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South American trip, 1939

Collection name:
William M. Mann and Lucile Quarry Mann field books, 1914-1940
Physical Description:
1 folder
Physical Location:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
Sublocation:
Box 24
Record type:
Fieldbook record
Object Type:
Field notes
Scrapbooks
Place:
Brazil
Argentina
Rio de Janeiro
Córdoba
Buenos Aires
La Plata
Nahuel Huapí, lago
Date Range:
1939
Start Date:
19390400
End Date:
19391212
Topic:
Zoos  Search this
Zoology  Search this
Wild animal collecting  Search this
Accession #:
SIA RU007293
Access Information:
Many of SIA's holdings are located off-site, and advance notice is recommended to consult a collection. Please email the SIA Reference Team at osiaref@si.edu.
See more records from this collection:
William M. Mann and Lucile Quarry Mann field books, 1914-1940
See more records associated with this person:
Mann, Lucile Quarry, 1897-1986
Mann, William M., 1886-1960
Shippen, William H.
Data Source:
Smithsonian Field Book Project
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:fbr_item_MODSI75
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Additional Online Media:

Erie Railroad Collection

Creator:
Erie Railroad Company  Search this
Olevsky, Walter  Search this
Donor:
ConRail  Search this
ConRail  Search this
Collector:
Mechanical and Civil Engineering, Division of [former name], NMAH, SI.  Search this
Work and Industry, Division of, NMAH, SI  Search this
Mechanical and Civil Engineering, Division of [former name], NMAH, SI.  Search this
Work and Industry, Division of, NMAH, SI  Search this
Extent:
57 Cubic feet (59 boxes, 97 map-folders)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Blueprints
Mechanical drawings
Tracings
Glass negatives
Photographs
Drawings
Date:
circa 1880-1980
Scope and Contents:
Collection consists of six hundred sixty-eight (668) glass negatives relating to the Erie Railroad. Subjects include stations, train cars, railroad employees, employees' recreational activities, ferries, construction, street scenes, and resort hotels; drawings of structures built by the various railroads which, at the time of the donation, constituted the Consolidated Rail Corporation. Included are linen tracings, blueprints, and mechanical copies; and two cubic feet of photoprints made from negatives in the Erie Railroad Collection.
Arrangement:
The collection is divided into seven series. Series 1: Photographs

Series 2: Glass Plate Negatives Series 3: Lists Series 4: Subject Files Series 5: Specifications for Bridges, Buildings and Terminals Series 6: Drawings Series 7: Bridge Notebooks
Biographical / Historical:
The Erie Railroad was founded in 1832 by large group of investors from the Southern Tier Counties of New York. Among these investors, businessman Eleazar Lord had been among the originators and later became the first president of the company. The railroad's construction took place from 1832 to 1851 with a seven-year pause between 1842 and 1849.

At the time of its completion, the Erie Railroad was the largest railway system in the United States, both in length, 446 miles, and in gauge, six feet. Thanks to its tracks span from New Jersey to Illinois and itsabove-average gauge, it could transport larger cargo.

Throughout its history the company underwent numerous bankruptcies and merged with several companies. The first merger was in 1960 with the Delaware, Lackawanna and Western Railroad creating the Erie Lackawanna Railroad. The second was in 1976 when the once-again bankrupt company merged with five other lines to create Conrail.

Source

Allegany County Historical Society, Andover, New York

https://www.alleganyhistory.org/culture/transportation/railroads/erie-railroad/1060-the-erie-railroad (Last accessed on Decemeber 3, 2019)
Provenance:
Originally collected by the National Museum of American History's Division of Mechanical and Civil Engineering's reference collection.

In 1978, 668 glass plate negatives documenting Erie railroad stations were purchaed from Walter Olevsky; in 1987 drawings of structures built by the various railroads which, at the time of the donation, constituted the Consolidated Rail Corporation were donated; and in 2007, two cubic feet of photoprints and nine cubic feet of archival records were transferred from the Division of Work and Industry to the Archives Center.
Restrictions:
Unrestricted research access on site by appointment. Unprotected photographs must be handled with gloves.
Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
Railroads -- Buildings and structures  Search this
Railroads -- Employees  Search this
Railroads -- Rolling-stock  Search this
Railroad tracksdrawings  Search this
Railroad stations -- United States  Search this
Railroads -- 20th century  Search this
Railroads -- 19th century  Search this
Genre/Form:
Blueprints
Mechanical drawings
Tracings
Glass negatives
Photographs -- 19th century
Photographs -- 20th century
Drawings
Citation:
Erie Railroad Collection, Archives Center, National Museum of American History.
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.1082
See more items in:
Erie Railroad Collection
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmah-ac-1082

Haskell and Barker Car Company Photographic Negatives

Creator:
Haskell & Barker Car Company  Search this
Extent:
13.5 Cubic feet (47 boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
undated
1926-1957
Summary:
A collection of photograpic negatives from the Haskell and Barker Car Company, manufacturers of railroad cars, of Michigan City, Indiana.
Scope and Contents:
An extensive and detailed guide to this collection was produced by John N. Stine of the Division of Transportation, National Museum of American History in 1991 and typed by Mary E. Braunagel, published by the Smithsonian Institution. The guide gives the negative number and a brief description or caption to each negative. The negatives are film and not glass plate. The collection was also scanned to video disc. The following quotes are from the Division of Transportation guide.

"A collection of photographs documenting the Haskell and Barker Car Company's activities from 1926 to 1957. The gaps between negative numbers assigned by Haskell and Barker indicate that a portion were either discarded by the photographer or removed from the file and not replaced. Although the car building operation at Michigan City, Indiana began in 1852, the photos listed in this catalogue represent the complete holdings of the Division of Transportation", and these represent the complete holdings transferred to the Archives Center.

"A great deal of attention has been directed at the operation of the plant. Shop scenes recording special tooling, testing of car components and the construction or upgrading of the car building plant are plentiful. In some instances a car is photographed during each step of construction, others only after completion. Occasionally a car was returned to the plant for a rebuild either due to its becoming obsolete or due to major damage. In any case, these repairs are well documented."

"Scenes showing shop personnnel operating car building equipment or engaged in the assembly of rolling stock are abundant."

"This is a very fine collection in that it deviates from the standard practice of recording finished cars and concentrates on the daily operation of the building plant. Except for some World War II troop sleeper views, all of the pictures are of railroad freight stock: box, hopper, refrigerator, tank, flat, and cabooses."

