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Secular Limba musical group known as Poro, Bafodea Town, Sierra Leone

Photographer:
Ottenberg, Simon  Search this
Collection Photographer:
Ottenberg, Simon  Search this
Collection Collector:
Ottenberg, Simon  Search this
Extent:
1 Slide (col.)
Culture:
Limba (African people)  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Slides
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Sierra Leone
Date:
1978-1980
Scope and Contents:
This photograph was taken by Dr. Simon Ottenberg while conducting field research in northern Sierra Leone within Bafodea Town, the capital of Wara Wara Bafodea Chiefdom, while on an Art Historical and Anthropological Field Research from October of 1978 through July of 1980.
Original title reads, "Poro musical group (not associated with Poro society as there is none of that name in Bafodea although it exists elsewhere in Sierra Leone. Christmas Day 1979. My neighbor Suma Mannio Mansaray on the big drum." [Ottenberg field research notes, Limba Slides and Photographs, October 1978-July 1980].
Local Numbers:
1878/1978-1980
General:
Title source: Dr. Simon Ottenberg, Professor Emeritus of Anthropology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA.
Other Archival Materials:
Simon Ottenberg Papers are located at the National Anthropological Archives, National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution.
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original records requires an appointment. Contact Archives staff for more details.
Collection Rights:
Permission to reproduce images from the Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives must be obtained in advance. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.

Photographs by Pa Huff, Hamaidu Mansaray, and Labelle Prussin are restricted. In these cases, the photographer's permission is required for access and publication of images.
Topic:
Musicians  Search this
Musical instruments  Search this
Dance  Search this
Genre/Form:
Color slides
Identifier:
EEPA.2005-001, Item EEPA 2005-0001-1857
See more items in:
Simon Ottenberg photographs of Limba and Afikpo Peoples
Archival Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-eepa-2005-001-ref3721

Miscellaneous musical groups available for events

Collection Creator:
Torpedo Factory Art Center  Search this
Container:
Box 4, Folder 69-70
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1979-1995
Collection Restrictions:
The collection is open for research. Use requires an appointment.
Collection Rights:
The Torpedo Factory Art Center records are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Collection Citation:
Torpedo Factory Art Center records, 1974-1996. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Torpedo Factory Art Center records
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-torpfaca-ref95

Mardi Gras Costume Ball notes and clippings concerning musical groups for hire

Collection Creator:
Torpedo Factory Art Center  Search this
Container:
Box 4, Folder 50
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1988-1989
Collection Restrictions:
The collection is open for research. Use requires an appointment.
Collection Rights:
The Torpedo Factory Art Center records are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Collection Citation:
Torpedo Factory Art Center records, 1974-1996. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Torpedo Factory Art Center records
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-torpfaca-ref78

The American Music Group

Collection Creator::
Smithsonian Institution. Division of Performing Arts  Search this
Container:
Box 22 of 35
Type:
Archival materials
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Accession T90055, Smithsonian Institution. Division of Performing Arts, Records
See more items in:
Records
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-sia-fat90055-refidd1e10453

Ed Hayes and his Banjo Girls Records

Creator:
Hayes, Ed  Search this
Extent:
1.3 Cubic feet (3 boxes)
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Programs
Clippings
Photograph albums
Maps
Membership cards
Scrapbooks
Date:
1918 - 1981
Scope and Contents:
A collection relating to the vaudeville musical group, Ed Hayes and his Banjo Girls: a photograph album, a scrapbook, route sheets, programs, Actors' Equity Association cards, clippings, and a map.
Arrangement:
1 series.
Biographical / Historical:
A vaudeville act consisting of Ed Hayes, his wife, Vivian Chenoweth Hayes, and Frances Roberts.
Provenance:
Musical History, Division of.,National Museum of American History
Restrictions:
Unrestricted research access on site by appointment.,Unprotected photographs must be handled with gloves.
Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
Vaudeville  Search this
Musicians  Search this
Musical groups  Search this
Banjo music  Search this
Banjo  Search this
Banjoists  Search this
Entertainment  Search this
Genre/Form:
Programs
Clippings
Photograph albums
Maps -- 1920-1930
Membership cards
Scrapbooks
Citation:
Ed Hayes and his Banjo Girls Records, 1918-1981, Archives Center, National Museum of American History.
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.1333
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmah-ac-1333

RS-225 Concert - American Music Group

Collection Creator::
Smithsonian Institution. Office of Telecommunications  Search this
Container:
Box 22 of 40
Type:
Archival materials
Collection Restrictions:
Restrictions pertaining to the use of these materials may apply (based on contracts/copyright). Access restrictions may also apply if listening copies are not currently available. Listening copies can be made for a fee. Contact reference staff for details.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 296, Smithsonian Institution. Office of Telecommunications, Production Records
See more items in:
Production Records
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-sia-faru0296-refidd1e3136

"The Great Inka Road" Family Day 2 - Music & Dance of Peru & Ecuador

Creator:
National Museum of the American Indian  Search this
Type:
Youtube videos
Uploaded:
2015-09-17T18:02:17.000Z
Topic:
Native Americans;American Indians  Search this
Youtube Category:
Education  Search this
See more by:
SmithsonianNMAI
YouTube Channel:
SmithsonianNMAI
Data Source:
National Museum of the American Indian
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_xrqlKtmjYh8

Family Farm Fieldwork: Musical Group Conjunto Ideal- with Ramon Rangel

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Extent:
1 sound recording (compact audio cassette)
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Date:
1991 March 9
Collection Restrictions:
Access by appointment only. Where a listening copy or viewing copy has been created, this is indicated in the respective inventory; additional materials may be accessible with sufficient advance notice and, in some cases, payment of a processing fee. Older papers are housed at a remote location and may require a minimum of three weeks' advance notice and payment of a retrieval fee. Certain formats such as multi-track audio recordings and EIAJ-1 videoreels (1/2 inch) may not be accessible. Contact the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at 202-633-7322 or rinzlerarchives@si.edu for additional information.
Collection Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1991 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1991, Item FP-1991-CT-0018
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1991 Festival of American Folklife
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-1991-ref898

