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Media Project Records, 1989-2000

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution Smithsonian Business Ventures Smithsonian Entertainment  Search this
Subject:
Woodman-Cioffi, Lee  Search this
Smithsonian Institution Office of Telecommunications  Search this
Physical description:
3 cu. ft. (3 record storage boxes)
Type:
Manuscripts
Collection descriptions
Clippings
Color photographs
Video recordings
Date:
1989
1989-2000
Topic:
Interactive multimedia  Search this
Motion pictures  Search this
Local number:
SIA Acc. 00-109
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_arc_228881

Departmental Records, 1968-1991

Creator:
National Museum of American History (U.S.) Office of Public Services  Search this
Subject:
Hatch, Josiah O  Search this
Taylor, Lonn 1940-  Search this
Closter, Harold A  Search this
Weaver, James Merle  Search this
Cherkasky, Shirley E  Search this
Sharpe, Elizabeth M  Search this
Melendez, Manuel J  Search this
Reagon, Bernice Johnson 1942-  Search this
Smithsonian Institution Division of Performing Arts  Search this
Physical description:
32.5 cu. ft. processed holdings
Type:
Black-and-white negatives
Black-and-white photographs
Manuscripts
Videotapes
Audiotapes
Clippings
Date:
1968
1968-1991
Topic:
Museums--Educational aspects  Search this
Performing arts  Search this
Lectures and lecturing  Search this
Exhibitions  Search this
Seminars  Search this
Congresses and conventions  Search this
Local number:
SIA RS00542
See more items in:
Departmental Records 1968-1991 [National Museum of American History (U.S.) Office of Public Services]
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_arc_219876

Agency history, 1980-

Creator:
National Museum of American History (U.S.) Office of Public Services  Search this
Subject:
Hatch, Josiah O  Search this
Reagon, Bernice Johnson 1942-  Search this
Simmons, Gwendolyn Zoharah  Search this
Sharpe, Elizabeth M  Search this
Taylor, Lonn 1940-  Search this
Weaver, James Merle  Search this
Cherkasky, Shirley E  Search this
Clapp, Rebecca B  Search this
Closter, Harold A  Search this
Kilkenny, Niani  Search this
Melendez, Manuel J  Search this
Sanderson, Geraldine E  Search this
Smithsonian Institution Division of Performing Arts  Search this
Type:
Mixed archival materials
Date:
1984
1980-
Topic:
Museums and education  Search this
Local number:
SIA AH00146
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_arc_221105

Production Records, 1876, 1963-2002

Creator:
Smithsonian Productions  Search this
Subject:
Webb, Jacqueline Gales  Search this
Cherkezian, Nazaret  Search this
Quinnette, Jean B  Search this
Freeland, Denise  Search this
Johnson, Paul B  Search this
Brownstein, Elizabeth Smith 1930-  Search this
Meehan, John P  Search this
Loveland, Karen  Search this
Tyler, John  Search this
Kaiser, Lisa H  Search this
Turner, Michele  Search this
Schneider, Laura T  Search this
Paulson, John R  Search this
Bradley, Sandra Wentworth  Search this
Physical description:
143.84 cu. ft. unprocessed holdings
26.33 cu. ft. processed holdings
Type:
Drawings
Floor plans
Video recordings
Compact discs
Audiotapes
Clippings
Manuscripts
Black-and-white negatives
Black-and-white transparencies
Color negatives
Color transparencies
Brochures
Exhibition catalogs
Black-and-white photographs
Color photographs
Newsletters
Pamphlets
Picture postcards
Serials (publications)
Floppy disks
Date:
1963
1963-2002
1876, 1963-2002
Topic:
Budget  Search this
Intellectual property  Search this
Television--Production and direction  Search this
Video recordings--Production and direction  Search this
Radio programs  Search this
Local number:
SIA RS00518
Restrictions & Rights:
Records less than 15 years old with sensitive materials. Restricted for 15 years to researchers with written permission from the Chief Information Officer. Contact reference staff for details
See more items in:
Production Records 1876, 1963-2002 [Smithsonian Productions]
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_arc_227457

"Product Specialist Training"

Collection Creator:
Krispy Kreme Doughnut Corporation.  Search this
Container:
Box 42
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1996
Collection Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Collection Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Collection Citation:
Krispy Kreme Doughnut Corporation Records, Archives Center, National Museum of American History.
See more items in:
Krispy Kreme Corporation Records
Krispy Kreme Corporation Records / Series 7: Audiovisual Materials / VHS Videotapes
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmah-ac-0594-ref663

Records

Creator::
National Museum of American History. Department of Public Programs  Search this
Extent:
41 cu. ft. (41 record storage boxes)
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Floor plans
Videotapes
Black-and-white photographs
Manuscripts
Brochures
Illustrations
Clippings
Floppy disks
Electronic records
Date:
1968-1992
Descriptive Entry:
These records mostly consist of staff correspondence and memoranda documenting administrative and program-oriented activities of the Department of Public Programs. The records pertain to fundraising, social history lectures and seminars, the Senior Series Program, budget, educational outreach proposals, grant information, planning for the Program of Hispanic American History, and the Country Music Program. In addition, there are budget reports; videotapes, audiotapes, abstracts, and planning documents from the Conference on Music in America at the Smithsonian Institution; minutes of meetings; information on educational projects for NMAH exhibitions; research material consisting of exhibition scripts, blueprints, and photographs; outline of Highlight Tours at NMAH; and brochures, articles, and newspaper clippings on NMAH special events.

The record unit also includes records which date back to the Division of Performing Arts. Performing Arts records primarily consist of working files; videotapes and audiotapes of performances from the Country Music Program, Jazz at the Smithsonian, and the Festival of American Folklife; and budgetary information.
Historical Note:
In 1980 an Office of Public and Academic Programs was established at the National Museum of History and Technology (NMHT), subsequently the National Museum of American History (NMAH). Josiah O. Hatch, a Special Assistant to the Director of the Museum, was assigned as Director of the Office. Hatch submitted reports for Public and Academic Programs to Douglas E. Evelyn, Deputy Director of NMAH.

When the Smithsonian Institution's Division of Performing Arts became defunct in 1983, part of its staff was reassigned to the Office of Public and Academic Programs. In 1984, the Office was reorganized as the Department of Public Programs. It included sections of production, education, the Program in Black American History, performances, publications, and the Office of Public Affairs. Hatch became its head as the Assistant Director for Public Programs. The next year, Lonn W. Taylor succeeded Hatch.

The Department of Public Programs is responsible for a variety of tasks associated with providing the public with opportunities for learning. It works with the Museum's other departments to produce educational materials such as scholarly publications, kits and guides, and information on various topics of interest that interpret NMAH exhibitions. The Department also sponsors or coordinates programs and performances using Museum collections; presents special programs on important aspects of American life and culture that cannot be exhibited through artifacts alone; and organizes colloquia, symposia, and lectures. Staff has included Josiah O. Hatch, Director of the Department of Public Programs, 1980-1983, and Assistant Director for Public Programs, 1984; Lonn Taylor, Deputy Assistant Director for Public Programs, 1984, and Assistant Director, 1985- ; Harold A. Closter, Production Director, 1983-1986, Program Manager, 1987-1990, and Deputy Assistant Director, 1991- ; Bernice Johnson Reagon, Director of the Program in Black American History, 1983-1987; James M. Weaver, Director of Performance Programs, 1983-1986; Shirley E. Cherkasky, Coordinator of Museum Programs, 1983- ; Elizabeth M. Sharpe, Education Specialist, 1985-1986, and Deputy Assistant Director for Public Programs, 1987- ; and Manuel J. Melendez, Performing Arts Production Specialist, 1984-1991.
Topic:
Museums -- Public relations  Search this
Science museums  Search this
Historical museums  Search this
Museums -- Education aspects  Search this
Genre/Form:
Floor plans
Videotapes
Black-and-white photographs
Manuscripts
Brochures
Illustrations
Clippings
Floppy disks
Electronic records
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 584, National Museum of American History. Department of Public Programs, Records
Identifier:
Record Unit 584
See more items in:
Records
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-faru0584
Additional Online Media:

Frederick Douglass Patterson papers

Creator:
Patterson, Frederick D. (Frederick Douglass), 1901-1988  Search this
Names:
Phelps-Stokes Fund  Search this
Tuskegee Institute  Search this
United Negro College Fund  Search this
Carver, George Washington, 1864?-1943  Search this
Moton, Robert Russa, 1867-1940  Search this
Patterson, Frederick D. (Frederick Douglass), 1901-1988  Search this
Extent:
18.66 Linear feet (21 boxes)
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Diplomas
Notebooks
Articles
Manuscripts
Photographic prints
Ephemera
Scrapbooks
Newsletters
Awards
Photographs
Invitations
Legal documents
Programs
Correspondence
Clippings
Date:
1882 - 1988
Summary:
President of Tuskegee Normal and Industrial Institute (later Tukegee Institute; now Tuskegee University) from 1935 - 1953 and founder of the United Negro College Fund (1944). Patterson was born on October 10, 1901. Orphaned at age two, he was raised by his eldest sister, Wilhelmina (Bess), a school teacher in Texas. He studied at Iowa State College, where he received a doctorate in veterinary medicine in 1923 and a master of science degree in 1927. Five years later, he was awarded a second doctorate degree from Cornell University. Patterson taught veterinary science for four years at Virginia State College, where he was also Director of Agriculture. His tenure at Tuskegee University started in 1928 and spanned almost 25 years, first as head of the veterinary division, then as the director of the School of Agriculture and finally as Tuskegee's third president. He married Catherine Elizabeth Moton, daughter of Tuskegee University's second president, Dr. Robert R. Moton. Patterson also founded the School of Veterinary Medicine at Tuskegee in 1944, the same year he founded the United Negro College Fund (UNCF). The UNCF continues today as a critical source of annual income for a consortium of Historically Black Colleges and Universities, Tuskegee University among them.
Scope and Content note:
The Frederick Douglass Patterson Collection comprises 18.66 linear feet of correspondence, manuscripts, research material, published writings, photographs, audiovisual material, scrapbooks, diplomas, awards, and other materials chronicling the personal life and professional career of Frederick D. Patterson.

