Skip to main content Smithsonian Institution

Search Results

Collections Search Center
217 documents - page 1 of 11

C. Malcolm Watkins Interviews

Creator::
Watkins, C. Malcolm interviewee  Search this
Extent:
15 audiotapes (reference copies).
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Date:
1992, 1994-1995
Introduction:
The Smithsonian Institution Archives began its Oral History Program in 1973. The purpose of the program is to supplement the written documentation of the Archives' record and manuscript collections with an Oral History Collection, focusing on the history of the Institution, research by its scholars, and contributions of its staff. Program staff conduct interviews with current and retired Smithsonian staff and others who have made significant contributions to the Institution. There are also interviews conducted by researchers or student on topics related to the history of the Smithsonian or the holdings of the Smithsonian Institution Archives.

C. Malcolm Watkins was interviewed for the Oral History Collection because of his long and distinguished career as curator in the Department of Cultural History, National Museum of American History, and his pioneering role in fields like historical archeology and material culture studies.
Descriptive Entry:
These interviews of Watkins by Pamela M. Henson, Historian for Smithsonian Institution Archives, and Susan H. Myers, Curator of Ceramics and Glass at the National Museum of American History, discuss his family, youth, and education; first job at Wells Historical Museum; curatorial career in the Division of Ethnology and Department of Cultural History; contributions to exhibits; research interests; role in the development of the fields of material culture studies and historical archeology; and reminiscences of such colleagues as Edna Greenwood, Herbert W. Krieger, Frank A. Taylor, George H. Watson, and Albert Wells.

This collection is comprised of eight interview sessions, totaling approximately 13.0 hours of recordings and 235 pages of transcript. There are two generations of tape for each session: original tapes and reference tapes. In total, this collection is comprised of 17 original 7" reel-to-reel audiotapes, 5 original audiotape cassettes, and 15 reference copy audiotape cassettes.
Historical Note:
C. Malcolm Watkins (1911-2001), cultural historian, developed an early interest in American material culture through his parents, Charles H. and Lura Woodside Watkins, who collected glass and pottery. Watkins received the B.S. from Harvard College in 1934 and began his museum career as Curator for the Wells Historical Museum, predecessor of Old Sturbridge Village, in Massachusetts. In 1949, he was appointed Associate Curator in the Division of Ethnology, United States National Museum (USNM), where he was responsible for the collections documenting American technology and decorative arts. When a separate National Museum of History and Technology (NMHT) was created in 1958, Watkins assumed responsibility for a new Division of Cultural History in the Department of Civil History. In 1969, a separate Department of Cultural History was established, with Watkins as Chairman. In 1973, he was named Senior Curator in the Department, a position he held until his retirement in 1980; he continued his research as Curator Emeritus until 1984. In 1980, the National Museum of History and Technology was renamed the National Museum of American History (NMAH).

During his career at the USNM and NMHT, Watkins worked on numerous exhibits, including the Hall of Everyday Life in the American Past, Growth of the United States, and A Nation of Nations. He was responsible for the acquisition of many significant collections, including the Arthur and Edna Greenwood Collection of Americana, the Remensnyder Collection of American Stoneware, and the Morgenstern Collection of early American material culture. His major research projects included the Marlborough and Jamestown, Virginia, archeological sites, North Devon pottery export to America, and early California history. Watkins was a pioneer in the fields of material culture studies and historical archeology.
Rights:
Restricted.
Topic:
History  Search this
History of science and technology  Search this
Exhibitions  Search this
Archaeology -- History  Search this
Museum curators -- Interviews  Search this
Anthropology  Search this
Genre/Form:
Interviews
Audiotapes
Oral history
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 9586, C. Malcolm Watkins Interviews
Identifier:
Record Unit 9586
See more items in:
C. Malcolm Watkins Interviews
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-faru9586

Louis R. Purnell Interviews

Creator::
Purnell, Louis R., interviewee  Search this
Extent:
13 audiotapes (reference copies).
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Date:
1993-1994
Introduction:
The Smithsonian Institution Archives began its Oral History Program in 1973. The purpose of the program is to supplement the written documentation of the Archives' record and manuscript collections with an Oral History Collection, focusing on the history of the Institution, research by its scholars, and contributions of its staff. Program staff conduct interviews with current and retired Smithsonian staff and others who have made significant contributions to the Institution. There are also interviews conducted by researchers or students on topics related to the history of the Smithsonian or the holdings of the Smithsonian Institution Archives.