Cyrus Trobbe Music Collection

Collector:
Trobbe, Cyrus (musician)  Search this
Names:
Curran Theater  Search this
Geary Theater  Search this
KFRC (radio station)  Search this
San Francisco Light Opera  Search this
San Francisco Symphony Orchestra  Search this
Extent:
300 Cubic feet (322 record boxes)
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Scrapbooks
Programs
Disc recordings
Card catalog
Sheet music
Place:
San Francisco (Calif.)
Date:
ca. 1900-1982.
Scope and Contents:
Includes: published music scores (1920-1980) collected by Cy Trobbe, scrapbooks documenting his music career (1919-1980), programs from musical presentations in San Francisco (1913-1980), disc recordings of Trobbe's radio broadcasts on KFRC in 1938; and a card catalog assembled by Trobbe of his collection, arranged by type of music.
Arrangement:
Divided into 5 series: (1) Collected music, (2) Scrapbooks, (3) Printed Programs, (4) Disc Recordings, (5) Card Catalog.
Biographical / Historical:
Trobbe was a musician and a leader of musical groups in the San Francisco Bay area for some sixty years. He was born in London and came to the U.S. shortly before 1920. Trobbe found regular work as a violinist and a group leader, assembling musical groups varying in size from small dance orchestras to large theater orchestras. He became a faculty member of what is now San Francisco State University soon after WW II.
Provenance:
Collection donated by Mrs. Cyrus Trobbe, 1986,September 30.
Restrictions:
Collection stored off site. Call 202-633-3270 to inquire about special arrangements to view collection.
Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
Radio broadcasts  Search this
Sound Recordings and Reproductions  Search this
Musicians -- 20th century  Search this
Musical performances  Search this
Bands (Music) -- 20th century  Search this
Theater  Search this
Genre/Form:
Scrapbooks -- 20th century
Programs
Disc recordings
Card catalog
Sheet music
Citation:
Cyrus Trobbe Music Collection, 1913-1982, Archives Center, National Museum of American History.
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.0242
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmah-ac-0242

Public Program Records

Creator::
National Museum of American History. Department of Public Programs  Search this
Extent:
1 cu. ft. (1 record storage box)
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Clippings
Brochures
Manuscripts
Black-and-white photographs
Color transparencies
Audiotapes
Videotapes
Date:
1975-1999
Descriptive Entry:
This accession consists of the records of Harold A. Closter and document his work in the Department of Public Programs developing, creating, and putting on public programs at the National Museum of American History (NMAH) and other sites around the Smithsonian Institution. Included are records from when the department was known as the Office of Public and Academic Programs as well as when the department was the independent Division of Performing Arts. Among the positions that Closter held were the Associate Director for Public Service, Department of Public Programs, NMAH and Country Music Program Coordinator, Division of Performing Arts. Materials include correspondence, memoranda, programs, news releases, brochures, flyers, mailings, clippings, images, video recordings, and audio recordings.
Topic:
Museums -- Educational aspects  Search this
Museums -- Public relations  Search this
Performing arts  Search this
Country music  Search this
Country music groups  Search this
Country musicians  Search this
Concerts  Search this
Genre/Form:
Clippings
Brochures
Manuscripts
Black-and-white photographs
Color transparencies
Audiotapes
Videotapes
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Accession 18-042, National Museum of American History. Department of Public Programs, Public Program Records
Identifier:
Accession 18-042
See more items in:
Public Program Records
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-fa18-042