The collection is comprised of glimpses into the life of Dr. Patterson. The little correspondece that survived is located in Series 2: Career, Series 3: Correspondence, and Series 4: Organizations. Some of the correspondence takes the form of congratulatory notes from 1953 during Patterson's transfer from Tuskegee Institute to the Phelps-Stokes Fund, located in Series 2. There is also a personal note sent to Patterson's wife, Catherine Patterson, from George Washington Carver in which he describes peanut oil as a good massage oil.
Arrangement note:
The collection is arranged by series and chronologically therein:

1. Biography: This series provides insight into Patterson's family life through primary documents. It is comprised of family wills, insurance policies, and his autobiography. Sub-series are arranged alphabetically by title.

2. Career: This series contains materials from Patterson's long professional career in the field of higher education, including his tenure as present of both the Tuskegee Institute and the Phelps-Stokes Fund. Sub-series are arranged chronologically.

3. Correspondence: This series contains letters sent to Patterson (and his wife) of a personal and professional nature. Several letters relate to Patterson's personal business "Signs and Services," which was a small billboard advertising company. There are also letters from George Washington Carver. The series is arranged chronologically. 4. Organizations: This series contains material from the various foundations Patterson founded and to which he belonged, including the R.R. Moton Fund and the College Endowment Funding Plan. He is especially noted for developing the United Negro College Fund. The series is organized alphabetically by sub-series title.

5. Honors: This series contains the awards, citations, and resolutions Patterson received during his lifetime. Folders are organized chronologically. 6. Subject Files: This series comprises articles, employee vitas, and other documents collected and organized by Patterson. Among the subjects in the files are higher education, Negroes, segregation, civil rights, and employee records. There is no key to this system.

7. Photographs: The Photograph series mostly documents Patterson's tenure at Tuskegee University. The series includes images of Patterson and various other notable figures during formal functions at the university. Noteworthy personalities include George Washington Carver, Eleanor and Franklin D. Roosevelt, and President Kwame Nkrumah of Ghana.

8. Printed Materials: This series contains books, programs, and other documents from Patterson's personal collection. The series is organized alphabetically by author's last name.
Biographical note:
Frederick Douglass Patterson was born on October 10, 1901 to parents William and Mamie Brooks Patterson, in the Buena Vista Heights area of Anacostia in Washington, D.C. The youngest of six children, Patterson's parents died of tuberculosis before he reached the age of two years, his mother when he was eleven months old and his father a year later. Following his parents' death, the Patterson children were split up and sent to live in the homes of family and friends as stipulated in his father's last will and testament until he was seven years old, Patterson lived in the Anacostia area with a family friend he called "Aunt Julia."

When he was seven years old, Patterson's older sister Bess (a recent graduate of the Washington Conservatory of Music) decided to seek employment in Texas and took him with her. Many of their parents' family still lived in the state, which allowed Patterson the opportunity to spend months with various aunts and uncles, while his sister taught music throughout the South. After completing eighth grade, Patterson joined his sister at the Prairie View Normal School, where she taught music and directed the choir. Patterson attended the school for four years, during which time he developed an interest in veterinary medicine.

In 1920, Patterson enrolled at Iowa State College as a veterinary student. He graduated in 1923 and moved to Columbus, Ohio, to join his brother John. While there, he took the Ohio State Board exam for Veterinary Medicine. Although he became certified, a lack of money prevented him from practicing. Four years later he received a teaching offer from Virginia State College (VSC) in Petersburg, Virginia, which afforded him the opportunity to work within his profession. While at VSC Patterson took a leave of absence and returned to Iowa, in 1926, to pursue a Master's degree in veterinary medicine.

After five years at VSC, the Tuskegee Normal and Industrial Institute offered Patterson a position running the veterinarian hospital and teaching veterinary science. He moved to Tuskegee, Alabama in 1928. While at Tuskegee, Patterson decided to pursue a Ph.D. in bacteriology at Cornell University. During his year and a half leave from Tuskegee, Patterson completed his coursework and wrote his dissertation. After he returned to Tuskegee, a serial killer murdered three people, including the head of the Department of Agriculture. Confronted with this tragedy, school officials quickly offered Patterson the vacant position, which he accepted in 1934.

Robert R. Moton, second president of Tuskegee, retired in 1935 and a search was soon commenced to find the next president for the school. Patterson, in the meantime, pursued more personal matters when he met and married Catherine Moton (with whom he would have a son) in June 1935. By then he was already hired to take his now, father-in-law's, position as President of Tuskegee Normal and Industrial Institute.

As president of Tuskegee, Patterson made several changes and many additions to the institution. He increased faculty housing for professors; integrated the Board of Trustees' meeting meals and eventually arranged for both balck and white members to eat at one table; shortened the name to Tuskegee Institute; and established the Department of Commercial Dietetics in 1935, the veterinary medicine program in 1942, and the engineering program in 1948. While many considered Patterson's changes important achievements, it was his development of the Commercial/Military Aviation Program that would bring the school distinction and fame.

Patterson first attempted to develop the aviation program in 1939. The government fostered the development of such programs by subsiding the expenses. All a university had to do was present able-bodied instructors and willing pupils. Tuskegee had both. By 1940 the United States Air Force was interested in integrating its forces. In order to do this they needed trained black pilots. Tuskegee was the perfect place to provide the needed pilots since the school was situated in an all-black environment where students could concentrate on learning to fly without having to worry about racist reactions from their fellow classmates. To accommodate this program, the Tuskegee Army Air Base was created. Tuskegee pilots flew missions throughout World War II and would later be recognized for their bravery.

An important part of Patterson's duties as president was fund-raising. By 1943 he found it increasingly difficult to find ample sources of funds to run the Institute. He came to realize Tuskegee and similar black colleges would benefit if they pooled their funding resources and asked for larger amounts of money from philanthropic individuals and organizations as a collective. Working together would cut fund-raising expenses; this in turn would leave more money for the colleges to use as they wished. Patterson named his new creation the United Negro College Fund (UNCF); it would go on to raise millions of dollars for the nation's historically black colleges. He served as the first president of the organization.

During the fifteen years Patterson served as president of Tuskegee, he hosted many famous personalities, including W.E.B. DuBois, Mary McLeod Bethune, Eleanor Roosevelt, Duke Ellington, Paul Robeson, Pearl Buck, and Andre Segovia. He developed a lasting relationship with George Washington Carver, who had been a professor with Tuskegee since the days of Booker T. Washington.

Patterson served on many organizational boards in addition to his educational work. His involvement with the Phelps-Stokes Fund would ultimately lead Patterson to leave his beloved Tuskegee Institute to apply his educational philosophies on a broader scale. In 1953 the Fund approached Patterson and offered him the presidency of the organization. Patterson, feeling he needed a change, accepted the offer. He resigned from Tuskegee that same year and moved to New York to begin a new life.

Organized in 1911, the Phelps-Stokes Fund supported African, African American, and Native American education and worked on solving housing problems in New York City. Patterson's interest in African education began before he joined Phelps-Stokes. In 1950 the World Bank/International Bank Commission to Nigeria hired him to "evaluate the resources of Nigeria and…to study the educational programs and the organizational structure of advanced education." Through his work with the Fund he continued his efforts to improve the educational opportunities for Africans and help them move beyond colonialism. Patterson traveled extensively throughout the west coast of Africa in support of these goals.

In addition to forming the UNCF, Patterson created two other organizations (the Robert R. Moton Institute and the College Endowment Funding Plan), during the mid 1960s and 1970s. Each was designed to improve funding efforts for historically black colleges. The Robert R. Moton institute began as an off-shoot of the Phelps-Stokes as a site for conferences to address the Fund's primary concerns. Patterson's idea for the Institute came from a desire to put to use a piece of property inherited after Moton's death. Empathy with the frustrations of college presidents regarding the restricted funding for institutional expenses led Patterson to create the College Endowment Funding Plan. The Endowment was designed to alleviate this situation by providing matching funds to eligible colleges. The Endowment made its first payment in 1978. Unfortunately, by the 1980s, the Moton Institute lost most of its government funding due to federal cutbacks. This resulted in reductions to the Institute's programming.

It was not until Patterson was well into his eighties that he began to retire from his life of public service. On June 23, 1987, President Ronald Reagan presented Dr. Patterson with the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the highest possible honor that can be bestowed upon a civilian, for his service in higher education and his role in creating funding sources for the nation's historically black colleges. A year later Frederick Douglass Patterson died at the age of eighty-seven.

