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Records, c. 1968-2010

Creator:
Washington Conservation Guild  Search this
Physical description:
4 cu. ft. (4 record storage boxes)
Type:
Manuscripts
Collection descriptions
Newsletters
Compact discs
Electronic records
Color photographs
Black-and-white photographs
Date:
1968
1968-2010
c 1968-2010
Topic:
Historic preservation  Search this
Professional associations  Search this
Conservators  Search this
Local number:
SIA Acc. 11-286
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_arc_305212

Don Wilson Papers and Biological Survey Chief Files, 1970s-1988

Creator:
Wilson, Don E  Search this
Subject:
Wilson, Don E  Search this
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Bird and Mammal Laboratories  Search this
Physical description:
26 cu. ft. (26 record storage boxes)
Type:
Manuscripts
Collection descriptions
Date:
1988
1970s-1988
Topic:
Research  Search this
Local number:
SIA Acc. 92-007
Restrictions & Rights:
Restricted for 15 years, until Jan-01-2004; Transferring office; Contact reference staff for details
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_arc_254222

Melvin Kranzberg Papers

Creator:
Kranzberg, Melvin, Dr., 1917-1995  Search this
Names:
Society for the History of Technology  Search this
Extent:
140 Cubic feet (359 boxes )
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Personal papers
Business records
Professional papers
Correspondence
Date:
1934 - 1988
Summary:
Personal papers of Dr. Kranzberg from his undergraduate years at Amherst College through his professional career. Collection documents his involvement with development of the new field of history of technology and his role as principal founder of the Society for the History of Technology (SHOT); work as consultant and advisor to domestic and international agencies, colleges, and universities; personal affiliations, lectureships, publications; and teaching and administrative activities for more than 40 years as a college professor.
Scope and Contents:
This collection consists of 140 cubic feet of material divided into nine series and housed in 359 document boxes. Several subseries remain organized in the original order as they were received. There has been no attempt by the archivist to rearrange them. Some folders did not have folder titles. The archivist has provided titles in those instances, and these folder titles have been put in brackets [] in the Container List. Melvin Kranzberg's personal activities from 1934 through 1968 are arranged chronologically in Series 4: PERSONAL ACTIVITIES, including his early education. Series 8: TEACHING AND ADMINISTRATION is divided into two subseries and is comprised of teaching and administrative files compiled by Dr. Kranzberg during his forty years as a college professor.

Series 2: Correspondence between Kranzberg and numerous colleagues in the U.S. and abroad, 1949-1988. He was actively involved with technically oriented societies, U.S. government agencies, and SHOT. Since he also wrote a textbook and several encyclopedia articles, subjects range from business to academic to personal.

Kranzberg's role as a consultant and advisor is located in Series 1: CONSULTATION AND ADVISEMENT. This series is further divided into nine alphabetically arranged subseries. Kranzberg's many professional affiliations are arranged in Series 5: PROFESSIONAL AFFILIATIONS. This series is comprised of eight alphabetically arranged subseries. Series 2: CORRESPONDENCE is also arranged alphabetically and contains much of Dr. Kranzberg's correspondence during the years 1949 to 1988. He was actively involved with a number of technically oriented societies, United States government agencies, and the Society for the History of Technology. Since he also wrote a textbook and several encyclopedia articles, the subjects represented range from business to academic to personal.

Series 7: RESEARCH SUBJECT FILES is arranged alphabetically and documents nearly forty years of research by Kranzberg on hundreds of diverse topics. The results of some of this research is available in Series 6: PUBLICATIONS, which is divided into eleven subseries and contains manuscripts, research, correspondence, outlines, and reprints of various Kranzberg essays and books. In addition, much of Kranzberg's research results were delivered in a verbal format. Series 3: LECTURESHIPS is divided into three subseries, and not only details lectures and speeches delivered by Melvin Kranzberg, but also those given by his colleagues, and those delivered at the National Endowment for the Humanities Summer Seminars for Professional Journalists, which he organized. Series 9: SPECIAL PROJECTS consists of materials relative to a number of projects of varying importance and duration, such as engineering and human values and ethics in an age of pervasive technology.
Arrangement:
Collection is divided into nine series.