Louis R. Purnell was interviewed for the Oral History Collection because of his long career at the Institution, including fifteen years as Curator of Astronautics at the National Air and Space Museum, and his pioneering work as an African American professional.
Descriptive Entry:
Purnell was interviewed in seven sessions between December 1993 and February 1994 by Terrica M. Gibson, an Intern with the Institutional History Division, Smithsonian Institution Archives. The interviews cover his childhood in Wilmington, Delaware, and Cape May, New Jersey; his education, love of flying, service during World War II; reminiscences of prominent Army Air Corps personnel, including General Benjamin O. Davis, Jr.; careers with the Office of the Quartermaster General, U.S. Book Exchange, NMNH and NASM; the circumstances surrounding the first lunar landing; the move of NASM from the Arts & Industries (A&I) Building; relationship with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA); and reminiscences of colleagues including G. Arthur Cooper, S. Paul Johnston, and Michael Collins.

This collection is comprised of approximately 12 hours of recordings and 291 pages of transcript. In total, this collection includes 24 original 7" reels, 24 preservation digital .wav files, 13 reference copy audio cassette tapes, and 24 reference copy digital .mp3 files.
Historical Note:
Louis R. Purnell (1920-2001), was born on 5 April 1920 in Snow Hill, Maryland. He spent his youth in Delaware and Cape May, New Jersey. While beginning his undergraduate degree at Lincoln University, in Lincoln University, Pennsylvania, he was able to pursue his dream of becoming a pilot when the Civilian Pilot Training Program (CPTP) was instituted on campus. In 1942, he enlisted and was accepted into the seventh class of African American Army Air Force aviation cadets stationed at the Tuskegee Army Air Field in Tuskegee, Alabama [the Tuskegee Airmen]. He joined the all-Black 99th Fighter Squadron in 1943. During World War II, he completed two tours of duty in North Africa and southern Italy with the 99th, and later the 332nd Fighter Group. He was presented the Distinguished Flying Cross and Air Medal with Eight Oak Leaf Clusters.

After his return to the United States, Purnell returned to Lincoln University and completed a B.A. in Psychology. He took a position as a Speech Therapist at the Lena J. Sklar School in Germantown, Pennsylvania. He eventually moved to Washington, D.C., and held positions at the Office of the Quartermaster General and the United States Book Exchange at the Library of Congress. Purnell worked in a variety of jobs at the Smithsonian, eventually joining the Division of Invertebrate Paleontology and Paleobotany in the National Museum of Natural History (NMNH) in 1961. In 1968, he moved to the Department of Astronautics of the National Air and Space Museum (NASM). During his career in the Astronautics Department (renamed the Department of Space Science and Exploration in 1980), he progressed through the ranks from Museum Specialist to Curator, a position he held until his retirement in January 1985.
Rights:
Restricted.
Topic:
World War, 1939-1945  Search this
African American history  Search this
History of science and technology  Search this
Paleontology  Search this
Aeronautics  Search this
Military history  Search this
Museum curators -- United States -- Interviews  Search this
Genre/Form:
Interviews
Audiotapes
Oral history
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 9578, Louis R. Purnell Interviews
Identifier:
Record Unit 9578
See more items in:
Louis R. Purnell Interviews
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-faru9578

