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Exhibition Records

Creator::
National Museum of American History. Division of Work and Industry  Search this
Extent:
8 cu. ft. (8 record storage boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Manuscripts
Newspapers
Clippings
Books
Floor plans
Drawings
Black-and-white photographs
Color photographs
Black-and-white transparencies
Color transparencies
Date:
1925-2010
Descriptive Entry:
This accession consists of the records of Bernard S. Finn, Curator Emeritus of electricity collections, documenting exhibition planning, development, and production at the National Museum of American History. Earlier records date from when Finn was in the Division of Information Technology and Society; the Division of Electricity and Modern Physics; the National Museum of History and Technology, Division of Electricity and Nuclear Energy; the Museum of History and Technology, Division of Electricity; as well as predate the creation of the museum. Also represented in these records are curators David K. Allison, Arthur P. Molella, and Paul Forman; museum specialists Elliot N. Sivowitch and Ray A. Hutt; Robert D. Friedel, Historian; and Nance L. Briscoe, Collections Manager. Documented are the following exhibitions: Laser 10: The First Ten Years of Laser Technology; The Laser at 25; Fifty Years of Lasers; Information Age: People, Information and Technology; Edison: Lighting a Revolution; Lighting a Revolution; Edison After the Electric Light: The Challenge of Success; Person to Person; 1876 Centennial Exhibition; Edison and the Electrical Age: 100 Years; Underwater Web: Cabling the Seas; FDR: The Intimate Presidency; History as Seen from the National Museum of American History; Science in American Life; Beyond Vision; A Material World; Stalking the Elusive Computer Bug; and Nation of Nations

Materials include correspondence, memoranda, and notes; exhibition proposals; planning and design information; scripts; budget summaries, contractual agreements; meeting agendas and minutes; reports; press releases; educational program information; floor plans; photographs; brochures; visitor surveys; loan information; clippings; drawings; information about the Hall of Electricity; and supporting documentation.
Rights:
Restricted for 15 years. until Jan-01-2026; Transferring office; 6/14/2013 memorandum, Johnstone to Wallace; Contact reference staff for details.
Topic:
Electricity -- History  Search this
Traveling exhibitions  Search this
Museum curators  Search this
Museums -- Educational aspects  Search this
Museum exhibits  Search this
Genre/Form:
Manuscripts
Newspapers
Clippings
Books
Floor plans
Drawings
Black-and-white photographs
Color photographs
Black-and-white transparencies
Color transparencies
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Accession 13-217, National Museum of American History. Division of Work and Industry, Exhibition Records
Identifier:
Accession 13-217
See more items in:
Exhibition Records
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-fa13-217

Exhibition Records

Creator::
National Museum of American History. Division of Work and Industry  Search this
Extent:
1 cu. ft. (1 record storage box)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Manuscripts
Brochures
Floor plans
Black-and-white photographs
Black-and-white negatives
Date:
1984-2005
Descriptive Entry:
This accession consists of the records of Pete Daniel, Curator, and document exhibition planning, development and production in the Division of Work and Industry, and when that Division was known as the Division of the History of Technology and the Division of Agriculture and Natural Resources, respectively. The records document the following exhibitions: Rock 'n' Soul: Social Crossroads; Official Images: New Deal Photography; Land of Promise: America in the 19th Century; A Sense of Place; Science, Power, and Conflict; and Photographs of Louisiana Sugercane Workers by Debbie Flemming Caffery. Materials include correspondence, memoranda, and notes; exhibition proposals; planning and design information; scripts; budget summaries; meeting agendas and minutes; articles; floor plans; photographs; exhibition brochures; and research material.
Topic:
Technology -- History  Search this
Agriculture -- History  Search this
Museum exhibits  Search this
Genre/Form:
Manuscripts
Brochures
Floor plans
Black-and-white photographs
Black-and-white negatives
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Accession 10-059, National Museum of American History. Division of Work and Industry, Exhibition Records
Identifier:
Accession 10-059
See more items in:
Exhibition Records
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-fa10-059

Francis P. Conant Papers

Creator:
Conant, Francis  Search this
Names:
Hunter College. Department of Anthropology  Search this
Goldschmidt, Walter, 1913-2010  Search this
Naguib, Mohammed, 1901-  Search this
Extent:
20 Linear feet ((43 boxes) plus 25 digital storage media and 5 map folders )
Culture:
Southern Bauchi languages  Search this
Suk (African people)  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Field recordings
Maps
Field notes
Manuscripts
Electronic records
Correspondence
Sound recordings
Photographs
Place:
Africa, French-speaking West
Sahara
Egypt
Ethiopia
Uganda
West Pokot District (Kenya)
Bauchi Province (Nigeria)
Belgian Congo
Finland
Morocco
Sudan
Date:
1946-2011
bulk 1953-2008
Summary:
The papers of Francis P. Conant document his anthropological work and, to a lesser extent, his previous career as a journalist and photographer. Francis Paine Conant was a cultural anthropologist who pioneered the use of satellite data in anthropology. He conducted fieldwork in Nigeria and Kenya, and his research interests spanned cultural ecology, AIDS, malaria, and sex and gender studies. He was also Professor Emeritus of Anthropology at Hunter College, where he taught from 1962 to 1995.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of Francis P. Conant document his anthropological work and, to a lesser extent, his previous career as a journalist and photographer. The bulk of the collection consists of his field work in Africa, specifically his doctoral research among the Barawa in Nigeria during the 1950s; his work among the Pokot in Kenya for Walter Goldschimdt's Culture and Ecology in East Africa Project during the 1960s; and his later research among the Pokot during the 1970s incorporating remote sensing tools. These materials include his dissertation, field notes, kinship charts, maps, correspondence, photographs, and sound recordings. The collection also contains photographs, correspondence, and writings relating to the Bernheim-Conant expedition through Africa. Among the photos are Polaroids of Mohammad Naguib, first president of Egypt. Also present in the collection are his published and unpublished academic writings, his writings and correspondence as a news correspondent in Finland, and files from courses that he taught. In addition, the collection contains some of Conant's digital files, which have not yet been examined. Overall there is little correspondence in the collection, aside from some letters scattered throughout the collection relating to his research and writings (both as an academic and a journalist).
Arrangement:
Collection is organized into 9 series: 1) Nigeria, 1956-1960, undated; 2) Kenya, 1961-1974, undated; 3) Remote Sensing, 1967, 1971, 1976-1984, 1991-1992, 2002; 4) Bernheim-Conant Expedition, 1953-1956; 5) Writings, 1960-1966, 1974-1995, 2000-2006, undated; 6) University Files, 1956-1957, 1961, 1970, 1972, 1982-1995, undated; 7) Biographical Files and Letters, circa 1940, CIRCA 1946-1947, 1951, 1955, 1979, 1989-1991, 1996-2000, 2007-2011, undated; 8) Sound Recordings, 1956-1965, 1971, 1977-1978, undated; 9) Digital Files
Biographical / Historical:
Francis Paine Conant was a cultural anthropologist who pioneered the use of satellite data in anthropology. He conducted fieldwork in Nigeria and Kenya, and his research interests spanned cultural ecology, AIDS, malaria, and sex and gender studies. He was also Professor Emeritus of Anthropology at Hunter College, where he taught from 1962 to 1995.

Conant was born on February 27, 1926 in New York City. After graduating from Phillips Exeter Academy, he deferred college to enlist in the U.S. Army in 1944. He served as a field artillery observer for the 294th Field Artillery Battalion and helped liberate two concentration camps during World War II. After he was honorably discharged in 1946, he attended Cornell University, where he obtained his B.A. in 1950. While at Cornell, a Finnish student invited Conant to Finland to help relocate families, farms, and livestock further from the Russian border, a protective measure against another Russian invasion. Conant accepted his invitation and took time off from his academic studies to spend several months in Finland in 1947, as well as a summer in 1949.

After graduating from Cornell, Conant attended University of Iowa's graduate writing program for a short time. Dissatisfied with the program, he worked briefly for the Carnegie Endowment, during which time he occasionally served as a personal driver for Alger Hiss. In 1951, he returned to Finland to pursue a career in journalism. He worked for United Press International until 1953.