Series 1: Consultation and advisement, 1958-1987

Series 2: Correspondence, 1949-1988

Series 3: Lectureships and speeches, 1951-1988

Series 4: Biographical, 1934-1963

Series 5: Professional affiliations, 1961-1988

Series 6: Publications, 1942-1968

Series 7: Research subject files, 1940-1978

Series 8: Teaching and administration, 1947-1988

Series 9: Special projects, 1951-1980
Historical:
Kranzberg's Six Laws

As reported in the July 1986 Issue of Technology and Culture, Volume 27, Number 3, pages 544-561, Kranzberg's Six Laws are listed as follows in the SHOT Presidential Address.

"These are not laws in the sense of commandments but rather a series of truisms deriving from a longtime immersion in the study of the development of technology and its interactions with sociocultural change." 1.. Technology is neither good nor bad; nor is it neutral.(p.545); 2. Invention is the mother of necessity, (p.548) 3. Technology comes in packages, big and small, (p. 549); 4. Although technology might be a prime element in many public issues, nontechnical factors take precedence in technology-policy decisions, (p. 550); 5. All history is relevant, but the history of technology is the most relevant, (p. 553); 6. Technology is a very human activity—and so is the history of technology, (p. 557); 7."But if ours is truly a man-made world, I claim that mankind can re-make it. And in that remaking process, the history of technology can play a very important role in enabling us to meet the challenges besetting mankind now and in the future."
Biographical:
Melvin Kranzberg (born St. Louis, Mo.) received his A.B. from Amherst College (1938), and his M.A. (1939) and Ph.D. (1942) in modern European history from Harvard University. When World War II commenced, Dr. Kranzberg went, with an Amherst professor, Charles W. Cole, to work at the Office of Price Administration in Washington, D. C. At that same time, he enlisted in the Signal Corps Reserve. Since he was regarded as "educable," he was sent for electronics training at Catholic University, and then to Johns Hopkins for a three-year course in electrical engineering that was crammed into sixteen weeks. Instead of receiving a commission, he was sent to Philco Radio Laboratories in Philadelphia for another three-month crash course, this one in radar.

By the end of his course of study, however, the Signal Corps no longer needed officers and he was put in the infantry. After basic training, he was assigned to the Army's Specialized Training Program. His language skills enabled him to engage in an intensive three-month study of Turkish. Since invasion of Turkey was not likely, he then entered a language program in German. This led to appointment in Military Intelligence, where he was charged with interrogating German POWs, often on the front lines. That assignment lasted from about September 1944 through the Battle of the Bulge, until the German surrender. He received three Battle Stars, a Combat Infantry Badge, and a Bronze Star. He was awarded honorary doctorates of letters (Litt. D.) by New Jersey Institute of Technology and Northern Michigan University, doctorates of engineering (D. Eng.) by Worcester Polytechnic Institute and Colorado School of Mines, and doctorates of humane letters (L.H.D.) by Denison University and Amherst College.

Dr. Kranzberg's major professional contribution has been the establishment of a new field of history: the history of technology. He was the principal founder of the Society for the History of Technology (SHOT), founding editor (1959-81) of its quarterly journal, Technology and Culture, and served as SHOT Secretary (1959-74) and President (1983-84). A cofounder of ICOHTEC (International Committee for the History of Technology, a Scientific Section of the International Union for the History Science [UNESCO], he served as its vice-president from its inception in 1968. When he retired from that post at ICOHTEC'S 17th International Symposium (Hamburg, 1989), he was elected honorary president for life. In 1979-1980 Dr. Kranzberg was national president of Sigma Xi, The Scientific Research Society (120,000 active members in 500 chapters and clubs). Over the years, he has been a Sigma Xi National Lecturer and has served on various committees of the honorary organization. He was Chairman (1966, 1979) of Section L (History and Philosophy of Science) of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), and Chairman (1978-81) of the AAAS Committee on Science Engineering, and Public Policy. From 1977-1980, he chaired the Advisory Committees of the Policy Research and Analysis (PRA) and Science Resources Studies (SRS) Divisions of the National Science Foundation (NSF). An original member (1964) of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's History Advisory Committee (Chairman, 1966-71, 1984-87), he also served on NASA's National Advisory Council (1984-87). In 1989, Dr. Kranzberg was elected to the newly founded Board of the National Association for Science, Technology, and Society (NASTS), an "umbrella organization for educators, scientists, engineers, public policy analysts, public interest groups, media, and individuals interested in the impact of scientific and technological development on society." At its 1992 Annual Technological Literacy Conference, Kranzberg was honored by being the initial recipient of a NASTS Honorary Lifetime Membership.