KPFK "Art Scene" interviews, 1958-1969

Creator:
Gore, Marian L.  Search this
Subject:
Elliott, James  Search this
Mallary, Robert  Search this
Robles, Esther Waggoner  Search this
Nevelson, Louise  Search this
Goeritz, Mathias  Search this
Cremean, Robert  Search this
Cuevas, José Luis  Search this
Albers, Josef  Search this
Lipchitz, Jacques  Search this
Kuntz, Roger  Search this
Wayne, June Claire  Search this
Hansen, Jurgen  Search this
Blair, Streeter  Search this
Siqueiros, David Alfaro  Search this
Leavitt, Thomas W.  Search this
Ortiz, Emilio  Search this
Carter, Earl  Search this
Schniede, Otto  Search this
Gerchik, Paul  Search this
Vicente, Esteban  Search this
Schwaderer, Fritz (Fritz Karl)  Search this
Greene, Balcomb  Search this
Hopps, Walter  Search this
Lebrun, Rico  Search this
Wark, Robert R.  Search this
Ankrum, Joan  Search this
Albert, Michel  Search this
Luna, Mario  Search this
Falkenstein, Claire  Search this
Geoffrey, J. Iqbal  Search this
Tamayo, Rufino  Search this
Brigante, N.P.  Search this
Ankrum Gallery  Search this
Dwan Gallery (Los Angeles, Calif.)  Search this
Ferus Gallery (Los Angeles, Calif.)  Search this
Ceeje Gallery  Search this
Silvan Simone Gallery  Search this
Comara Gallery  Search this
Topic:
Gallery owners  Search this
Curators  Search this
Artists  Search this
Interviews  Search this
Photographs  Search this
Sound recordings  Search this
Transcripts  Search this
Art  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)6118
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)216328
AAA_collcode_goremari
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_coll_216328
Additional Online Media:

Smithsonian Institution Paleontology Interviews

Extent:
(Reference copies).
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Date:
1987-1988
Introduction:
The Smithsonian Videohistory Program, funded by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation from 1986 until 1992, used video in historical research. Additional collections have been added since the grant project ended. Videohistory uses the video camera as a historical research tool to record moving visual information. Video works best in historical research when recording people at work in environments, explaining artifacts, demonstrating process, or in group discussion. The experimental program recorded projects that reflected the Institution's concern with the conduct of contemporary science and technology.

Eighteen Smithsonian historians participated in the program to document visual aspects of their on-going historical research. Projects covered topics in the physical and biological sciences as well as in technological design and manufacture. To capture site, process, and interaction most effectively, projects were taped in offices, factories, quarries, laboratories, observatories, and museums. Resulting footage was duplicated, transcribed, and deposited in the Smithsonian Institution Archives for scholarship, education, and exhibition. The collection is open to qualified researchers.
Descriptive Entry:
Pamela M. Henson, Institutional History Division, Smithsonian Institution Archives, interviewed scientists in the museum's Department of Paleobiology who developed its extensive fossil collection. She used the fossil collections to stimulate discussion of the history of the collections and visually documented fossil preparation techniques.

This collection consists of three interview sessions, totaling approximately 4:04 hours of recordings, and 115 pages of transcript. There are three generations of tape for each session: originals, dubbing masters, and reference copies. In total, this collection is comprised of 7 original videotapes (6 U-matic videotapes, and 1 Beta videotape), 7 dubbing master videotapes (7 U-matic videotapes), and 5 reference copy videotapes (5 VHS videotapes). The collection has been remastered digitally, with 7 motion jpeg 2000 and 7 mpeg digital files for preservation, and 7 Windows Media Video and 7 Real Media Video digital files for reference.

For additional information on Cooper, see Record Unit 7318, G. Arthur Cooper Papers, Record Unit 328, Department of Paleobiology Records, and Record Unit 9524, G. Arthur Cooper Oral History Interviews, Smithsonian Institution Archives.
Historical Note:
The National Museum of Natural History (NMNH) of the Smithsonian Institution houses one of the world's major paleontological collections. In addition, museum curators have developed many innovative techniques for handling, processing, and interpreting fossils.

Scientists interviewed for the project included G. Arthur Cooper (1902-2000), who received a B.S. degree from Colgate University in 1924 with a major in chemistry and an M.S. in 1926. He was awarded a Ph.D. from Yale University in 1929 for his thesis on the stratigraphy of the Hamilton formation. In 1930 he was appointed Assistant Curator in the Division of Stratigraphic Paleontology of the United States National Museum (USNM) and by 1957 assumed head curatorship of the Department of Geology, where he oversaw its division into separate departments of Paleobiology and Mineral Sciences in 1963. He continued as Chairman of the Department of Paleobiology until he was appointed Senior Paleobiologist in 1967. He retired from federal service in 1974 but continued his research as paleobiologist emeritus at the Smithsonian Institution until June 1987.

J. Thomas Dutro, Jr., (1923-2010) began his career as a geologist and paleontologist with the United States Geological Survey (USGS) in 1948. He received his A.B. from Oberlin College in 1948 and his M.S. and Ph.D. from Yale University in 1950 and 1953 respectively. He was stationed in the USGS offices in NMNH, and, in 1962, was appointed Research Associate of the Smithsonian Institution. His interests include the Paleozoic stratigraphy of Alaska and the western United States and the systematics of late Paleozoic Brachiopoda.