From December 5, 1953 to May 26, 1954, Conant traveled throughout Africa as part of the Bernheim-Conant Expedition for the American Museum of Natural History (AMNH). The expedition was led by Claude Bernheim, the father of his first wife, Miriam. They traveled 16,000 miles through Northern Central and Eastern Africa, collecting film footage and material culture for the museum. Conant served as the writer and photographer for the expedition, publishing illustrated articles in the New York Times and Natural History Magazine.

He later returned to Africa as a doctoral student at Columbia University, where he earned his PhD in Anthropology in 1960. After studying the Hausa language at the International African Institute in London, he traveled to Nigeria as a Fellow of the Ford Foundation to carry out his fieldwork in Dass Independent District, Bauchi Province. Working among the Barawa that live in the mountains of Dass, he focused on their religion and its impact on the technology, social and political organization, and structure of their society. His dissertation was titled "Dodo of Dass: A Study of a Pagan Religion of Northern Nigeria." During his fieldwork, he also collected data on rock gongs, which were first identified and written about by Bernard Fagg in 1955.

In 1961 to 1962, Conant was a research associate for Walter Goldschmidt's Culture and Ecology in East Africa Project. The purpose of the project was to conduct a controlled comparison of four different East African societies and the farmers and pastoralists within each tribe. Conant was assigned to conduct ethnographic research among the Pokot in West Pokot District in Kenya. This research would form the basis of his remote sensing work in the same area more than a decade later. Conant was first introduced to remote sensing data in 1974 when his colleague Priscilla Reining showed him Landsat imagery of one his former fieldwork sites. He was inspired by the potential applications of satellite data to study cultural and ecological relationships. In 1975, he and Reining organized a workshop on "Satellite Potentials for Anthropological Studies of Subsistence Activities and Population Change." He incorporated remote sensing tools in his 1977 to 1980 study of the changing cultivation patterns and management of livestock in West Pokot District. His research combined traditional fieldwork (which included data he had collected in the 1960s), LANDSAT data, and geospatial data collected from the ground.

Later in his career, Conant's research interests expanded to include the spread of diseases, specifically AIDS and malaria. He, along with Priscilla Reining, John Bongaarts, and Peter Way found that uncircumcised men were 86% more likely to contract HIV than circumcised men. Their findings were published in their paper "The Relationship Between Male Circumcision and HIV Infection in African Populations" (1989). His research on malaria focused on the spread of the disease during African prehistory.

Conant taught briefly at Columbia University and was an Assistant Professor at University of Massachusetts, at Amherst in 1960-1961. Most of his academic career was spent at Hunter College, where he served as Chair of the Anthropology Department several times. He also founded and headed the college's Research Institute in Aruba.

Conant was a Fulbright Senior Research Fellow at Oxford University's Pitts Rivers Museum in 1968-1969. He was also a fellow of the American Anthropological Association, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the International African Institute, the New York Academy of Sciences, and the Royal Anthropological Institute. In addition, he was actively involved with the Human Ecology: An Interdisciplinary Journal.

Conant died at the age of 84 on January 29, 2011.

Sources Consulted

Bates, Daniel G. 2011. Francis P. Conant: A Tribute to a Friend of Human Ecology. Human Ecology 39(2): 115.

Bates, Daniel and Oliver Conant. Francis P. Conant. Anthropology News. 52(5): 25.

Conant, Veronika. Email message to Lorain Wang, October 22, 2013.

[Curriculum Vitae], Series 7. Biographical Files and Letters, Francis Conant Papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution

Francis P. Conant. http://www.hunter.cuny.edu/anthropology/faculty-staff/in-remembrance/francis-p.-conant [accessed August 23, 2013].

1926 -- Born February 27 in New York City, New York

1944-1946 -- Enlists in Army and serves in World War II as a flash ranger in 294th Field Artillery Battalion

1950 -- Earns B.A. from Cornell University in English and Russian, minor in Engineering

1953-1954 -- AMNH Bernheim-Conant Expedition to northern Africa

1957 -- Conducts language studies at the International African Institute

1957-1959 -- Conducts fieldwork in northern Nigeria

1960 -- Earns PhD in Cultural Anthropology from Columbia University

1960-1961 -- Assistant Professor, Anthropology, University of Massachusetts at Amherst

1961-1962 -- Research Associate for Culture and Ecology in East Africa Project directed by Walter Goldschimdt

1962 -- Joins faculty at Hunter College

1968-1969 -- Fulbright Senior Research Fellow, Oxford University, Pitt-Rivers Museum

1977-1980 -- Sets up remote sensing monitoring area in West Pokot district in Kenya. Studies changing cultivation patterns and management of livestock

1995 -- Retires from Hunter College; Emeritus Professor

2011 -- Dies on January 29 at the age of 84
Related Materials:
For additional materials at the National Anthropological Archives relating to Francis Conant, see the papers of Priscilla Reining and John Lawrence Angel. His film collection is at the Human Studies Film Archives.

Artifacts and film collected during the Bernheim-Conant Expedition, his doctoral research in Nigeria, and his fieldwork in Kenya during the 1960s and 70s are at the American Museum of Natural History. He also deposited collections at the Pitts River Museum at the University of Oxford.
Provenance:
These papers were donated to the National Anthropological Archives by Francis Conant's widow Veronika Conant in 2012.
Restrictions:
The Francis P. Conant Papers are open for research. Access to the Francis P. Conant Papers requires an appointment.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Remote sensing  Search this
Journalism  Search this
Musical instruments -- Nigeria  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Subsistence farming -- Kenya  Search this
Subsistence herding -- Kenya  Search this
Human ecology  Search this
Landsat satellites  Search this
Genre/Form:
Field recordings
Maps
Field notes
Manuscripts
Electronic records
Correspondence
Sound recordings
Photographs
Citation:
Francis P. Conant Papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.2012-13
See more items in:
Francis P. Conant Papers
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-2012-13
Additional Online Media:

Records

Topic:
Wheels and Wheeling: The Smithsonian Cycle Collection (Monograph : 1974)
Creator::
National Museum of American History. Division of Transportation  Search this
Extent:
15.51 cu. ft. (15 record storage boxes) (1 document box) (1 oversize folder)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Diaries
Black-and-white photographs
Manuscripts
Newsletters
Brochures
Clippings
Date:
1946-1985
Descriptive Entry:
These records consist of curator's day journals, 1946-1956; a manuscript copy, Wheels and Wheeling: The Smithsonian Cycle Collection, 1974; and administrative files of the Division of Transportation concerning such matters as gifts and grants, annual budgets, minutes of meetings, publications, and historical inquiries regarding objects. Also included are records concerning exhibition planning, including fundraising, travel, and production files for the Hall of American Maritime Enterprise at the National Museum of American History (NMAH).

Curatorial staff represented in the records include Smith Hempstone Oliver, Associate Curator, 1946-1956; Howard Irving Chapelle, Curator, 1957-1966, Senior Historian, 1967-1971; John H. White, Jr., Assistant Curator, 1958-1961, Associate Curator, 1961-1966, Curator, 1966-1985, Senior Historian, 1986- ; Donald H. Berkebile, Assistant Curator, 1973-1975, Associate Curator, 1975-1980; Melvin H. Jackson, Associate Curator, 1966-1968, Curator, 1969-1977, Honorary Curator, 1978-1979; Robert C. Post, Curator, 1980-1981; and William L. Withuhn, Curator, 1983- .
Historical Note:
In 1978 the Division of Transportation was part of the Department of History of Technology, which merged with the Department of History of Science to form the Department of the History of Science and Technology in 1980.
Topic:
Transportation -- History  Search this
Museum curators  Search this
Genre/Form:
Diaries
Black-and-white photographs
Manuscripts
Newsletters
Brochures
Clippings
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 528, National Museum of American History. Division of Transportation, Records
Identifier:
Record Unit 528
See more items in:
Records
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-faru0528