Honorary Degrees

undated -- Xavier University

1941 -- Virginia State College

1941 -- Wilberforce University

1953 -- Morehouse College

1956 -- Tuskegee Institute

1961 -- New York University

1966 -- Edward Waters College

1967 -- Atlanta University

1969 -- Franklin and Marshall College

1970 -- Virginia Union University

1975 -- Bishop College

1977 -- St. Augustine's College

1982 -- Brooklyn College of the City University of New York

1984 -- Stillman College

1985 -- Payne College

Distinctions

undated -- Association for the Study of Negro Life and History Carter

undated -- The Southern Education Foundation, Inc. Distinguished Service Citation

undated -- The United Negro College Fund (UNCF) and Texas Association of Developing Colleges Annual Leadership Awards

1950 -- Christian Education department, African Methodist Episcopal Zion Church, Inc. Citation for Distinguished Service

1953 -- Bethune-Cookman College, the Mary McLeod Bethune Medallion

1953 -- John A. Andrew Clinical Society at Tuskegee Institute, Citation for Distinguished Service in the Cause of Humanity

1953 -- Tuskegee Institute, Certificate of Appreciation for 25 Years of Service

1957 -- Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity, Inc. Beta Lamda Sigma Chapter, Bigger and Better Business Award

1960 -- National Alumni Council of the UNCF, Inc. Award

1963 -- National Business League, Booker T. Washington Award

1965 -- Booker T. Washington Business Association, Certificate of Acknowledgement

1970 -- Moton Conference Center Award

1970 -- Tuskegee National Alumni Association, R.R. Moton Award

1972 -- American College Public Relations Association, 1972 Award for Distinguished Service to Higher Education

1972 -- UNCF F.D. Patterson 71st Birthday Award

1975 -- National Business League, Booker T. Washington Symbol of Service Award

1976 -- Phelps-Stokes Fund, Continuous Creative and Courageous Leadership in the Cause of Higher Education for Blacks

1977 -- Yale Alumni Associates of Afro-America, Distinguished Service Award

1979 -- Alpha Phi Alpha Education Foundation Inc., Distinguished Educator Award

1979 -- Tuskegee Institute Alumni Association Philadelphia Charter Award

1980 -- The Iowa State University Alumni Association, Distinguished Achievement Citation

1980 -- Gary Branch NAACP Life Membership Fight for Freedom Dinner 1980, Roy Wilkins Award

1980 -- State of Alabama Certificate of Appreciation

1982 -- St. Luke's United Methodist Church Achievement Award

1983 -- Tuskegee Airmen, Inc., Distinguished Service Award

1984 -- Booker T. Washington Foundation, Booker T. Washington Distinguished Service Award

1984 -- The Ohio State University Office of Minority Affairs, Distinguished Humanitarian and Service Award

1985 -- Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc, Eta Zeta Lamda Chapter Civic Award

1985 -- United States, Private Sector Initiative Commendation

1987 -- Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc of New York State, Founders Day Award

1987 -- Presidential Medal of Freedom

1987 -- Brag Business Achievement Award

1987 -- Phelps-Stokes Fund, Aggrey Medal

Public Service

1941-1971 -- Southern Educational Foundation, Inc., Board Member

1943-1988 -- United Negro College Fund, Founder, President, and Member

1960s-1988 -- Robert R. Moton Memorial Institute, Founder

1970s-1988 -- The College Endowment Funding Plan, Founder

undated -- American National Red Cross, Board of Governors Member

undated -- Boys Scouts of America, National Council Member

undated -- Citizens Committee for the Hoover Report on Reorganization of Federal Government, Board Member

undated -- Institute of International Education, Advisory committee Member

undated -- National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, Life Member

undated -- National Business League, President and Board Member

undated -- National Urban League, National Committee Member

undated -- Phelps-Stokes Fund, Board of Trustees Member

undated -- President's Commission on Higher Education for Negroes

undated -- Southern Regional Education, Board of Control Member
Related Materials:
Additional biographical materials in the Dale/Patterson Collection of the Anacostia Community Museum Archives.

This collection contains artifacts catalogued in the ACM Objects Collection.
Provenance:
The Frederick Douglass Patterson papers were donated to the Anacostia Community Museum in 2001 by Frederick Douglass Patterson, Jr.
Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Please contact the archivist to make an appointment: ACMarchives@si.edu.
Rights:
The Frederick Douglass Patterson papers are the physical property of the Anacostia Community Museum. Literary and copyright belong to the author/creator or their legal heirs and assigns. Rights to work produced during the normal course of Museum business resides with the Anacostia Community Museum. For further information, and to obtain permission to publish or reproduce, contact the Museum Archives.
Topic:
Universities and colleges -- Administration  Search this
African Americans -- Education (Higher)  Search this
African American universities and colleges  Search this
Genre/Form:
Diplomas
Notebooks
Articles
Manuscripts
Photographic prints
Ephemera
Scrapbooks
Newsletters
Awards
Photographs
Invitations
Legal documents
Programs
Correspondence
Clippings
Citation:
Frederick Douglass Patterson papers, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution, gift of Frederick Douglass Patterson, Jr.
Identifier:
ACMA.06-010
See more items in:
Frederick Douglass Patterson papers
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-acma-06-010
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Additional Online Media:

Benjamin H. Stansbury Papers

Donor:
Stansbury, Jacqueline  Search this
Creator:
Stansbury, Benjamin H., 1935-1996  Search this
Names:
Dymo Industries  Search this
Industrial Design Affiliates  Search this
Mattel Toys  Search this
Product Specialists  Search this
Ronco Teleproducts  Search this
Stansbury Company  Search this
Walter Dorwin Teague Associates  Search this
Extent:
5 Cubic feet (15 boxes, 1 oversize folder)
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Photographs
Correspondence
Clippings
Memorandums
Manuals
Design drawings
Slides (photographs)
Date:
1955 - 1995
Summary:
The collection documents the inventing and design work of Benjamin Stansbury.
Scope and Contents:
The collection documents the inventing and design work of Benjamin Stansbury. It contains correspondence; photographs and slides; memoranda, manuals and other internal company documents; design drawings; clippings; and trade literature. The bulk of the material relates to Stansbury's work at the Stansbury Company and the PULSAR electric toothbrush.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged into ten series.

Series 1: Personal Materials, 1954-1983

Series 2: Walter Dorwin Teague and Associates Records, 1959-1971

Series 3: Dymo, 1961, 1966

Series 4: Mattel Toymakers, Inc., 1962-1966

Series 5: Product Specialists, 1962-1971

Series 6: Innovation, undated

Series 7: Industrial Design Affiliates, 1964-1973

Series 8: The Stansbury Company, 1966-1994 (bulk 1978-1990)

Series 9: Ronco Teleproducts, Inc., 1978-1980

Series 10: Pulse Innovations, Inc., 1990-1995
Biographical / Historical:
Benjamin H. Stansbury, Jr. (September 26, 1934-March 11, 1996) was born in Chattanooga, Tennessee and graduated high school from the Baltimore Polytechnic Institute (founded in 1883 as an engineering school). He attended the Georgia Institute of Technology, School of Architecture, earning a BS in Engineering in 1957. From 1957 to 1961, Stansbury worked for Walter Dorwin Teague Associates in New York as an industrial designer. At Teague, Stansbury worked on a variety of products and missile components. In 1960, he won the Industrial Design Institute Design Award Citation for the Euphorian dental chair (for Ritter Dental). While at Teague, Stansbury met Helen Marie Beheney (December 5, 1935-July 27, 2014) who was a secretary. The couple married in 1961 in California and had two children, Claude and Jacqueline.

Stansbury left New York for Berkeley, California where he joined Dymo Industries, Inc. as Director of New Product Planning from 1961 to 1965. At Dymo, Stansbury crafted a new corporate image and supervised plant and office construction. From 1965 to 1966 he worked for Mattel Toymakers in Hawthorne, California as Director of Corporate Planning and Acquisitions. In 1966, Stansbury, along with John Pylant, formed Product Specialists in Santa Monica. Rudy Hurwich later invested in the company as a three-way partner. Product Specialists focused on product development, manufacturing and marketing. While at Product Specialists, Stansbury developed and built a folding polypropylene boat called the Stowboat (US Patent 4,556,009) available in three sizes (seven, eight and nine feet). His marketing included the phrase, "Let's Go Stowboating!" Stansbury obtained approximately thirty-five patents, many of which were design patents. Almost all of the patents issued to him were assigned to the company who contracted his services. In 1969, Stansbury founded Innovation, a company to take conceptual ideas to the point of commercialization and to then license or sell them.

In 1969, Stansbury was hired by Industrial Design Affiliates (IDA) of Beverly Hills to help turn around the faltering design practice. After years of creative frustration working for someone else, Stansbury left IDA and founded his own design firm, the Stansbury Company, in 1973. Stansbury believed in giving creative people as much freedom as possible and all of his employees were encouraged to be part of the creative process. His company provided full service product development--concept, design, appearance models, engineering development, prototype construction and testing, tool patterns, and pre-production models. A strong emphasis was placed on engineering and manufacturability. Some of the diverse products created included: an exercise bike, roller skates, a smokeless ashtray, a sewage treatment device for boats, cosmetic bottles, surgical rubber gloves, musical toys, a dental chair, packaging (Elvis concert album), and special effects (twenty-four foot alligator) for the film Alligator and miniature sets for the disaster filmMeteor. In 1978, The Stansbury Company was awarded the Western Plastics Art and Design Award for the toy category (sun runner roller skates) and the rotational molding category (La Chair). Some of his clients included: Honda Motor Car, Mansfield Sanitary, Procter and Gamble, Max Factor & Company, Mattel Toys, Schlage Lock, Technicolor, Tomy Toys, Redkin, Jaybee Manufacturing, American Hospital Supply Company and Ronco Teleproducts, Inc.