Richard E. Grant (1927-1995) received his B.A. in 1949 and M.S. in 1953 from the University of Minnesota and his Ph.D. in geology from the University of Texas at Austin in 1958. From 1961 to 1972 he worked as a geologist and paleontologist with the USGS until he assumed the position of Chairman of the Department of Paleobiology at NMNH in 1972. In 1977 he was appointed Geologist in that department and in 1983 became Curator and Senior Geologist. His research interests include the brachiopods and stratigraphy of the Permian period.

Ellis L. Yochelson (1928-2006) was a paleontologist with the USGS from 1952 until his retirement in 1985. During those years he occupied an office in NMNH and in 1967 was appointed a Research Associate in the Department of Paleobiology. A specialist in extinct mollusks, concentrating on the evolution of gastropods, Dr. Yochelson received B.S. and M.S. degrees from the University of Kansas and a Ph.D. from Columbia University. His research interests included the history of geology.
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 9530, , Smithsonian Institution Paleontology Interviews
Identifier:
Record Unit 9530
See more items in:
Smithsonian Institution Paleontology Interviews
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-faru9530

Oral history interviews with Cynthia Adams Hoover, 1986

Interviewee:
Hoover, Cynthia A (Cynthia Adams)  Search this
Interviewer:
Binfield, Richard  Search this
Subject:
Hoover, Cynthia A (Cynthia Adams)  Search this
Department of Cultural History (NMHT)  Search this
Division of Cultural History (NMHT)  Search this
National Museum of American History (U.S.)  Search this
National Museum of History and Technology  Search this
American Musicological Society  Search this
Smithsonian Institution Forum on Material Culture  Search this
Yale-Smithsonian Seminar on Material Culture  Search this
Physical description:
2 audiotapes (Reference copies)
Type:
Interviews
Collection descriptions
Audiotapes
Oral history
Place:
United States
Date:
1986
Topic:
Musical instruments  Search this
Exhibitions  Search this
Historic preservation  Search this
Musicology  Search this
Piano  Search this
Museum curators  Search this
Local number:
SIA RU009608
Restrictions & Rights:
The recordings are available for research use, but the transcripts of the interviews of Cynthia Hoover do not have prefaces. Researchers may submit a written request to interviewee, heirs, or assigns for written permission to use the transcript
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_arc_249478

Oral history interviews with Robert P. Multhauf 1974

Interviewee:
Multhauf, Robert P  Search this
Interviewer:
Freilicher, Miriam S  Search this
Henson, Pamela M  Search this
Uniform title:
Isis (Serial)  Search this
Subject:
Carmichael, Leonard 1898-1973  Search this
Chapelle, Howard Irving  Search this
Taylor, Frank A (Frank Augustus) 1903-2007  Search this
Multhauf, Robert P  Search this
National Museum of American History (U.S.)  Search this
National Museum of History and Technology (U.S.)  Search this
National Museum of History and Technology (U.S.) Department of Science and Technology  Search this
National Museum of History and Technology (U.S.) Office of the Director  Search this
United States National Museum  Search this
United States National Museum Division of Engineering  Search this
Physical description:
3 audiotapes (Reference copies). 6 digital .mp3 files (Reference copies)
Type:
Interviews
Collection descriptions
Audiotapes
Oral history
Date:
1974
Topic:
Museum curators  Search this
Museum directors  Search this
History of science and technology  Search this
Local number:
SIA RU009502
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_arc_217670

Oral history interviews with A. Gilbert Wright 1983

Interviewee:
Wright, A. Gilbert (Arthur Gilbert) 1909-1987  Search this
Interviewer:
Henson, Pamela M  Search this
Subject:
Wright, A. Gilbert (Arthur Gilbert) 1909-1987  Search this
Coggeshall, Arthur Sterry  Search this
Anglim, John E  Search this
Wetmore, Alexander 1886-1978  Search this
Lewis, Ralph  Search this
Florida State Museum  Search this
National Museum of Natural History (U.S.) Assistant to the Director for Exhibits Planning  Search this
National Museum of Natural History (U.S.) Exhibits Editor's Office  Search this
George Washington University Museum Studies Program  Search this
Illinois State Museum  Search this
United States National Park Service  Search this
Smithsonian Institution Office of Exhibits Programs  Search this
Physical description:
9 audiotapes (Reference copies)
Type:
Interviews
Collection descriptions
Audiotapes
Oral history
Place:
Jefferson National Expansion Memorial (Saint Louis, Mo.)
Date:
1983
Topic:
Entomology  Search this
Museum techniques  Search this
Zoology  Search this
Museum curators  Search this
Zoologists  Search this
Local number:
SIA RU009523
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_arc_217691

