AAG.GCA, File VA410
See more items in:
The Garden Club of America collection
The Garden Club of America collection / Series 1: United States Garden Images / Virginia
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-gca-ref18845
Additional Online Media:

Hector and Norma Orcí Advertising Agency Records

Creator:
Orci, Hector  Search this
Orci, Norma  Search this
Orci Advertising Agency  Search this
Names:
McCann Erickson  Search this
Extent:
3.5 Cubic feet (10 boxes)
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Letters (correspondence)
Born digital
Newsletters
Business records
Clippings
Photographs
Training manuals
Slides (photographs)
Programs
Reports
Advertisements
Awards
Oral history
Advertising
Date:
1979-2016, undated
Summary:
The Hector and Norma Orcí Advertising Agency Records document the history, educational, and creative output produced by Hector and Norma Orcí throughout their extensive career in advertising. The Orcís founded their own independent agency in 1986 in Los Angeles. The Orcí Advertising Agency successfully introduced various products to Latinos in the United States and developed a reputation as one of the top advertising agencies to understand the US Latino market. The collection showcases the agency's history and awards, advertising and marketing campaigns, and its role in educating advertising agencies on the importance of the US Latino market.
Scope and Contents:
The collection documents the Orcí Advertising Agency and its work in helping clients market their products to U.S. Latinos, its marketing methods and creative philosophy, and its role in educating other advertising companies about the Latino consumer market in the United States. The collection includes the founding and history of the agency, business records, awards and press clippings, training materials for staff, reports on the US Latino market for various products, training and curriculum materials for a UCLA Extension course on advertising in the US Latino market, account reports, conference materials, slides and photographs, and campaigns and advertising materials developed for clients such as Allstate, Honda, and Pepsi. Video footage of Spanish-language commercials developed by the Orcí Advertising Agency is also part of the collection.
Arrangement:
The collection is divided into five series.

Series 1: Background Materials, 1979-2010, undated

Series 2: Advertising and Marketing Materials, 1986-2003, undated

Series 3: Teaching Materials, 1985-2012, undated

Series 4: Conference Materials, 1984-1999, undated

Series 5: Audiovisual Materials, 1986-2016
Biographical / Historical:
Once employees of La Agencía de McCann-Erickson advertising company, Hector and Norma Orcí founded their own independent agency in 1986. The Orcí Advertising Agency, also known as La Agencía de Orcí & Asociados, is based in Los Angeles. Since its inception, the Orcí Advertising Agency has devoted itself to US Latino marketing and teaching other advertising agencies how to effectively advertise and sell products to US Latinos. The Orcís quickly developed an impressive roster of successful campaigns for major clients and continue to be a well-respected agency in the advertising sector.
Separated Materials:
The Division of Work and Industry holds the following artifacts related to this collection:

Virgin of Guadalupe Painting, Accession #: 2015.0306.01

INS Eagle Painting, Accession #: 2015.0306.02

Don Quixote Figurine, Accession #: 2015.0306.03
Provenance:
Collection donated by Hector and Norma Orcí, 2016.
Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
Hispanic American businesspeople  Search this
Hispanic American leadership  Search this
Hispanic American consumers  Search this
Mexican American leadership  Search this
mexican Americans and mass media  Search this
advertising -- Beer -- 1950-2000  Search this
Mexican American business enterprises  Search this
advertising -- 21st century  Search this
Advertising campaigns  Search this
Hispanic American business enterprises  Search this
advertising -- Beverages  Search this
Hispanic American capitalists and financiers  Search this
Advertising history  Search this
advertising -- Soft drinks  Search this
Advertising executives  Search this
Hispanic Americans and mass media  Search this
Advertising agencies -- United States  Search this
Minority consumers  Search this
advertising -- Automobiles  Search this
Hispanic American businesswomen  Search this
Minorities in advertising  Search this
Latinos in American society and culture  Search this
Hispanic Americans -- Press coverage  Search this
Genre/Form:
Letters (correspondence) -- 20th century.
Letters (correspondence) -- 21st century
Letters (correspondence) -- 21st century
Born digital
Newsletters -- 21st century
Business records -- 21st century
Clippings -- 20th century
Photographs -- 20th century
Training manuals -- 21st century
Slides (photographs) -- 20th century
Programs -- 20th century
Clippings -- 21st century
Newsletters -- 20th century
Programs -- 21st century
Reports -- 21st century
Slides (photographs) -- 21st century
Reports -- 20th century
Advertisements -- 21st century
Training manuals -- 20th century
Awards
Business records -- 20th century
Oral history -- 2010-2020
Advertising -- 20th century
Photographs -- 21st century
Advertisements -- 20th century
Citation:
Hector and Norma Orcí Advertising Agency Records, 1979-2016, Archives Center, National Museum of American History.
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.1384
See more items in:
Hector and Norma Orcí Advertising Agency Records
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmah-ac-1384
Additional Online Media:

Kimowan (Metchewais) McLain collection

Creator:
McLain, Kimowan (Metchewais)  Search this
Names:
Cold Lake First Nations  Search this
University of New Mexico  Search this
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill  Search this
McNeil, Larry, 1950-  Search this
Extent:
871 negatives (photographic)
1918 slides (photographs)
989 polaroid prints
15 Notebooks
0.8 Linear feet
1,496 Photographic prints
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Negatives (photographic)
Slides (photographs)
Polaroid prints
Notebooks
Photographic prints
Sketchbooks
Negatives
Slides
Place:
Alberta
North Carolina -- Chapel Hill
Date:
1991-2011
Summary:
The collection of Kimowan McLain, significant First Nations artist, contains materials related to his artistic practice and his personal life. The materials include not only photographs of his art, completed and in-progress, but also sketchbooks and journal entries that give important context to his major works and artistic practices. The materials range from his early career in the early 1990s as a magazine editor to his solo and group exhibitions to his time as an art professor at various universities and images of his final works in 2011. McLain balanced both Western and Native artistic methods and history in his work, his archive provides valuable insight into the swiftly evolving and often contested world of contemporary Native American art.
Scope and Contents:
The Kimowan (Metchewais) McLain collection spans the majority of McLain's artistic career from 1991 to 2011, beginning with his work as a comic illustrator and ending with one of his final pieces, Raincloud. Series 1: Works contains materials relating to his artistic works, mainly consisting of 4X6 color photographs, slides, and negatives of his completed works. There are also images of the works in progress, sources of inspiration for various pieces, and several items reflecting the various processes he used to create the final work, be it painting, "paper wall," installation, or a mixed media piece. Works of note include: After (1999), Map of Moths (2001), Cold Lake (2004), and Raincloud (2010). Series 2: Polaroids is McLain's collection of Polaroid prints. These prints were used as a reference collection by the artist, and reflect all aspects of his life and work: from intimate personal portraits of the artist, friends and family, to color studies, to documentation of nature and everyday items, the series is glimpse into the heart of the collection.

Series 3: Sketchbooks, is an equally revealing look into McLain's artistic practice and personal life. Documenting everything from his struggle with a smoking addiction, his thoughts on art history and teaching, designing his website, the creative process of exhibit planning, and numerous sketches in pen, pencil, and charcoal, the sketchbooks are an invaluable resource for understanding both the man and the work he created. Series 4: Personal Materials contains materials related to McLain's personal life- his travels around the U.S. and abroad, the works by other artists he felt were important to collect, published material related to his work and also his decisions on where to go to graduate school and where to apply for teaching positions. Series 5: Teaching Materialscontains materials concerning his teaching career- mainly slides of his student's work, and slides he used in his lectures. He taught art classes at both the University of New Mexico and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, on subjects ranging from "Drawing I" to "Native American Art in the 1980s."