Diana Davies photographs

Photographer:
Davies, Diana, 1938-  Search this
Gahr, David  Search this
Performer:
Bread and Puppet Theater  Search this
Everly Brothers  Search this
New Lost City Ramblers  Search this
Pentangle (Musical group)  Search this
The Pennywhistlers (Musical group)  Search this
The Young Tradition (Musical group)  Search this
Andersen, Eric  Search this
Bikel, Theodore  Search this
Brand, Oscar  Search this
Cameron, John A.  Search this
Chandler, Len  Search this
Collier, Jimmy  Search this
Collins, Judy, 1939-  Search this
Fuller, Jesse  Search this
Gerrard, Alice, 1934-  Search this
Guthrie, Arlo  Search this
Hartford, John  Search this
Hjorth, Ole  Search this
Joplin, Janis  Search this
Kennedy, Norman, 1934-  Search this
Kershaw, Doug  Search this
Killen, Louis  Search this
Kirkpatrick, Frederick Douglass  Search this
Koerner, John  Search this
McGhee, Brownie, 1915-1996  Search this
Mitchell, Joni  Search this
Monroe, Bill, 1911-1996  Search this
Ochs, Phil  Search this
Perkins, Carl  Search this
Proffitt, Frank, Jr., 1946-2005  Search this
Rachell, Yank  Search this
Raim, Ethel  Search this
Ramsey, Frederic, 1915-1995  Search this
Reagon, Bernice Johnson, 1942-  Search this
Rinzler, Ralph  Search this
Sainte-Marie, Buffy  Search this
Seeger, Mike, 1933-2009  Search this
Stabi, Bjorn  Search this
Sykes, Roosevelt, 1906-1983  Search this
Taylor, James  Search this
Traum, Artie  Search this
Traum, Happy  Search this
Waters, Muddy, 1915-1983  Search this
Watson, Doc  Search this
Watson, Merle  Search this
White, Elaine (Vocalist)  Search this
Wiseman, Mac  Search this
Names:
Newport Folk Festival  Search this
Philadelphia Folk Festival  Search this
Asch, Moses  Search this
Chandler, Nancy  Search this
Dunson, Josh., 1941-  Search this
King, Coretta Scott, 1927-2006  Search this
Silber, Irwin, 1925-2010  Search this
Young, Izzy, 1928-  Search this
Musician:
Bosco, John  Search this
Extent:
3.83 Cubic feet (8 binders containing contact sheets, slides, and prints; 7 boxes (8.5"x10.75"x2.5") of 35 mm negatives; 2 binders of 35 mm and 120 format negatives; and 1 box of 11 oversize prints.)
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Contact sheets
Slides (photographs)
Black-and-white negatives
Photographic prints
Place:
New York (N.Y.)
Saint Simons Island (Ga. : Island)
Date:
1963-2009
Summary:
The Diana Davies photographs consist of images taken by Diana Davies at various stages of her career. Locations include the Festival of American Folklife, the Newport Folk Festival, the Philadelphia Folk Festival, the Poor People's Campaign, various peace and protest marches and outdoor performances, New York City, and the Georgia Sea Islands. The collection includes contact sheets, negatives, photographic prints, and slides. Original photographs, negatives, and color slides taken by Diana Davies. Materials date from 1963-2009. Bulk dates: Newport Folk Festival, 1963-1969, 1987, 1992; Philadelphia Folk Festival, 1967-1968, 1987.
Scope and Contents:
The Diana Davies photographs, 1963-2009, consist of black and white negatives, contact sheets and prints, as well as color slides and negatives. The bulk of materials depict major festivals and protest movements (including the Poor People's March of 1968) documented by Diana Davies (located in Series 1: Newport Folk Festival, Series 2: Philadelphia Folk Festival, Series 6: Festival of American Folklife, and Series 11: Social Justice). Also well-represented are non-festival performances (in locations such as clubs, concert halls, and homes), recording sessions, and other music-related images, mainly of notable figures in the American folk music revival (located in Series 3: Broadside Magazine, Series 4: Sing Out! Magazine Concerts, Series 5: Miscellaneous Concerts and People, Series 7: Recording Sessions, Series 8: Instruction Book Shots, and Series 9: Jazz, Blues, and Salsa Musicians). Series 10: Georgia Sea Islands consists of photographs depicting the culture, environment, and daily life of these coastal islands in 1966. Series 12: New York City Scenes contains photographs taken on the street depicting everyday life in NYC in the 1960s and 1970s. The collection also contains related papers in Series 13: Miscellaneous Papers and Correspondence.
Arrangement note:
Each item in the Diana Davies Photographs has been assigned an accession number, and like materials have been put together such as the Newport Folk Festival photographs, in a chronological sequence as much as possible. Materials in the three more recent donation batches (1998, 2004, and 2006) were numbered and integrated into the collection. In some series, the accession numbers are in numerical order, and in others, the numbers are random because like items with different number sequences were pulled together in a series for subject coherence. The best way to find occurrences of a particular subject is to use the ctrl+F function. Please consult the archivists if you have any questions about the collection contents.

Contact sheets, slides, and prints arranged in 8 binders; negatives and oversize prints are stored separately.

Arranged in 14 series:

Series 1: Newport Folk Festival

Series 2: Philadelphia Folk Festival

Series 3: Broadside Magazine

Series 4: -- Sing Out! -- Magazine Concerts

Series 5: Miscellaneous Concerts and People

Series 6: Festival of American Folklife

Series 7: Recording Sessions

Series 8: Instruction Book Shots

Series 9: Jazz, Blues, and Salsa Musicians

Series 10: Georgia Sea Islands

Series 11: Social Justice

Series 12: New York City Scenes

Series 13: Miscellaneous Papers and Correspondence

Series 14: Oversize Materials
Biographical/Historical note:
Diana Davies is a well-known photographer of folk performers and festivals. Davies photographed the Smithsonian Folklife Festival in its earlier years. Born in 1938, Davies grew up in Maine, the Catskills, New York City, and Boston. Her grandparents were local union organizers and Debs socialists; one grandfather was a gandy dancer with the railroad, and her grandmother was a textile worker in Massachusetts, New York, and Pennsylvania. Davies finds that her family background was later expressed in her own activist efforts.

Davies left high school at 16, and worked sweeping out coffeehouses, which gave her the opportunity to listen to music while she worked. She became interested in theater and music. In Greenwich Village, she began doing some sound technician work, and then got interested in photography. She taught herself how to develop and print photographs in a darkroom, and began photographing in theaters, shooting from behind the scenes. Her theater photos are at Smith College in Northampton, where she presently lives. In the early 1960s, she began working with the editors of Broadside Magazine, Sis Cunningham and Gordon Friesen. She developed an interest in human rights work, which grew from her contact with Sis and Gordon, and also her own family background. She also worked as a photographer in a wide range of settings, including night clubs, weddings, and doing portrait photography. This led her to work for major national and international media including the New York Times, covering such events as the war in Biafra, and traveling to Mexico, Cuba, and Portugal on assignment.

Davies' folk photographs represent about one-quarter of her body of work; her other major photographic work includes the Civil Rights Movement, the Peace Movement, and theater. Davies began photographing at the Newport Folk Festival in 1964, which she covered for a number of years. She knew Ralph Rinzler, and found him a vibrant, alive person excited by all aspects of culture. He introduced her to Bessie Jones from the Georgia Sea Islands, and in 1966 she made a photographic journey to the islands. Her work from this trip is included in the collection. Davies has also been a musician. She became involved with the punk rock movement of the 1970s, and felt that there was a connection between the hard-hitting songs from the punk world and the songs being published in Broadside Magazine. In 1975, she became part of a folk/punk women's band in Boston, and later moved to Western Massachusetts. In addition to being a photographer and musician, Davies is also a writer. She wrote a play entitled "The Witch Papers" in 1980, which was produced in Boston and other locations. The play was a vehicle for her human rights activism, comparing the technology of inquisition with labor sweatshops. In 1998, her play "The War Machine" was produced in Amherst, Mass. She lives in Northampton, and enjoys and participates in street performance, which she describes as the "most essentially communicative stuff you can come up with."
General note:
All contact sheets from the collection are digitized and accessible through this finding aid. Series-level slideshows accessible through this finding aid represent a small sampling from the collection.
Provenance:
The Smithsonian Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections acquired portions of the Diana Davies Photograph Collection in the late 1960s and early 1970s, when Ms. Davies photographed for the Festival of American Folklife. More materials came to the Archives circa 1989 or 1990. Archivist Stephanie Smith visited her in 1998 and 2004, and brought back additional materials which Ms. Davies wanted to donate to the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections. These two more recent donations of additional photographs (contact sheets, prints, and slides) consisted of documentation of the Newport Folk Festival, the Philadelphia Folk Festival, the Poor People's March on Washington, the Civil Rights Movement, the Georgia Sea Islands, and miscellaneous personalities of the American folk revival. In a letter dated 12 March 2002, Ms. Davies gave full discretion to the Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage to grant permission for both internal and external use of her photographs, with the provison that her work be credited in any use.
Restrictions:
Access by appointment only. Contact the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at 202-633-7322 or rinzlerarchives@si.edu for additional information.