Oral history interviews with Curtis W. Sabrosky 1988

Interviewee:
Sabrosky, Curtis W (Curtis Williams) 1910-  Search this
Creator:
Henson, Pamela M  Search this
Subject:
Sabrosky, Curtis W (Curtis Williams) 1910-  Search this
Bradley, J. Chester (James Chester) 1884-1975  Search this
Brown, Roland W (Roland Wilbur) 1893-1961  Search this
Muesebeck, Carl F. W (Carl Frederick William) 1894-  Search this
Clarke, J. F. Gates (John Frederick Gates) 1905-1990  Search this
Systematic Entomology Laboratory (U.S.)  Search this
International Commission on Zoological Nomenclature  Search this
Department of Entomology (NMNH)  Search this
Bureau of Entomology (USDA) United States Department of Agriculture  Search this
United States Bureau of Entomology  Search this
United States Department of Agriculture Systematic Entomology Laboratory (USDA)  Search this
Physical description:
5 audiotapes (Reference copies)
Type:
Interviews
Collection descriptions
Classification
Audiotapes
Oral history
Place:
United States
Date:
1988
Topic:
Entomology  Search this
Biology  Search this
Records of meetings, organizations, and professional societies  Search this
Museum curators  Search this
Local number:
SIA RU009583
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_arc_217751

Oral history interviews with Harald A. Rehder 1976-1977

Interviewee:
Rehder, Harald Alfred 1907-  Search this
Interviewer:
Henson, Pamela M  Search this
Subject:
Rehder, Harald Alfred 1907-  Search this
Bartsch, Paul 1871-1960  Search this
National Museum of Natural History (U.S.)  Search this
Division of Mollusks (NMNH) Department of Biology (NMNH)  Search this
Physical description:
6 audiotapes (Reference copies)
Type:
Interviews
Collection descriptions
Audiotapes
Oral history
Date:
1976
1976-1977
Topic:
Mollusks  Search this
Museum curators  Search this
Local number:
SIA RU009519
Restrictions & Rights:
Restricted. Audio recordings may not be used without permission. Contact SIHistory@si.edu to request permission
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_arc_217687

Oral history interviews with Thomas Dale Stewart 1975, 1986

Interviewee:
Stewart, T. D (Thomas Dale) 1901-1997  Search this
Interviewer:
Henson, Pamela M  Search this
Subject:
Stewart, T. D (Thomas Dale) 1901-1997  Search this
Collins, Henry Bascom 1899-1987  Search this
Hrdlička, Aleš 1869-1943  Search this
Stirling, Matthew Williams 1896-1975  Search this
United States National Museum Exhibits Modernization Program  Search this
National Museum of Natural History (U.S.). Division of Physical Anthropology  Search this
National Museum of Natural History (U.S.) Office of the Director  Search this
Acting Assistant Secretary for Science  Search this
Shanidar Archeological Site (Iraq)  Search this
National Museum of Natural History (U.S.)  Search this
Smithsonian Institution Bureau of American Ethnology  Search this
National Museum of Natural History (U.S.) Department of Anthropology  Search this
Physical description:
14 audiotapes (Reference tapes). 27 digital .mp3 files (Reference copies)
Type:
Interviews
Collection descriptions
Audiotapes
Oral history
Date:
1975
1975-1986
1975, 1986
Topic:
Anthropology  Search this
Paleontology  Search this
Museum curators  Search this
Museum directors  Search this
Local number:
SIA RU009521
Restrictions & Rights:
Restricted. Recording of interview 13 may not be reproduced without permission. Contact SIHistory@si.edu for permission
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_arc_217689

American Association of Museums Centennial Interviews

Extent:
11 compact discs (reference copies).
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Date:
2006
Introduction:
The Smithsonian Institution Archives (SIA) began its Oral History Program in 1973. The purpose of the program is to supplement the written documentation of the Archives' record and manuscript collections with an Oral History Collection, focusing on the history of the Institution, research by its scholars, and contributions of its staff. Program staff conduct interviews with current and retired Smithsonian staff and others who have made significant contributions to the Institution. There are also reminiscences and interviews recorded by researchers or students on topics related to the history of the Smithsonian or the holdings of the Smithsonian Institution Archives.