Stansbury was also a senior consultant to the Bender Corporation, which advised large manufacturing facilities about air quality issues and engineering improvements. He worked with the company on matters related to fluid dynamic modeling and to devise optimal air movements/clearance within a structure.

Stansbury was heavily involved in local politics in Beverly Hills, California. He served as traffic commissioner (1973-1977) and as a planning commissioner (1977-1980). In 1980, Stansbury was elected to the Beverly Hills City Council serving as mayor in 1983 and 1988. After leaving politics, Stansbury continued to invent and in 1992, moved to King City, Ontario, Canada to pursue his invention of the PULSAR Electric Toothbrush (US Patent 5,259,083). The patent was later reissued (RE 35,941) on November 3, 1998. Stansbury was an initial shareholder in Pulse Innovations, Inc., a Canadian corporation formed to develop, market, and license the Pulse toothbrush. The other shareholders in Pulse Innovations included Spark Innovations, Inc. (SPI), a Canadian venture capital incubator and other investors. At SPI, Stansbury was Vice-President of technical services and acted as an engineering consultant and technical advisor on other products under development. In 1995, Procter & Gamble was given an exclusive development option for the Pulse toothbrush, but ultimately Procter & Gamble underwent a restructuring and returned its focus to core products which did not include electric toothbrushes. In 1996, Pulse entered into an agreement with Butler Gum, Canada's largest consumer oral care product company. Stansbury's children, Claude and Jacqueline sold their parents' shares in Pulse Innovations to other shareholders. Stansbury returned to the United States in 1995 and died on March 16, 1996, in Alexandria, Virginia.
Separated Materials:
Artifacts related to the Ronco Egg Scrambler are located in the Division of Work and Industry.

Artifacts related to The Mr. Dentist, Pulse toothbrushes, Hayes School Publishing Co. posters for "Good Manners" (1957) and Safety (1957), a Sesame Street learning kit and parent guides (1970) are located in the Division of Home and Community Life.

A Hayes School Publishing Company poster for "Good Habit Check Charts" (1959) is located in the Division of Medicine and Science.

Materials related to Helen Stansbury's volunteer work for the Democratic Party, especially a George McGovern Handbook, 1972 and Mike Dukakis materials, 1988 are in the Division of Political History.
Provenance:
Collection donated to the Archives Center by Benjamin H. Stansbury's daughter, Jacquelyn Stansbury in 2015.
Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
Toys  Search this
Inventors  Search this
Designers  Search this
Design, Industrial  Search this
Inventions -- 1950-2000 -- United States  Search this
Toothbrushes  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs -- 2000-2010
Correspondence -- 1950-2000
Clippings -- 1950-2000
Memorandums -- 1950-2000
Manuals -- 1950-2000
Design drawings -- 1950-2000
Slides (photographs) -- 1950-2000
Citation:
Benjamin H. Stansbury Papers, Archives Center, National Museum of American History
Benjamin H. Stansbury Collection, 1959-1995, Archives Center, National Museum of American History.
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.1350
See more items in:
Benjamin H. Stansbury Papers
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmah-ac-1350

Media Project Records

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution, Smithsonian Business Ventures., Smithsonian Entertainment  Search this
Extent:
3 cu. ft. (3 record storage boxes)
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Manuscripts
Clippings
Color photographs
Video recordings
Date:
1989-2000
Descriptive Entry:
This accession consists of records that document the media project activities of Lee Woodman-Cioffi, Executive Producer of Smithsonian Entertainment, a branch office of Smithsonian Business Ventures. Materials also include records that date from when Woodman-Cioffi was Manager of Multimedia Projects, first under the Office of Telecommunications (OTC) and later reporting to the Office of the Under Secretary; and from when she was Audio-Visual Production Specialist for OTC prior to 1990. Woodman-Cioffi left the Smithsonian in July 2000. These records consist of personal correspondence and memoranda; marketing, proposal, and treatment samples; media planning material, including on-site color photographs, for the movie "The Patriot;" Creative Artists Agency and multimedia company information; and research articles from newspapers and magazines.
Topic:
Interactive multimedia  Search this
Motion pictures  Search this
Genre/Form:
Manuscripts
Clippings
Color photographs
Video recordings
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Accession 00-109, Smithsonian Institution, Smithsonian Business Ventures., Smithsonian Entertainment, Media Project Records
Identifier:
Accession 00-109
See more items in:
Media Project Records
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-fa00-109

History of the Polymerase Chain Reaction Interviews

Extent:
11 videotapes.
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Interviews
Videotapes
Oral history
Date:
1992-1993
Introduction:
The Smithsonian Videohistory Program, funded by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation from 1986 until 1992, used video in historical research. Additional collections have been added since the grant project ended. Videohistory uses the video camera as a historical research tool to record moving visual information. Video works best in historical research when recording people at work in environments, explaining artifacts, demonstrating process, or in group discussion. The experimental program recorded projects that reflected the Institution's concern with the conduct of contemporary science and technology.

Smithsonian historians participated in the program to document visual aspects of their on-going historical research. Projects covered topics in the physical and biological sciences as well as in technological design and manufacture. To capture site, process, and interaction most effectively, projects were taped in offices, factories, quarries, laboratories, observatories, and museums. Resulting footage was duplicated, transcribed, and deposited in the Smithsonian Institution Archives for scholarship, education, and exhibition. The collection is open to qualified researchers.
Descriptive Entry:
Ramunas Kondratas, curator at the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History (NMAH), documented the discovery, development, commercialization, and applications of PCR technology. Three sessions were recorded May 14 and May 15, 1992 at Emeryville, California; September 25, 1992 at Alameda, California; and February 25, 1993 at Norwalk, Connecticut.

This collection consists of three interview sessions, totalling approximately 19:00 hours of recordings, and 346 pages of transcript. There are three generations of tape for each session: originals, dubbing masters, and reference copies. In total, this collection is comprised of 38 original Betacam videotapes, 19 dubbing master U-matic videotapes, and 11 reference copy VHS videotapes. The collection has been remastered digitally, with 38 motion jpeg 2000 and 38 mpeg digital files for preservation, and 38 Windows Media Video and 38 Real Media Video digital files for reference.

Several participants were also interviewed on audiotape. The audiotapes and transcripts complement the videotape sessions and are available through the Division of Medical Science, National Museum of American History.
Historical Note:
The Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) technique, invented in 1985 by Kary B. Mullis, allowed scientists to make millions of copies of a scarce sample of DNA. The technique has revolutionized many aspects of current research, including the diagnosis of genetic defects and the detection of the AIDS virus in human cells. The technique is also used by criminologists to link specific persons to samples of blood or hair via DNA comparison. PCR also affected evolutionary studies because large quantities of DNA can be manufactured from fossils containing but trace amounts.

Kary Mullis invented the PCR technique in 1985 while working as a chemist at the Cetus Corporation, a biotechnology firm in Emeryville, California. The procedure requires placing a small amount of the DNA containing the desired gene into a test tube. A large batch of loose nucleotides, which link into exact copies of the original gene, is also added to the tube. A pair of synthesized short DNA segments, that match segments on each side of the desired gene, is added. These "primers" find the right portion of the DNA, and serve as starting points for DNA copying. When the enzyme Taq DNA Polymeras from the bacterium, Thermus aquaticus is added, the loose nucleotides lock into a DNA sequence dictated by the sequence of that target gene located between the two primers.

The test tube is heated, and the DNA's double helix separates into two strands. The DNA sequence of each strand of the helix is thus exposed and as the temperature is lowered the primers automatically bind to their complementary portions of the DNA sample. At the same time, the enzyme links the loose nucleotides to the primer and to each of the separated DNA strands in the appropriate sequence. The complete reaction, which takes approximately five minutes, results in two double helices containing the desired portion of the original. The heating and cooling is repeated, doubling the number of DNA copies. After thirty to forty cycles are completed a single copy of a piece of DNA can be multiplied to hundreds of millions.

When completed manually, Mullis' PCR technique was slow and labor-intensive. Therefore, Cetus scientists began looking for ways in which to automate the process. Before the discovery of the thermostable Taq enzyme, scientists needed to add fresh enzyme to each cycle. The first thermocycling machine, "Mr. Cycle" was developed by Cetus engineers to address that need to add fresh enzyme to each test tube after the heating and cooling process. Purification of the Taq polymerase then resulted in the need for a machine to cycle more rapidly among different temperatures. In 1985, Cetus formed a joint venture with the Perkin-Elmer Corporation in Norwalk, Connecticut, and introduced the DNA Thermal Cycler. By 1988, Cetus was receiving numerous inquiries about licensing to perform PCR for commercial diagnostic purposes. On January 15, 1989, Cetus announced an agreement to collaborate with Hoffman-LaRoche on the development and commercialization of in vitro human diagnostic products and services based on PCR technology. Roche Molecular Systems eventually bought the PCR patent and associated technology from Cetus for $300,000,000.

Interviewees included scientists, engineers, and managers from Cetus Corporation, Roche Molecular Systems, and Perkin-Elmer Corporation. Norman Arnheim first became interested in the study of medicine in high school, as the result of a summer spent working at a hospital. He received his B.A. (1960) and M.A. (1962) from the University of Rochester, and his Ph.D. (1966) in Drosophila genetics from the University of California, Berkeley. A professor of molecular biology at the University of Southern California, Arnheim formerly worked at Cetus Corporation on PCR. John G. Atwood came to Perkin-Elmer Corporation in November 1948 with a masters' degree in electrical engineering from Columbia University (1948), and served as senior scientist for the biotechnology instrument group.