Exhibition Records

Creator::
National Museum of American History. Division of Science, Medicine and Society  Search this
Extent:
2 cu. ft. (2 record storage boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Manuscripts
Clippings
Brochures
Floor plans
Drawings
Color photographs
Black-and-white photographs
Date:
1961-2002
Descriptive Entry:
This accession consists of the records of Jon B. Eklund, curator of chemistry and computers, which document his exhibition planning, development and production activities in the Division of Science, Medicine and Society and during the years when he was in the Division of Information Technology and Society; the Division of Computers, Information and Society; and the Division of Physical Sciences. Some records date back to when the National Museum of American History was known as the National Museum of History and Technology and the Museum of History and Technology, respectively. Also represented in these records are curators David Kite Allison, Arthur P. Molella, Patricia Peck Gossel, Bernard S. Finn, and Susan Faye Cannon. The records document the following exhibitions: Information Age: People, Information and Technology; Science in American Life; A Material World; Aspects of Art and Science; Stalking the Elusive Computer Bug; Nation of Nations; The Foucault Pendulum; and Engines of Change: The American Industrial Revolution, 1790-1860. Materials include correspondence, memoranda, and notes; exhibition proposals; agreements; budget summaries; scripts; meeting agendas and minutes; loan information; photographs; floor plans and design drawings; brochures; newspaper clippings; object lists; information about the Hall of Chemistry; visitor comment forms; and supporting documentation.
Topic:
Foucault's pendulum  Search this
Museums -- Collection management  Search this
Medical museums  Search this
Computer science  Search this
Chemistry -- History  Search this
Technology -- History  Search this
Museum curators  Search this
Museum loans  Search this
Genre/Form:
Manuscripts
Clippings
Brochures
Floor plans
Drawings
Color photographs
Black-and-white photographs
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Accession 14-107, National Museum of American History. Division of Science, Medicine and Society, Exhibition Records
Identifier:
Accession 14-107
See more items in:
Exhibition Records
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-fa14-107

Curatorial Records

Creator::
National Museum of American History. Division of Science, Medicine and Society  Search this
Extent:
3 cu. ft. (3 record storage boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Manuscripts
Clippings
Color photographs
Black-and-white photographs
Date:
1955-2004
Descriptive Entry:
This accession consists of the records of Jon B. Eklund, curator of chemistry and computers, which document his curatorial and professional activities in the Division of Science, Medicine and Society and during the years when he was in the Division of Information Technology and Society; the Division of Computers, Information and Society; and the Division of Physical Sciences. Also consists of the records of Audrey B. Davis, during the years she was a curator in the Division of Medical Sciences, and Patricia Peck Gossel, curator in the Division of Biological Sciences and later, when that division merged with Medical Sciences, in the Division of Science, Medicine and Society. Some of Gossel and Eklund's records date prior to their tenures, respectively, at the Smithsonian Institution, and when the National Museum of American History was known as the National Museum of History and Technology. Materials include correspondence, memoranda, and notes; meeting agendas and minutes; agreements; lecture papers, articles, and book reviews; collections management information; photographs; information in regard to conferences, symposiums, workshops, and committees; and newspaper clippings.
Topic:
Museums -- Collection management  Search this
Medical museums  Search this
Computer science  Search this
Chemistry -- History  Search this
Museum curators  Search this
Genre/Form:
Manuscripts
Clippings
Color photographs
Black-and-white photographs
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Accession 14-102, National Museum of American History. Division of Science, Medicine and Society, Curatorial Records
Identifier:
Accession 14-102
See more items in:
Curatorial Records
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-fa14-102

MS 4800 James O. Dorsey papers

Creator:
Dorsey, James Owen, 1848-1895  Search this
Names:
Smithsonian Institution. Bureau of American Ethnology  Search this
Bushotter, George, 1864-1892  Search this
Gatschet, Albert S. (Albert Samuel), 1832-1907  Search this
Hewitt, J. N. B. (John Napoleon Brinton), 1859-1937  Search this
Mooney, James, 1861-1921  Search this
Powell, John Wesley, 1834-1902  Search this
Riggs, Stephen Return, 1812-1883  Search this
Extent:
30 Linear feet (70 boxes, 1 oversized box, 20 manuscript envelopes, 4 rolled maps, and 23 map folders)
Culture:
Indians of North America -- Subarctic  Search this
Athapascan Indians  Search this
Catawba Indians  Search this
Hidatsa Indians  Search this
Mandan Indians  Search this
Biloxi Indians  Search this
Tutelo Indians  Search this
Iowa Indians  Search this
Chiwere  Search this
Winnebago Indians  Search this
Oto Indians  Search this
Quapaw Indians  Search this
Osage Indians  Search this
Dakota Indians  Search this
Siouan Indians  Search this
Teton Indians  Search this
Dhegiha Indians  Search this
Assiniboine Indians  Search this
Ponca Indians  Search this
Omaha Indians  Search this
Tututni Indians  Search this
Kansa Indians  Search this
Siletz Indians  Search this
Kusan  Search this
Coos Indians  Search this
Yakonan Indians  Search this
Arctic peoples  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northwest Coast of North America  Search this
Indians of North America -- Great Plains  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southeast  Search this
Takelma Indians  Search this
Klikitat Indians  Search this
Chastacosta Indians  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Field notes
Drawings
Vocabulary
Folklore
Sermons
Manuscripts
Obituaries
Correspondence
Newspaper clippings
Place:
Siletz Indian Reservation (Or.)
Date:
circa 1870-1956
bulk 1870-1895
Summary:
Reverend James Owen Dorsey (1848-1895) was a missionary and Bureau of American Ethnology ethnologist who conducted extensive research on Siouan tribes and languages.The papers of James Owen Dorsey comprise mostly ethnographic and linguistic materials on various tribes of the Siouan language family as well as tribes from Siletz Reservation in Oregon. These materials include texts and letters with interlineal translations; grammar notes; dictionaries; drawings; and his manuscripts. In addition, the collection contains Dorsey's correspondence, newspaper clippings, his obituaries, and reprints.
Scope and Contents:
This collection contains James O. Dorsey's research and writings as a BAE ethnologist, as well as his earlier work as a missionary among the Ponca. The vast majority of the collection pertains to his research on Siouan-Catawban languages, including the Dakota and Dhegiha languages, Chiwere, Winnebago, Mandan, Hidatsa, Tutelo, Biloxi, and Catawba. His research on Athapascan, Kusan, Takilman, and Yakonan languages from his field work at Siletz Reservation are also present, as well as some notes on the Caddoan languages. Dorsey's research files include linguistic and ethnological field notes, reading notes, stories and myths, vocabularies, drawings, and unpublished and published manuscripts. The collection also contains Omaha, Ponca, Quapaw, and Biloxi dictionaries that he compiled and materials relating to his work editing Steven Riggs' Dakota-English Dictionary. Additional noteworthy materials in the collection are Teton texts and drawings from George Bushotter and drawings by Stephen Stubbs (Kansa), Pahaule-gagli (Kansa), and George Miller (Omaha). The collection also contains Dorsey's correspondence, newspaper clippings, obituaries, and his collection of reprints.
Arrangement:
The collection is organized into 6 series: 1) Siouan; 2) Siletz Reservation; 3) Caddoan; 4) General Correspondence; 5) Personal Papers; 6) Miscellaneous & Reprints.
Biographical Note:
Reverend James Owen Dorsey (1848-1895) was a missionary and Bureau of American Ethnology ethnologist who conducted extensive research on Siouan tribes and languages.

Dorsey was born on October 31, 1848 in Baltimore, Maryland. He exhibited a talent for languages at an early age. At age 6 he learned the Hebrew alphabet and was able to read the language at age 10. In 1867 Dorsey attended the Theological Seminary of Virginia and was ordained a deacon of the Protestant Episcopal Church in 1871. In May of that year, Dorsey traveled to the Dakota Territory to serve as a missionary among the Ponca. Plagued by ill health, Dorsey was forced to end his missionary work in August 1873. By that time, however, he had learned the Ponca language well enough to converse with members of the tribe without an interpreter.

Dorsey returned to Maryland and engaged in parish work while continuing his studies of Siouan languages. His linguistic talents and knowledge of these languages attracted the attention of Major John Wesley Powell. Powell arranged for Dorsey to work among the Omaha in Nebraska from 1878 to 1880 to collect linguistic and ethnological notes. When the Bureau of American Ethnology (BAE) was established in 1879, Powell recruited Dorsey to join the staff.