To commemorate the 100th anniversary of the American Association of Museums (AAM) and the 30th anniversary of the Museum Studies Department, The George Washington University, oral history interviews were videotaped with eleven of the AAM's Centennial Honor Roll honorees as a part of a special Museum Studies graduate seminar taught by Smithsonian Institution Archives historian, Pamela M. Henson. Interviews were recorded in digital video and deposited in the Smithsonian Institution Archives Oral History Collection.
Descriptive Entry:
These interviews discuss their careers as outstanding museum professionals.

The AAM Centennial Interviews consist of 13.0 hours of digital video interviews and 379 pages of transcript. The original digital video files are preserved in security storage with Windows Media Video files available for reference.
Historical Note:
The AAM Centennial Honorees that were interviewed were Nina M. Archabal, Director of the Minnesota Historical Society; Rebecca A. Buck, Chief Registrar, The Newark Museum; Lonnie G. Bunch, Director, National Museum of African American History and Culture, Smithsonian Institution; Robert Macdonald, former Director, Museum of the City of New York; Marie C. Malaro, former Smithsonian Institution General Counsel and Director, Museum Studies Department, The George Washington University; Kathy McLean, Principal, Independent Exhibitions; Keith E. Melder, former Curator, National Museum of American History; Harold K. Skramstad, Jr., former Director, Henry Ford Museum and Greenfield Village; Kathy Dwyer Southern, Director, National Children's Museum; James M. Vaughn, Vice President, Stewardship of Historic Sites, National Trust for Historic Preservation; and W. Richard West, Jr., Director, National Museum of the American Indian. The interviews document their careers and reflections on the museum profession.

Graduate students Melanie M. Blanchard, Lauren A. Boegen, Reagan M. Furrow, Natascha L. Guluk, Heather T. Hawkins, Arthur Kim, Anthony Sankston Wallace, Elizabeth A. Pierson, Erica I. Nuckles, and Kimberly I. Robinson, from the GWU Museum Studies Program and the course instructor, SIA Historian Pamela Henson, conducted the interviews.
Topic:
Anniversaries  Search this
Museum exhibits  Search this
Historic preservation  Search this
Museum curators  Search this
Museum directors  Search this
Museum registrars  Search this
Interviews  Search this
Genre/Form:
Interviews
Electronic records
Compact discs
Digital images
Electronic images
Sound recordings
Transcripts
Oral history
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 9620, American Association of Museums Centennial Interviews
Identifier:
Record Unit 9620
See more items in:
American Association of Museums Centennial Interviews
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-faru9620

African-American Exhibits at the Smithsonian Interviews

Extent:
10 audiotapes (reference copies).
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Date:
1999, 2001
Introduction:
The Smithsonian Institution Archives began its Oral History Program in 1973. The purpose of the program is to supplement the written documentation of the Archives' record and manuscript collections with an Oral History Collection, focusing on the history of the Institution, research by its scholars, and contributions of its staff. Program staff conduct interviews with current and retired Smithsonian staff and others who have made significant contributions to the Institution. There are also reminiscences and interviews recorded by researchers or students on topics related to the history of the Smithsonian or the holdings of the Smithsonian Institution Archives.

The History of African American Exhibits at the Smithsonian Oral History Interviews were compiled by graduate student Michele Gates-Moresi as part of her research on the presentation of African American history at the Smithsonian.
Descriptive Entry:
The History of African American Exhibits at the Smithsonian Oral History Interviews conducted by Michele Gates-Moresi cover each curator's role in and views on National Museum of American History exhibitions that have portrayed African-Americans. These interviews cover the relationship between research and exhibition at the NMAH; changes in attitudes towards culturally diverse exhibits; exhibit processes during 1964 to 1990 at National Museum of History and Technology (now NMAH) and the incorporation of Negro History an other ethnic groups, especially Hispanics; the Bicentennial of the American Revolution exhibit, A Nation of Nations; and integration of African American collections into the music, costume, and political history collections.