Peter Barrett received a B.S. in Chemistry from Lowell Technological Institute and a Ph.D. in Analytical Chemistry from Northeastern University. He joined Perkin-Elmer in 1970 as product specialist in the Instrument Division, was promoted to manager of the Applications Laboratory in 1982, and director of the Laboratory Robotics Department in 1985. In 1988, Barrett was named director of European Marketing and relocated to Italy. In 1989, he moved to Germany to set up the European Sales and Service Center. He returned to the U.S. in 1990 to serve as Division Vice-President of Instruments and was named Vice-President of the Life Sciences Division in 1991. In 1993, in conjunction with the merger with Applied Biosystems Incorporated, he moved to California to become Executive Vice-President, Applied Biosystems Division.

Joseph L. DiCesare received his Ph.D. in Biochemistry from the University of Rhode Island. In 1976, he accepted the position of Assistant Product Line Manager at Perkin-Elmer Corporation and was appointed Product Line Manager of the Gas Chromatography Division in 1983. In 1987, he was promoted to the position of Research and Development Applications Manager of the Biotechnology Division. Henry Anthony Erlich received his B.A. in biochemical sciences from Harvard University in 1965 and his Ph.D. in genetics from University of Washington in 1972. He served as a postdoctoral fellow in the Department of Biology at Princeton University from 1972 to 1975 and in the Department of Medicine at Stanford University from 1975 to 1979. He joined the Cetus Corporation in 1979 and was appointed Senior Scientist and Director of Human Genetics in 1981. After the dissolution of Cetus in 1991, Erlich transferred to Roche Molecular Systems to serve as director of Human Genetics.

A few years after graduating from high school, Fred Faloona began working as a research assistant under Kary B. Mullis at the Cetus Corporation, c. 1983. He assisted Mullis with the initial development and application of PCR. He followed Mullis to Xytronyx Incorporated in 1986 where he served as a Research associate working on DNA and RNA sequencing and further applications of PCR. In 1988, he returned to Cetus as a research assistant where he worked on the application of PCR to the discovery of new retroviruses and he further refined PCR detection techniques. In 1991, Faloona and a partner began Saddle Point System, a small company designing computer hardware and software.

David H. Gelfand completed his B.A. in Biology at Brandeis University in 1966. After receiving a Ph.D. in Biology from the University of California, San Diego in 1970, he began work as an assistant research biochemist at the University of California in San Francisco. He was offered the position of Director of Recombinant Molecular Research at Cetus in 1976 and was promoted to Vice-President of that division in 1979. He later accepted positions as Vice-President of Scientific Affairs and Director of Core Technology, PCR Division, in 1981 and 1988. In 1991, Gelfand also transferred to Roche Molecular Systems to serve as Director for the Program in Core Research.

Lawrence Allen Haff received his B.S. in Biochemistry from Michigan State University in 1969. After completing his Ph.D. in Biochemistry from Cornell University in 1974, Haff served as a research fellow in the biological laboratories of Harvard University. In 1976, he accepted the position of Senior Research Scientist at Pharmacia. He transferred to Millipore Corporation in 1982 to serve as Technical Research Manager developing and supporting high performance separation techniques. He joined the Perkin-Elmer Corporation in 1985 as principal scientist and research manager to help develop the DNA Thermal Cycler.

After receiving his B.S. in mechanical engineering from the University of California-Davis in 1978, David C. Jones worked as a stress engineer for the Boeing Commercial Aircraft Company. In 1980, he joined the Bio-Rad Laboratories designing and developing chromatography instruments. He accepted the position of Mechanical Engineer at Cetus Corporation in 1986 to work on thermocycling instrumentation. He also completed an M.B.A. in management from Golden State University in 1988.

Elena D. Katz was awarded her M.S. degree in Chemistry from Moscow University, Russia. From 1969 to 1972, she studied in the Ph.D. program at the Institute of Physical Chemistry of the Academy of Sciences in Moscow. In 1973, she was appointed Associate Researcher in the physical chemistry department of Moscow University. After moving to the United States, Katz became Senior Staff Scientist at Perkin-Elmer in 1977 working on various multidisciplinary projects utilizing liquid and gas chromatography. After 1985, Katz concurrently pursued a Ph.D. in Chemistry from the University of London. Shirley Kwok began her career as a research associate with the Assay Department of Cetus Corporation after graduating from the University of California, Berkeley, with a degree in microbiology. Kwok was part of a group of researchers devoted to the use of PCR to detect HIV in human cells, and held the position of Research Investigator for Hoffman-La Roche at Roche Molecular Systems.

Richard Leath started with Cetus in 1980, after receiving a masters' degree in electrical engineering from Purdue University in 1974. Leath spent a decade developing machines like Mr. Cycle, and later worked as Senior Engineer at Maxwell Labs, Richmond, California, a firm which developed particle accelerators.

Kary B. Mullis received his B.S. in Chemistry from the Georgia Institute of Technology in 1966 and his Ph.D. in Biochemistry from the University of California-Berkeley in 1972. In 1973, he was awarded a post-doctoral fellowship in pediatric cardiology at the University of Kansas Medical School. He returned to California in 1977 and was awarded another fellowship in pharmaceutical chemistry from the University of California, San Francisco to research endorphins and the opiate receptor. He accepted the position of Scientist at Cetus in 1979 to work in the chemistry department researching oligonucleotide synthesis and chemistry. He transferred to the Department of Human Genetics in 1984 to conduct research on DNA technology. In 1986, Mullis accepted the position of Director of Molecular Biology at Xytronyx, Inc. researching DNA technology, photochemistry, and photobiology. He left Xytronyx in 1988 and then served as a private consultant to a variety of companies in the field of nucleic chemistry. Mullis won the Nobel Prize in chemistry in 1993 for his invention of the PCR technique.

Lynn H. Pasahow graduated from Stanford University in 1969 and received his law degree from the University of California at Berkeley School of Law in 1972. He joined the firm of McCutchen, Doyle, Brown, and Enersen in 1973, where he chaired the firm's intellectual property group. He had advised clients and handled complex litigation involving patent, copyright, trademark, trade secret, licensing, export-import, noncompetition, and trade regulation disputes, most involving biotechnology, computer hardware and software and other advanced technology products. He led the group of lawyers which successfully obtained a jury verdict upholding Cetus' landmark polymerase chain reaction patents against the Dupont Company challenge. Enrico Picozza began work with Perkin-Elmer in June 1985, shortly after receiving his degree from the University of Connecticut. He was a Senior Technical Specialist, devoted to specifying, developing, testing and evaluating instrumentation primarily for the PCR market.

Riccardo Pigliucci earned his degree in chemistry in Milan, Italy and graduated from the Management Program at the Northeastern University. He joined Perkin-Elmer in 1966 and held numerous management positions in analytical instrument operations in Europe as well as in the U.S. He was appointed General Manager of the U.S. Instrument Division in 1989 after serving as director of Worldwide Instrument Marketing since 1985. In 1988, Pigliucci was appointed a sector Vice-President in Connecticut Operations. The following year, he was elected corporate Vice-President of Perkin-Elmer Instruments. He became President of the Instrument Group in 1991 and was named Senior Vice-President of Perkin-Elmer Corporation in 1992. In 1993, he was elected President and Chief Operating Officer and also served as a Director of the Corporation.

After receiving his bachelors degree in Chemistry and Biology from the University of Washington in 1978, Randall K. Saiki served one year as a laboratory technician in their Department of Microbiology. In 1979, he transferred to Washington University to serve as a lab technician in the Biology Department. He joined the Cetus Corporation in late 1979 as a research assistant in the Recombinant DNA Group. In 1981, he was promoted to Research Associate in the Department of Human Genetics and was named Scientist in that department in 1989. Saiki transferred to Roche Molecular Systems in 1991 to serve as Research Investigator in the Department of Human Genetics. Stephen Scharf received a degree in bacteriology from University of California, Davis. He worked there as a biochemist for four and a half years until 1980, when he came to Cetus. Scharf was a Research Associate in the Department of Human Genetics at Cetus at the time PCR was developed and later served as Senior Scientist at Roche Molecular Systems.

Donna Marie Seyfried graduated from Lehigh University with a B.S. in Microbiology. Her professional career began as a microbiologist for the E.I. Dupont de Nemours Company. Seyfried joined Perkin-Elmer in 1985. From 1990 to 1993, she served as Business Director for Biotechnology Instrument Systems. In 1994, she was appointed Director of Corporate Business Development and Strategic Planning. She was responsible for managing the development, commercialization, and marketing of the PCR business as part of the Perkin-Elmer Cetus JointVenture, and the subsequent strategic alliance with Hoffman-LaRoche. She was also instrumental in the Perkin-Elmer Applied Biosystems merger.

After receiving his B.S. from Bates College in 1972 and his Ph.D. from Purdue University in 1976, John J. Sninsky accepted a postdoctoral fellowship from the Departments of Genetics and Medicine at the Stanford University School of Medicine. In 1981, he accepted an assistant professorship at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine. He joined the Cetus Corporation in 1984 as a Senior Scientist in the Department of Microbial Genetics. In 1985, he was appointed Director of the Diagnostics Program and of the Department of Infectious Diseases. In 1988, he was promoted to Senior Director of both of those departments. Sninsky transferred to Roche Molecular Systems in 1991 to serve as Senior Director for Research. Robert Watson, who joined Cetus in 1977, was a Research Investigator with Roche Molecular Systems, working on nucleic acid-based diagnostics.