"The photos themselves range in quality from fair to excellent." From the Division of Transportation guide to the Haskell and Barker Car Company, Michigan City, Indiana, Photographic Collection, 1991. Copies of this guide are available in the Archives Center reading room and at the National Museum of American History library.
Arrangement:
This collection is arranged in one series. The photographic negatives are arranged by negative number assigned by Smithsonian Photographic Services within broad chronological order.

Series 1: Photographic Negatives, 1926-1957, undated
Biographical / Historical:
In 1852, the wagon and freight car firm of Sherman, Haskell, Aldridge & Company was founded in Michigan City, Indiana on the shores of Lake Michigan. The founders of the company were Dr. Mason C. Sherman, Frederick Haskell (1810-1890), and Hiram Aldridge, Haskell's brother-in-law. The three reportedly had moved to Michigan City from Ogdensburg, New York. Sherman left the firm in 1855 and sold his interest to John Barker (1818-1878). Barker, a merchant and grain broker, had originally come from Andover, Massachusetts to Michigan City in 1835. The firm's name was changed to Haskell, Barker & Aldridge. In addition to rail cars the firm produced Woodbury corn shelling threshing machines and J.J. Mann reapers. Upon Aldrige's retirment in 1858 the firm became known simply as Haskell & Barker. In 1871 the firm was incorporated as the Haskell & Barker Car Company. Haskell became president, Barker treasurer, and Nathaniel P. Rogers secretary. Rogers had joined the firm in 1864 as an accountant. John Barker retired in 1869, and his son John H. Barker joined the firm. Haskell retired in 1883, and John H. Barker became president with Rogers as secretary and treasurer. John H. Barker and Rogers ran the company until Rogers' death in 1906.

Haskell & Barker initially manufactured passenger and wood-structure freight rail cars. By the late 1850s they had ceased manufacture of passenger cars and devoted themselves strictly to freight cars. The American Civil War brought a surge in business because of government contracts. This increase in business not only grew the company but made it one of the largest employers in Indiana and one of the wealthiest.

The company at one time produced 15,000 cars a year and in 1907 was the largest factory complex in Indiana, covering fifty-one acres along Eighth and Wabash Streets. In 1907 there were 990,000 feet of factory space. The south yards consisted of 1,308,344 square feet on 109 acres. In 1913, Haskell & Barker suffered a massive fire at the south yards. In 1916 it became know as Haskell & Barker, Inc. After 1922 it was a subsidiary of the Pullman Car Company and in 1934 became known as the Haskell & Barker Shops of Pullman-Standard. It returned to manufacturing passenger cars briefly during World War II.

The factory is said to have been the birthplace of the modern assembly line, an innovation often credited to Henry Ford. The factory also produced the PS-1, the first standardized box car on American railroads. As the company entered the late 20th century, production shifted to other locations and the company announced the closing of the facility in December of 1970. At that time the workforce numbered seventy with over 1,000 workers having been laid off. The physical plant suffered a massive fire in July 1973 which totally destroyed the entire complex. Only two buildings survived, the original Haskell & Barker office built in 1914 and the machine shop next door. A warehouse on the north side of the complex also escaped the fire but was later razed.

The site of the Haskell & Barker factory site was made into an outlet shopping mall named Lighthouse Place, with the Pullman Cafe in the surviving Pullman buildings. The shopping center, renamed Prime Outlets by 2007, was at the time Michigan City's biggest attraction with over 3 million visitors.

Frederick Haskell was born in East Windsor, Connecticut in 1810, the son of Eli B. Haskell (1778-1861) and Sophia Bissell (1785-1816). He married Caroline E. Aldridge (1822-1900) on November 11, 1852 in Chazy, Clinton County, New York. Haskell was a dry goods merchant, as well as a miller and textile manufacturer before moving to Michigan City and becoming involved with Haskell & Barker. He and Caroline adopted a son, Frederick Tudor Haskell (1854-1935). Haskell retired in 1883 and sold his interests in the company. He died on May 6, 1890 in Chicago, Illinois and was buried in Odgensburg Cemetery, Ogdensburg, New York. His estate was valued at $1,635,000 and was left to his wife, various relations, and his adopted son.

John Barker married Cordelia Collamer (1818-1894) and the couple had at least two children, Anna and a son, John Henry Barker (1844-1910). John H. joined the company in 1869 upon the retirement of his father. John H. had been successfully engaged in the wholesale grocery business in Chicago and later in Springfield, Illinois prior to his return to Michigan City. John H. became the General Manger of the company, and in 1883 he became President. By 1910 he was worth an estimated fifty to sixty million dollars. The company became prosperous enough that John H. built a substantial mansion on Washington Street in Michigan City in 1905. This mansion was later listed on the National Register of Historic Places. John Barker was also president of the Harbor Company and played an instrumental role in many improvements in Michigan City, including erecting a bandstand in Washington Park. John H. was married twice. His first marriage was to Jennie M. Brooks (1843-1891). They had three children, who all died before the age of five. He married his second wife, Katherine Fitzgerald (circa 1858-1910) in 1893. They had one daughter, Catherine (1896-1970) who later married Charles V. Hickox. Both John H. and his wife died in 1910, and they were buried in Greenwood Cemetery, Michigan City.

Sources

Egelhof, Joseph, "Chicago Leads Nation As Rail Supply Source", Chicago Daily Tribune, January 13, 1952.

Harper, Charlton E. Railway Car Builders of the United States and Canada. New York, NY: Interurban Press, 1957.

"Our Heritage", The Michigan City News Dispatch, 1976. http://www.mclib.org/ourheri1.htm

"A Look Back", The Michigan City News Dispatch, 2007.

Sederberg, Deborah, "Book takes a look back at Washington Park history", thenewsdispatch.com, May 13, 2011. findagrave.com (last accessed April 25, 2013 and May 1, 2013.)
Provenance:
Originally collected for the Division of Transportation (now the Division of Work & Industry) reference files. Date and source of acquisition unknown.
Restrictions:
The collection is open for research.