The History of African American Exhibits Oral History Collection consist of 7 interview sessions, totaling approximately 9.0 hours of audiotape recordings, and 231 pages of transcript. There are three generations of recordings: original audio cassettes, preservation digital audio .wav files, reference digital audio .mp3 files and reference audio cassettes. In total this collection is comprised of 10 original audio cassette tapes, 18 preservation digital audio .wav files, 18 reference digital audio .mp3 files, and 10 reference copy audio cassettes. The original tapes are reserved in preservation storage.
Historical Note:
Museum exhibits are the result of a complex interplay between curators, collections, social currents, and the public. In 1999 and 2001, Smithsonian predoctoral fellow Michele Gates-Moresi conducted oral history interviews about the history of African-American exhibits at the Smithsonian Institution as part of her dissertation research. In 1999 and 2001, Gates-Moresi interviewed six curators from the National Museum of American History (NMAH), Richard E. Ahlborn, curator in the Division of Community Life; Ellen Roney Hughes, curator in the Division of Community Life; Claudia B. Kidwell, curator in the Division of Costume; Edith P. Mayo, former curator in the Division of Political History; Keith Melder, former curator in the Division of Political History; and Rodris Roth, curator in the Division of Domestic Life. In 2001, she also interviewed Cynthia H. Hoover, curator in the Division of Musical History, also at the NMAH.
Rights:
Restricted.
Topic:
Museum curators -- United States -- Interviews  Search this
African Americans  Search this
Exhibitions  Search this
Employees  Search this
African Americans -- History  Search this
Genre/Form:
Interviews
Audiotapes
Oral history
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 9603, African-American Exhibits at the Smithsonian Interviews
Identifier:
Record Unit 9603
See more items in:
African-American Exhibits at the Smithsonian Interviews
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-faru9603

Oral history interviews with John C. Ewers

Creator::
Ewers, John C. (John Canfield), 1909-1997 interviewee  Search this
Extent:
7 audiotapes (reference copies). 11 digital .mp3 files (reference copies).
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Date:
1974-1975
Introduction:
The Smithsonian Institution Archives began its Oral History Program in 1973. The purpose of the program is to supplement the written documentation of the Archives' record and manuscript collections with an Oral History Collection, focusing on the history of the Institution, research by its scholars, and contributions of its staff. Program staff conduct interviews with current and retired Smithsonian staff and others who have made significant contributions to the Institution. There are also interviews conducted by researchers or students on topics related to the history of the Smithsonian or the holdings of the Smithsonian Institution Archives.

Ewers was interviewed for the Oral History Program because of his significant scholarly and administrative contributions to the Smithsonian Institution during the prior thirty years.
Descriptive Entry:
Ewers was interviewed by Pamela M. Henson on 17 December 1974, 15 and 18 January and 4 February 1975. The interviews consist of reminiscences of his education, career with the National Park Service, Museum of the Plains Indian, and Smithsonian Institution, especially his work in exhibits modernization, the development of the National Museum of History and Technology, and ethnological research.
Historical Note:
John C. Ewers (1909-1997) was an ethnologist for the National Museum of Natural History. After pursing his graduate work in anthropology at Yale University, Ewers was a field Curator for the National Park Service from 1935 to 1940 and developed exhibits for many National Park Service sites. From 1941 to 1944, he was Curator at the Museum of the Plains Indian in Browning, Montana, under the Bureau of Indian Affairs. In 1945 Ewers was appointed Associate Curator of Ethnology in the United States National Museum and worked on the Museum's Exhibits Modernization Program. From 1956 to 1959, Ewers served as Planning Officer for the development of the National Museum of History and Technology (now the National Museum of American History, as Assistant Director of the Museum of History and Technology from 1959 to 1964, and as Director from 1964 to 1965. Ewers was Senior Ethnologist in the Department of Anthropology of the National Museum of Natural History from 1965 to 1997. Ewers' research concentrated on Plains Indian ethnology and art depicting American Indians.
Topic:
Anthropology  Search this
Ethnology  Search this
Museum techniques  Search this
Museum curators -- United States -- Interviews  Search this
Museum directors -- United States -- Interviews  Search this
Genre/Form:
Interviews
Audiotapes
Oral history
Transcripts
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 9505, Ewers, John C. (John Canfield), 1909-1997 interviewee, Oral history interviews with John C. Ewers
Identifier:
Record Unit 9505
See more items in:
Oral history interviews with John C. Ewers
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-faru9505