Thomas J. White graduated from John Hopkins University in 1967 with a B.A. in Chemistry. After serving for four years as a Peace Corps volunteer in Liberia, he received his Ph.D. in Biochemistry from the University of California, Berkeley in 1976. In 1978, he joined the Cetus Corporation as a scientist, and was promoted to Director of Molecular and Biological Research and Associate Director of Research and Development in 1981. He was appointed Vice-President of Research in 1984. He transferred to Roche Diagnostics Research in 1989 to serve as Senior Director and in 1991 was appointed Vice-President of Research and Development of Roche Molecular Systems and Associate Vice-President of Hoffman-LaRoche, Incorporated. Joseph Widunas, who graduated from the University of Illinois with a degree in engineering in 1975, came to Cetus in 1981 as a sound engineer. Later, as Director of new product development for Colestech Corporation, Hayward, California, he was instrumental in the development of the second Mr. Cycle prototype, "Son of Mr. Cycle."

Timothy M. Woudenberg received his B.S. in Chemistry from Purdue University in 1980. He worked as an electronics design engineer for Mulab Incorporated from 1980 to 1982. He served as a teaching and research assistant at Tufts University from 1982 to 1987 and there completed his Ph.D. in Physical Chemistry in 1988. He joined Perkin-Elmer in 1987 as an engineer in the Instrument Division of the Biotechnology Department.

Also interviewed were Perkin-Elmer's Robert P. Regusa, biotechnology systems engineering manager for the biotechnology group responsible for the development of the thermocycler instrumentation; Robert L. Grossman, an engineer at Perkin-Elmer, involved with the design and manufacture of the thermocycler line; Senior Marketing Specialist Leslie S. Kelley; as well as Cetus' Senior Scientist, Richard Respess.
Topic:
History of science and technology  Search this
Molecular biology  Search this
Biotechnology  Search this
Bioengineering  Search this
Scientific apparatus and instruments  Search this
Patents  Search this
Genre/Form:
Interviews
Videotapes
Oral history
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 9577, , History of the Polymerase Chain Reaction Interviews
Identifier:
Record Unit 9577
See more items in:
History of the Polymerase Chain Reaction Interviews
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-faru9577

DNA Sequencing Interviews

Extent:
files (Reference copies).
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Interviews
Videotapes
Oral history
Date:
1989-1990
Introduction:
The Smithsonian Videohistory Program, funded by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation from 1986 until 1992, used video in historical research. Additional collections have been added since the grant project ended. Videohistory uses the video camera as a historical research tool to record moving visual information. Video works best in historical research when recording people at work in environments, explaining artifacts, demonstrating process, or in group discussion. The experimental program recorded projects that reflected the Institution's concern with the conduct of contemporary science and technology.

Smithsonian historians participated in the program to document visual aspects of their on-going historical research. Projects covered topics in the physical and biological sciences as well as in technological design and manufacture. To capture site, process, and interaction most effectively, projects were taped in offices, factories, quarries, laboratories, observatories, and museums. Resulting footage was duplicated, transcribed, and deposited in the Smithsonian Institution Archives for scholarship, education, and exhibition. The collection is open to qualified researchers.
Descriptive Entry:
Ramunas Kondratas, curator at the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History (NMAH), was interested in documenting the history, development, and applications of the DNA Sequencer. He also explored the commercialization of the instrument, including its testing and marketing, and addressed current and future uses of the ABI 370A model sequencer in medical research. Sessions were recorded at California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, California, on October 19, 1988, at Applied Biosystems, Inc., in Foster City, California, on October 21, 1988, and at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in Washington, D.C., on March 27, 1990.

Interviewees included scientists and technicians at Cal Tech, ABI, and NIH. Jeannine Gocayne received a M.A. in molecular biology from the State University of New York-Buffalo in 1985 and was appointed a biologist and sequencing supervisor with the Receptor Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Section of the Laboratory of Molecular and Cellular Neurobiology, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), NIH in 1986.

Several others provided additional information about the sequencer for the three video sessions. These people included: Kurt Becker, DNA Sequencing Product Manager; Kip Connell, research scientist; Marilee Shaffer, products specialist for DNA sequencing, ABI; and Anthony R. Kerlavage and W. Richard McCombie of the Receptor Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Section of the Laboratory of Molecular and Cellular Neurobiology, NINDS, NIH.

Session one took place at the California Institute of Technology with Hood, Sanders, and Kaiser. Interviews focused on the history, design, and development of the sequencer prototype and its operation.

Session Two took place at Applied Biosystems, Inc., with Hunkapiller, Becker, Connell, and Shaffer and dealt with the commercial design, fabrication, and marketing of the sequencer and other related instrumentation. Tours of the assembly and manufacturing areas were included in the session, as well as a demonstration of how the DNA sequencing data is represented graphically on a computer.

Session Three took place at the Receptor Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Section of the Laboratory of Molecular and Cellular Neurobiology, NINDS, NIH, where Venter explained and demonstrated the automated DNA sequencing processes during a tour of the lab. Kerlavage and McCombie assisted during the tour. Finally, Gocayne described the application of new DNA sequencing technology to work in the lab.

This collection consists of three interview sessions, totaling approximately 8:40 hours of recordings, and 176 pages of transcript. There are three generations of tape for each session: originals, dubbing masters, and reference copies. In total, this collection is comprised of 26 original videotapes (26 Beta videotapes), 22 dubbing master videotapes (22 U-matic videotapes), and 5 reference copy videotapes (5 VHS videotapes). The collection has been remastered digitally, with 26 motion jpeg 2000 and 26 mpeg digital files for preservation, and 22 Windows Media Video and 22 Real Media Video digital files for reference.

Restrictions: Ramunas Kondratas must approve before broadcast or public viewing.
Historical Note:
DNA is composed of the four individual nucleotides: adenine (A), thymine (T), cytosine (C), and guanine (G). To decipher a particular piece of DNA, it is necessary to determine the exact sequence of these nucleotides. The sequence of the nucleotides determines the genetic information encoded in a DNA strand. A partial nucleotide sequence for a human gene might look like: GGCACTGACTCTCTC. In 1977, biochemist Fred Sanger developed the enzymatic chain termination procedure that allowed for sequencing of individual strands of DNA. This made mapping and sequencing of genetic material possible.

In 1986, Leroy E. Hood's Laboratory at the California Institute of Technology (Cal Tech) announced its development of a semiautomated machine for sequencing DNA. The machine automated the enzymatic chain termination procedure for DNA sequence analysis developed by Sanger and became a key instrument in mapping and sequencing genetic material. That same year, Applied Biosystems, Inc. (ABI) produced the first commercial instruments for clinical use. Constant improvements in the technology resulted in faster sequencing capacity, which was significant for advanced scientific research in projects such as mapping the human genome.

Leroy E. Hood received his M.D. from The Johns Hopkins School of Medicine in 1964, and a Ph.D. in immunology from Cal Tech in 1968. From 1968 until 1970 he held a postdoctoral fellowship at the National Institutes of Health. In 1970 he was appointed professor of biology at Cal Tech and eventually became chairman of the Division of Biology and the director of its cancer center.

Michael Hunkapiller received a Ph.D. in chemistry from Cal Tech in 1974. He joined ABI as its vice president for research and development in 1983.

Robert J. Kaiser received his Ph.D in chemistry from Cal Tech in 1983, and subsequently joined the Cal Tech staff as a research fellow in biology. Jane Z. Sanders joined the Cal Tech staff in 1984 as an associate biologist and was appointed senior biologist a year later. She took graduate courses in biochemistry in 1971-72 at the Stanford University Medical School.

Lloyd M. Smith received a Ph.D. in biophysics from Stanford University in 1981, and was a senior research fellow in biology at Cal Tech from 1982 until 1987, when he was appointed assistant professor in the Analytical Division of the Department of Chemistry at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

J. Craig Venter received his Ph.D. in physiology and pharmacology from the University of California, San Diego in 1975. In 1983 he was appointed adjunct professor of biochemical pharmacology at the State University of New York-Buffalo and joined NIH in 1984 as chief of the Receptor Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Section, NINDS. In 1987 he also became co-director of the Laboratory of Molecular and Cellular Neurobiology, NINDS, NIH and was appointed director of the NINDS DNA facility at NIH.
Rights:
Restricted. Contact SIHistory@si.edu, 202-633-5910 for details.
Topic:
History of science and technology  Search this
Molecular biology  Search this
Genre/Form:
Interviews
Videotapes
Oral history
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 9549, , DNA Sequencing Interviews
Identifier:
Record Unit 9549
See more items in:
DNA Sequencing Interviews
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-faru9549

Production Records

Topic:
Inside Meteorites (Television production)
Japan's Ceramic Heritage (Television production)
Strike Up the Bandstand (Television production)
That's Entertainment (Television production)
Happy Birthday, Hirshhorn Museum (Television production)
Keeping Orchids Alive (Television production)
Something to Hang the Paint On (Television production)
Restoring it to 'Wright' (Television program)
Advertising: Yesterday and Today (Television production)
Black Wings (Television production)
Air and Space Anniversary (Television production)
Corals in Captivity (Television production)
Smithsonian Holiday (Television production)
King Herod's Dream (Television production)
New Deal Murals (Television production)
On the Air (Television production)
Zoo Vets (Television production)
Brush of Innocence (Television production)
Tending a Sculpture Garden (Television production)
Holiday Celebration (Television production)
Decorative Designs of Frank Lloyd Wright (Television production)
Here at the Smithsonian (Television program)
Creator::
Smithsonian Institution. Office of Telecommunications  Search this
Extent:
4 cu. ft. (4 record storage boxes)
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Brochures
Clippings
Exhibition catalogs
Manuscripts
Newsletters
Pamphlets
Picture postcards
Black-and-white photographs
Color photographs
Color transparencies
Date:
1981-1989
Descriptive Entry:
This accession consists of records that document the planning, development, and execution of television productions for the "Here at the Smithsonian" (HATS) series. Also included are developmental materials for ideas that were not carried through to a full production, as well as material relating to singular projects unrelated to HATS. Subject matter for the HATS series were wide and varied, including: orchids, Frank Lloyd Wright, insects, aviation, kites, ballooning, Duke Ellington, jewelry, and the National Zoo.