Gloves must be worn when handling unprotected photographs and negatives. Special arrangements required to view negatives due to cold storage. Using negatives requires a three hour waiting period. Contact the Archives Center at 202-633-3270.
Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning intellectual property rights. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
Railroads -- Rolling-stock  Search this
Railroads -- 20th century -- United States  Search this
Freight cars  Search this
Railroad companies  Search this
Railroad trains  Search this
Citation:
Haskell and Barker Car Company Photographic Negatives, 1926-1957, undated, Archives Center, National Museum of American History.
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.1183
See more items in:
Haskell and Barker Car Company Photographic Negatives
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmah-ac-1183
Additional Online Media:

Southern Iron & Equipment Company Records

Creator:
Southern Iron & Equipment Company  Search this
Bond, Edward  Search this
Names:
Southern Iron & Equipment Company  Search this
Extent:
2.5 Cubic feet (7 boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Card files
Place:
Georgia
Atlanta (Ga.)
Date:
1903-1960
Scope and Contents:
These records document the rebuilding of locomotives by the Southern Iron & Equipment Company during the period circa 1903-1960. They consist of one folder of "Memorandum of Locomotive Numbers" and a number of 4" x 6" cards recording sales of rebuilt locomotives. The "Memorandum," (forty-eight pages) lists the locomotives by number and shows the company from which it was purchased, type of locomotive, manufacturer, and to whom it was sold. The cards, alphabetically arranged by purchaser, record the type of locomotive, manufacturer, its number, and the purchase price. The cards contain the most complete information on the period circa1903-1924; after that, only the number of the locomotive was noted on the card.
Arrangement:
The collection is divided into two series.

Series 1: Locomotive Sales Cards

Series 2: Photographs
Biographical / Historical:
The Southern Iron & Equipment Company, a family owned business located in Atlanta, Georgia, was a major reconditioner of locomotives in the period ca. 1900 1960. The company purchased locomotives, refurbished them, and then sold them. In addition, the company did repair and reconditioning work on behalf of various railroads.
Provenance:
The written and photographic records of the Southern Iron & Equipment Company were purchased from the company at the time of its dissolution by Mr. Witbeck, a collector of railroad photographs. The records were subsequently purchased from him by Mr. Edward Bond of Marietta, Georgia. Mr. Bond donated them to the National Museum of American History in December 1988.
Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
Repairing  Search this
Transportation  Search this
Railroad equipment industry  Search this
Locomotives  Search this
Locomotive works -- Georgia  Search this
Railroads -- Equipment and supplies  Search this
Locomotive industry  Search this
Railroads -- Rolling-stock  Search this
Genre/Form:
Card files
Citation:
Southern Iron & Equipment Company Records, 1903-1960, Archives Center, National Museum of American History.
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.0354
See more items in:
Southern Iron & Equipment Company Records
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmah-ac-0354
Additional Online Media:

Harry A. McBride Railroad Photographs

Donor:
McBride, Harry A.  Search this
Collector:
Work and Industry, Division of, NMAH, SI  Search this
Transportation, Division of, NMAH, SI.  Search this
Transportation, Division of, NMAH, SI.  Search this
Work and Industry, Division of, NMAH, SI  Search this
Extent:
4.5 Cubic feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Date:
ca. 1940s-1950s.
Scope and Contents:
The collection consists of approxiamtely 3,000 views of railroads, railroad equipment, stations, yards and employees. The emphasis is on American railroads, but the collection includes a few views of railroad subjects in Africa, Asia, Central and South America, Europe, Scandinavia and several island nations.
Arrangement:
1 series, arranged by railroad.
Biographical / Historical:
McBride was a foreign service officer and museum official. He was also a railroad enthusiast.
Provenance:
Collection donated by Colonel Harry A. McBride, Date Unknown
Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Collection is open for research and access on site by appointment. Unprotected photographs must be handled with gloves.
Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
Railroads -- Buildings and structures  Search this
Railroad trains  Search this
Railroad stations  Search this
Railroad companies  Search this
Transportation  Search this
Railroads -- 20th century -- United States  Search this
Railroads -- Rolling-stock  Search this
Railroads -- Employees  Search this
Citation:
Harry A. McBride Railroad Photographs, 1940s-1950s, Archives Center, National Museum of American History.
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.1171
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmah-ac-1171
Additional Online Media:

Providence and Worcester R.R. Account Book

Creator:
Providence and Worcester Railroad Company  Search this
Source:
Transportation, Division of, NMAH, SI.  Search this
Former owner:
Transportation, Division of, NMAH, SI.  Search this
Extent:
0.15 Cubic feet (1 volume)
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Account books
Place:
Rhode Island
Date:
1851-1899
Scope and Contents:
This log book of the Providence, Rhode Island repair shop records the annual summaries of repair costs by various divisions of the Railroad for 1851-1854, as submitted by John B. Winslow, Master Mechanic. It also includes entries recording miscellaneous repairs (mostly minor) and overhauls to locomotives for 1880-1899.
Arrangement:
This collection is arranged chronologically.
Biographical / Historical:
Like many of the early railroads in the United States the Providence and Worcester Railroad was built, as were most of the early turnpikes and canals, to serve nearby and local needs.*

*Taylor, Geroge Rogers and Neu, Irene D. The American RR Network, 1861-1890 Cambridge, Massachusetts: Harvard University Press, 1956, p.4.
Provenance:
Immediate source of acquisition unknown.
Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
Railroads -- 19th century  Search this
Railroads -- Rolling-stock  Search this
Locomotives  Search this
Repairing  Search this
Genre/Form:
Account books -- 19th century
Citation:
Providence and Worcester R.R. Account Book, 1851-1899, Archives Center, National Museum of American History.
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.0154
See more items in:
Providence and Worcester R.R. Account Book
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmah-ac-0154
Additional Online Media:

Timken Roller Bearing Company Collection

Creator:
Timken Roller Bearing Company  Search this
Pauly, Frank G.  Search this
United States. Bureau of Mines  Search this
Extent:
0.15 Cubic feet (1 box)
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Technical reports
Articles
Pamphlets
Professional papers
Place:
Canton (Ohio)
Ohio
Date:
1925-1957
Scope and Contents:
Primarily technical papers by Timken engineers, presented in journals and meetings of professional societies. The papers concern the use of Timken roller bearings and other products in locomotives and other rolling stock on U.S. railroads and rapid transit systems. Also articles from trade magazines and brochures advertising Timken products, and a 1925 U.S. Bureau of Mines study of friction in mine-car wheels.
The material in this collection primarily consists of technical papers written by Timken engineers which were presented in journals and meetings of professional societies. The papers all deal with the use of Timken roller bearings and other products in locomotives and other rolling stock on U.S. railroads and rapid transit systems. In addition to professional papers, there are also articles from trade magazines and brochures advertising Timken products. A 1925 U.S. Bureau of Mines study of friction in mine car wheels is also included.
Biographical / Historical:
The Timken Roller Bearing Co., of Canton, Ohio, produced its first tapered roller bearings in the 1890s. The bearings were first used in horse drawn vehicles and later in automobiles. As automobiles improved in design, power, and endurance, Timken made improvements in its bearings to compensate. The company soon realized that the only way to ensure quality in its product was through the production of its own special alloy steel. It organized the Timken Steel & Tube Company to supply both itself and other manufacturers with high grade steel. In the late 1920s, the company entered the railroad equipment supply market with special tapered bearings for use in locomotives. Timken continued to supply components for use in the railroad rolling stock, automotive, and other manufacturing industries. It set high standards for such products, both in engineering and materials quality.
The Timken Roller Bearing Co., Canton, Ohio, produced its first tapered roller bearings in the 1890s. The bearings were first used in horse-drawn vehicles and later in automobiles. As automobiles improved in design, power, and endurance, Timken made improvements in its bearings to compensate. The company soon realized that the only way to ensure quality in its product was through the production of its own special alloy steel. It organized the Timken Steel & Tube Company to supply itself and other manufacturers with high-grade steel. In the late 1920s, the company entered the railroad equipment supply market with special tapered bearings for locomotives.
Provenance:
This collection was donated to the Archives Center, National Museum of American History, on September 25, 1990, by Frank G. Pauly. Mr. Pauly had been employed as a Sales Engineer in Timken's Railroad Division, working out of the Chicago Sales Office, which was closed in 1966.
Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
Transportation  Search this
Railroads -- Rolling-stock  Search this
Locomotives  Search this
Roller bearings  Search this
Steel alloys  Search this
Railroads -- Cars -- Bearings  Search this
Bearings (Machinery)  Search this
Railroad equipment industry  Search this
Railroads -- Equipment and supplies  Search this
Mining equipment  Search this
Mine railroads  Search this
Locomotive industry  Search this
Friction  Search this
Genre/Form:
Technical reports
Articles -- 20th century
Pamphlets
Professional papers
Citation:
Timken Roller Bearing Company Collection, 1925-1927, Archives Center, National Museum of American History.
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.0380
See more items in:
Timken Roller Bearing Company Collection
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmah-ac-0380
Additional Online Media:

Delaware and Hudson Railroad Engineering Drawings

Donor:
Brosterman, Norman  Search this
Nahem, Edward T.  Search this
Sasson, Maurice  Search this
Smith, Sanford  Search this
Creator:
Delaware and Hudson Railway Company  Search this
Muhlfeld, John E.  Search this
Collector:
Work and Industry, Division of, NMAH, SI  Search this
Work and Industry, Division of, NMAH, SI  Search this
Extent:
240 Cubic feet
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Blueprints
Photographs
Design drawings
Engineering drawings
Ledgers (account books)
Periodicals
Date:
1900-1955
Scope and Contents:
The bulk of this collection consists of approximately 26,500 original ink and pencil drawings from which blueprints were later made. The drawings depict not only the rolling stock but the components of the railroad equipment, from the largest to the smallest. The drawings are indexed, titled, numbered, dated and annotated with dimensions and other information. In addition to the drawings, the collection also includes thousands of blueprints, photographs, ledgers, books, and periodicals.
Arrangement:
1 series.
Biographical / Historical:
The Delaware and Hudson Railway Company grew out of the former Delaware and Hudson Canal Company, which had been chartered in Northeastern Pennsylvania in 1823. The canal was last used in 1891. The company's first rail line ran between Carbondale, Pennsylvania and New York, beginning in 1872. After numerous mergers and purchases, it became the Delaware and Hudson Company and later Delaware and Hudson Railway. It was purchased by Guilford Rail System in 1984, and went bankrupt in 1988. Its lines were purchased in 1991 by the Canadian Pacific Railway. During its most successful years, Delaware and Hudson was the inventor, manufacturer and user of some of the most important innovations in steam locomotive design. One of its most important designers, John E. Muhlfeld, is well represented in this collection.
Provenance:
Donated in 1991 by Sanford L. Smith, Maurice Sasson, Edward T. Nahem, and Norman Brosterman.
Restrictions:
UNPROCESSED COLLECTION.
Unrestricted research access on site by appointment.,Unprotected photographs must be handled with gloves.
Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
Railroads -- 20th century -- United States  Search this
Railroad companies  Search this
Transportation  Search this
Genre/Form:
Blueprints
Photographs -- 20th century
Design drawings
Engineering drawings
Ledgers (account books)
Periodicals
Citation:
Delaware and Hudson Railroad Engineering Drawings, 1900-1955, Archives Center, National Museum of American History.
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.1169
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmah-ac-1169

Wheeling and Lake Erie Railway Photographs

Collector:
Mechanical and Civil Engineering, Division of [former name], NMAH, SI.  Search this
History of Technology, Division of, NMAH, SI  Search this
Work and Industry, Division of, NMAH, SI  Search this
History of Technology, Division of, NMAH, SI  Search this
Mechanical and Civil Engineering, Division of [former name], NMAH, SI.  Search this
Work and Industry, Division of, NMAH, SI  Search this
Donor:
Rehor, John A.  Search this
Rehor, John A.  Search this
Creator:
Wheeling and Lake Erie Railway  Search this
Extent:
2 Cubic feet (6 boxes)
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Photographs
Black-and-white negatives
Place:
Ohio
West Virginia
Date:
1925-1942.
Scope and Contents:
Over nine hundred official company photographs documenting the history of the railroad. Subjects include trains, locomotives and cars; employees and employee gatherings and events; structures such as stations, track, bridges, crossings, towers, coaling stations.
Arrangement:
Divided into 2 series: Series 1, Negatives and Series 2, Prints.
Biographical / Historical:
Founded in 1871, the Wheeling and Lake Erie Railway was built to haul coal from southeastern Ohio mines to the Lake Erie ports of Huron and Toledo. After World War II, WLE had several owners, the Nickel Plate, then the Norfolk & Western,and later, the Norfolk & Western and Southern (NS) merged. The WLE was dissolved in 1989 but was revived in 1990 by new investors.
Provenance:
Donated to the Museum's Division of Mechanical and Civil Engineering in 1981 by John A. Roher.
Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
Railroads -- Rolling-stock  Search this
Railroad stations -- United States  Search this
Railroad tracks  Search this
Railroad companies  Search this
Railroads  Search this
Railroads -- Buildings and structures  Search this
Railroads -- Employees  Search this
Locomotives  Search this
Railroad bridges  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs -- Black-and-white photoprints -- Silver gelatin -- 1900-1950
Black-and-white negatives
Citation:
Wheeling and Lake Erie Railway Photographs, 1905-1942, Archives Center, National Museum of American History.
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.1075
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmah-ac-1075

Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad Negatives

Source:
Mechanical and Civil Engineering, Division of [former name], NMAH, SI.  Search this
Work and Industry, Division of, NMAH, SI  Search this
Creator:
Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad Company.  Search this
Former owner:
Mechanical and Civil Engineering, Division of [former name], NMAH, SI.  Search this
Work and Industry, Division of, NMAH, SI  Search this
Names:
Modjeski, Ralph, 1861-1940  Search this
Extent:
2.33 Cubic feet (8 boxes)
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Photographs
Date:
1890-1915, undated.
Summary:
The photographic images in this collection are largely of railway bridge construction and other properties owned by the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad Company at the turn of the twentieth century. Images are of two distinct projects (mostly construction) taken in and around the St. Louis, Missouri area (1890-1900): of a bridge project (name and location unknown) spanning 1902-1903; and of the construction of the Metropolis Bridge (that crosses the Ohio River at Metropolis, Illinois, about 12 miles south of Paducah, Kentucky) between 1914-1915. For the latter project Ralph Modjeski originally served as consultant engineer and then as chief civil engineer of construction. There are also negatives of unidentified bridge construction.
Scope and Contents:
The collection includes approximately 230 glass plate negatives depicting railway bridge construction; 41 negatives, dated 1890 to 1894, depicting construction and railroad facilities in St. Louis, Missouri (including the Mound Street Viaduct and the buildings at the corner of Main and Brooklyn Streets); and 36 negatives showing construction work at the Metropolis (Illinois) Bridge from 1914-1915.

Court testimony in an accidental injury claim (Kersten vs. Hines, no. 21593) indicates these sites are located in St. Louis, Missouri, and were at the time owned by the Terminal Railroad Association of St. Louis. The envelope containing these negatives marks them as the property of F.H. Cramer, Bridge Engineer with the Chicago, Burlington, and Quincy Railroad.

Negatives in Subseries 3 are themselves undated. The containing envelope indicates the photos depict construction work at the Metropolis Bridge by Carter H. Harrison Jr., 1914-1915.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged into one series.

Series 1: Photographic negatives, 1890-1915, undated

Subseries 1: Bridge construction, glass plate negatives, 1902-1903, undated

Subseries 2: Construction, Saint Louis (Missouri), acetate film negatives, 1890-1894, undated

Subseries 3: Construction, Metropolis (Illinois) Bridge, acetate film negatives, 1914-1915
Biographical/Historical note:
In the later part of the 1800s and throughout the Progressive Era, the United States experienced a great expansion of its railroad industry, which resulted in many partnerships, mergers and changes in leadership. Among railroad companies that became a dominant force in the industry was the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad Company (originally the Aurora Branch Railroad), which was purchased in 1901 by James Jerome Hill. Hill, a businessman and resident of St. Paul, Minnesota, also owned the Great Northern Railway and other entities. Hill's other business interests included mining, timber, land, and livestock--all industries with ties to the transportation industry, and particularly to railroads as the country became more reliant upon this mode of transportation. Hill was noted for his business acumen and competition with other wealthy men and families of the time--J.P. Morgan, the Rockefellers, and E.H. Harriman of the Union Pacific--who eventually pooled their resources to form the Northern Securities Company.

Northern Securities Company was a holding company, set up to hold a controlling part of the stock of other companies, essentially to control four big railroads of the Northwest. During a period of much labor unrest and migration to the country's Midwestern and Northwestern regions, people were left at the mercy of one big conglomerate that had a stronghold on the industry. It is important to note that the Northwestern Securities Company (at President Theodore Roosevelt's request) was sued by the United States government through invocation of the Sherman Antitrust Act.

In March of 1904, the Supreme Court, by a vote of 5 to 4, ruled in favor of the United States and ordered the Northern Securities Company dissolved (Northern Securities Co. vs. United States 193 U.S. 197). While the images in this collection are not known to be tied to the court case, they do provide details of many construction projects that are significant to the railroad expansion occurring at that time. The bulk of the collection focuses on railway bridge construction. Also included are photos of the Metropolis Bridge in Metropolis, Illinois, which was overseen in part by Ralph Modjeski. Modjeski was a lauded civil engineer who wrote the engineering manual Standard Designs for Steel Bridges for the Northern Pacific Railway Company. Additionally, the collection includes earlier photographic negatives showing construction from 1890 to 1894 of the Mound Street Viaduct and buildings at the corner of the Main and Brooklyn Streets in St. Louis, Missouri.
Related Materials:
Materials in the Archives Center

Warshaw Collection of Business Americana, subject category Railroads (AC0060)

Baltimore and Ohio Railroad Records, circa 1826-1943, 1951 (AC1086)

Wilbur L. Metz Collection of Railroad Ephemera, 1910-1986 (AC1172)

Northern Pacific Railway Photoprints, 1880-1945 (AC1067)

Wheeling and Lake Erie Photographs, 1925-1942 (AC1075)

Materials at Other Organizations

The Newberry Library

The Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad Company, 1820-1999

Minnesota Historical Society

Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad Company Corporate records, 1855-1983 (bulk 1901-1970)
Provenance:
Originally collected by the Division of Mechanical and Civil Engineering (now called the Division of Work and Industry). Exact date and source of acquisition unknown.
Restrictions:
Unrestricted research access on site by appointment.,Unprotected photographs must be handled with gloves.
Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Reproduction permission from Archives Center: reproduction fees may apply.
Topic:
Bridges  Search this
Railroad companies  Search this
Railroad bridges  Search this
Railroads -- Buildings and structures  Search this
Railroad tracks  Search this
Railroads -- Rolling-stock  Search this
Railroads -- Employees  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs -- Black-and-white negatives -- Acetate film -- 20th century
Photographs -- Black-and-white negatives -- Glass -- 19th century
Citation:
Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad Negatives, 1890-1915, undated, Archives Center, National Museum of American History.
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.1080
See more items in:
Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad Negatives
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmah-ac-1080
Additional Online Media:

Miscellaneous railroad surveys, patrols, bills, sketches (Union Pacific Railway Company, Housatonic Rolling Stock Company, Mexican National Railway, Hancock and Stephantown Route, New England route survey)