As an ethnologist for the BAE, Dorsey continued his research on Siouan tribes. His studies focused on languages but also included Siouan personal names, folklore, social organization, religion, beliefs, and customs. He conducted fieldwork among the Tutelo at Six Nations on Grand River in Upper Canada (1882); the Kansa, Osage, and Quapaw in Indian Territory (1883-1884); the Biloxi at Lecompte, Rapides Parish, Louisiana (1892); and again with the Quapaw at the Quapaw Mission (1894). He also worked with Native Americans that visited DC, including George Bushotter (Teton), Philip Longtail (Winnebago), Samuel Fremont (Omaha), and Little Standing Buffalo (Ponca). He also spent time at Siletz Reservation in 1884 to collect linguistic notes on the Athapascan, Kusan, Takilman, and Yakonan stocks.

In addition to his research, Dorsey helped found the American Folklore Society and served as the first vice-president of the association. He also served as vice-president of Section H of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

At the age of 47, Dorsey died of typhoid fever on February 4, 1895.

Sources Consulted

1st-16th Annual Reports of the Bureau of American Ethnology. 1881-1897.

Hewitt, J.N.B. 1895. "James Owen Dorsey" American Anthropologist A8, 180-183.

McGee, W.J. 1895. "In Memoriam." Journal of American Folklore 8(28): 79-80.

1848 -- Born on October 31 in Baltimore, Maryland.

1871 -- Ordained a deacon of the Protestant Episcopal Church.

1871-1873 -- Served as a missionary among the Ponca in Dakota Territory.

1878-1880 -- Conducted fieldwork among the Omaha in Nebraska.

1879 -- Joined the staff of the Bureau of American Ethnology.

1882 -- Conducted fieldwork among the Tutelo at Six Nations on Grand River in Upper Canada.

1883-1884 -- Conducted fieldwork among the Kansa, Osage, and Quapaw in Indian Territory.

1887 -- Worked with George Bushotter to record information regarding the language and culture of the Dakota.

1884 -- Conducted fieldwork at Siletz Reservation.

1892 -- Conducted fieldwork among the Biloxi at Lecompte, Rapides Parish, Louisiana.

1894 -- Conducted fieldwork among the Quapaw at the Quapaw Mission in Indian Territory.

1895 -- Died of typhoid fever on February 4th at the age of 47.
Restrictions:
The James O. Dorsey Papers are open for research. Access to the James O. Dorsey Papers requires an appointment
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Ethnology  Search this
Social structure  Search this
Kinship  Search this
Manners and customs  Search this
Shahaptian languages  Search this
Yakonan languages  Search this
Athapascan languages  Search this
Kusan languages  Search this
Linguistics  Search this
Siouan languages  Search this
Dhegiha language  Search this
Siuslaw Indians  Search this
Hidatsa language  Search this
Omaha language  Search this
Dakota language  Search this
Catawba language  Search this
Biloxi language  Search this
Caddoan languages  Search this
Osage language  Search this
Alsea language  Search this
Kansa language  Search this
Mandan language  Search this
Chastacosta language  Search this
Coquille language  Search this
Tutelo language  Search this
Winnebago language  Search this
Siuslaw language  Search this
Takelma language  Search this
Genre/Form:
Field notes
Drawings
Vocabulary
Folklore
Sermons
Manuscripts
Obituaries
Correspondence
Newspaper clippings
Citation:
Manuscript 4800 James O. Dorsey papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS4800
See more items in:
MS 4800 James O. Dorsey papers
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms4800
Additional Online Media:

Carl Whiting Bishop Collection

Creator:
Bishop, Carl Whiting, 1881-1942  Search this
Names:
Bishop, Carl Whiting, 1881-1942  Search this
Tung, Kuang-zung.  Search this
Warner, Langdon (1881-1955)  Search this
Wenley, A. G. (Archibald Gibson), 1898-1962  Search this
Extent:
20 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Negatives
Photographic prints
Manuscript
Place:
China
Date:
1923-1934
Summary:
An associate curator and associate in archaeology at the Freer Gallery of Art from 1922 to 1942, the collection of Carl Whiting Bishop (1881-1942) document his Gallery-sponsored travels to China from 1923 to 1934 and include an unpublished manuscript describing his archaeological research in China; line drawings; rubbings; maps; note cards; and nearly 4,000 glass and film negatives with corresponding original silver prints. These document his expeditions in northern and central China, illustrating archaeological sites in Henan, Shanxi, and Hebei provinces. Specific digs include the large neolithic site at Wanquan, Shanxi, and sixth century C.E. tombs near Fenyin. Additional images show Chinese cityscapes, daily life and customs, topography, temples, pagodas, caves, and sculpture.
Scope and Contents:
The professional papers and official records of Carl Whiting Bishop include his unpublished two-volume manuscript, [not before 1940]; and photographs, nearly 4,000 images, 1915-1934; and undated. These materials document over a twenty-five year period in the course of Bishop's research and archaeological activities. They were retained at the Freer Gallery of Art after Bishop's death in 1942, and were supplemented with an addition received in 1956 from his widow Daisy Furscott Bishop.

The manuscript was prepared in a typescript format, over 421 pages of text, with photographic illustrations, and completed by Bishop sometime after 1939. Properly titled Archaeological Research in China 1923-1934, this unpublished manuscript constituted a field report that chronicled Bishop's Gallery-sponsored expeditions in northern and central China during the period 1923 to 1934. The reader is provided with a record of the day-to-day operations completed, of obstacles and opposition encountered, and the results obtained from their work. Key diplomatic and scientific representatives from the West and China are recorded who aided and contributed to the investigations. Moreover, there are descriptions of the academic, social and political climate in China during a period of civil war and economic strife. Against this background, Bishop also discussed their efforts in view of the history of China, with commentary on the country's geography, topography, climate, flora and fauna, mineral products, and ancient customs and legends.

The earliest still photographic prints in the Bishop Papers date from his employ at the University of Pennsylvania Museum, where he conducted archaeological reconnaissance from 1915 to 1918 in China, Korea, and Japan. All subsequent images were created or collected by Bishop and his assistant Kuang-zung Tung during the Freer Gallery-sponsored expeditions of 1923-1934. Further descriptions of these materials may be found under Series 2 and Series 3 in this finding aid.

In the transliteration into English of the names of Chinese characters, Bishop followed the Wade-Giles system, with a few exceptions to those rules for certain well known and commonly used place-names, especially those of cities, towns, territorial divisions, and bodies of water. We have retained Bishop's romanization except in certain areas where clarification was needed. The Chinese personal and place-names have been kept as they appeared in his captions.
Arrangement:
Series 1: Manuscript/Writings 1915-1934 and undated

Series 2: Photography Prints

Series 3: Negatives

Series 4: Drawings, Rubbings, and Maps
Biographical / Historical:
Carl Whiting Bishop (1881-1942) was an archaeologist, anthropologist, and specialist in the field of East Asian studies. Born in Tokyo, Japan, on July 12, 1881, he was the son of a Methodist missionary, the Reverend Charles Bishop. Except for a twelve-month residence in the United States during 1889-90, Bishop spent the first sixteen years of his life in Japan, before returning to this country in 1898 for college preparatory work at Northwestern Academy, Evanston, Illinois. He studied at Hampden-Sydney College and in 1912 received an A.B. degree from DePauw University. In 1913 he was awarded the degree of Master of Arts by the Department of Anthropology, Columbia University, where he studied with the noted German anthropologist, Franz Boas (1858-1942). That same year he received his first scientific appointment as a member of the Peabody Museum Expedition to Central America.

From 1914-18 Bishop served as Assistant Curator in Oriental Art at the University of Pennsylvania Museum, where on an expedition for that museum he made his first trip to China. Under the auspices of the university, he conducted archaeological reconnaissance during 1915 and 1916 in China, Korea, and Japan, and again conducted archaeological surveys in 1917 and 1918, although no systematic excavations were carried out at that time. When the United States entered World War I on the side of the Allied Powers, Bishop enlisted in the United States Navy and was made assistant naval attaché, serving in China in the years 1918-20, with the rank of lieutenant, junior grade. He returned to Columbia University in 1921 to assume the position of Assistant in Anthropology, a post he held until the end of the academic season in 1922.