The "Here at the Smithsonian" series was aired nationwide over the Public Broadcasting System between 1982-1989. Productions were created to highlight and or record significant Smithsonian anniversaries and events, holidays, special projects, major exhibitions, or areas of unique or special interest.

Some of the earliest records may have been created by Ann Carroll who served as Series Producer for HATS (1981-1985; volumes I-IV). However, the bulk of the records were created and maintained by John P. Meehan, Audio Visual Production Specialist, and Series Producer for HATS (1986-1989; volumes V-VIII). Please note that Carroll and Meehan acted as producers on both the series and segment level during the time of the series.

Materials include contracts, correspondence, editing logs, memoranda, notes, research material, scripts, and tape logs.

NOTE: See accession 00-132 for the video tapes of the above referenced productions.
Topic:
Video recordings -- Direction and production  Search this
Documentary television programs  Search this
Advertising  Search this
Corals  Search this
Papermaking  Search this
Intellectual property  Search this
Orchids  Search this
Entomology  Search this
Aeronautics  Search this
Kites  Search this
Ballooning  Search this
Jewelry  Search this
Museum exhibits  Search this
Genre/Form:
Brochures
Clippings
Exhibition catalogs
Manuscripts
Newsletters
Pamphlets
Picture postcards
Black-and-white photographs
Color photographs
Color transparencies
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Accession 00-114, Smithsonian Institution. Office of Telecommunications, Production Records
Identifier:
Accession 00-114
See more items in:
Production Records
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-fa00-114

Production Records

Topic:
Perpetual Campaign: The President, The People, and The Court (Video recording : 1992)
Negative Campaigns (Video recording : 1991)
Low Road to High Office? (Video recording : 1992)
Black Radio: Telling It Like It Was (Radio program : 1995)
Folk Masters from the Barns of Wolf Trap (Radio program)
Jazz Smithsonian (Radio program : 1993)
Remembering Slavery (Radio program : 1997)
The Mississippi: River of Song (Television program : 1999)
Beyond Category: The Music of Duke Ellington (Video recording)
Jazz Age in Paris: 1914-1940 (Video recording : 1998)
The Mississippi: River of Song (Radio program : 1999)
Here at the Smithsonian (Television program)
Jazz Singers (Radio program)
People and Pianos: 300 Years (Television program : 2001)
Preserving an Architectural Heritage: The Decorative Designs of Frank Lloyd Wright (Motion picture)
Rescue in the Wild: Endangered Species and Habitat Protection at SI (Video recording)
The National Zoo: Think Tank (Video recording : c. 1995)
Afro-Americans and the Evolution of a Living Constitution (Video recording : 1988)
First Ladies (Video recording : 1989)
Radio Smithsonian (Radio program)
Workers and Managers (Video recording : 1993)
In Open Air: A Portrait of the American Impressionists (Motion picture : 1982)
Celebrations (Video recording : 1987)
Titanic Mail Story (Video recording : 1999)
Red, Hot, and Blue! (Radio program)
Swedish Sculpture (Video recording)
Memphis: Cradle of Rock 'n' Soul (Radio program : 2000)
Creator::
Smithsonian Productions  Search this
Extent:
8 cu. ft. (8 record storage boxes)
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Manuscripts
Clippings
Brochures
Color transparencies
Color photographs
Date:
1982-2001
Descriptive Entry:
This accession consists of records created and maintained by John P. Meehan, Audio-Visual Production Specialist; Jacquie Gales Webb, Producer; Paul B. Johnson, Director; and other Radio Smithsonian staff, documenting the planning, development, and execution of original radio series and programs.

Radio productions documented in this accession include "Memphis: Cradle of Rock 'n' Soul;" "Folk Masters at the Barns of Wolf Trap;" "Jazz Smithsonian;" "Remembering Slavery;" "River of Song: A Musical Journey Down the Mississippi River;" "Jazz Singers;" "Black Radio: Telling It Like It Was;" "Red, Hot, and Blue!;" and "Radio Smithsonian." Video productions documented in this accession include "Perpetual Campaign: The President, The People, and The Court;" "Negative Campaigns;" "Low Road to High Office?;" "Beyond Category: the Musical Genius of Duke Ellington;" "Jazz Age in Paris: 1914-1940;" "Rescue in the Wild: Endangered Species and Habitat Protections at SI;" "The National Zoo: Think Tank;" "Afro-Americans and the Evolution of a Living Constitution;" "First Ladies;" "Workers and Managers;" "Celebrations;" "Titanic Mail Story;" and "Swedish Sculpture." Television productions documented in this accession include "River of Song: Music Along the Mississippi;" "Here at the Smithsonian;" and "People and Pianos: 300 Years."

Films documented in this accession include "Preserving an Architectural Heritage: The Decorative Designs by Frank Lloyd Wright" and "In Open Air: A Portrait of the American Impressionists."

Materials include correspondence, memoranda, notes, scripts, treatments, release forms, contracts, photographs, clippings, press releases, and budgets.
Topic:
Intellectual property  Search this
Video recordings -- Production and direction  Search this
Television -- Production and direction  Search this
Radio programs  Search this
Contracts  Search this
Radio -- Production and direction  Search this
Motion pictures -- Production and direction  Search this
Documentary films  Search this
Documentary videos  Search this
Documentary television programs  Search this
Genre/Form:
Manuscripts
Clippings
Brochures
Color transparencies
Color photographs
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Accession 05-149, Smithsonian Productions, Production Records
Identifier:
Accession 05-149
See more items in:
Production Records
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-fa05-149

Production Records

Topic:
Dream Window: Reflections on the Japanese Garden (Documentary film : 1991)
Creator::
Smithsonian Press/Smithsonian Productions  Search this
Extent:
1 cu. ft. (1 record storage box)
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Manuscripts
Clippings
Brochures
Date:
1989-1997
Descriptive Entry:
This accession includes the records of Laura T. Schneider, Audio-Visual Production Specialist, documenting her work on the television program "Dream Window: Reflections on the Japanese Garden." The materials consist of correspondence, memoranda, and notes pertaining to production, proposals, and meetings; promotion funding and expense information; production schedule, script, and credits; license agreements and releases; shoot logs; contracts; and research information.
Topic:
Intellectual property  Search this
Television -- Production and direction  Search this
Documentary television programs  Search this
Contracts  Search this
Genre/Form:
Manuscripts
Clippings
Brochures
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Accession 02-150, Smithsonian Press/Smithsonian Productions, Production Records
Identifier:
Accession 02-150
See more items in:
Production Records
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-fa02-150

Production Records

Topic:
American Roots (Radio program : 1993)
Folk Masters from the Barns of Wolf Trap (Radio program)
Radio Smithsonian (Radio program)
Smithsonian Galaxy (Radio program)
Jazz Smithsonian (Radio program : 1993)
Guitar: Electrified, Amplified, Deified (Radio program : 1996)
Folk Masters: Traditional Music in the Americas (Radio program : 1991)
Creator::
Smithsonian Press/Smithsonian Productions  Search this
Extent:
1 cu. ft. (1 record storage box)
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Manuscripts
Date:
1973-1998
Descriptive Entry:
This accession includes records documenting the radio production activities of John Tyler, Radio Production Specialist. Material primarily includes production scripts; program schedules and listings; carriage reports; radio control room modifications project information; and incoming correspondence.

Productions documented in these records include: "American Roots," "Folk Masters: Traditional Music in the Americas," "Folk Masters at the Barns of Wolf Trap," "Radio Smithsonian," "Jazz Smithsonian," "Guitar: Electrified, Amplified, Deified," and "Smithsonian Galaxy."
Topic:
Radio programs  Search this
Radio -- Production and direction  Search this
Genre/Form:
Manuscripts
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Accession 02-158, Smithsonian Press/Smithsonian Productions, Production Records
Identifier:
Accession 02-158
See more items in:
Production Records
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-fa02-158

Production Records

Topic:
The Mississippi: River of Song (Television program : 1999)
The Mississippi: River of Song (Radio program : 1999)
Folk Masters from the Barns of Wolf Trap (Radio program)
Poetics of Line: Seven Artists of the Nsukka Group, Nigeria (Video recording : 1997)
Radio Smithsonian (Radio program)
Lewis Latimer (Video recording : 1999)
Discovering America (Radio program)
Monumental Propaganda (Video recording : 1994)
Here at the Smithsonian (Television program)
Black Radio: Telling It Like It Was (Radio program : 1995)
Ain Ghazal (Video recording)
Guide to the Smithsonian (Documentary film)
Woody Guthrie's Legacy (Documentary film : 2000)
Colors of Invention: An Exploration of Color, Technology, and Culture (Documentary film : 1998)
Creator::
Smithsonian Productions  Search this
Extent:
2 cu. ft. (2 record storage boxes)
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Manuscripts
Brochures
Color photographs
Black-and-white photographs
Date:
1989-2001
Descriptive Entry:
This accession includes records documenting the film, video, and radio production activities of John R. Paulson, Audio-Visual Production Specialist. Materials include correspondence, memoranda, and notes; production scripts, proposals, shoot schedules, and credits; release forms; contracts; budget summaries; camera reports; conference and awards information; and technical articles.