Collection Creator:
Hutton, William R., 1826-1901  Search this
Container:
Box 5, Folder 52
Type:
Archival materials
Text
Date:
1882-1886
Collection Restrictions:
The collection is open for research. Gloves must be worn when handling unprotected photographs and negatives.
Collection Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Collection Citation:
William R. Hutton Papers, dates, Archives Center, National Museum of American History
See more items in:
William R. Hutton Papers
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmah-ac-0987-ref981

John H. White, Jr. Railroad Reference Collection

Collector:
Watkins, J. Elfreth (John Elfreth), 1852-1903  Search this
Transportation, Division of, NMAH, SI.  Search this
Transportation, Division of, NMAH, SI.  Search this
Creator:
White, John H., 1933-  Search this
Extent:
31.33 Cubic feet (94 boxes)
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Ephemera
Manuscripts
Writings
Articles
Photographs
Photocopies
Research
Date:
1880s-1990
Scope and Contents:
The archivist has arranged the collection into five separate series: Series 1: CAR BUILDERS, arranged alphabetically by company or individual. Series 2: EQUIPMENT - ROLLING STOCK, arranged in two sections: alphabetically by White's heading: Articles in Progress and alphabetical by type of railroad car under White's heading: Research Files for Book in Progress. Series 3: LOCOMOTIVES, arranged alphabetically by Locomotive builders in two sections, first by individual company and second by individuals. Series 4: RAILROAD COMPANIES AND LINES, arranged alphabetically by railroad companies and railroad lines. Series 5: PUBLICATIONS, White's files for his book The American Railroad Freight Car, which are arranged into two sections, Illustrations and Text. Both sections are arranged numerically by chapters or sections of the book.
Arrangement:
The collection is divided into five series. Most material arranged alphabetically and chronologically.

Series 1: Car Builders

Series 2: Equipment--Rolling Stock

Subseries 2.1: Articles in progress

Subseries 2.2: Research Files for Books in Progress

Series 3: Locomotives

Series 4: Railroad Companies and Lines

Series 5: Publications
Biographical / Historical:
John H. White, Jr., (1933- ), historian and museum curator, was born in Cincinnati, Ohio. He graduated with a B.A. in history from Miami University, Ohio, in 1958. Shortly after receiving his degree, White joined the staff of the Smithsonian Institution as Assistant Curator of the Division of Transportation, Department of Science and Technology, National Museum of History and Technology (NMHT). White became Associate Curator of the Division, 1961-1966, Curator, 1967-1985, and Senior Historian, 1986-1989. White specialized in land transportation, particularly the history of railroads. He retired in 1990. His papers, the John H. White, Jr., Papers, circa 1959-1989 are at the Smithsonian Institution Archives.

This collection of railroad materials was begun many years ago by employees of the Smithsonian Institution, and maintained later by curators and museum specialists working in the Division of Transportation, NMHT, later named the National Museum of American History (NMAH).

Some of the clippings date back to the time of J. Elfreth Watkins in the 1880-1890s. In 1885 Watkins was appointed Curator of the Section of Steam Transportation, which was successively known as Transportation and Engineering, and Technological Collections. Other portions of White's collection were clearly from Carl Mitman, author of several hundred entries on inventors and engineers in the Dictionary of American Biography and a Smithsonian employee who served as Curator of Mechanical Technology in 1919. In 1921 Mitman took the title of Curator of the Divisions of Mineral and Mechanical Technology, serving in this capacity until 1931. In 1931 the Division of Engineering was established. Mitman served as Curator of the Division and in charge of Mineral Technology, 1931-1938, Head Curator of the Department of Arts and Industries, 1932-1938, and Head Curator of the Department of Engineering and Industries, 1938-1948.

Some portions of this collection were acquired under the time of Frank A. Taylor (Mitman's protégé) who was Assistant Curator, 1928-1931, Assistant Curator for Mechanical Technology, 1932, Curator of the Division and in charge of Mechanical Technology, 1932-1948, Head Curator of the Division of Engineering and Industry, 1948-1957. In 1955 Taylor was appointed Assistant Director, United States National Museum (USNM), with special responsibility for planning the new NMHT, and in 1958 was appointed the first Director of the new museum. In 1962 Taylor became Director of the USNM with responsibility for both the National Museum of Natural History and NMHT.

Smith Hempstone Oliver of the Division of Transportation also kept up the files to a degree, though his main interest was in automobiles.

When White started employment at the Museum in June, 1958, there were, perhaps, two file cabinets on railroads. As Mr. White mentions in a letter to the archivist in March of 2002, "It was and is a great mix of odds and ends -- photos, news clippings, small prints, manufacturing catalogs, post cards, etc. Some junk and some treasure."

White found the material very useful for research and greatly expanded the collection. It more than doubled in size during his years in the Division, 1958-1990. The collection was White's working file and was set up to meet his needs. According to White, the collections greatest lack was cross referencing -- which was mostly in his head. He could usually find things but the organization might be confusing to other users. It was not intended for public use.

White is the author of many books on railroads, including:

American Locomotives: An Engineering History, 1830-1880. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins Press, 1968; 1997.

Early American Locomotives, with 147 engraving. New York: Dover Publications, 1972.

American Single Locomotives and the "Pioneer". Washington: Smithsonian Institution Press, 1973.

The Pioneer, Chicago's First Locomotive. Chicago: Chicago Historical Society, 1976.

The American Railroad Passenger Car. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1978.

The John Bull, 150 Years a Locomotive. Washington, D.C.: Smithsonian Institution Press, 1981.

A Short History of American Locomotive Builders in the Steam Era. Washington, D.C.: Bass, 1982.