Effective 10 April 1922, Bishop was appointed as Associate Curator of the Freer Gallery of Art by then director John Ellerton Lodge (1878-1942). Asked to undertake important archaeological work, Bishop headed the gallery's first expedition to China, sponsored jointly by the FGA and the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, lasting from 20 February 1923 to 6 August 1927. From 16 November 1929 to 11 April 1934, he headed another expedition, sent out this time by the Freer Gallery alone. When conditions in China made further efforts impractical, Bishop returned to Washington in 1934, where he remained at the gallery as Associate in Archaeology until the time of his death on 16 June 1942.

Carl Whiting Bishop was a member of a number of learned societies: the American Oriental Society, the American Archaeological Society, the Anthropological Society, the American Society for the Advancement of Science, the American Geographical Society, and he served on the advisory board of the American Council of Learned Societies until his death.

1881, July 12 -- Born in Tokyo, Japan

1898 -- Attends Northwestern Academy in Evanston, Illinois for college preparatory work Attends Hampden-Sydney College

1912 -- Receives A.B. degree from DePauw University

1913 -- Receives Master of Arts from Department of Anthropology from Columbia University, where he studied with Franz Boas

1914 -- Begins serving as Assistant Curator in Oriental Art at the University of Pennsylvania Museum

1915-1918 -- Makes several archaeological survey trips to China, Korea and Japan

1918-1920 -- Enlists in the U.S. Navy, serving as assistant naval attaché in China

1921 -- Serves as Assistant Professor in Anthropology at Columbia University

1922, April 10 -- Becomes Associate Curator of the Freer Gallery of Art

1923-1927 -- Heads the Freer Gallery's first expedition to China, co-sponsored by the Boston Museum of Fine Arts

1929-1934 -- Heads the second Freer-sponsored expedition to China

1934 -- Returns to US and serves as Associate in Archaeology at the Freer Gallery of Art

1942, June 16 -- Dies.
Related Materials:
Additional Bishop material may be found in the following collections also found in the the Archives of the Freer Gallery of Art and the Arthur M. Sackler Gallery:

Li Chi Reports, 1926-1929, regarding Li's reconnaissance work at Shi-yin Ts'un, Shansi Province, and the excavation at Anyang.

Archibald Gibson Wenley Papers, 1924-1926, including field diaries, notes, and photographs documenting his participation in the FGA expedition work in China.

Charles Lang Freer Papers, including 1915 correspondence between Freer and Bishop; newspaper clippings related to Bishop, and documents dated 1912-1913, relating to Freer's support for a proposed American School of Archeology in China.

A number of objects from the FGA expeditions, including bronzes, ceramics, and stone sculpture, have been accessioned into the permanent art collection of the Freer Gallery of Art. Additionally, remnants of antiquities, potteries, and metalwork accumulated during the field work, have been placed in the Freer Gallery Study Collection. Records for these items are retained with the Galleries' Registrar's Office.

Additional Bishop material may be found in the Smithsonian Institutional Archives:

Expedition Records, including correspondence of Carl Whiting Bishop, 1914; 1923-1942, nearly 3,000 letters arranged alphabetically by correspondent name; a manuscript catalogue of expedition acquisitions, Peking, 1923-1925; financial records, 1923-1934, including expedition fund ledgers, account statements, and receipts; and newspaper clippings, 1924-1932, documenting the gallery's field work and general archaeological work being conducted around the world at that time.

Smithsonian Institutional Archives, Central Files, Bishop folders, 1923-1942, including expedition letters, field reports, and photographs sent to John E. Lodge.

Personnel and Special Events Photograph Collection, containing portrait photographs of Bishop.

Additional Bishop matieral may be found in the University of Pennsylvania Museum Archives, Philadelphia:

Documentation of University of Pennsylvania Museum-sponsored field work in East Asia may be found there that includes records of C.W. Bishop, dated 1914-1927 (measuring about .5 linear foot), much of it created during his tenure as the Museum's Assistant Curator of Oriental Art from 1914-1918. Included are Bishop's journals consisting of daily entries for two trips to China for the University of Pennsylvania Museum; letters to and from G.B. Gordon, C.W. Harrison, and Jane McHugh, written during Bishop's travel in China and subsequent to his return; and detailed financial accounts of expenditures during the China travels. Additionally, the repository houses a group of Bishop's negatives taken in China to visually record the expedition work.
Provenance:
Gift of Carl Whiting Bishop.
Restrictions:
Access is by appointment only, Monday through Thursday 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Please contact the Archives to make an appointment: AVRreference@si.edu.
Rights:
Permission to reproduce and publish an item from the Archives is coordinated through the Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery's Rights and Reproductions department. Please contact the Archives in order to initiate this process.
Topic:
Archaeology  Search this
Archaeological expeditions  Search this
Archaeology -- China  Search this
Photography -- China  Search this
Genre/Form:
Negatives
Photographic prints
Manuscript
Citation:
The Carl Whiting Bishop Collection. Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives. Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C.
Identifier:
FSA.A.02
See more items in:
Carl Whiting Bishop Collection
Archival Repository:
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-fsa-a-02

Records

Creator::
National Museum of American History. Division of Photographic History  Search this
Extent:
10 cu. ft. (10 record storage boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Manuscripts
Brochures
Black-and-white photographs
Date:
circa 1883-1984
Descriptive Entry:
These records consist mostly of curatorial and staff correspondence and memoranda documenting activities of the Division and its predecessors, especially during the tenures of Thomas W. Smillie, Alexander J. Wedderburn, and Eugene N. Ostroff. The records also include information on the Hall of Photography, organized by Ostroff; newspaper clippings pertaining to the field of photography; historic photographs; annual reports; and administrative files.
Historical Note:
The history of photography at the Smithsonian Institution dates from the 1850s. In 1859, Secretary Joseph Henry proposed that a photographic record be assembled of Native American delegations visiting Washington, D.C. In 1867, with the support of Ferdinand V. Hayden, a geologist, and William H. Blackmore, a wealthy English collector and speculator, Washington photographers Alexander Gardner and Antonio Zeno Shindler began photographing the Native American delegates. These images and others formed the earliest Smithsonian photograph collection.

In 1883, the Section of Photography was established in the Department of Preparation, with Thomas William Smillie as photographer. Smillie, a former photographer at the United States Fish Commission, had been employed by the Institution as its official photographer since 1870. Smillie was named custodian of the Section in 1896, but also continued to function as the Institution's photographer until his death in 1917. His successors also retained these dual responsibilities until 1943, when the duties were separated and Gurney I. Hightower became the Institution's official photographer.

In 1897, the Section became a part of the Division of Graphic Arts, where it remained until 1969. At that time, the Division was redesignated Graphic Arts and Photography. In 1972, the two functions divided, and the Division of Photographic History was established in the Department of Applied Arts. At that time, Eugene N. Ostroff, associate curator and curator of photography under the previous divisions, was made curator of photographic history. Successively, the Division was affiliated with the Department of History of Technology, 1978-1980, and then the Department of the History of Science and Technology.

The Division of Photographic History and its predecessors primarily documented the history of photographic science and technology in America since the nineteenth century. The Division collected cameras, patent models, motion picture apparatus, and photographs such as daguerreotypes, tintypes, and calotypes.