Productions documented in these records include: "Folk Masters from the Barns of Wolf Trap," "The Poetics of Line: Seven Artists of the Nsukka Group, Nigeria," "Radio Smithsonian," "Lewis Latimer," "Discovering America," "Monumental Propaganda," "Here at the Smithsonian," "Black Radio: Telling It Like It Was," "Ain Ghazal," "River of Song: A Musical Journey Down the Mississippi River," "River of Song: Music Along the Mississippi," "VIARC [Visitor Information and Associates' Reception Center] Theater Program," "Woody Guthrie's Legacy," and "The Colors of Invention: An Exploration of Color, Technology, and Culture."
Topic:
Intellectual property  Search this
Radio programs  Search this
Video recordings -- Direction and production  Search this
Television -- Production and direction  Search this
Budget  Search this
Contracts  Search this
Radio -- Production and direction  Search this
Motion pictures -- Production and direction  Search this
Documentary films  Search this
Documentary videos  Search this
Documentary television programs  Search this
Genre/Form:
Manuscripts
Brochures
Color photographs
Black-and-white photographs
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Accession 02-157, Smithsonian Productions, Production Records
Identifier:
Accession 02-157
See more items in:
Production Records
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-fa02-157

Production Records

Topic:
Dream Window: Reflections on the Japanese Garden (Documentary film : 1991)
The Haupt Garden (Video recording : 1994)
Smithsonian world
Smithsonian video collection
Search for the Tunguska Meteorite (Documentary film)
The Mississippi: River of Song (Television program : 1999)
Piano 300 (Video recording : 2000)
Creator::
Smithsonian Productions  Search this
Extent:
6 cu. ft. (6 record storage boxes)
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Manuscripts
Clippings
Black-and-white photographs
Color transparencies
Black-and-white negatives
Date:
1984-2002
Descriptive Entry:
This accession includes the records of Laura T. Schneider, Audio-Visual Production Specialist, primarily documenting her work on "Dream Window: Reflections on the Japanese Garden," an educational film to acquaint American audiences with the historical and cultural significance of Japanese Gardens and their importance to Japan's landscape; and the production "The Haupt Garden," an orientation video about the Victorian garden to be shown in the Children's Room at the Smithsonian 'Castle' Building. The records also include information about other productions such as "Smithsonian World," an educational television series that explored people, ideas, and events that shape world culture; "Search for the Tunguska Meteorite," a documentary film about the 1908 explosion in Siberia of a large meteorite; "River of Song: Music Along the Mississippi," an educational television program exploring music along the Mississippi River from Minnesota to New Orleans; "Piano 300," an exhibition video celebrating three centuries of people and pianos; and the "Smithsonian Video Collection," an educational video series focusing on the Smithsonian Institution's collections and research.
Topic:
Intellectual property  Search this
Television -- Production and direction  Search this
Video recordings -- Production and direction  Search this
Tunguska meteorite  Search this
Smithsonian buildings  Search this
Contracts  Search this
Motion pictures -- Production and direction  Search this
Documentary films  Search this
Documentary videos  Search this
Documentary television programs  Search this
Genre/Form:
Manuscripts
Clippings
Black-and-white photographs
Color transparencies
Black-and-white negatives
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Accession 03-029, Smithsonian Productions, Production Records
Identifier:
Accession 03-029
See more items in:
Production Records
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-fa03-029

Production Records

Topic:
Celebrating a Century: The 1876 Philadelphia Exhibition (Motion picture : 1976)
Piano Grand! (Television program : 2000)
Black Radio: Telling It Like It Was (Radio program : 1995)
Beyond Category: The Music of Duke Ellington (Video recording)
Sawyer and His Mill (Motion picture : 1969)
Creatures Great and Small (Video recording : 1989)
Smithsonian World (Television program : 1984-1991)
Yorktown (Motion picture : 1982)
First Ladies (Video recording : 1989)
Engines of Change: The American Industrial Revolution, 1790-1860 (Video recording : 1987)
The Mississippi: River of Song (Television program : 1999)
Piano 300 (Video recording : 2000)
Jazz Smithsonian (Radio program : 1993)
Smithsonian Quest (Television program : 1986)
Science in American Life (Video recording : c. 1992)
Jazz Age in Paris: 1914-1940 (Video recording : 1998)
Smithsonian Minutes (Television program : c. 1995)
Smithsonian video collection
Last Wheel Works (Motion picture : 1974)
Beyond the Ocean, Beneath the Leaf (Video recording : 1982)
What in the World (Television program : 1977)
Creator::
Smithsonian Productions  Search this
Extent:
3.9 cu. ft. (3 record storage boxes) (1 16x20 box) (4 oversize folders)
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Manuscripts
Floor plans
Drawings
Black-and-white photographs
Color photographs
Color negatives
Black-and-white negatives
Date:
1968-2002
Descriptive Entry:
This accession includes records documenting the film, video, and radio production activities of John P. Meehan, Audio-Visual Production Specialist; Jacquie Gales Webb, Producer; and Paul B. Johnson, Director. Material consists of correspondence, memoranda, and notes; performer's licenses; production logs; contracts and releases; music cue sheets; blueprints; interview transcripts; grant information; audio scripts; photographs and slides; drawings; budget summaries; meeting agenda; proposals; and information on the Smithsonian Video Collection.

Productions documented in these records include "Piano Grand!," "Black Radio: Telling it Like it Was," "Beyond Category: The Musical Genius of Duke Ellington," "The Sawyer and His Mill," "Creatures Great and Small," "Celebrating a Century: The 1876 Philadelphia Exhibition," "The Last Wheel Works," "Smithsonian Quest," "Smithsonian World," "Yorktown," "The First Ladies," "Engines of Change," "Beyond the Ocean, Beneath the Leaf," "River of Song: Music Along the Mississippi," "Piano 300," "Jazz Smithsonian," "What in the World," "Science in American Life," "Jazz in Paris: 1914-1940," and "Smithsonian Minutes."
Oversize:
This collection contains oversize material.
Topic:
Intellectual property  Search this
Video recordings -- Production and direction  Search this
Television -- Production and direction  Search this
Radio programs  Search this
Budget  Search this
Motion pictures -- Production and direction  Search this
Documentary films  Search this
Documentary television programs  Search this
Documentary videos  Search this
Contracts  Search this
Genre/Form:
Manuscripts
Floor plans
Drawings
Black-and-white photographs
Color photographs
Color negatives
Black-and-white negatives
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Accession 02-208, Smithsonian Productions, Production Records
Identifier:
Accession 02-208
See more items in:
Production Records
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-fa02-208

Production Records

Topic:
Diversity Endangered (Video recording : 1987)
Reel Jungle (Video recording : 1988)
Creator::
Smithsonian Institution. Office of Telecommunications  Search this
Extent:
4 cu. ft. (4 record storage boxes)
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Brochures
Manuscripts
Architectural drawings
Drawings
Black-and-white photographs
Videotapes
Date:
circa 1985-1990
Descriptive Entry:
This accession consists of the records of Lee Woodman-Cioffi, Audio-Visual Production Specialist for the Office of Telecommunications (OTC), 1985- . The records pertain to the Visitor Information and Associates' Reception Center (VIARC) orientation and interactive touch program; OTC productions, such as "Biodiversity Teleconference," "Diversity Endangered," and "The Reel Jungle;" and development of a Research at the Smithsonian interactive program on "Behind the Scenes Research at the Smithsonian," which did not get funded. Materials include correspondence and memoranda; interactive video, theater, and shooting edit logs; video scripts; design concepts for the VIARC orientation and interactive touch program; budgetary information; personal research notes; blueprints for the Visitor Center; production proposals; preliminary and master tape shot lists for thirty second video segments; color code lists for Betacams; shoot permissions (release forms); and photographs of the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute (STRI).
Topic:
Interactive multimedia  Search this
Video recordings -- Production and direction  Search this
Motion pictures -- Production and direction  Search this
Documentary films  Search this
Documentary videos  Search this
Genre/Form:
Brochures
Manuscripts
Architectural drawings
Drawings
Black-and-white photographs
Videotapes
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Accession 94-070, Smithsonian Institution. Office of Telecommunications, Production Records
Identifier:
Accession 94-070
See more items in:
Production Records
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-fa94-070

Production Records

Creator::
Smithsonian Press/Smithsonian Productions  Search this
Extent:
3 cu. ft. (3 record storage boxes)
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Books
Clippings
Manuscripts
Drawings
Date:
circa 1989-1996
Descriptive Entry:
This accession consists of records created and maintained by Lee Woodman, a former Audio-Visual Production Specialist, 1985-1990, and Manager of Multimedia Projects, 1990-1996, for the Office of Telecommunications that, in 1995, was reorganized as Smithsonian Press/Smithsonian Productions. The records consist of correspondence and memoranda documenting audio-visual and interactive video productions for Smithsonian exhibitions and the visitor center; scripts; press releases and articles; and budgetary information, proposals, and multimedia contracts.
Topic:
Video recordings -- Production and direction  Search this
Contracts  Search this
Intellectual property  Search this
Documentary videos  Search this
Interactive multimedia  Search this
Genre/Form:
Books
Clippings
Manuscripts
Drawings
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Accession 97-061, Smithsonian Press/Smithsonian Productions, Production Records
Identifier:
Accession 97-061
See more items in:
Production Records
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-fa97-061

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