Other activities include: Vice-President, AAAS (1966); Chairman (1957-58), Humanistic-Social Division, American Society for Engineering Education (ASEEO; Vice-President (1959), Society for French Historical Studies; Trustee (1979-), Charles Babbage Foundation; and Chairman (1972-73), U.S. National Committee of the International Union of the History and Philosophy of Science. He has served on the Technology Assessment Panel of the National Academy of Sciences and the NAS Committee on the Survey of Materials Science and Engineering, The National Research Council's Committee on the Education and Utilization of the Engineer, and various advisory committees of the National Academy of Engineering.

Kranzberg has been a member of the Editorial Advisory Boards of the following journals: Engineering Education; Science, Technology & Human Values; Knowledge in Society; History and Technology; and Research in Philosophy and Technology; and the "Inside Technology" book series of the MIT Press. In 1980, he coordinated the Course-by-Newspaper on "Energy and the Way We Live" with 400 newspapers and was awarded a $10,000 prize by the Academy for Educational Development. He was a TV commentator on the PBS "Connections" series and lectured throughout the world, including USIA tours to India, Southeast Asia, and Africa. He has written or edited: The Siege of Paris, 1870-1871 (1950; reprinted 1970); 1848: A Turning Point? (1959, 14 printings); the two-volume

Technology in Western Civilization (1967; Japanese, 1976; Spanish, 1980); Technology and Culture: an Anthology (1972; Arabic, 1976; Spanish 1980); By the Sweat of Thy Brow: Work in the Western World (1975 [an alternate selection of the Fortune Book Club]; Italian, 1976); Technological Innovation: A Critical Review of Current Knowledge (1978); Energy and the Way We Live (1980); Ethics in an Age of Pervasive Technology (1980); Bridge to the Future: A Centennial Celebration of the Brooklyn Bridge (1984); Technological Education/Technological Style (1986); and Innovation at the Crossroads Between Science and Technology (1989). He is also the author of over 150 articles in encyclopedias, learned journals, and scholarly collections on topics in European history, engineering education, history of technology, science-technology policy, and science-technology-society interactions.

Dr. Kranzberg taught at Harvard, Stevens Institute of Technology, Amherst College, and Case Western Reserve University, where he established the first graduate program in the history of technology at an American university. From 1972 to 1988, he was Callaway Professor of the History of Technology at Georgia Institute of Technology (Georgia Tech). He is a member of the honorary societies Phi Beta Kappa, Sigma Xi, Epsilon Pi Tau, and Phi Kappa Phi. His awards include: Leonardo da Vinci Medal, Society for the History of Technology (1968); Apollo Achievement Award, NASA (1969); Special Research Day Citation, Case Western Reserve University (1970); Special Recognition Award, American Industrial Arts Association (1978); and the Roe Medal, American Society of Mechanical Engineers (1980). Dr. Kranzberg was one of 100 Americans presented the State of Israel's Jabotinsky Centennial Medal (1980) for eminence in the sciences and letters, and was elected (1985) an Honorary Foreign Member of the Czechoslovak Society for the History of Science and Technology, Czechoslovak Academy of Sciences. In 1991, the Liberal Education Division of the American Society for Engineering Education presented him its Olmsted Award for "outstanding contributions to engineering education by bringing the humanities and technology together for the mutual benefit of both." In November 1991, the Society for Social Studies of Science (SSSS) and the Institute for Scientific Information (ISI) presented him the Bernal Award for "outstanding contributions to the social studies of science." At its 1994 meeting in Zaragoza, Spain, the prestigious International Academy of the History of Science elected Dr. Kranzberg to its membership.