Permission for the duplication or publication of items in the Diana Davies Photograph Collection must be obtained from the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections.
Rights:
Copyright restrictions apply. Please contact the archives staff for further information.
Topic:
Peace movements  Search this
March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, Washington, D.C., 1963  Search this
Civil rights -- United States  Search this
Genre/Form:
Contact sheets
Slides (photographs)
Black-and-white negatives
Photographic prints
Citation:
Diana Davies photographs, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.DAVIE
See more items in:
Diana Davies photographs
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-cfch-davie
Additional Online Media:

Michael Travis Costume Design Collection

Creator:
Travis, Michael  Search this
Donor:
Lavdas, George  Search this
Names:
5th Dimension (Musical group)  Search this
Supremes (Musical group)  Search this
Liberace, 1919-1987  Search this
Sinatra, Nancy  Search this
Warwick, Dionne  Search this
Extent:
15 Cubic feet (35 boxes, 1 map-folder )
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Pastels (Drawings)
Pencil works
Drawings
Design drawings
Date:
1947-1986
Summary:
The collection contains approximately 2,500 costume designs in colored pencil and pastels, on tissue paper mounted on mat boards. The designs were created for entertainers such as Liberace, Diana Ross and the Supremes, Dionne Warwick, the Fifth Dimension, Nancy Sinatra, and others. Some were created for the television show Rowan and Martin's Laugh-In.
Scope and Contents:
This collection consists of the sketches and finished renderings of costumes created over approximately thirty years by Michael Travis. Many are signed by the artist; most are not, which may indicate that Travis collected renderings done by other designers to save them from destruction. They are done in a variety of media and many pencil "roughs" are present as well as the finished art presented to clients. The earlier works are relatively small in size and are believed to have been created in the late 1950s and 1960s for New York costume houses and theatrical productions. The larger format works are primarily designs for the musical performers and television productions that comprised Travis's clients in Los Angeles in the 1970s and 1980s.

During his career his style of illustration evolved and he may also have used several different styles to suit the subject. It is likely that he used assistants for some of the drawings, especially for large productions. In any case, the liveliness of the drawings, the brilliance of their color, the sheer panache they posess is the essence of the drama and excitement that is the lifeblood of the entertainment industry. Many of the illustrations have one (or many) fabric swatches attached to them; a group of large fabric samples is included as well.

Other materials include ephemera, a few publications, and photographs. There is also a small group of artworks by other artists, particularly Waldo Angelo, a long-time friend and colleague.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged into five series.

Series 1: Costume Designs for Individual Performers and Performing Groups, 1961-1986, undated

Series 2: Costume Designs for Theatrical and Television Productions, 1958-1978, undated

Series 3: Ephemera, Publications, and Photographs, 1977-1985, undated

Series 4: Fabric Samples, undated

Series 5: Artworks by Others, 1947-1968, undated
Biographical / Historical:
Costume designer Michael Travis was born Louis Torakis to a Detroit Greek-American family in 1928. While serving in the postwar United States Army he was stationed in Paris. Upon his discharge in1949 he remained in the city to study at the Ecole des Beaux-Arts and the Sorbonne on the GI Bill. Also studying haute couture, he met the designers Jacques Fath and Pierre Balmain and occasionally provided sketches for their collections.

Travis left Paris to seek work in New York and was hired at Eaves Costume Company. The company had been founded in 1863 and was the premier costumer for Broadway productions. He was hired as a secretary (his army employment) but became an assistant to the designers. With the owner's encouragement, he passed the exam for the costumers union and became a member of the Designers Guild. This made him eligible to design for Broadway shows and union films.

Travis became an assistant at Brooks Costume Company where he worked with famous Broadway and Hollywood designers such as Raul Pene du Bois and Irene Sharaff. This would lead to his designing the costumes for Ionesco's play Rhinosceros, starring Zero Mostel. The director of the play then hired Travis for a series of Public Television theater productions. Following these, he became the designer for two television programs featuring operatic and theatrical stars, The Voice of Firestone and The Bell Telephone Hour.

Beginning in 1958, Travis worked on the Motion Picture Acadmey of Arts and Sciences (MPAAS) Academy Awards, the Oscars, for eight years as assistant to well-known costume designer Edith Head. She persuaded him to move from New York to Los Angeles in the mid 1960s and he was hired to design for The Steve Lawrence Show, produced by George Schlatter. Travis and Schlatter became close friends and when Schlatter produced the ground-breaking comedy-variety show Laugh-In, Travis was hired as costume designer. The show ran for six seasons, 1968-1973, and required as many as 300 costumes per episode for a large cast, numerous guest stars, and the corps of dancers. He was nominated for an Academy of Television Arts and Sciences (ATAS) award, the Emmy, and more importantly, met and worked with a great many of the musical, film, and theatrical stars of the time. When the show ended in 1973 he was himself a star in his field. Travis was now able to concentrate on his clientele of musical performers and groups. These included The Supremes, The Temptations, The 5th Dimension, Tony Orlando and Dawn, and solo artists Dionne Warwick, Connie Stevens, Nancy Sinatra, John Denver, Wayne Newton and many others. He also acquired his most extravagant client, Liberace, when the flamboyant pianist's designer retired in 1973.