Curators and staff of the Division included Thomas W. Smillie, photographer, 1871-1895, custodian and photographer, 1896-1917; Loring W. Beeson, custodian and photographer, 1917-1920; Arthur J. Olmsted, custodian and photographer, 1920-1930, assistant curator and photographer, 1931-1941, associate curator and photographer, 1942, associate curator, 1943-1946; Alexander I. Wedderburn, associate curator, 1947-1960; Eugene N. Ostroff, associate curator of photography, 1960-1966, curator, 1966-1972, curator of photographic history, 1972- , and David E. Haberstich, assistant curator, 1970-1976.
Topic:
Museum curators  Search this
Museum exhibits  Search this
Photography -- History  Search this
Graphic arts  Search this
Genre/Form:
Manuscripts
Brochures
Black-and-white photographs
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 529, National Museum of American History. Division of Photographic History, Records
Identifier:
Record Unit 529
See more items in:
Records
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-faru0529

Correspondence

Creator::
National Museum of American History. Division of Photographic History  Search this
Extent:
2 cu. ft. (2 record storage boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Clippings
Manuscripts
Black-and-white photographs
Date:
circa 1985-1989
Descriptive Entry:
This accession consists of correspondence between the Division of Photographic History curatorial staff and outside museums, college professors, professional/amateur photographers, publishers, and photographic equipment manufacturers. Most of the correspondence refers to famous photographers, collections of the Division, pioneers of photographic science and technology, the National Museum of American History Hall of Photography, and early photographic processes (such as daguerreotypes). Correspondents include Eugene Ostroff, Curator, 1969- ; Peter Liebhold, Photo Specialist, 1985-1989; and Museum Technicians Sandra A. Babbidge, Michelle Anne Delaney, Mary K. Grassick, and Lynn J. Novick. Materials also include photographs and slides.
Topic:
Photography -- History  Search this
Museum curators  Search this
Genre/Form:
Clippings
Manuscripts
Black-and-white photographs
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Accession 94-050, National Museum of American History. Division of Photographic History, Correspondence
Identifier:
Accession 94-050
See more items in:
Correspondence
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-fa94-050

Divisional Records

Creator::
National Museum of American History. Division of Medical Sciences  Search this
Extent:
2.5 cu. ft. (2 record storage boxes) (1 document box)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Illustrations
Manuscripts
Clippings
Black-and-white photographs
Color photographs
Color negatives
Date:
1957-1986
Descriptive Entry:
These records consist of curatorial correspondence and memoranda pertaining to exhibition planning, acquisitions, curatorial research, and collections management. In addition there are minutes of meetings with organizations including the American Association of Health and Medical Museums, as well as the American Academy of the History of Dentistry; proposals, scripts, photographs, and other related information pertaining to the exhibitions Pain and Its Relief and Women in Science in 19th-century America; Audrey B. Davis research files; letters of inquiry from medical academies, government agencies, private collectors, and universities; illustrations of medical specimens; symposium and sponsored lecture files; travel reports; and information on early medical practice.
Topic:
Museum exhibits  Search this
Medical museums  Search this
Genre/Form:
Illustrations
Manuscripts
Clippings
Black-and-white photographs
Color photographs
Color negatives
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 471, National Museum of American History. Division of Medical Sciences, Divisional Records
Identifier:
Record Unit 471
See more items in:
Divisional Records
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-faru0471

Curatorial Records

Creator::
National Museum of American History. Division of Physical Sciences and Mathematics  Search this
Extent:
12 cu. ft. (24 document boxes) (oversize materials)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Floor plans
Illustrations
Manuscripts
Black-and-white photographs
Date:
1956-1988 and undated
Descriptive Entry:
These records include administrative files of the Division of Mathematics and its predecessors; Merzbach correspondence with computer industries, university professors, and pioneers or experts in the field of computing science; exhibition scripts, research material, and blueprints for the Hall of Mathematics; Computer History Project research files, correspondence, floor plans, and budgetary information; and photographs of exhibitions, artifacts, and Division staff.
Historical Note:
In 1965, a Section of Mathematics and Antique Instruments was created in the Division of Physical Sciences under Uta C. Merzbach, associate curator. The Section was renamed the Section of Mathematics in 1968, and Merzbach reported to Silvio A. Bedini, assistant director for the Museum. In 1970 the Section of Mathematics became part of the Division of Electricity and Nuclear Energy. Merzbach became involved in the Computer History Project (CHP), which included Henry S. Tropp as principal investigator. CHP was a joint research effort between the Smithsonian Institution and the American Federation of Information Processing Societies (AFIPS) to gather information on the development of computer technology. The project closed in 1974.

From 1974 to 1977, the Section of Mathematics reported to the chairman of the Department of Science and Technology. In 1978 it became the Division of Mathematics in the Department of History of Science; and in 1987, it merged with the Division of Physical Sciences to form the Division of Physical Sciences and Mathematics.

The Division of Mathematics and its predecessors were concerned with the history of mathematical calculating instruments, both domestic and foreign, dating back to the eighteenth century. The Division prepared exhibitions for the Hall of Mathematics and collected artifacts such as planimeters, slide rules, mechanical calculators, digital electronic computers, and astrolabes. Curators and staff of the Division and its predecessors included Robert P. Multhauf, curator of Physical Sciences and Measurement, 1955-1957, curator of Physical Sciences, 1957-1964; Uta C. Merzbach, associate curator of Physical Sciences, 1964, associate curator of Mathematics and Antique Instruments, 1965-1968, associate curator of Mathematics, 1968-1970, Curator of Mathematics, 1970-1988; and Henry S. Tropp, principal investigator of the Computer History Project, 1971-1974.
Oversize:
This collection contains oversize material.
Topic:
Museum curators  Search this
Mathematics -- History  Search this
Physical sciences -- History  Search this
Genre/Form:
Floor plans
Illustrations
Manuscripts
Black-and-white photographs
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 332, National Museum of American History. Division of Physical Sciences and Mathematics, Curatorial Records
Identifier:
Record Unit 332
See more items in:
Curatorial Records
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-faru0332

Exhibition Records

Creator::
National Museum of American History. Division of Information Technology and Society  Search this
Extent:
0.25 cu. ft. (1 half document box)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Manuscripts
Drawings
Black-and-white photographs
Color photographs
Date:
1960-1995
Descriptive Entry:
This accession consists of the exhibition records of Paul Forman, curator of modern physics, which document proposals, planning, and object research for exhibitions and displays. Earlier records date from when Forman was in the Division of Electricity and Nuclear Energy, and, prior to his arrival at the Smithsonian Institution, when that Division was known as the Division of Physical Sciences at the Museum of History and Technology. In addition to Forman's records is the correspondence of Lester Clark Lewis, curator, pertaining to the exhibition 35 Years With Electrons as Waves, which opened at the Arts and Industries Building in December 1962. Materials include correspondence, notes, scripts, photographs, drawings, and supporting documentation.
Topic:
Museums -- Educational aspects  Search this
Science -- History  Search this
Museum curators  Search this
Museum exhibits  Search this
Genre/Form:
Manuscripts
Drawings
Black-and-white photographs
Color photographs
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Accession 12-600, National Museum of American History. Division of Information Technology and Society, Exhibition Records
Identifier:
Accession 12-600
See more items in:
Exhibition Records
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-fa12-600

Exhibition Records

Creator::
National Museum of American History. Division of Information Technology and Society  Search this
Extent:
0.5 cu. ft. (1 document box)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Manuscripts
Floor plans
Date:
1975-1997
Descriptive Entry:
This accession consists of the records of Paul Forman, curator of modern physics, which document his participation in exhibition planning at the National Museum of American History, as well as his work on exhibition publications and object research. Earlier records date from when Forman was in the Division of Electricity and Nuclear Energy and the Division of Electricity and Modern Physics, respectively. Documented are the following exhibitions: Science in American Life, Atomic Clocks, and Einstein: A Centenary Exhibition. Materials include correspondence, memoranda, and notes; scripts; label texts; object lists; and floor plans.
Topic:
Museums -- Educational aspects  Search this
Science -- History  Search this
Museum curators  Search this
Museum exhibits  Search this
Genre/Form:
Manuscripts
Floor plans
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Accession 13-026, National Museum of American History. Division of Information Technology and Society, Exhibition Records
Identifier:
Accession 13-026
See more items in:
Exhibition Records
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-fa13-026