The January-September 1976 issue (Vol. 12, Nos. 1-3) of Lex et Scientia (The International Journal of Law and Science) was devoted to Kranzberg's 1975 Mellon Lectures at Lehigh University, and the French Centre de Recherche sur la Culture Technique dedicated its June 1983 (No. 10) issue of Culture Technique to him. In 1985 The Society for the History of Technology and the MIT Press co-published John M. Staudenmaier's, Technology's Storytellers: Reweaving the Human Fabric as a "tribute" to him, and Lehigh University Press published (1989) Stephen H. Cutcliffe and Robert C. Post's, In Context; History and the History of Technology — Essays in Honor of Melvin Kranzbergr containing articles by major historians of technology. When Dr. Kranzberg became emeritus in June 1988, the Georgia Tech Foundation established the Melvin Kranzberg Professorship in the History of Technology. The first occupant of this chair was Dr. Bruce Sinclair, former head of the Institute for the History and Philosophy of Science and Technology at the University of Toronto and a former student of Dr. Kranzberg. Dr. Melvin Kranzberg married tLouise Lester Clark.
Provenance:
Collection donated by Georgia Institute of Technology, through Dr. Melvin Kranzberg, August 24, 1988.
Restrictions:
Collection is open for research. Collection stored off-site. Contact repository for details.
Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
Technology -- Societies, etc. -- 1930-1990  Search this
Educators -- 1930-1990  Search this
Technology -- History -- 1930-1990  Search this
Genre/Form:
Personal papers -- 20th century
Business records -- 20th century
Professional papers -- 20th century
Correspondence -- 1940-1990
Citation:
Melvin Kranzberg Papers, 1934-1988, Archives Center, National Museum of American History.
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.0266
See more items in:
Melvin Kranzberg Papers
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmah-ac-0266

Sydel Silverman papers

Creator:
Silverman, Sydel  Search this
Names:
American Anthropological Association  Search this
City University of New York  Search this
Wenner-Gren Foundation for Anthropological Research  Search this
Extent:
24.96 Linear feet (59 document boxes plus 1 oversize box)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Place:
Italy
Monte Castello di Vibio (Italy)
Date:
1939-2010
bulk 1949-2010
Summary:
The Sydel Silverman papers, 1939-2010 (bulk 1949-2010) document her field research in Italy, her work as an educator and foundation executive, and her involvement in professional organizations. Sydel Silverman taught at Queens College in New York, was Executive Officer of the CUNY Ph.D. Program in Anthropology, and served as president of the Wenner-Gren Foundation. Her primary fields of research have been agrarian communities in Italy and the history and practice of anthropology. Materials in the collection include field notes, journals, correspondence, calendars, published and unpublished writings, conference papers and lectures, teaching files, student files, photographs and slides, and sound recordings.
Scope and Contents:
This collection contains the professional papers of anthropologist Sydel Silverman. Included are research materials consisting of field notes, journals, other scholars' publications, and newspaper clippings; correspondence; postcards; calendars; published and unpublished writings; conference papers and lectures; brochures; itineraries; conference meeting notes; teaching files, including syllabi and reading lists; student files such as class notes and papers from Silverman's years as an anthropology student; photographs and slides; and sound recordings.

The materials in this collection document Silverman's travels through Italy while conducting field research, her role as an educator and academic administrator, and her involvement in professional organizations such as the Wenner-Gren Foundation and the American Anthropological Association. Silverman participated heavily in conferences and seminars across the U.S. and internationally. A copious note taker, Silverman recorded her reflections on many of these experiences. Her notes can be found throughout the collection.
Arrangement:
The collection is organized into 10 series: (1) Field Research, 1939-2002 [bulk 1960-1987]; (2) Correspondence, 1959-2009; (3) Writings, 1963-2009; (4) Wenner-Gren Foundation Files, 1985-2009; (5) Professional Activities, 1961-2010; (6) Teaching Files, 1958-2005; (7) Biographical Files, 1961-2008; (8) Student Files, 1949-65; (9) Photographs, 1961-2002; (10) Sound Recordings, 1960-61
Biographical Note:
Sydel Silverman is an anthropologist known for her work as a researcher, writer, academic administrator, and foundation executive. Her career in anthropology began with her graduate studies at the University of Chicago (1952-1957) and Columbia University (1957-63). After graduation she started teaching at Queens College in New York (1962-75) and became Executive Officer of the CUNY Ph.D. Program in Anthropology (1975-86). After leaving CUNY, she moved on to the Wenner-Gren Foundation, serving as president of the Foundation from 1987 to 1999.

Silverman was born on May 20, 1933 in Chicago, Illinois. Sydel, the youngest of seven siblings, was raised in the Jewish neighborhood of Lawndale on the west side of Chicago. Silverman credits her Uncle Hirschel for inspiring her to learn about foreign cultures and traditions, writing that her time spent with him reading about mysticism and oriental religions "may have been the beginnings of what became my interest in anthropology" (Silverman 2008).

Silverman graduated from high school in January 1951 and entered the University of Illinois at Navy Pier as a pre-med student. At the end of her second year at the University of Illinois, she entered the University of Chicago's program in Committee on Human Development, which combined study in biology, psychology, and sociology-anthropology. The program allowed students to enter with only two years of college with a special exam, which Silverman passed. She completed her Masters in 1957 and enrolled in the PhD program in Anthropology at Columbia University, during which she decided to focus her research on central Italy.