Frank Ortiz had designed an elaborately beaded and decorated jacket for Liberace as early as 1959 and, with other designers, continued to design elaborate costumes for him throughout the 1960s and early 1970s. Following this tradition, Travis was encouraged by Liberace to create the most fabulous, beautiful, and exquisitely crafted suits, vests, boots, and capes possible. The costumes were made using the finest fabrics, embroideries, crystals, sequins, feathers and furs—even lights! Anna Nateece, Liberace's longtime furrier, continued to supply his furs. One of these ensembles was valued at $300,000 dollars and they could weigh over 100 pounds. They were objects of awe for his audiences and made a spectacular appearance with the pianos and automobiles in his stage show. One of Liberace's favorite sayings was "Too much of a good thing is wonderful!" Travis was able to demonstrate how right he was and continued as his designer and friend until the pianist died in 1987.

When Travis was in his forties he had been diagnosed with multiple sclerosis. The disease gradually disabled him to the point that walking was extremely difficult and eventually he became wheelchair-bound. After Liberace's death, he retired from his work but continued an active social life and traveled with his care-givers both within the United States and to European countries. In 2010 he received The Career Achievement in Television Award at the 12th Annual Costume Designers Guild Awards in Beverly Hills. His friends, George Schlatter and Nancy Sinatra, were with him at the ceremony. He died on May 1, 2014 at the age of 86.

Source

Liberace Extravaganza! by Connie Furr Soloman and Jan Jewett, HarperCollins 2013
Provenance:
Donated to the Archives Center in 2015 by George Lavdas.
Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
Costume  Search this
Costume design  Search this
Costume designers  Search this
Genre/Form:
Pastels (Drawings)
Pencil works
Drawings -- 20th century
Design drawings -- 20th century
Citation:
Michael Travis Costume Design Collection, 1947-1986, undated, Archives Center, National Museum of American History.
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.1347
See more items in:
Michael Travis Costume Design Collection
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmah-ac-1347
Additional Online Media:

Family Farm Fieldwork: Musical Group with R. Tijerina, R. Valle, J, Herrera (Los Bribones?)

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Extent:
1 sound recording (compact audio cassette)
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Date:
1991 March 9
Collection Restrictions:
Access by appointment only. Where a listening copy or viewing copy has been created, this is indicated in the respective inventory; additional materials may be accessible with sufficient advance notice and, in some cases, payment of a processing fee. Older papers are housed at a remote location and may require a minimum of three weeks' advance notice and payment of a retrieval fee. Certain formats such as multi-track audio recordings and EIAJ-1 videoreels (1/2 inch) may not be accessible. Contact the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at 202-633-7322 or rinzlerarchives@si.edu for additional information.
Collection Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1991 Festival of American Folklife, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.1991, Item FP-1991-CT-0017
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 1991 Festival of American Folklife
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-1991-ref897

Lee Hays papers

Creator:
Hays, Lee, 1914-1981  Search this
Names:
Almanac Singers  Search this
Baby Sitters (Musical group)  Search this
United States. Congress  Search this
Weavers (Musical group)  Search this
Gilbert, Ronnie  Search this
Guthrie, Woody, 1912-1967  Search this
Hays, Lee, 1914-1981  Search this
Houston, Cisco  Search this
Lampell, Millard, 1919-1997  Search this
Leventhal, Harold  Search this
Seeger, Pete, 1919-2014  Search this
Extent:
6.95 Cubic Feet (Papers)
0.9 Cubic Feet (Audiorecordings)
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Interviews
Sheet music
Notes
Photographic prints
Business records
Audiotapes
Correspondence
Scripts (documents)
Date:
1923-1981
Summary:
The Lee Hays papers measures 7.85 cubic feet and dates from 1923 to 1981. The collection includes original writings, correspondence, and miscellaneous projects by Lee Hays; business records, interviews and features related to Lee Hays, including photographs; clippings saved by Lee Hays; and audiorecordings made by Lee Hays.
Scope and Contents:
The Lee Hays papers, which date from 1923-1981, contain personal and business correspondence; typescripts of Lee Hays' fiction, non-fiction, scripts and poetry; miscellaneous project and idea materials; business documents; and audiorecordings made by Lee Hays. The collection measures 7.85 cubic feet.
Arrangement:
The Lee Hays papers, are divided into seven series: 1) Correspondence, 2) Business, 3) Projects and Writings, 4) Collected Texts, 5) Interviews, 6) Features on Lee Hays and 7) Audio Recordings.

The Correspondence Series is divided into two subseries: 1) Personal, and 2) Business. The Projects and Writings series is divided into six subseries: 1) Songs, 2) Non-Fiction, 3) Fiction, 4) Musical Productions, 5) Radio Scripts, and 6) Cisco Houston Project.

When possible, folders are arranged within series and subseries in alphabetical order by file title, and within folders in chronological order with undated items at the top.
Biographical / Historical:
Lee Hays (1914-1981) was an influential American singer, songwriter, author, and activist. His legacy, both literary and musical, emphasizes the dynamic relationship between traditional culture and contemporary events and issues. As is clear from his essay "The Folk Song Bridge", Hays conceived of "folk music" as a living, breathing "process". Born in Arkansas in 1914 to a Methodist preacher, Hays' first experiences with music revolved around the church. His political awakening came later, when he returned to Arkansas from Ohio in 1934. Under the wing of mentors such as Claude Williams and Zilphia Horton (maiden name: Zilphia Johnson), Hays began to fight for the cause of sharecroppers and union workers. His musical ability and passion for social justice came together as he used music to represent the voice of labor, replacing the religious motifs of traditional and gospel songs with pro-union themes.