The collection contains 4X6 color photographic prints, 35 mm color negatives, 3X5 Polaroid prints, and 35 mm color slides, noted if otherwise. Some titles are bracketed, this reflects a title that has been constructed during processing, titles not bracketed were generally assigned by the creator.
Arrangement:
Collection is arranged by subject. Series 1: Works is arranged chronologically within the subseries, excepting the Works, General subseries. Series 2: Polaroids, retains the original order created by the artist. Images are separated by subject and arranged alphabetically. Series 3: Sketchbooks, is arranged chronologically when date is known. Series 4: Personal Materials, is arranged by subject and occasionally by format. Series 5: Teaching Materials contains slides which are arranged chronologically and by subject.
Biographical / Historical:
Kimowan McLain was a significant figure in the Native art world. He was born in Oxbow, Saskatchewan, October 2, 1963. He used his step-father Bruce's name- McLain, until later in life when he began to go by his mother Ada's maiden name - Metchewais. He spent his childhood and early adulthood on the Cold Lake First Nations reserve in Alberta. He began his artistic career working as an illustrator and later editor at Windspeaker Native Newspaper from 1983 to 1989. From 1992 to 1996 he attended the University of Alberta in Edmonton, receiving his Bachelors of Fine Arts. It was during this time, in 1993, at age 29, that he was diagnosed with oligodendroglioma, a rare form of brain tumor. The surgery to remove the tumor and following radiation left McLain with a permanent bald spot on the back of his head would feature in his art in later years. He was told that life expectancy for this condition was 11-12 years. Despite his illness, in 1995 McLain received the Ellen Battel Stoekel Fellowship to spend the summer at Yale University and in 1996 he received a National Award from the Canadian Native Arts Foundation. He continued on to complete his Master of Fine Arts at the University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico, from 1996 to 1999. It was there he met life-long friend Larry McNeil. McLain then made the move to Chapel Hill, North Carolina where he began teaching in the Art Department at the University of North Carolina, and continuing to exhibit his own work in both solo exhibitions and group exhibitions.

In Chapel Hill he lived in the neighborhood of Carrboro, a small, relaxed community attached to the larger college town. At this time, McLain developed an interest in "hooping" – hula-hooping as a spiritual activity--founding a collective and developing many close friendships through the hobby. He also began making trips home to Cold Lake and documenting the people and places there. In 2005, following symptoms of his tumor returning, McLain underwent a relatively complication-free surgery that allowed him to return directly to work, including participation in the well-received Loom exhibition. In 2007 McLain underwent surgery once again but due to complications from the surgery, McLain was left partially paralyzed. For a year, McLain worked diligently at rehabilitation, even developing his own rehab program he called "Kimochi," and was eventually able to return both to work and hooping. During his time at the hospital he met his eventual fiancée, Antje Thiessen.

Following his return to work, McLain continued to evolve his artistic practice – producing what some called his magnum opus - Cold Lake in 2004 and the evocative self-portrait Raincloud in 2010. Both pieces are examples of the space McLain gracefully navigated, between Native and Western sensibilities and artistic practices in his work. In 2011 his symptoms returned for a final time and he returned to his mother's home in St. Paul, Alberta, with Thiessen, for palliative care. He passed away on July 29, 2011. A retrospective of his work Horizon: Kimowan Metchewais (McLain) was shown that fall at the John and June Allcott Gallery, University of North Carolina.
Separated Materials:
The National Museum of the American Indian has 185 of Kimowan McLain's works in their Modern and Contemporary Arts collection. These pieces have catalog numbers 26/9426 - 26/9610. To view these pieces, an Object Collections Research Request must be made two months in advance, using the form found at http://www.nmai.si.edu/explore/collections/accessing/. Kimowan Metchewais McLain also has an artist file held by the Vine Deloria Jr. Library, containing material relevant to this collection. It can be accessed by contacting the library by phone: (301) 238-1376 or email: AskALibrarian@si.edu.
Provenance:
Bequest of Kimowan (Metchewais) McLain in 2015.
Restrictions:
Access to NMAI Archive Center collections is by appointment only, Monday - Thursday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment (phone: 301-238-1400, email: nmaiarchives@si.edu).
Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center. Please submit a written request to nmaiphotos@si.edu. For personal or classroom use, users are invited users to download, print, photocopy, and distribute the images that are available online without prior written permission, provided that the files are not changed, the Smithsonian Institution copyright notice (where applicable) is included, and the source of the image is identified as the National Museum of the American Indian.
Topic:
Art -- American Indian  Search this
Indian art -- 21st century  Search this
Powwows  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographic prints
Sketchbooks
Negatives
Slides
Citation:
Identification of specific item; Date (if known); Kimowan (Metchewais) McLain Collection, Box and Folder Number; National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NMAI.AC.084
See more items in:
Kimowan (Metchewais) McLain collection
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmai-ac-084
Additional Online Media:

Cozy Inn Collection

Donor:
Freeze, Gerald  Search this
Creator:
Cozy Inn (Thurmont, Md.)  Search this
Names:
Freeze, Wilbur  Search this
Extent:
7.75 Cubic feet (8 boxes)
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Menus
Newsletters
Magazines (periodicals)
Placemats
Photograph albums
Guidebooks
DVDs
Visitors' books
Videocassettes
Letters (correspondence)
Promotional literature
Slides (photographs)
Programs
Postcards
Certificates
Recipes
Clippings
Audiocassettes
Business records
Photographs
Brochures
Articles
Advertisements
Place:
Camp David -- (Md.)
Date:
undated
Summary:
The collection documents the history of the Cozy Inn and Restaurant in Thurmont, Maryland.
Scope and Contents:
The collection documents the entire history of the Cozy Inn, including the guest register from the guest house run by the last owner's aunt, 1926; also business records; correspondence; employee handbooks; photographs, photograph albums and slides; a scrapbook of clippings; certificates and honors; restaurant placemats and menus; recipes; advertisements; internal newsletters; audiovisual materials; articles and clippings; and miscellaneous promotional printed materials such as postcards, flyers, and brochures.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged into five series.

Series 1: Administrative Files, 1885-2011 Series 2: Menus, 1943-05-01-2012-12-31

Series 3: Printed Advertisements and Ephemera, 1932-2013 Series 4: Magazine Articles and Newspaper Clippings, 1960-2013 Series 5: Photographic Materials, 1920-2009
Biographical / Historical:
The Cozy Inn was an eighty five year old business when it closed in 2014. Located on a major highway near Gettysburg and the Catoctin Mountains, Wilbur Freeze started what was then called Camp Cozy in 1929, with just three cabins, later adding a gas station to attract tourists, and in the 1930s, he added in a small lunch counter, and eventually a full service restaurant. It is an excellent example of a 20th century business that started small and grew large, increasing the services offered over time. The Inn grew both in size and popularity, and the Freezes added entertainment attractions in order to increase business, including festivals and special offerings for various holidays. Some of the attractions were eccentric, such as hot air balloons and live animal shows.

In 1942, the presidential retreat Camp David (then known as Shangri-La) was established just six miles away. This led to the Cozy Inn becoming the headquarters for Secret Service agents, reporters and photographers during events that occurred at Camp David. Sometimes foreign dignitaries stayed there. State and local politicians such as members of the Senate, governors of states, cabinet members, and Presidents' family members, also were guests.

The Freezes were fond of boasting that they were the oldest family-run restaurant in the state. They also capitalized on their proximity to Camp David, using the fact in their advertising and naming the Inn's rooms after presidents. In 2005, they started a small Museum on the history of the Inn, its famous guests, and its connection to Camp David. They also sold souvenirs that related to that connection. They regularly hosted weddings and other events and were famous for their lavish holiday decorations. At Christmas they set up gingerbread houses, multiple Christmas trees, a miniature railroad village, etc. The Cozy Inn's restaurant cultivated a large number of repeat, loyal customers with its family atmosphere and comfort food. Some of its dishes became locally famous, like its clam chowder.
Provenance:
Collection donated by Gerald G. Freeze, 2015
Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
Handbooks  Search this
Hotels  Search this
Motels  Search this
Taverns (Inns)  Search this
Restaurants  Search this
Genre/Form:
Menus
Newsletters
Magazines (periodicals)
Placemats
Photograph albums
Guidebooks
DVDs
Visitors' books
Videocassettes
Letters (correspondence)
Promotional literature
Slides (photographs)
Programs
Postcards
Certificates
Recipes
Clippings
Audiocassettes
Business records
Photographs -- 21st century
Brochures
Photographs -- Black-and-white photoprints -- Silver gelatin -- 20th century
Articles
Advertisements
Citation:
Cozy Inn Collection, Archives Center, National Museum of American History.
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.1345
See more items in:
Cozy Inn Collection
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmah-ac-1345

Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2000 Smithsonian Folklife Festival

