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George Hubbard Pepper photograph collection

view George Hubbard Pepper photograph collection digital asset: Finding aid
Creator:
Pepper, George H. (George Hubbard), 1873-1924
Extent:
1,292 negatives (photographic)
23 photographic prints (black & white)
Culture:
Santa Ana Pueblo
Puve Pueblo
Hopi Indians
Cochiti Pueblo
Santa Clara Pueblo
Zia Pueblo
Picuris (N.M.)
Ute Indians
Sandia Pueblo (N.M.)
Pojoaque pueblo (N.M.)
Nambe Pueblo
Piegan Indians
Aztecs
San Ildefonso (N.M.)
Tesuque Pueblo
Laguna (N.M.)
Acoma (N.M.)
Navajo Indians
Tarasco Indians
San Juan Pueblo
San Carlos Apache Tribe
Jemez Pueblo
Taos Pueblo
San Felipe Pueblo (N.M.)
Isleta Indians
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Place:
New Mexico
Texas
Zuni (N.M.)
New York
Montana
Arizona
Basin
Illinois
Mexico
Southwest
Guatemala
Ecuador
Utah
Plains
Date:
1895-1918
Summary:
George Hubbard Pepper specialized in the study of cultures of the American Southwest and Ecuador. Tribes which he studied are Acoma, Aztec, Blackfeet, Cochiti, Hopi, Isleta, Jemez, Laguna, Nambe, Navajo, Picuris, Pojuaque, Puye, San Carlos Apache, San Felipe, San Ildefonso, San Juan, Sandia, Santa Ana, Santa Clara, Taos, Tarascan, Tesuque, Ute, Zia, and Zuni. Photographs in the collection are of an excavation in Tottenville, New York, 1895; Pueblo Bonito in Chaco Cañon, New Mexico: Hyde Expedition, 1896-1900; and expeditions to the occupied Pueblos of the Southwest, 1904; Mexico, 1904, 1906; Guatemala; and Ecuador, 1907. There are also photos which complement a study Pepper did of the technique of Navajo weaving, and miscellaneous scenic and personal photos.
Arrangement note:
Collection arranged by item number.
Biographical/Historical note:
George Hubbard Pepper was born on February 2, 1873 in Tottenville, Staten Island, New York. As a young boy he exhibited a strong interest in archaeology and after his graduating from high school followed encouragement from Prof. Fredric W. Putnam to study at the Peabody Museum of Harvard University, where Pepper stayed from 1895-96. In 1896 he was appointed assistant curator of the Department of the Southwest in the American Museum of Natural History in New York City. From 1896 to 1900, Pepper was a member of the Hyde Exploring Expedition, which conducted excavations at Pueblo Bonito in Chaco Canyon, New Mexico. In 1904, he conducted an ethnological survey of the occupied pueblos of the Southwest and at the same time continued his study of the weaving techniques of the Navajo. Pepper also participated in excavations in the yacatas of the Tierra Caliente of Michoacan in Mexico sponsored by George Gustav Heye, and in 1907 he went with Marshall Saville on an expedition to the Province of Manabi in Ecuador, also for Heye. In 1909 Pepper was appointed assistant curator in the Department of American Archaeology at the University Museum of Philadelphia, but after only a year there he joined the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation in New York City, where he stayed until his death. In 1914 he excavated a Munsee cemetery of the historic period near Montague, New Jersey and in the following year he went on the exploration of the Nacoochee mound in the old Cherokee region in Georgia. In 1918 he joined the Hawikku explorations of the Hendricks-Hodge Expedition in New Mexico. Pepper died on May 13, 1924, in New York City. George H. Pepper was a co-founder of the American Anthropological Association, a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and of the American Ethnological Society of New York, a member of the American Folklore Society, and a corresponding member of the Academia Nacional de Historia of Ecuador. A complete bibliography of his works can be found in Indian Notes, v. 1, no. 3, July 1924, pp. 108-110. The George Hubbard Pepper Papers are in the Latin American Library, Tulane University Library, New Orleans, Louisiana.
Provenance:
According to Frederick Dockstader, director of MAI from 1960 to 1975, in a letter dated March 26, 1968, the collection was given to MAI by Pepper. However, the 1965 Annual Report (p. 26) states that the Photographic Department acquired through the donation of Mrs. Jeannette Cameron approximately 500 new negatives pertaining to field work done by her father from 1900-1910; and the 1966 Annual Report (p. 9) states that many papers of Dr. George H. Pepper were acquired through the courtesy of his daughter, Mrs. Jeanette Cameron.
Restrictions:
Access restricted. Researchers should contact the staff of the NMAI Archives for an appointment to access the collection.
Genre/Form:
Negatives
Photographic prints
Identifier:
NMAI.AC.001.034
See more items in:
George Hubbard Pepper photograph collection
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmai-ac-001-034