Upon moving to the North in 1940, Hays met Pete Seeger, another musician of the Folk Revival. Hays and Seeger shared the common goal of spreading political topical songs, and their collaborations with Woody Guthrie and Millard Lampell led to the creation of the Almanac Singers the same year. Later, the four band members, along with other musicians such as Burl Ives and Sis Cunningham, established the People's Songs organization and publication to create and distribute labor songs. However, interpersonal conflicts with members, including Pete Seeger, led to Hays' pressured resignation from both of these endeavors. He moved in with his mentor, Walter Lowenfels, and began to focus more on his writing. Though Hays was a prolific writer whose work spanned articles, essays, short stories, poetry, and songs, he is rarely recognized for his literary achievement. His writing often centered on the social and political themes for which he is best known—labor rights, racism, poverty and inequality—and used vernacular culture and narrative to address those problems.

Seeger and Hays eventually made amends, and in 1948 they formed The Weavers with Fred Hellerman and Ronnie Gilbert, bringing music of the Folk Revival to a national audience. However, as the Red Scare impacted the American political climate into the 1950s, the Weavers were blacklisted and ultimately had to disband. Though he was under investigation by the House Un-American Activities Committee (HUAC) and had no steady income, Hays continued to write both fiction and non-fiction during the three year blacklisting. In 1955, the Weavers finally reunited for a highly successful revival under manager Harold C. Leventhal, but as years passed, the group split up again, and Hays began to focus on other projects. It was at this time that he produced the bulk of his memoirs, began a project on Cisco Houston, and recorded folk music for children with his group The Baby Sitters. In 1980, the Weavers reunited for a concert in Carnegie Hall and Hays' last performance with them was in 1981. Hays died in 1981 as a result of diabetic cardiovascular disease.
Provenance:
The Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at the Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage acquired the "Lee Hays Archives" in 1992 as a donation from Harold C. Leventhal and Doris Kaplan, who acquired the collection upon Lee Hays' death in 1981. The donation included materials produced by Lee Hays, as well as materials of interest to him that were found in his possession.
Restrictions:
Access by appointment only. Contact the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at (202) 633-7322 or rinzlerarchives@si.edu for additional information.

This collection has been digitized and a majority of its content has been made available online for research and educational purposes. Online access to select materials is not available due to privacy or rights concerns.
Rights:
Copyright restrictions apply. Contact archives staff for additional information.

Restrictions may apply concerning the use, duplication, or publication of items in these collections. Consult the archivists for additional information.
Topic:
Political ballads and songs -- United States  Search this
Folk music -- United States  Search this
Topical songs -- United States  Search this
Popular music -- 20th century -- United States  Search this
Genre/Form:
Interviews
Sheet music
Notes
Photographic prints
Business records
Audiotapes
Correspondence
Scripts (documents)
Citation:
Lee Hays papers, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.HAYS
See more items in:
Lee Hays papers
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-cfch-hays
Additional Online Media:

Ray Brown Papers

Creator:
Brown, Ray (Jazz musician)  Search this
Composer:
Allen, Steve, 1921-2000  Search this
Musician:
Clayton, John  Search this
Jackson, Milt  Search this
Peterson, Oscar, 1925-  Search this
Shank, Bud  Search this
Singer:
Fitzgerald, Ella  Search this
Producer:
Granz, Norman  Search this
Extent:
8 Cubic feet (8 boxes)
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Photographic prints
Posters
Clippings
Music
Audiotapes
Awards
Scrapbooks
Correspondence
Business records
Date:
undated
circa 1940-2010
Summary:
Ray Brown was an African-American musician, composer, bandleader, manager, music teacher and promoter. He became best known for his collaborative work with Dizzy Gillespie, Oscar Peterson, Ella Fitzgerald, the Oscar Peterson Trio and Norman Granz' s Jazz at the Philharmonic. Over the course of his career, Brown received awards and accolades from the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences, the National Endowment for the Arts, the Jazz Hall of Fame, Down Beat and Playboy. Brown's papers document his professional music career from 1944 to 2002 and include music compositions and notes, publicity materials, photographs and some recordings of his performances.
Scope and Contents:
The collection primarily documents the near sixty-year music career of upright bass player, bandleader, composer, and instructor Raymond Matthews (Ray) Brown and the various bands that he played with. The materials consist of music manuscripts, musical arrangements, published sheet music, photographs, programs, newspaper clippings, magazine articles, posters, audio and video recordings, honors and awards, correspondence, and publications. There is very little information about Brown's education, family or other aspects of his personal life.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged into five series.

Series 1, Musical Compositions and Notes, 1940s-2000s, undated

Series 2, Publicity Materials, 1950s-2002, undated

Series 3, Photographic Materials, 1940-2003, undated

Series 4, Personal Papers, 1954-2010

Series 5, Audiovisual Materials, 1978-1993, undated
Biographical / Historical:
Raymond Matthews Brown was an African-American musician (double bass and cello) born on October 13, 1926 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. He became known for his collaborative work with Dizzy Gillespie, Oscar Peterson, Ella Fitzgerald (to whom he was married for a few years) and others. He was a composer, bandleader, manager, music teacher and promoter. His professional music career lasted almost sixty years, dating from 1944 to 2002.

Brown's career began with a risky move to New York City in 1945, as a recent high school graduate, which resulted in his being hired on the spot to play with Dizzy Gillespie. Brown continued to play with Gillespie and others in various groups, recording songs such as "One Bass Hit" and "Night in Tunisia," before leaving in 1947. Brown married notable jazz singer Ella Fitzgerald that same year. He and Fitzgerald adopted a son, Raymond Matthew Brown Jr., and performed together in Norman Granz's Jazz at the Philharmonic. Granz's tours, which Brown participated in from around 1949 to 1958, allowed him to travel and play all around the world. After being introduced to Oscar Peterson during a Philharmonic tour, Brown became a founding member of the Oscar Peterson Trio in 1952. His growing commitment to the group, along with other factors, led to Brown and Fitzgerald's divorce in 1953. However, the two would continued to collaborate and perform together, as friends and colleagues.