Videohistory Records

Creator::
National Museum of American History. Division of Medical Sciences  Search this
Extent:
3.5 cu. ft. (3 record storage boxes) (1 document box)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Manuscripts
Clippings
Floppy disks
Posters
Color photographs
Black-and-white photographs
Color negatives
Black-and-white negatives
Color transparencies
Videotapes
Audiotapes
Electronic records
Date:
1969-2000
Descriptive Entry:
This accession consists of records created and maintained by Ray Kondratas, Curator, Division of Medical Sciences, in his work researching and conducting interviews for the Smithsonian Videohistory Program. The videohistories produced by Kondratas covered such topics as DNA sequencing; Acuson ultrasound machines; fluorescence activated cell sorting instrumentation; the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique; diagnostic imaging technology; and the project to sequence the smallpox virus genome. Also included is an interview with Vsevold Kuravcev, regarding his work in nuclear magnetic resonance. Materials include correspondence; memoranda; reports; research notes; biography files; proposals; transcripts; audio and video recordings; images; brochures; posters; and clippings. Some materials are in electronic format.
Topic:
Nucleotide sequence  Search this
DNA  Search this
Ultrasonic imaging  Search this
Flow cytometry  Search this
Polymerase chain reaction  Search this
Diagnostic imaging  Search this
Smallpox  Search this
Nuclear magnetic resonance  Search this
Scientists -- Interviews  Search this
Medicine -- History  Search this
Science -- History  Search this
Genre/Form:
Manuscripts
Clippings
Floppy disks
Posters
Color photographs
Black-and-white photographs
Color negatives
Black-and-white negatives
Color transparencies
Videotapes
Audiotapes
Electronic records
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Accession 11-046, National Museum of American History. Division of Medical Sciences, Videohistory Records
Identifier:
Accession 11-046
See more items in:
Videohistory Records
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-fa11-046

Curatorial Records

Creator::
National Museum of American History. Division of Medicine and Science  Search this
Extent:
15 cu. ft. (15 record storage boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Manuscripts
Clippings
Floor plans
Color photographs
Black-and-white photographs
Audiotapes
Date:
1962-2011
Descriptive Entry:
This accession consists of the records of Paul Forman, Curator of modern physics, which document his curatorial and professional activities in the Division of Medicine and Science, and during the years when modern physics was part of the Division of Electricity and Nuclear Energy, the Division of Electricity and Modern Physics, and the Division of Information Technology and Society. Also includes some records which date prior to Forman's tenure at the Smithsonian Institution. Materials include correspondence, memoranda, and notes; Forman's lecture papers, articles, and book reviews; proposals; collections management information; photographs; professional society information in regard to grants, committees, and symposiums; newspaper clippings; fellowship and workshop information; floor plans; audio cassettes; and meeting agendas.
Topic:
Museums -- Collection management  Search this
Physics -- History  Search this
Museum curators  Search this
Genre/Form:
Manuscripts
Clippings
Floor plans
Color photographs
Black-and-white photographs
Audiotapes
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Accession 12-384, National Museum of American History. Division of Medicine and Science, Curatorial Records
Identifier:
Accession 12-384
See more items in:
Curatorial Records
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-fa12-384

Robert Moody Laughlin papers

Creator:
Laughlin, Robert M.  Search this
Extent:
39 videocassettes (vhs)
1 videocassettes (betamax)
20 cd-rs
6 electronic discs (dvd)
65.09 Linear feet
50 floppy discs
147 sound recordings
Culture:
Tzotzil  Search this
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Videocassettes (vhs)
Videocassettes (betamax)
Cd-rs
Electronic discs (dvd)
Floppy discs
Sound recordings
Transcripts
Audiotapes
Paper tapes
Photographs
Vocabulary
Manuscripts
Date:
1899-2016, bulk 1954-2016
Summary:
Robert Moody Laughlin is an American ethnologist specializing in the study of Mayan language, history, customs, and folklore. He spent the majority of his career working for the Smithsonian Institution, first with the Bureau of American Ethnology, then with the Department of Anthropology. He has been a curator emeritus with the department since his retirement in 2006.

The Robert Moody Laughlin papers (1899-2016, bulk 1954-2016) document his research and professional activities and primarily deal with language and folktales he recorded and studied, as well as the culture and history of the Tzotzil and other Mayan groups in the Chiapas region. His involvement in language education and training, advocacy for the Tzotzil and language and cultural revitalization, and administrative matters at the Smithsonian are also represented. The collection consists of materials created for books and other publications, field notes, research materials, correspondence, administrative files, sound recordings, video recordings, photographs, and electronic records.
Scope and Contents:
The Robert Moody Laughlin papers (1899-2016, bulk 1954-2016) document his research and professional activities and primarily deal with language and folktales he recorded and studied, as well as the culture and history of the Tzotzil and other Mayan groups in the Chiapas region. His involvement in language education and training, advocacy for the Tzotzil and language and cultural revitalization, and administrative matters at the Smithsonian are also represented. The collection consists of materials created for books and other publications, field notes, research materials, correspondence, administrative files, sound recordings, video recordings, photographs, and electronic records.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged in 14 series: Series 1. Tzotzil Dictionaries, 1963-1988, undated; Series 2. Of Wonders Wild and New, 1963-1976; Series 3. Of Cabbages and Kings, 1960-1977; Series 4. Of Shoes and Ships and Sealing Wax, 1963-1980; Series 5. Other Writings by Laughlin, 1956-2006; Series 6. Writings by Others, 1954-2002; Series 7. Biographical Files, 1906-2003; Series 8. Correspondence, 1899-1900, 1948-2002; Series 9. Research and Field Notes, 1954-1993; Series 10. Sna Jtz'ibajom, 1983-2016; Series 11. Administrative Files, 1961-2014; Series 12. Sound Recordings, circa 1960-2004; Series 13. Video Recordings, 1985-2002, undated; Series 14. Photographic Material, 1985-circa 2007, undated; Series 15. Electronic Files, 1985-circa 2004.
Biographical / Historical:
Robert Moody Laughlin (also known as Lol Bik'it Nab in Tzotzil) is an ethnologist in the Smithsonian Department of Anthropology specializing in modern and colonial Tzotzil lexicography as well as Tzotzil oral history, worldview, dreams, prayers, ethnobotany, and history. As a pioneer in advocacy anthropology, Laughlin spent the majority of his career working to support the Chiapas Mayas through his publications, research, and other professional efforts. Among his most notable contributions to local and global understandings of the Chiapas Mayas and the Tzotzil language are his publication of The Great Tzotzil Dictionary of San Lorenzo Zinacantan (1975) and his work in founding Sna Jtz'ibajom, a writers collective based in San Cristobal de las Casas, Chiapas, Mexico.

Laughlin was born in 1934 in Princeton, New Jersey and graduated from Princeton University with a Bachelors degree in English in 1956. He first visited the Chiapas area of Mexico in 1957 as a graduate student at the Escuela Nacional de Antropologia e Historia in Mexico City. He then transferred to Harvard University and began studying under cultural anthropologist Evon Vogt who had recently started the Harvard Chiapas Project. Laughlin completed his field work in Zinacantan, where he learned to speak Tzotzil. After receiving his Ph. D. in anthropology from Harvard in 1963, he collected myths and folk tales in Zinacantan as an ethnologist for the Smithsonian's Bureau of American Ethnology. During regular trips to the field in Chiapas, Mexico, he also worked to compile a dictionary of Tzotzil words. After fourteen years of work, The Great Tzotzil Dictionary of San Lorenzo Zinacantan was published in 1975.

After his dictionary was published, Laughlin returned to the study of folk tales and culture in Tzotzil and other Mayan cultural groups in Central America. He published several books on stories, dreams, marriage and other customs, ethnobotany, and history of the Tzotzil peoples. Laughlin's efforts at revitalizing the Tzotzil language and promoting the area's culture sparked significant Tzotzil interest in their own language and history, but illiteracy was still a major barrier to cultural revitalization. In 1983, Laughlin helped found Sna Jtz'ibajom (House of the Writer), a writers cooperative that took writings about Tzotzil history, folklore, and customs and translated them into Tzotzil. Sna Jtz'ibajom also created Teatro Lo'il Maxil (Monkey Business Theater), a group that wrote and performed plays related to Mayan folklore and education about social issues such as family planning and alcoholism.

Laughlin received the Premio Chiapas in Science in 2002 and the PEN Gregory Kolovakos Award for the translation of Spanish (including Native American) literature in 2004. He retired in 2006 and is currently a curator emeritus in the Department of Anthropology at the Smithsonian Institution.