Frederick Starr negatives and lantern slides

view Frederick Starr negatives and lantern slides digital asset: Finding aid
Creator:
Starr, Frederick, 1859-1933
Photographer:
Lang, Charles B.
Grabic, Louis
Extent:
152 lantern slides
3,344 negatives (photographic)
Culture:
Zoque Indians
San Felipe Pueblo (N.M.)
Mazatec Indians
Zapotec Indians
Mayas
Wampanoag Indians
Salish Indians
Mazahua Indians
San Blas
Ute Indians
Sioux Nation
Mandan Indians
Tzotzil Indians
Taos Pueblo
Tzeltal Indians
Sauk and Fox Nation
Laguna (N.M.)
Triqui
Shuar Indians
Macusi Indians
Choco Indians
Nez Percé Indians
Ottawa Indians
Chol Indians
Totonac Indians
Osage Indians
Pawnee Indians
Tonkawa Indians
Otomi Indians
Chontal Indians
Navajo Indians
Tlingit Indians
Mixe Indians
Chinantec Indians
Mixtec Indians
Potawatomi Indians
Chibcha Indians
Pima Indians
Mehinacu Indians
Flathead Indians
Apache Indians
Cheyenne Indians
Ponca Indians
Menomini Indian Tribe
Cahuilla Indians
Hopi Indians
Haida Indians
Caraja Indians
Cherokee Indians
Cuna Indians
Arikara Indians
Cuicatec Indians
Eskimos
Assiniboine Indians
Crow Indians
Caddo Indians
Tepehua Indians
Kwakiutl Indians
Cochiti Pueblo
Acoma (N.M.)
Teotihuacan
Isleta Indians
Tarasco Indians
Arapaho Indians
Iroquois Indians
Iowa Indians
Ojibwa Indians
Huave Indians
Zuni Indians
Huastec Indians
Tlaxcala
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Place:
Colombia
Washington
West Virginia
Kentucky
Kansas
New Mexico
Brazil
Ecuador
Missouri
Wisconsin
Oklahoma
Ohio
New York
Georgia
Mexico
Iowa
Arkansas
Illinois
Pennsylvania
Alaska
Date:
1894-1910
Summary:
The collection includes materials from cultures in the United States, Mexico, Brazil, Guatemala, Colombia, Ecuador, and Guiana: Acoma Pueblo, Apache, Arapaho, Arikara, Assiniboine, Caddo, Cahuilla, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chinantec, Chippewa (Ojibwa), Choco, Chol, Chontal, Cochiti Pueblo, Crow, Cuicatec, Eskimo, Flathead, Haida, Hopi, Huastec, Huave, Iowa, Iroquois, Isleta, Karaja, Kwakiutl, Laguna Pueblo, Macusi, Mandan, Maya, Mazahua, Mazatec, Mehinaku, Menomini, Mixe, Mixtec, Navajo, Nez Perce, Osage, Otomi, Ottawa, Pawnee, Pima, Ponca, Potawatomi, Salish, San Blas, San Felipe Pueblo, Sauk & Fox, Shuar, Sioux, Taos Pueblo, Tarasco, Teotihuacan, Tepehua, Tlaxcala, Tlingit, Tonkawa, Totonac, Triqui, Tzental, Tzotzil, Ute, Wampanoag, Zapotec, Zoque, Zuni.
Arrangement note:
Collection arranged by item number.
Biographical/Historical note:
Frederick Starr was born in Auburn, New York, on September 2, 1858. He received a Ph.D. in biology in 1884 at Coe College, where he was later appointed professor of biology. Starr did postgraduate work in anthropology at Yale. In 1889 he was appointed head of Ethnology at the American Museum of Natural History, and in 1892 he was chosen by William Harper to organize the Anthropology Department at the new University of Chicago. Starr remained at the University until his retirement in 1923. Besides his field studies with various Indian tribes in the United States, Starr traveled to Mexico, Brazil, Colombia, Guatemala, Ecuador, Guiana, Japan, the Philippines, and Africa. He died in Tokyo, Japan, on August 14, 1933. Starr was the author of several books and scholarly articles.
General note:
Starr hired professional photographers Charles B. Lang and Louis Grabic to accompany him on his field trips. One lantern slide of Moses Ladd (Menomini) was taken by William H. Jackson.
Provenance:
Dr. Frederick Starr, Purchased, circa 1929
Restrictions:
Access restricted. Researchers should contact the staff of the NMAI Archives for an appointment to access the collection.
Topic:
Indians of South America -- Brazil
Indians of Mexico
Indians of North America -- Southwest
Indians of South America -- Colombia
Indians of North America -- Alaska
Indians of North America -- Basin
Indians of North America -- Plains
Indians of North America -- Southeast
Indians of North America -- Plateau
Indians of Central America -- Guatemala
Indians of North America -- Northwest
Indians of North America -- Northeast
Indians of North America -- Midwest
Indians of South America -- Ecuador
Indians of South America -- Guiana
Genre/Form:
Negatives
Lantern slides
Identifier:
NMAI.AC.052
See more items in:
Frederick Starr negatives and lantern slides
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmai-ac-052