Great Yellow Fleet: A History of American Railroad Refrigerator Cars. Golden West Books, 1986

The American Railroad Freight Car: From the Wood-Car Era to the Coming of Steel. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1993.
Provenance:
The manuscript was donated by Jack White in 1995.
Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
Railroads -- History  Search this
Genre/Form:
Ephemera
Manuscripts
Writings
Articles
Photographs -- 19th century
Photocopies
Research
Citation:
John H. White, Jr. Railroad Reference Collection, ca. 1830-1980, Archives Center, National Museum of American History.
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.0523
See more items in:
John H. White, Jr. Railroad Reference Collection
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmah-ac-0523
Additional Online Media:

Baldwin Locomotive Works Drawings

Source:
Transportation, Division of, NMAH, SI.  Search this
Creator:
Baldwin Locomotive Works.  Search this
Former owner:
Transportation, Division of, NMAH, SI.  Search this
Extent:
9 Cubic feet (4 drawers)
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Technical drawings
Erection drawings
Place:
Philadelphia (Pa.)
Pennsylvania
Date:
1870-1890
Summary:
Collection consists of 202 assembly drawings of locomotives and tenders, prepared to check the clearances and major component parts of the locomotive and retained for engineering reference.
Scope and Contents note:
202 assembly drawings of locomotives and tenders, prepared to check the clearances and major component parts of the locomotive. When work was slow, draftsmen hand-colored the drawings. They were not used in the shop but were retained for engineering reference.
Biographical/Historical note:
The Baldwin Locomotive Works was the largest and most successful locomotive building firm in the world. It was begun as a machine shop owned and operated by Matthias W. Baldwin in 1831. Baldwin turned out its first locomotive engine from its shop in Philadelphia in 1832; within a few years the company was producing two a month and employed 240 men. By 1852, 500 engines had been produced; by 1861, 1,000; and by 1868, 2,000. At that point, the company employed between 1,600-1,700 men, and was one of the very largest machine works in the nation. In 1906 Baldwin began construction of a large auxiliary plant in Philadelphia suburb of Eddystone. In 1928 the Broad Street plant was closed and all work transferred to the Eddystone Plant.

Baldwin had been forced by hard financial times to take on a series of partners between 1839 and 1846, and the firm's name changed repeatedly as a result. It was known as Baldwin, Vail & Hufty (1839-1842); Baldwin & Whitney (1842-1845); M.W. Baldwin (1846-1853); and M.W. Baldwin & Co. (1854-1866). After Baldwin's death in 1866 the firm was known as M. Baird & Co. (1867-1873); Burnham, Parry, Williams & Co. (1873-1890); Burnham, Williams & Co. (1891-1909); it was finally incorporated as the Baldwin Locomotive Works in 1909.

The company's phenomenal growth ended with in the mid-1920s as the U.S. railroad industry began its long decline. Despite various mergers and acquisitions--and an increased attention to the development of diesel engines--a slow but sure decline set in. Baldwin declared bankruptcy in 1935. World War Two brought a temporary respite, but after the war the steam locomotive was obsolete and orders rapidly diminished. The Westinghouse Corporation bought Baldwin in 1948 but was unable to turn the company around. In 1950 the Lima-Hamilton Corporation and Baldwin merged but in 1956 the last of some 70,500 locomotives were produced and the company's long history came to an end.

Sources

History of the Baldwin Locomotive Works, 1831-1902

A Short History of American Locomotive Builders in the Steam Era, John H. White, (1982).
Related Archival Materials:
Archives Center #157, the Baldwin Locomotive Works Collection, consists of Engine Registers and Order Books for locomotives, 1833-1956. In addition, a six-reel microfilm edition of collection #157 is located in the NMAH Library (mfm-720).

Photographs relating to Baldwin are in the Railroad and Firefighting History Photographic Collection, Division of Work and Industry.

The DeGolyer Library of Southern Methodist University has a collection of 8,500 original Baldwin engineering drawings and has published three guides to their records.
Provenance:
Collection donated by H.L. Broadbelt, July 1959-November 1960.
Restrictions:
Unrestricted research use on site by appointment.
Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
Railroad equipment industry  Search this
Locomotives -- Drawings  Search this
Transportation  Search this
Railroads -- Rolling-stock  Search this
Railroads -- Equipment and supplies  Search this
Baldwin locomotives  Search this
Locomotives  Search this
Locomotive works -- Pennsylvania  Search this
Locomotive industry  Search this
Genre/Form:
Technical drawings
Erection drawings
Citation:
Baldwin Locomotive Works Drawings, 1870-1890, Archives Center, National Museum of American History.
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.0353
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmah-ac-0353
Additional Online Media:

Military Data and Memoranda

Collection Creator:
Milling, Thomas DeWitt, 1887-1960  Search this
Container:
Box 1, Folder 10
Type:
Archival materials
Text
Date:
1911-1913
Collection Restrictions:
No restrictions on access
Collection Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests.
Collection Citation:
Thomas DeWitt Milling Collection, NASM.XXXX.0133, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Thomas DeWitt Milling Collection
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nasm-xxxx-0133-ref23
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Chicago Surface Lines Drawings

Creator:
Chicago City Railway Company.  Search this
West Chicago Street Railroad Company.  Search this
Pennsylvania & West Virginia Railway.  Search this
Chicago Transit Authority.  Search this
Chicago Surface Lines.  Search this
Source:
Transportation, Division of, NMAH, SI.  Search this
Names:
Chicago Board of Traction Supervising Engineers.  Search this
Chicago Consolidated Traction Company.  Search this
Chicago Railways Company.  Search this
Chicago Union Traction Company.  Search this
D.T. Steelwork Company.  Search this
Garden City Construction Company.  Search this
Gilbert Car Manufacturing Company.  Search this
Lake Street Elevated Railroad (Chicago, Ill.).  Search this
North Chicago Street Railroad Company.  Search this
United States Construction Company.  Search this
Former owner:
Transportation, Division of, NMAH, SI.  Search this
Extent:
4.6 Cubic feet (13 oversized folders)
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Tracings
Drawings
Blueprints
Place:
Chicago (Ill.)
Date:
1880-1948
Scope and Contents:
The collection consists of blueprints, working drawings, line drawings, tracings, and plans of the Chicago Surface Railway system from 1896-1926; 1948. The majority of the drawings are on linen and are 24" x 36" or larger. Some of the drawings are annotated. The drawing number, title of drawing and the date are provided for each sheet.
Arrangement:
The collection is divided into seven series:

Series 1: West Chicago Street Railroad Company

Series 2: Chicago Board of Traction Supervising Engineers/Chicago Railway Company

Series 3: Chicago Traction System (Car Drawings)

Series 4: Chicago Cable Blueprints

Series 5: Chicago Union Traction Company

Series 6: Pennsylvania & West Virginia Railway

Series 7: Miscellaneous
Biographical / Historical:
The first street cars in Chicago were horse cars run by the Chicago City railway Company and the North Chicago City railway Company around 1858-1861. This method, however, was slow and expensive, and the companies began substituting cable cars in the 1880s. Chicago City was the first railway company in 1881, with the addition of the Chicago Passenger Railway in 1883, and the West Chicago Street Railroad Company in 1887. Chicago had the largest cable railway system in the world.