Brown worked with Peterson and other prominent jazz musicians to found the Advanced School of Contemporary Music in Toronto, which lasted from 1960 to 1965. He left the Peterson trio in the late 1960s and moved to Los Angeles to work as a composer, manager, educator, and publisher. In California, he worked for several movie and television show orchestras, became bassist for all of Frank Sinatra's television specials, and accompanied some noted singers, including Fitzgerald, Sarah Vaughan and Tony Bennett. He composed the theme song to Steve Allen's show, "Gravy Waltz," for which they both won a Grammy Award in 1964. He also managed the Modern Jazz Quartet, and Quincy Jones. In the 1980s, he formed the Ray Brown Trio with pianist Gene Harris, which lasted nine years. He also directed events such as the Monterey Jazz and Concord Summer Festivals, and consulted for the Hollywood Bowl Association. Brown continued to play and record with his trio and various other groups, such as the Oscar Peterson Trio and the Modern Jazz Quartet, for the rest of his life. He also published an instructional book for the bass, Ray Brown's Bass Method, through his own company in 1999. Over the course of his career, Brown received awards and accolades from the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences, the National Endowment for the Arts, the Jazz Hall of Fame, Down Beat, Playboy, and many more. Ray Brown died in 2002 at the age of seventy five.
Provenance:
The collection was donated to the Archives Center in 2015 by Ray Brown's widow, Cecilia Brown.
Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
African Americans -- Music  Search this
Music -- Performance  Search this
Music -- Songs  Search this
Musicians  Search this
Musicians -- United States  Search this
Jazz musicians -- United States  Search this
African American music -- 20th century  Search this
Jazz  Search this
African American musicians  Search this
Music -- 20th century  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographic prints
Posters
Posters -- 20th century
Clippings
Music -- Manuscripts
Audiotapes
Awards
Scrapbooks -- 20th century
Correspondence -- 20th century
Business records -- 20th century
Citation:
Ray Brown Papers, Archives Center, National Museum of American History.
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.1362
See more items in:
Ray Brown Papers
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmah-ac-1362

Folk Music Ensemble of the China Conservatory of Music: Beijing Traditional Music Group, October 3, 2005 (2 copies)

Collection Creator::
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery. Department of Education  Search this
Container:
Box 1 of 1
Type:
Archival materials
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Accession 12-191, Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery. Department of Education, Event Programs
See more items in:
Event Programs
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-sia-fa12-191-refidd1e1706

Ken Rattenbury Collection

Composer:
Strayhorn, Billy (William Thomas), 1915-1967  Search this
Collector:
Rattenbury, Ken, 1920-  Search this
Interviewee:
Anderson, William "Cat", 1916-1981 ((musician))  Search this
Ellington, Duke, 1899-1974  Search this
Extent:
0.16 Cubic feet (1 box)
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Transcriptions
Audiotapes
Theses
Date:
1967-1991.
Scope and Contents:
Five cassette audiotapes, master's degree thesis, and Billy Strayhorn music transcription to Duke Ellington's "Lotus Blossom.",Material documents the career and compositional techniques of Duke Ellington, and interviews with Duke Ellington and Cat Anderson.
Arrangement:
1 series. Unarranged.
Biographical / Historical:
Professional musician, author of "Duke Ellington Jazz Composer", editor of "Crescendo International", and member/organizer of the music group "Jazz Five."
Provenance:
Collection donated by Ken Rattenbury, 1991, June 15.
Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Rights:
Copyright restrictions. Contact staff for information.
Topic:
Musicians -- United States  Search this
Jazz musicians -- United States  Search this
Music -- 20th century -- United States  Search this
Jazz -- 20th century -- United States  Search this
Genre/Form:
Transcriptions
Audiotapes
Theses
Citation:
Ken Rattenbury Collection, 1967-1992, Archives Center, National Museum of American History.
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.0432
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmah-ac-0432

Robert C. Malone photographs

Photographer:
Malone, Robert C.  Search this
Names:
Old Town School of Folk Music  Search this
Weavers (Musical group)  Search this
Broonzy, Big Bill, 1893-1958  Search this
Performer:
Bikel, Theodore  Search this
English, Logan  Search this
Gilbert, Ronnie  Search this
GoodingCynthia  Search this
Hamilton, Frank, 1934-  Search this
Hays, Lee, 1914-1981  Search this
Hellerman, Fred, 1927-  Search this
Houston, Cisco  Search this
Jackson, Mahalia, 1911-1972  Search this
Koppelman, Robert S. (Robert Steven), 1959-  Search this
Langhorne, Bruce  Search this
Odetta, 1930-2008  Search this
Schlamme, Martha  Search this
Seeger, Pete, 1919-2014  Search this
Sellers, John, 1924-  Search this
Stracke, Win, 1908-1991  Search this
Extent:
1 folder (papers)
1 binder (contact sheets and prints, black and white)
1 box (35 mm negatives, black and white, 8.5"x10.75"x2.5")
0.44 Cubic Feet (2 boxes contain the extent details for this collection, Box 1 is 0.24 cubic feet and Box 2 is 0.2 cubic feet)
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Binders
Photographic prints
Correspondence
Contact sheets
Black-and-white negatives
Place:
Chicago (Ill.)
New York (N.Y.)
Date:
1957 - 1961
Summary:
Original photographs and negatives taken by Robert C. Malone.
Scope and Contents:
The Robert C. Malone photographs document the performances of folk singers. The collection dates from 1957 to circa 1961. Photographic materials include 16 rolls of negatives, contact sheets made from the negatives, and 14 prints. The collection features photographs of the Weavers and Cisco Houston. The collection also includes a small amount of correspondence, including two letters from Robert C. Malone to the Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage concerning the donation of the collection, and two letters from Lee Hays to Robert C. Malone. A handful of Malone's prints are housed with the Lee Hays papers in the Rinzler Archives and are not included in the finding aid.
Arrangement note:
Arranged in 6 series: (1) University of Chicago; (2) Old Town School of Folk Music, Chicago, Ill.; (3) One Sheridan Square, N.Y.; (4) Cisco Houston's Last Performance; (5) Miscellaneous People; (6) Correspondence and Miscellaneous. Contact sheets and prints arranged in 1 binder; negatives are stored in a separate binder. Series VI, Correspondence and Miscellaneous, is filed separately. Materials are arranged chronologically.
Biographical/Historical note:
Robert C. Malone is currently retired and living in Ridgewood New Jersey. During the late 1950's and early 1960's, Mr. Malone moved between Chicago and New York photographing folk singers such as the Weavers and Cisco Houston. Through contact with Robert Koppelman, a scholar working with the Lee Hays Papers in the Rinzler Archives, Robert C. Malone heard about the Archives and wrote to offer his photos to the Archives collections.
Provenance:
The Smithsonian Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections acquired the Robert C. Malone Photograph Collection in 1998. In a letter dated 19 January 1999, Mr. Malone gave full discretion to the Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage to grant permission for both internal and external use of his photographs with the request that his work be credited.
Restrictions:
Access by appointment only. Permission for the reproduction or publication of items in the Robert C. Malone Photograph Collection must be obtained from the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections. Consult the archivists for further information at (202) 633-7322.
Rights:
Copyright restrictions apply. Please contact the archivists for further information.
Topic:
Folk songs -- United States  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographic prints
Correspondence
Contact sheets
Black-and-white negatives
Citation:
Robert C. Malone photographs, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.MALO
See more items in:
Robert C. Malone photographs
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-cfch-malo
Additional Online Media:

Tony Alderman Country Music Collection

Source:
Musical Instruments, Division of (NMAH, SI)  Search this
Community Life, Div. of, NMAH, SI  Search this
Creator:
Alderman, Alonzo (Tony) Elvis, 1900-1983 ((musician))  Search this
Former owner:
Community Life, Div. of, NMAH, SI  Search this
Musical Instruments, Division of (NMAH, SI)  Search this
Names:
Hill Billies (Musical group)  Search this
Old Fiddler's Convention  Search this
Stoneman, Ernest V.  Search this
Extent:
4 Cubic feet (5 boxes)
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Correspondence
Audiotapes
Clippings
Papers
Sheet music
Date:
1927-1983
Summary:
Alonzo Elvis "Tony" Alderman played country music with the Galax Dixie Concert Band and The Hill Billies. During the 1950s through 1970s he recorded old-time and early country music, primarily at festivals and conventions. Alderman recorded many of the open-reel audiotapes in the collection at the Old Time Fiddlers Convention in Galax, Virginia.
Scope and Contents:
The collection is divided into two series. Series one contains 98 1/4" open reel audiotapes primarily of the Galax Fiddler's Convention (1959-1963) made by Tony Alderman and three audio disc recordings. Series two contains manuscript materials including bills and receipts, correspondence, sheet music, newspaper clippings, performance announcements, and publications.
Arrangement:
The collection is organized into two series.

Series 1, Audiovisual, 1950-circa 1970

Series 2, Manuscript Materials, 1927-1976
Biographical / Historical:
Alonzo Elvis "Tony" Alderman, (1900-1983) was introduced to old-time music at an early age by his relatives in Galax, Virginia. Alderman learned to play trumpet, French horn, and, inspired by Earnest "Pop" Stoneman, the country fiddle. He first performed publicly with the Galax Dixie Concert (brass)Band.

In the late spring of 1924, he formed a group with John Rector, Al Hopkins, and Joe Hopkins. Rector convinced the band to record a record. Unfortunately, due to technical problems the recording session was unsuccessful.

Undaunted, the quartet travelled to OKeh Studios in January of 1925 where they recorded six songs under the supervision of Ralph Peer. When Peer asked the band's name Al Hopkins replied, "We're nothing but a bunch of hill billies from North Carolina and Virginia. Call us anything." Reportedly Inspired by his reply, Peer named the group "The Hill Billies."

"The Hill Billies" released their first record in February 1925. In May of that year while performing at a fiddler's convention sponsored by the Ku Klux Klan in Montana, Tennesee, they recruited Charlie Bowman from Gray Station, Tennessee to join them. Later that year 'The Hill Billies' left OKeh and joined the Combined Vocalion Brunswick Company to work with artist and repertoire man Jim O'Keefe. On the Vocalion label the band's name remained the same, but on the Brunswick label it changed to "Al Hopkins and His Buckle Busters."

For the next several years, the "Pine Hill Billies" performed across the country, made several more records, and broadcast on WRC radio in Washington, D.C. After the group disbanded in 1932,Tony Alderman moved to Washington, D.C. to work as an x-ray technician, as well as an investor, and he experimented with aerial photography.

In 1970, Alderman retired to Golden Beach in St. Mary's County, Maryland. He joined the "Over the Hill Gang" and played at local celebrations, including solos for the National Council for Traditional Arts festivals, the Smithsonian Institution's Festival of American Folklife, and various holiday celebrations held by the Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of American History.
Related Materials:
University of North Carolina. Southern Folklife Collection

Letter. Tony Alderman to Archie Green, 1961. Archie Green Collection (#20002).
Restrictions:
Collection is open for research. Only reference copies of the audiotapes and audio discs may be used.
Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
Country music  Search this
Music -- Performance  Search this
Musical saw music  Search this
Musicians  Search this
Genre/Form:
Correspondence -- 1930-1950
Audiotapes
Clippings
Papers
Sheet music
Citation:
Tony Alderman Country Music Collection, 1927-1976, Archives Center, National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.0211
See more items in:
Tony Alderman Country Music Collection
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmah-ac-0211

"Explorations Music Group, recorded at outdoor dance event." From Charles Forberg Associates, New York. 5-inch reel of 1/4-inch audiotape, 30 minutes.

Collection Creator::
National Museum of American Art. Office of Program Support  Search this
Container:
Box 285 of 287
Type:
Archival materials
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 321, National Museum of American Art. Office of Program Support, Records
See more items in:
Records
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-sia-faru0321-refidd1e21270

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