Fred Harvey Company collection of Carl Moon Southwest photographs

view Fred Harvey Company collection of Carl Moon Southwest photographs digital asset: Finding aid
Photographer:
Moon, Carl, 1878-1948
Publisher:
Fred Harvey (Firm)
Extent:
434 photographs
Container:
Box 1-15
Culture:
Havasupai (Coconino)
Hopi Pueblo
A:shiwi (Zuni)
Acoma Pueblo
Diné (Navajo)
Tesuque Pueblo
San Felipe Pueblo (N.M.)
White Mountain Apache
Isleta Pueblo
Hopi -- Shipaulovi
Kewa (Santo Domingo Pueblo)
K'apovi (Santa Clara Pueblo)
Ohkay Owingeh (San Juan Pueblo)
Laguna Pueblo
Taos Pueblo
San Ildefonso Pueblo
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Place:
Arizona
New Mexico
Date:
1907-1914
Summary:
This collection contains photographs that were commissioned by Fred Harvey Co. and shot by Carl Moon circa 1907-1914. The photographs depict American Indian communities in the southwest including A:shiwi (Zuni), Acoma Pueblo, Diné (Navajo), Hopi, Laguna Pueblo, and Taos Pueblo among many others.
Scope and Contents:
This collection contains 203 glass transparencies, 2 nitrate negatives, and 1 autochrome (plus 228 copy negatives and copy transparencies) that were commissioned by Fred Harvey Co. and shot by Carl moon circa 1905-1914. The photographs depict the southwest American Indian communities of A:shiwi (Zuni), Acoma Pueblo, Dine (Navajo), Havasupai (Coconino), Hopi Pueblo, Isleta Pueblo, K'apovi (Santa Clara Pueblo), Kewa (Santo Domingo Pueblo), Laguna Pueblo, Nambe Pueblo, Ohkay Owingeh (San Juan Pueblo), San Felipe Pueblo, San Ildefonso Pueblo, Taos Pueblo, Tesuque Pueblo, and White Mountain Apache. Some images were also shot in Grand Canyon National Park in Arizona. The photographs are a mix of portraits, posed action shots, and architecture shots. Some of the photographs appear to have been staged by the photographer. There are a few photographs in this collection that may have been shot by Moon prior to his employment with the Fred Harvey Company.