1934 -- Born on May 29 in Princeton, New Jersey

1956 -- Received Bachelor's Degree in English from Princeton University

1957 -- First trip to Chiapas area of Mexico in 1957 as a graduate student at the Escuela Nacional de Antropologia e Historia in Mexico City

1959 -- Traveled to Chiapas as a member of the Harvard Chiapas Project

1961 -- Received Masters Degree in Anthropology from Harvard University

1962 -- Hired as an ethnologist by the Bureau of American Ethnology (Smithsonian Institution).

1962-1964 -- Ethnologist, Bureau of American Ethnology, Smithsonian Institution

1963 -- Received a Ph. D. in Anthropology from Harvard University

1964-1969 -- Associate Curator, Smithsonian Office of Anthropology

1969-1973 -- Associate Curator, Smithsonian Department of Anthropology

1973-2006 -- Curator, Smithsonian Department of Anthropology

1983 -- Aided in the foundation of Sna Jtz'ibajom (House of the Writer) in Chiapas.

2006 -- Retired from the Smithsonian Department of Anthropology.
Separated Materials:
Material in Series 13. Video Recordings has been transferred to the National Anthropological Film Collection (NAFC), but is described in the this finding aid.
Provenance:
These papers were donated and transferred to the National Anthropological Archives by Robert M. Laughlin in 1985, 2011, and 2016 under accessions 1974-15, 2011-06, and 2016-16.
Restrictions:
The Robert Moody Laughlin papers are open for research.

Electronic media is currently restricted due to preservation concerns.

Please contact the archives for information on availability of access copies of audiovisual recordings. Original audiovisual material in the National Anthropological Film Collection may not be played.

Access to the Robert Moody Laughlin papers requires an appointment.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Dreams  Search this
Genre/Form:
Transcripts
Audiotapes
Paper tapes
Photographs
Vocabulary
Manuscripts
Citation:
Robert Moody Laughlin papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NAA.2011-06
See more items in:
Robert Moody Laughlin papers
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-2011-06
Additional Online Media:

Exhibition Records

Creator::
National Museum of American History. Division of Information Technology and Society  Search this
Extent:
1 cu. ft. (1 record storage box)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Manuscripts
Clippings
Brochures
Floor plans
Black-and-white photographs
Color photographs
Date:
1976-2003
Descriptive Entry:
This accession consists of the exhibition records of Paul Forman, Curator of modern physics, which document his participation in exhibition planning groups and as co-curator of exhibitions. Earlier records date from when Forman was in the Division of Electricity and Nuclear Energy and the Division of Electricity and Modern Physics, respectively. Documented are the following exhibitions, some of which are proposals: Timeline: A Nation's History; Tunnels; Looking Around: America in the World of Science; The Four Days of August, 1945; and Atom Smashers. Materials include correspondence, memoranda, and notes; proposals; scripts; loan information; photographs; brochures; meeting minutes; floor plans; and supporting documentation.
Topic:
Museums -- Educational aspects  Search this
Science -- History  Search this
Museum curators  Search this
Museum exhibits  Search this
Genre/Form:
Manuscripts
Clippings
Brochures
Floor plans
Black-and-white photographs
Color photographs
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Accession 12-385, National Museum of American History. Division of Information Technology and Society, Exhibition Records
Identifier:
Accession 12-385
See more items in:
Exhibition Records
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-fa12-385

Hands On Science Center Records

Creator::
National Museum of American History. Division of Information Technology and Society  Search this
Extent:
1 cu. ft. (1 record storage box)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Brochures
Manuscripts
Floor plans
Black-and-white negatives
Black-and-white photographs
Black-and-white transparencies
Color negatives
Color photographs
Color transparencies
Date:
1984-2004
Descriptive Entry:
This accession consists of materials which document the creation and activities of the Hands On Science Center (HOSC) located in the National Museum of American History. HOSC was created as a part of the exhibition, Science and American Life which opened on April 27, 1994. The HOSC is a 1,500 square-foot interactive education center meant to serve as a venue for children age 5 and up to explore scientific and social issues through performing experiments. These records primarily document the early history of the HOSC including its mission statement, original activities, and proposal as well as photographs from preview testing of activities and of staff. Materials include correspondence; memoranda; a mission statement; floor plans, fund proposals; brochures; color negatives, photographs, slides, and transparencies; and black-and-white negatives, photographs, slides, and transparencies.
Topic:
Science -- Study and teaching  Search this
Experiments  Search this
Museums -- Educational aspects  Search this
Genre/Form:
Brochures
Manuscripts
Floor plans
Black-and-white negatives
Black-and-white photographs
Black-and-white transparencies
Color negatives
Color photographs
Color transparencies
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Accession 08-026, National Museum of American History. Division of Information Technology and Society, Hands On Science Center Records
Identifier:
Accession 08-026
See more items in:
Hands On Science Center Records
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-fa08-026

Exhibition Records

Creator::
National Museum of American History. Division of Information Technology and Society  Search this
Extent:
16 cu. ft. (16 record storage boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Brochures
Clippings
Manuscripts
Floppy disks
Floor plans
Black-and-white photographs
Color photographs
Black-and-white negatives
Color negatives
Place:
United States -- Social life and customs
Date:
1942-2001
Descriptive Entry:
This accession consists of records which document the planning, development, and installation of Science in American Life, a major permanent exhibition at the National Museum of American History (NMAH). This exhibition demonstrates how science has changed the way Americans have lived over the past 125 years. Opening on April 27, 1994, Science in American Life was 4 years in the making and took the work and collaboration of more than 75 curators, educators, writers, designers and scientific consultants. It occupies 13,000 square feet of exhibition space and includes approximately 600 artifacts, 700 graphics, six video loops, three sound and light displays, six computer interactives, two CD-ROM interactives, 11 mechanical interactives, and a science center featuring 20 hands-on activities.

The exhibition was underwritten by a $5.3 million contribution from the American Chemical Society and was executed under the leadership of Chief Curator, Arthur P. Molella, chair of the Department of the History of Science and Technology. The exhibition begins with an orientation area where people are greeted by 12 host scientists - 10 scientists and two children, represented by life-size photographs and recorded voices - who give a personal, contemporary perspective of the historial materials found in the exhibition. Following this are 6 sections arranged in chronologic order: "Laboratory Science Comes to America, 1876-1920;" "Science for Progress, 1920-1940;" "Mobilizing Science for War, 1940-1960;" "Better Than Nature, 1950-1970;" "Science in the Public Eye, 1970 to the present;" and "Looking Ahead." Developed by Museum Specialist Howard Morrison, "Looking Ahead" focuses on the science of biotechnology and public attitudes about it.

An additional component to the exhibition is the 1,500 square-foot interactive education center known as the "Hands on Science Center." All aspects of the exhibition are documented, including publicity, the anti-science controversy, the glossing over of corporate misdeeds, exhibition design, educational aspects, curriculum development, grant proposals, advisory board meetings, copyrights, audio and video development, feasibility studies, audience surveys, and object acquisition. Subjects and people covered in the exhibition include chemists Ira Remsen and Ellen Henrietta Richards; coal tar and synthetic materials; the Manhattan Project; the first nuclear reactor, Chicago Pile no. 1; the birth control pill; pesticides; DNA; chlorofluorocarbons and atmospheric ozone; the Superconducting Super Collider; genetic engineering; and biotechnology. Materials include correspondence, memoranda, reports, meeting minutes, notes, scripts, contracts, loan agreements, exhibitions proposals, evaluations, budget summaries, design submittals, floor plans, black-and-white photographs and negatives, color photographs and negatives, floppy disks, clippings, and brochures.
Topic:
Nuclear reactors  Search this
Chemists  Search this
Synthetic products  Search this
Coal-tar  Search this
Oral contraceptives  Search this
Pesticides  Search this
DNA  Search this
Chlorofluorocarbons  Search this
Ozone  Search this
Superconducting Super Collider  Search this
Genetic engineering  Search this
Biotechnology  Search this
Museums -- Educational aspects  Search this
Science -- History  Search this
Museum exhibits  Search this
Genre/Form:
Brochures
Clippings
Manuscripts
Floppy disks
Floor plans
Black-and-white photographs
Color photographs
Black-and-white negatives
Color negatives
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Accession 06-276, National Museum of American History. Division of Information Technology and Society, Exhibition Records
Identifier:
Accession 06-276
See more items in:
Exhibition Records
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-fa06-276

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