Silverman's first experience in Italy was in 1955 when she spent a year traveling through Europe with her first husband, Mel Silverman. They moved from city to city, beginning in Naples and then Rome, the city that Sydel writes was "the instant beginning of my love affair with Italy" (Silverman 2008). Upon their return from Europe the couple moved to New York. Sydel began working as a secretary but she soon decided to go back to school. She "picked anthropology, because it was the closest thing to being multi-disciplinary while still having a label, and Columbia was the obvious place to go in New York" (Silverman 2008). She was inspired to focus on the Mediterranean for her fieldwork because of Conrad Arensberg's cultural anthropological work in Europe.

In August of 1960 Sydel left for Italy to conduct a community study of the village Montecastello di Vibio. Silverman confessed in her memoirs that she was "never good at fieldwork," but she formed relationships with many of the locals who helped her collect data for her dissertation. Her research in Italy was one of the first social-anthropological studies of Central Italy and is known for its description of the traditional agrarian system of that area (the mezzadria) shortly before it was abolished by law. Silverman's dissertation research resulted in a book, Three Bells of Civilization, and numerous journal articles. She was awarded her Ph.D. in 1963.

Silverman's subsequent research in Italy included a study of a land reform area in the South (1967) and several field seasons (1980-85) devoted to a comparative study of competitive festivals in Central Italy. Most notable from this work are her publications on the Palio of Siena.

Silverman's other primary research interest has been in the history and practice of anthropology. She edited Totems and Teachers (1981, rev. 2004), a text about prominent anthropologists, and co-authored One Discipline Four Ways (2005). Her book The Beast on the Table (2002) analyzes twenty-five international symposia that she organized and led while at the Wenner-Gren Foundation and is a record of the living history of anthropology. She later became interested in parallels between the history of anthropology and that of the movies, which she presented as the 2006 Distinguished Lecture to the American Anthropological Association (published in The American Anthropologist Volume 109, Issue 3). In addition, she initiated an effort to save the primary documents of anthropology, co-authoring with Nancy Parezo the book Preserving the Anthropological Record (1992, rev. 1995) and co-organizing CoPAR (the Council for the Preservation of Anthropological Records).

Silverman's career as an administrator began in 1970 when she was elected as departmental chair at Queens College. In 1975 she was chosen as the Executive Officer of the CUNY Ph.D. Program in Anthropology, and under her leadership the program went from disarray and the threat of elimination to being cited as one of the ten top anthropology doctoral programs in the country. She also led a successful effort to retain full anthropology departments at all the senior CUNY colleges during the New York City budget crises of 1965-76. In 1987 she was appointed president of the Wenner-Gren Foundation, and acted as the spokesperson for the Foundation, overseeing fellowship and grant funding and advocating for the field of anthropology. She retired from Wenner-Gren in 1999.

Silverman died of cancer on March 25, 2019 at age 85.

Sources Consulted

Silverman, Sydel. 2008. "Memoirs." Sydel Silverman Papers: Box 42. National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

Roberts, Sam. "Sydel Silverman, 85, Dies; Defended Anthropology in Academia." New York Times, April 5, 2019.

Chronology

1933 -- Born May 20 in Chicago, Illinois

1951 -- January: Entered University of Illinois at Navy Pier, pre-med, through August 1952

1952 -- Entered University of Chicago, Program in Human Development

1953 -- December 27: Married Mel Silverman

1957 -- September: Entered Columbia University, Department of Anthropology Received M.A. from University of Chicago

1960-1961 -- Conducted fieldwork in Montecastello di Vibio

1962 -- September: Began teaching classes at Queens College, CUNY

1963 -- PhD awarded

1966 -- Mel Silverman died

1968 -- Fall semester: Acting Chairman, Dept. of Anthro., Queens Tenure awarded, Queens College

1970-1973 -- Department Chairman, Anthropology, Queens

1972 -- March 18: Married Eric R. Wolf

1975 -- Executive Officer of Ph.D. Program in Anthropology, CUNY Graduate School (through June 1982)

1980-1982 -- Festival research and travels in Italy: Siena, Perugia, Gubbio, Rome, Florence, Geneva

1982-1983 -- September: Acting Dean of the Graduate School, CUNY

1987 -- President of Wenner-Gren Foundation

1999 -- Eric R. Wolf died Retired from Wenner-Gren presidency

2019 -- Silverman died of cancer on March 25 at age 85

Selected Bibliography

1968 -- Silverman, Sydel F. "Agricultural Organization, Social Structure, and Values in Italy: Amoral Familism Reconsidered." American Anthropologist 70 (February 1968): 1-20.