In the 1880s, electric powered trolleys first became practical. The Chicago companies hesitated at first to install these faster and more efficient systems because of their heavy investment in cable cars. Smaller Illinois cities and the Calumet Electric Street Railway of the South Side of the city built successful systems, causing the Chicago companies to feel themselves dropping behind. By the mid 1890s most companies began the conversion to electricity.

The 1890s saw the consolidation of many of the Chicago companies and through this reorganization continued into the next century. In 1905 the city voted that the surface railways should come under municipal ownership but not operation, provided the companies rehabilitate their systems, and give the city the right to buy the property at a fixed value. In addition, new construction was to be approved by a new bureau, the Board of Traction Supervising Engineers.

The continuous reorganization was finally completed by the Unification Ordinance of 1913 which stipulated that all lines would come under the management of a single operating company called the Chicago Surface Lines (CSL). Four companies made up the CSL-the Chicago Railways Company, Chicago City Railway, Calumet and South Chicago Railway, and Southern Street Railway. At this time Chicago had the largest street railway system, the longest one-fare ride, the longest average ride, and the most liberal transfer privileges in the world.

The 1920s saw continued growth despite the increasing competition from the automobile, but the Depression dealt a heavy blow to traffic. By 1948 the Chicago Transit Authority, which took over the Chicago Surface Lines in 1927, had abandoned all but four lines in favor of buses. By 1958 the remaining lines were "bustituted."
Related Materials:
Materials at Other Organizations

The Chicago Historical Society

Holds approximately 13 cubic feet of materials documenting the Chicago Surface Lines, 1857-1951. The materials include minute books, corporate records, account books, agreements, correspondence, contracts, ordinances, patents, memoranda, stock certificates, bank statements, and blueprints.
Provenance:
Gift of the Chicago Transit Authority.
Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
Railroads -- Equipment and facilities  Search this
Railroads -- Rolling-stock  Search this
Railroad engineers  Search this
Civil engineers  Search this
Civil engineering  Search this
Railroads  Search this
Railroads -- Buildings and structures  Search this
Engineering and technology  Search this
Cable railroads  Search this
Genre/Form:
Tracings
Drawings
Blueprints
Citation:
Chicago Surface Lines Drawings, 1880-1948, Archives Center, National Museum of American History.
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.0212
See more items in:
Chicago Surface Lines Drawings
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmah-ac-0212

[Trade catalogs from Lead Industries Association]

Company Name:
Lead Industries Association  Search this
Related companies:
Lead Industries Assn.  Search this
Notes content:
Technical information , data , and reports : "Useful Information about Lead" ; "Improved Sound Barriers Employing Lead" ; "Lead in the Ceramic Industries" ; "Adapting Leaden Fittings to the Modern House" ; "Red Lead Paint Formulations" ; "Red Lead Based Paint Systems" ; "Primers for Railroad Structures and Rolling Stock" ; "Painting Highway Structural Steel" ; "Recommended Surface Preparation of Steel for Red Lead Paints" . "Lead" newsletter ; "Lead Pipe" , manufacture and uses of lead pipe, with "the new lead pipe standards" .
Includes:
Trade catalog
Black and white images
Physical description:
13 pieces; 1 box
Language:
English
Type of material:
Trade catalogs
Trade literature
Place:
New York, New York, United States
Date:
1900s
Topic (Romaine term):
Architectural designs and building materials  Search this
Brass; bronze and specialty metals  Search this
Ceramics; pottery; glass; crystal; china; bricks; and stones  Search this
Industrial equipment or mechanical machinery (including supplies and components)  Search this
Metalwork products (architectural and ornamental)  Search this
Paint; varnishes; adhesives; coatings; etc.  Search this
Plumbing supplies and fixtures  Search this
Topic:
"Decoration and ornament, Architectural"  Search this
Adhesives  Search this
Architectural design  Search this
Architectural metal-work  Search this
Art metal-work  Search this
Brass  Search this
Bronze  Search this
Building materials  Search this
Ceramics  Search this
Glass  Search this
Industrial equipment  Search this
Machinery  Search this
Metal-work  Search this
Metals  Search this
Paint industry and trade  Search this
Plumbing equipment industry  Search this
Plumbing fixtures  Search this
Porcelain  Search this
Pottery  Search this
Record ID:
SILNMAHTL_26075
Location:
Trade Literature at the American History Museum Library
Collection:
Smithsonian Libraries Trade Literature Collections
Data source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:SILNMAHTL_26075

Cattle, Photos

Collection Collector:
Watkins, J. Elfreth (John Elfreth), 1852-1903  Search this
Transportation, Division of, NMAH, SI.  Search this
Collection Creator:
White, John H., 1933-  Search this
Container:
Box 8, Folder 30
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1870-1874
Collection Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Collection Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Collection Citation:
John H. White, Jr. Railroad Reference Collection, ca. 1830-1980, Archives Center, National Museum of American History.
See more items in:
John H. White, Jr. Railroad Reference Collection
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmah-ac-0523-ref100

Cattle Car,

Collection Collector:
Watkins, J. Elfreth (John Elfreth), 1852-1903  Search this
Transportation, Division of, NMAH, SI.  Search this
Collection Creator:
White, John H., 1933-  Search this
Container:
Box 8, Folder 31
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1830-1879
Collection Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Collection Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Collection Citation:
John H. White, Jr. Railroad Reference Collection, ca. 1830-1980, Archives Center, National Museum of American History.
See more items in:
John H. White, Jr. Railroad Reference Collection
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmah-ac-0523-ref101

Freight - Four Wheel

Collection Collector:
Watkins, J. Elfreth (John Elfreth), 1852-1903  Search this
Transportation, Division of, NMAH, SI.  Search this
Collection Creator:
White, John H., 1933-  Search this
Container:
Box 8, Folder 32
Type:
Archival materials
Collection Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Collection Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Collection Citation:
John H. White, Jr. Railroad Reference Collection, ca. 1830-1980, Archives Center, National Museum of American History.
See more items in:
John H. White, Jr. Railroad Reference Collection
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmah-ac-0523-ref102

Freight Cars - Photos - Wisconsin

Collection Collector:
Watkins, J. Elfreth (John Elfreth), 1852-1903  Search this
Transportation, Division of, NMAH, SI.  Search this
Collection Creator:
White, John H., 1933-  Search this
Container:
Box 8, Folder 33
Type:
Archival materials
Collection Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Collection Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Collection Citation:
John H. White, Jr. Railroad Reference Collection, ca. 1830-1980, Archives Center, National Museum of American History.
See more items in:
John H. White, Jr. Railroad Reference Collection
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmah-ac-0523-ref103

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