The copy negatives and transparencies were created by the Museum of the American Indian (NMAI's predecessor museum). There are sometimes multiple copy negatives and copy transparencies per glass plate transparency.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged into 17 series by culture group or location. Series 1: A:shiwi (Zuni), Series 2: Acoma Pueblo, Series 3: Diné (Navajo), Series 4: Havasupai (Coconino), Series 5: Hopi, Series 6: Isleta Pueblo, Series 7: K'apovi (Santa Clara Pueblo), Series 8: Kewa (Santa Domingo Pueblo), Series 9: Laguna Pueblo, Series 10: Nambe Pueblo, Series 11: Ohkay Owingeh (San Juan Pueblo), Series 12: San Felipe Pueblo, Series 13: San Ildefonso Pueblo, Series 14: Taos Pueblo, Series 15: Tesuque Pueblo, Series 16: White Mountain Apache, Series 17: Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona

The collection is physically arranged first by collection type (transparencies and negatives) and then in photo numeric order.
Biographical / Historical:
Born in 1878 in Wilmington, Ohio, Carl E. Moon (originally spelled Karl) took up photography after serving with the Ohio National Guard. He moved to Albuquerque, N.M. in 1903 and opened a photograph studio where he began photographing American Indians in the U.S. southwest region. After publishing and exhibiting many of his photographs nationally, he was commissioned by the Fred Harvey Company in 1907 to take photographs of American Indian communities in the southwest. The Fred Harvey Company was founded by Frederick Henry Harvey and consisted of a chain of successful gift shops, restaurants, and hotels know as Harvey Houses. Moon photographed individuals in his El Tovar Studio in the Grand Canyon, Ariz. and also traveled to communities in the region including A:shiwi (Zuni), Diné (Navajo), Hopi, and Laguna Pueblo, among many others. The Fred Harvey Company used these photographs in their postcards, brochures, and publications for the tourist industry. The Fred Harvey Company also partnered with the Sante Fe Railroad to help generate tourism to the southwest region and Moon became the official photographer for the railroad. Moon also took up drawing and painting and studied with American painter Thomas Moran. Moon stayed with the Fred Harvey Company until 1914.

After Moon left the Fred Harvey Company, he opened a studio in Pasadena, California and continued his career as a photographer and painter. During this period, Moon painted and donated 26 works depicting Southwest American Indians to the Smithsonian Institution (now in the Smithsonian American Art Museum's collection). He also sold 24 oil paintings and 293 photographic prints to Henry E. Huntington that are now part of the Huntington Library in San Marino California. With his wife Grace Purdie Moon, he also produced and illustrated children's books of collected Native American stories and legends. Moon died in San Francisco, Calif. in 1948.
Related Materials:
The Huntington Library in San Marino California holds a large collection of Carl Moon works, including oil paintings and photographic prints. The University of Arizona Libraries, Special Collections also holds photographs shot by Carl Moon and the Smithsonian American Art Museum holds 26 Carl Moon paintings.
Separated Materials:
Two nitrate negatives are stored at an offsite storage facility.
Provenance:
Donated to the Museum of the American Indian by the Fred Harvey Company in 1963.
Restrictions:
Access to NMAI Archive Center collections is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment (phone: 301-238-1400, email: nmaiarchives@si.edu).
Rights:
Single photocopies may be made for research purposes. Permission to publish or broadcast materials from the collection must be requested from National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center. Please submit a written request to nmaiarchives@si.edu.
Some images restricted: Cultural Sensitivity.
Topic:
Indians of North America -- Arizona
Indians of North America -- New Mexico
Citation:
Identification of specific item; Date (if known); Fred Harvey Company collection of Carl Moon Southwest photographs, Box and Photo Number; National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NMAI.AC.090
See more items in:
Fred Harvey Company collection of Carl Moon Southwest photographs
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmai-ac-090

The pueblo of San Felipe

Author:
White, Leslie A. 1900-1975
Subject:
American Anthropological Association Memoirs
Physical description:
69 pages, 3 leaves of plates : illustrations ; 24 cm
Type:
Books
No. 38
Place:
San Felipe Pueblo (N.M.)
Date:
1974
1932
Notes:
Reprint of the 1932 edition.
Topic:
Pueblos
Social life and customs
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_1031419

The pueblo of San Felipe / by Leslie A. White

Author:
White, Leslie A. 1900-1975
Physical description:
69 p., 3 pl. on 2 leaves : ill. (incl. plans ; 26 cm
Type:
Books
Place:
New Mexico
San Felipe Pueblo (N.M.)
Date:
1932
Notes:
Cover title.
Topic:
Social life and customs
Pueblos
Call number:
F804.S15 W45 1932
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_922391

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