1970 -- Silverman, Sydel F. "'Exploitation' in Rural Central Italy: Structure and Ideology in Stratification Study." Comparative Studies in Society and History 12 (July 1970): 327-339.

1975 -- Silverman, Sydel. Three Bells of Civilization: the Life of an Italian Hill Town. New York: Columbia University Press, 1975.

1976 -- Silverman, Sydel. "Anthropology and the Crisis at CUNY." Anthropology News 17, no.10 (December 1976): 7-10.

1981 -- Silverman, Sydel, ed. Totems and Teachers: Key Figures in the History of Anthropology. New York: Columbia University Press, 1981.

1984 -- Silverman, Sydel. "Anthropological Perspectives on Suicide." In Suicide: The Will to Live vs. The Will to Die, edited by Norman Linzer, 225-233. New York: Human Sciences Press, 1984.

1986 -- Silverman, Sydel. "Anthropology and History: Understanding the Boundaries." Historical Methods 19 (Summer 1986): 123-126.

1992 -- Silverman, Sydel and Nancy J. Parezo, eds. Preserving the Anthropological Record. New York: Wenner-Gren Foundation for Anthropological Research, 1992.

2002 -- Silverman, Sydel. The Beast on the Table: Conferencing with Anthropologists. Walnut Creek, CA: AltaMira Press, 2002.
Provenance:
These papers were donated to the National Anthropological Archives by Sydel Silverman in April 2011.
Restrictions:
Files containing Silverman's students' grades and papers have been restricted, as have grant and fellowships applications sent to Silverman to review and her comments on them. For preservation reasons, the computer disks from The Beast on the Table are also restricted.

Access to the Sydel Silverman papers requires an appointment.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Women anthropologists  Search this
Anthropology  Search this
Festivals  Search this
Ethnology  Search this
Village Communities  Search this
Agriculture  Search this
Citation:
Sydel Silverman papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.2011-11
See more items in:
Sydel Silverman papers
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-2011-11

Sinezona carinata (Adams)

Type Citation:
Ladd. 1982. USGS Professional Paper. (n.1171): 20, pl.01,f.3,4.
Place:
Santo, New Hebrides
Taxonomy:
Animalia Mollusca Cyrtosoma Gastropoda
Published Name:
Sinezona carinata (Adams)
USNM Number:
PAL214324
See more items in:
Paleogeneral
Types: Mollusca Cenozoic
Mollusca Cenozoic Marine Type
Paleobiology
Data Source:
NMNH - Paleobiology Dept.
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmnhpaleobiology_3173072
Additional Online Media:

Cassidulina okinawaensis Leroy, 1964

Type Citation:
LeRoy, L. W. 1964. Smaller Foraminifera from the late Tertiary of southern Okinawa. USGS Professional Paper. 454-F: 1-58.
Type Status:
holotype
Taxonomy:
Protoctista Granuloreticulosa Foraminifera
Published Name:
Cassidulina okinawaensis Leroy, 1964
USNM Number:
MO625093
See more items in:
Paleogeneral
Types: Foraminifera
Foraminiferida Primary Type Microslides
Paleobiology
Data Source:
NMNH - Paleobiology Dept.
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmnhpaleobiology_3147970
Additional Online Media:

Cibicides shinzatoensis Leroy, 1964

Type Citation:
LeRoy, L. W. 1964. Smaller Foraminifera from the late Tertiary of southern Okinawa. USGS Professional Paper. 454-F: 1-58.
Type Status:
holotype
Taxonomy:
Protoctista Granuloreticulosa Foraminifera
Published Name:
Cibicides shinzatoensis Leroy, 1964
USNM Number:
MO625097
See more items in:
Paleogeneral
Types: Foraminifera
Foraminiferida Primary Type Microslides
Paleobiology
Data Source:
NMNH - Paleobiology Dept.
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmnhpaleobiology_3147971
Additional Online Media:

Asterigerina fimbriata Todd, 1957

Type Citation:
Todd, R. 1957. Smaller foraminifera, In: Geology of Saipan, Mariana Islands: Part 3. USGS Professional Paper. (280-H): 265-320.
Type Status:
holotype
Taxonomy:
Protoctista Granuloreticulosa Foraminifera
Published Name:
Asterigerina fimbriata Todd, 1957
USNM Number:
MO623799
See more items in:
Paleogeneral
Types: Foraminifera
Foraminiferida Primary Type Microslides
Paleobiology
Data Source:
NMNH - Paleobiology Dept.
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmnhpaleobiology_3147890
Additional Online Media:

Anomalina ? maculosa Todd, 1957

Type Citation:
Todd, R. 1957. Smaller foraminifera, In: Geology of Saipan, Mariana Islands: Part 3. USGS Professional Paper. (280-H): 265-320.
Type Status:
holotype
Taxonomy:
Protoctista Granuloreticulosa Foraminifera
Published Name:
Anomalina ? maculosa Todd, 1957
USNM Number:
MO624126
See more items in:
Paleogeneral
Types: Foraminifera
Foraminiferida Primary Type Microslides
Paleobiology
Data Source:
NMNH - Paleobiology Dept.
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmnhpaleobiology_3147916
Additional Online Media:

Cristellaria basilodoensis Israelsky, 1955

Type Citation:
Israelsky, M. C. 1955. Foraminifera of the Lodo Formation Central Callifornia, Part 2, Calcareous Foraminifera (Miliolidae and Lagenidae, part). USGS Professional Paper. 240-B
Type Status:
holotype
Taxonomy:
Protoctista Granuloreticulosa Foraminifera
Published Name:
Cristellaria basilodoensis Israelsky, 1955
USNM Number:
MO548975
See more items in:
Paleogeneral
Types: Foraminifera
Foraminiferida Primary Type Microslides
Paleobiology
Data Source:
NMNH - Paleobiology Dept.
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmnhpaleobiology_3147638
Additional Online Media:

Cristellaria alucinans Israelsky, 1955

Type Citation:
Israelsky, M. C. 1955. Foraminifera of the Lodo Formation Central Callifornia, Part 2, Calcareous Foraminifera (Miliolidae and Lagenidae, part). USGS Professional Paper. 240-B
Type Status:
holotype
Taxonomy:
Protoctista Granuloreticulosa Foraminifera
Published Name:
Cristellaria alucinans Israelsky, 1955
USNM Number:
MO548993
See more items in:
Paleogeneral
Types: Foraminifera
Foraminiferida Primary Type Microslides
Paleobiology
Data Source:
NMNH - Paleobiology Dept.
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmnhpaleobiology_3147642
Additional Online Media:

Robulus inenodabilis Israelsky, 1955

Type Citation:
Israelsky, M. C. 1955. Foraminifera of the Lodo Formation Central Callifornia, Part 2, Calcareous Foraminifera (Miliolidae and Lagenidae, part). USGS Professional Paper. 240-B
Type Status:
holotype
Taxonomy:
Protoctista Granuloreticulosa Foraminifera
Published Name:
Robulus inenodabilis Israelsky, 1955
USNM Number:
MO549005
See more items in:
Paleogeneral
Types: Foraminifera
Foraminiferida Primary Type Microslides
Paleobiology
Data Source:
NMNH - Paleobiology Dept.
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmnhpaleobiology_3147649
Additional Online Media:

Robulus vanus Israelsky, 1955

Type Citation:
Israelsky, M. C. 1955. Foraminifera of the Lodo Formation Central Callifornia, Part 2, Calcareous Foraminifera (Miliolidae and Lagenidae, part). USGS Professional Paper. 240-B
Type Status:
holotype
Taxonomy:
Protoctista Granuloreticulosa Foraminifera
Published Name:
Robulus vanus Israelsky, 1955
USNM Number:
MO549006
See more items in:
Paleogeneral
Types: Foraminifera
Foraminiferida Primary Type Microslides
Paleobiology
Data Source:
NMNH - Paleobiology Dept.
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmnhpaleobiology_3147650
Additional Online Media:

Robulus conspissatus Israelsky, 1955

Type Citation:
Israelsky, M. C. 1955. Foraminifera of the Lodo Formation Central Callifornia, Part 2, Calcareous Foraminifera (Miliolidae and Lagenidae, part). USGS Professional Paper. 240-B
Type Status:
holotype
Taxonomy:
Protoctista Granuloreticulosa Foraminifera
Published Name:
Robulus conspissatus Israelsky, 1955
USNM Number:
MO549008
See more items in:
Paleogeneral
Types: Foraminifera
Foraminiferida Primary Type Microslides
Paleobiology
Data Source:
NMNH - Paleobiology Dept.
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmnhpaleobiology_3147652
Additional Online Media:

Robulus mediocris Israelsky, 1955

Type Citation:
Israelsky, M. C. 1955. Foraminifera of the Lodo Formation Central Callifornia, Part 2, Calcareous Foraminifera (Miliolidae and Lagenidae, part). USGS Professional Paper. 240-B
Type Status:
holotype
Taxonomy:
Protoctista Granuloreticulosa Foraminifera
Published Name:
Robulus mediocris Israelsky, 1955
USNM Number:
MO549024
See more items in:
Paleogeneral
Types: Foraminifera
Foraminiferida Primary Type Microslides
Paleobiology
Data Source:
NMNH - Paleobiology Dept.
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmnhpaleobiology_3147661
Additional Online Media:

Robulus revoltus Israelsky, 1955

Type Citation:
Israelsky, M. C. 1955. Foraminifera of the Lodo Formation Central Callifornia, Part 2, Calcareous Foraminifera (Miliolidae and Lagenidae, part). USGS Professional Paper. 240-B
Type Status:
holotype
Taxonomy:
Protoctista Granuloreticulosa Foraminifera
Published Name:
Robulus revoltus Israelsky, 1955
USNM Number:
MO549026
See more items in:
Paleogeneral
Types: Foraminifera
Foraminiferida Primary Type Microslides
Paleobiology
Data Source:
NMNH - Paleobiology Dept.
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmnhpaleobiology_3147662
Additional Online Media:

Robulus revoltus Israelsky, 1955

Type Citation:
Israelsky, M. C. 1955. Foraminifera of the Lodo Formation Central Callifornia, Part 2, Calcareous Foraminifera (Miliolidae and Lagenidae, part). USGS Professional Paper. 240-B
Type Status:
paratype
Taxonomy:
Protoctista Granuloreticulosa Foraminifera
Published Name:
Robulus revoltus Israelsky, 1955
USNM Number:
MO549027
See more items in:
Paleogeneral
Types: Foraminifera
Foraminiferida Primary Type Microslides
Paleobiology
Data Source:
NMNH - Paleobiology Dept.
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmnhpaleobiology_3147663
Additional Online Media:

Robulus nobilitatus Israelsky, 1955

Type Citation:
Israelsky, M. C. 1955. Foraminifera of the Lodo Formation Central Callifornia, Part 2, Calcareous Foraminifera (Miliolidae and Lagenidae, part). USGS Professional Paper. 240-B
Type Status:
holotype
Taxonomy:
Protoctista Granuloreticulosa Foraminifera
Published Name:
Robulus nobilitatus Israelsky, 1955
USNM Number:
MO549041
See more items in:
Paleogeneral
Types: Foraminifera
Foraminiferida Primary Type Microslides
Paleobiology
Data Source:
NMNH - Paleobiology Dept.
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmnhpaleobiology_3147666
Additional Online Media:

Robulus jocosus Israelsky, 1955

Type Citation:
Israelsky, M. C. 1955. Foraminifera of the Lodo Formation Central Callifornia, Part 2, Calcareous Foraminifera (Miliolidae and Lagenidae, part). USGS Professional Paper. 240-B
Type Status:
holotype
Taxonomy:
Protoctista Granuloreticulosa Foraminifera
Published Name:
Robulus jocosus Israelsky, 1955
USNM Number:
MO549044
See more items in:
Paleogeneral
Types: Foraminifera
Foraminiferida Primary Type Microslides
Paleobiology
Data Source:
NMNH - Paleobiology Dept.
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmnhpaleobiology_3147668
Additional Online Media:

Robulus infortunatus Israelsky, 1955

Type Citation:
Israelsky, M. C. 1955. Foraminifera of the Lodo Formation Central Callifornia, Part 2, Calcareous Foraminifera (Miliolidae and Lagenidae, part). USGS Professional Paper. 240-B
Type Status:
holotype
Taxonomy:
Protoctista Granuloreticulosa Foraminifera
Published Name:
Robulus infortunatus Israelsky, 1955
USNM Number:
MO549049
See more items in:
Paleogeneral
Types: Foraminifera
Foraminiferida Primary Type Microslides
Paleobiology
Data Source:
NMNH - Paleobiology Dept.
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmnhpaleobiology_3147669
Additional Online Media:

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