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Names:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival  Search this
Extent:
1 Cubic foot (approximate)
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Negatives
Correspondence
Business records
Audiocassettes
Slides (photographs)
Memorandums
Videotapes
Contracts
Notes
Plans (drawings)
Photographic prints
Audiotapes
Digital images
Sound recordings
Video recordings
Date:
June 23-July 4, 2000
Summary:
The Smithsonian Institution Festival of American Folklife, held annually since 1967 on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., was renamed the Smithsonian Folklife Festival in 1998. The materials collected here document the planning, production, and execution of the annual Festival, produced by the Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage (1999-present) and its predecessor offices (1967-1999). An overview of the entire Festival records group is available here: Smithsonian Folklife Festival records.
Scope and Contents note:
This collection documents the planning, production, and execution of the 2000 Smithsonian Folklife Festival. Materials may include photographs, audio recordings, motion picture film and video recordings, notes, production drawings, contracts, memoranda, correspondence, informational materials, publications, and ephemera. Such materials were created during the Festival on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., as well as in the featured communities, before or after the Festival itself.
Arrangement note:
Arranged in 5 series.

Series 1: Program Books, Festival Publications, and Ephemera

Series 2: El Río

Series 3: Special Events

Series 4: Tibetan Culture Beyond the Land of Snows

Series 5: Washington, D.C.: It's Our Home
Historical note:
The Festival of American Folklife, held annually since 1967 on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., was renamed the Smithsonian Folklife Festival in 1998.

The 2000 Smithsonian Folklife Festival was produced by the Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage and cosponsored by the National Park Service.

For more information, see Smithsonian Folklife Festival records.
Introduction:
The goal of the Smithsonian Folklife Festival is to present diverse, community-based traditions in an understandable and respectful way. The great strength of the Festival is to connect the public, directly and compellingly, with practitioners of cultural traditions. In 2000, the Festival featured programs on the cultural ecology of the Río Grande/Río Bravo Basin, on Tibetan refugee culture, and on the local traditions of Washington, D.C. Visitors could learn how a cowboy or vaquero from South Texas works cattle, or speak with a Tibetan American immigrant about the meaning underlying her continued practice of sacred traditions. As an artist's hand guided the eyes of Festival viewers, they could imagine how an urban mural reflects life in Washington, D.C.

The Festival program on the cultures of Washington, D.C., showed the vibrancy of local communities that live in the shadow of national institutions. El Río demonstrated the tenacity of regional culture at the borders, even margins, of Mexico and the United States. The program on Tibetan refugees provided a cultural in-gathering of a diaspora community facing issues of continuity and survival - climaxed by a huge ceremony on the National Mall presided over by His Holiness the 14th Dalai Lama, who also offered a public address on the occasion. Overall, the Festival this year demonstrated that, while people may be subject to modern forms of colonization, to unequal power and economic arrangements, and to marginalization, exile, and strife in many forms, they use their cultural traditions as sources of strength, resistance, and creativity to cope with and overcome their travail. Culture, after all, is a means of human adaptation. Just because people may be economically poor or politically powerless does not necessarily mean that their cultures are brittle or bereft of value.

The Festival has long had an especially significant impact on those artists, musicians, cooks, and ritual specialists who participate directly in it. The attention they receive usually fortifies their intent to pass on their traditions to children, apprentices, and students, just as it sometimes encourages cultural exemplars to extend their creativity by connecting it to broader civic and economic issues. The Festival's rich cultural dialogue on the National Mall was considered to be particularly significant for American civic life at the dawn of the 21st century, as we enter an era in which no single racial or ethnic group will be a majority. The Festival allows a broad array of visitors to understand cultural differences in a civil, respectful, and educational way. Little wonder it has become a model for public cultural presentation, adopted by organizations elsewhere in the United States and in other democratic nations.

The 2000 Festival took place during two five-day weeks (June 23-27 and June 30-July 4) between Madison Drive and Jefferson Drive and between 9th Street and 14th Street, south of the National Museum of American History and the National Museum of Natural History (see site plan). It featured three programs, with several special events including the Ralph Rinzler Memorial Concert.

The 2000 Program Book included schedules and participant lists for each program; essays provided background on the Festival and on each of the programs.

The Festival was co-presented by the Smithsonian Institution and National Park Service and organized by the Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage.

Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage

Richard Kurin, Director; Richard Kennedy, Deputy Director; Diana Parker, Festival Director; Anthony Seeger, Director, Smithsonian Folkways Recordngs; James Early, Director, Cultural Heritage Policy; Thomas Vennum, Jr., Senior Ethnomusicologist; Olivia Cadaval, Chair, Research & Education; D.A. Sonneborn, Assistant Director, Smithsonian Folkways Recordings; Betty J. Belanus, Nancy Groce, Marjorie Hunt, Diana Baird N'Diaye, Peter Seitel, Cynthia Vidaurri, Curators, Folklorists, Education and Cultural Specialists; Carla M. Borden, Program/Publications Manager; John W. Franklin, Program Manager; Cynthia Vidaurri, Coordinator, Latino Cultural Resource Network; Jeffrey Place, Archivist; Stephanie Smith, Assistant Archivist; Arlene L. Reiniger, Program Specialist; Charlie Weber, Media Specialist; Zain Abdullah, Stanford Carpenter, Susan T. Chen, Roland Freeman, Dan Goodwin, Todd Harvey, Amy Horowitz, Ivan Karp, Guy Logsdon, Alan Lomax, Worth Long, René López, Kate Rinzler, Katherine Skinner, Saul Tobias, Bob White, Fellows & Research Associates

Folklife Advisory Council and Folkways Advisory Council

Michael Asch, Phyllis Barney, Jane Beck, Don DeVito, Pat Jasper, Ella Jenkins, Jon Kertzer, Barbara Kirshenblatt-Gimblett, John Nixdorf, Bernice Johnson Reagon, Gilbert Sprauve, Jack Tchen, Ricardo Trimillos

National Park Service

Robert Stantion, Director; Terry Carlstrom, Director, National Capital Region
Forms Part Of:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2000 Smithsonian Folklife Festival forms part of the Smithsonian Folklife Festival records .

Smithsonian Folklife Festival records

Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: Papers

1967 Festival of American Folklife records - [Ongoing]
Related Archival Materials note:
Within the Rinzler Archives, related materials may be found in various collections such as the Ralph Rinzler papers and recordings, the Lily Spandorf drawings, the Diana Davies photographs, the Robert Yellin photographs, and the Curatorial Research, Programs, and Projects collection. Additional relevant materials may also be found in the Smithsonian Institution Archives concerning the Division of Performing Arts (1966-1983), Folklife Program (1977-1980), Office of Folklife Programs (1980-1991), Center for Folklife Programs and Cultural Studies (1991-1999), Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage (1999-present), and collaborating Smithsonian units, as well as in the administrative papers of key figures such as the Secretary and respective deputies. Users are encouraged to consult relevant finding aids and to contact Archives staff for further information.
Restrictions:
Access by appointment only. Where a listening copy or viewing copy has been created, this is indicated in the respective inventory; additional materials may be accessible with sufficient advance notice and, in some cases, payment of a processing fee. Older papers are housed at a remote location and may require a minimum of three weeks' advance notice and payment of a retrieval fee. Certain formats such as multi-track audio recordings and EIAJ-1 videoreels (1/2 inch) may not be accessible. Contact the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at 202-633-7322 or rinzlerarchives@si.edu for additional information.
Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Topic:
Food habits  Search this
arts and crafts  Search this
World music  Search this
Folklore  Search this
Folk music  Search this
Folk art  Search this
Folk festivals  Search this
Genre/Form:
Negatives
Correspondence
Business records
Audiocassettes
Slides (photographs)
Memorandums
Videotapes
Contracts
Notes
Plans (drawings)
Photographic prints
Audiotapes
Digital images
Sound recordings
Video recordings
Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2000 Smithsonian Folklife Festival, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.2000
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2000 Smithsonian Folklife Festival
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-cfch-sff-2000
Additional Online Media:

Jose L. Hernandez-Rebollar Innovative Lives presentation

Creator:
Hernandez-Rebollar, Jose L.  Search this
Jerome and Dorothy Lemelson Center for the Study of Invention and Innovation.  Search this
Extent:
0.25 Cubic feet
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Slides (photographs)
Transcripts
Audiocassettes
Digital images
CD-ROMs
Date:
2005 August 3
Summary:
Jose L. Hernandez-Rebollar was born in the state of Puebla in Mexico. He is the inventor of the AcceleGlove, a prototype device which can translate the alphabet and over 300 words into American Sign Language. The collection contains original and reference audio cassettes of Dr. Rebollar's presentation, "The Process of Invention: The AcceleGlove," a transcript of the presentation, photocopies of his power point presentation slides, and a CD-ROM containing digital images taken at the presentation.
Scope and Contents:
Collection documents Dr. Jose L. Hernandez-Rebollar's invention prototype of the AcceleGlove. In his power point presentation The Process of Invention: The AcceleGlove, Rebollar discusses his childhood in Mexico and his educational background, emphasizing his Ph.D. work on the AcceleGlove at The George Washington University. Dr. Rebollar describes his research and his attempt to solve communication and translation problems associated with turning American Sign Language into spoken words and text. Rebollar also discusses American Sign Language and its applications. A demonstration of the AcceleGlove is given. The presentation concludes with a question and answer period.

Series 1: Original Audio Cassettes, 2005, is one audio cassette recording of Dr. Rebollar's Innovative Lives Presentation on August 3, 2005. The recording is approximately 70 minutes.

Series 2: Reference Audio Cassettes, 2005, contains copies of Dr. Rebollar's Innovative Lives Presentation on August 3, 2005.

Series 3: Transcript of presentation, August 3, 2005

Series 4: Digital Images, 2005, consists of one CD-ROM containing 46 digital images (jpeg files) documenting Dr. Rebollar's Innovative Lives Presentation. The digital images were taken by Richard Straus of Smithsonian Photographic Services.

Series 5: Power Point Slides contains two photocopied sets of the twenty-one slides used during Dr. Rebollar's power point presentation The Process of Invention: The AcceleGlove.
Arrangement:
Collection is divided into five series.

Series 1: Original Audio Cassette, August 3, 2005

Series 2: Reference Audio Cassettes, 2005

Series 3: Transcript of Presentation, August 3, 2005

Series 4: Digital Images, 2005

Series 5: Power Point Slides, 2005
Biographical / Historical:
Dr. Jose L. Hernandez-Rebollar was born in the state of Puebla in México. He completed his B.S. in electronics at Benemérita Universidad Autónoma de Puebla in 1993 and received his masters in Electronics Engineering from the Instituto Nacional de Astrofísica, Optica y Electrónica (National Institute of Astrophysics, Optics and Electronics) in 1997. In 1998, Dr. Rebollar obtained a Fulbright scholarship to pursue a Ph.D. at The George Washington University. He was awarded his Ph.D. in Science in Electrical Engineering in 2003. He majored in Signals and Systems with a minor in Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) and Bioelectronics.

Dr. Rebollar's invention, an electronic glove, called the AcceleGlove, can turn American Sign Language (ASL) gestures into spoken words or text. The glove is placed on the hand and strapped to the arm, allowing sensors on the glove to generate signals from the movement, orientation, and positioning of the hand and the fingers in relation to the body. These signals are analyzed by a micro-controller to find the position of the fingers and hand trajectory. The AcceleGlove translates the alphabet and over 300 words in American Sign Language.

The Jerome and Dorothy Lemelson Center for the Study of Invention and Innovation was founded in 1995 at the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of American History through a generous gift from the Lemelson Foundation. The Center's mission is: to document, interpret, and disseminate information about invention and innovation; to encourage inventive creativity in young people; and to foster an appreciation for the central role invention and innovation play in the history of the United States. The Innovative Lives series brings together Museum visitors and American inventors to discuss inventing and the creative process and to experiment and play with hands-on activities related to each inventor's product. This collection was created by the Innovative Lives Program of the Jerome and Dorothy Lemelson Center for the Study of Invention and Innovation.
Provenance:
Transferred by Jerome and Dorothy Lemelson Center for the Study of Invention and Innovation, January 30, 2006.
Restrictions:
The collection is open for research use.
Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning intellectual property rights. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
Language and languages  Search this
Self-help devices for people with disabilities  Search this
Sign language  Search this
American Sign Language  Search this
Inventors -- 21st century  Search this
Inventions -- 21st century  Search this
Genre/Form:
Slides (photographs)
Transcripts
Audiocassettes
Digital images
CD-ROMs
Citation:
Jose L. Hernandez-Rebollar Innovative Lives Program, Archives Center, National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.0917
See more items in:
Jose L. Hernandez-Rebollar Innovative Lives presentation
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmah-ac-0917

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