Oral history interviews with Fenner Albert Chace

Creator::
Chace, Fenner Albert, interviewee  Search this
Extent:
3 audiotapes (reference copies).
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Date:
1977
Introduction:
The Smithsonian Institution Archives began its Oral History Program in 1973. The purpose of the program is to supplement the written documentation of the Archives' record and manuscript collections with an Oral History Collection, focusing on the history of the Institution, research by its scholars, and contributions of its staff. Program staff conduct interviews with current and retired Smithsonian staff and others who have made significant contributions to the Institution. There are also interviews conducted by researchers or students on topics related to the history of the Smithsonian or the holdings of the Smithsonian Institution Archives.

Chace was interviewed for the Oral History Collection because of his long association with the NMNH and outstanding research career.
Descriptive Entry:
Chace was interviewed by Pamela M. Henson on 6 and 11 October 1977. The interviews cover Chace's youth and education, curatorial career at the MCZ and NMNH, research interests in decapod Crustacea, service during World War II, and reminiscences about colleagues.
Historical Note:
Fenner Albert Chace, (1908-2004) was a carcinologist and Research Associate of the National Museum of Natural History (NMNH), specializing in the taxonomy, morphology, and distribution of decapod Crustacea. He was born in Fall River, Massachusetts, in 1908, where he grew up. His summers were spent in the countryside of Tiverton, Rhode Island, and there he developed an early interest in natural history. Chace majored in biology at Harvard University, receiving the A.B. in 1930, the A.M. in 1931, and the Ph.D. in 1934. From 1934 to 1946, Chace curated the crustacean collection at the Museum of Comparative Zoology (MCZ), as Assistant Curator, Marine Invertebrates, from 1934 to 1942 and as Curator of Crustacea from 1942 to 1946. Chace held the Agassiz fellowship at the MCZ from 1935 to 1939. After serving in the army during World War II, Chace was appointed Curator of the Division of Marine Invertebrates of the United States National Museum (USNM) in 1946. During his years as Curator, Chace oversaw the growth of the division, the move into the West Wing of the Natural History Building, and the planning of exhibits. In 1963, Chace was appointed the first Senior Scientist in the NMNH, a position devoted entirely to research. During his long career, Chace named over 200 taxa in the Decapoda and Stomatopoda. Chace retired from the position as Senior Zoologist, Department of Invertebrate Zoology in September of 1978, but continued as a Zoologist Emeritus and Research Associate of the NMNH until his death in 2004.
Topic:
World War, 1939-1945  Search this
Invertebrate zoology  Search this
Museum curators -- Interviews  Search this
Genre/Form:
Interviews
Audiotapes
Oral history
Transcripts
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 9514, Chace, Fenner Albert, interviewee, Oral history interviews with Fenner Albert Chace
Identifier:
Record Unit 9514
See more items in:
Oral history interviews with Fenner Albert Chace
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-faru9514

Oral history interviews with Paul Edward Garber

Creator::
Garber, Paul Edward, 1899-1992. interviewee  Search this
Extent:
8 audiotapes (reference copies).
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Date:
1974
Introduction:
The Smithsonian Institution Archives began its Oral History Program in 1973. The purpose of the program is to supplement the written documentation of the Archives' record and manuscript collections with an Oral History Collection, focusing on the history of the Institution, research by its scholars, and contributions of its staff. Program staff conduct interviews with current and retired Smithsonian staff and others who have made significant contributions to the Institution. There are also interviews conducted by researchers or students on topics related to the history of the Smithsonian or the holdings of the Smithsonian Institution Archives.

Paul E. Garber was interviewed for the Oral History Collection because of his seminal role in the development of the National Air and Space Museum during his sixty-nine years at the Smithsonian.
Descriptive Entry:
Garber was interviewed in 1974 by Smithsonian Institution Archives Historian Miriam S. Freilicher. The interviews discuss his background, living in Washington, D.C., as a child, and early interest in flying; his early career at the Smithsonian as a Preparator; the acquisition of many of the famous aircraft in the National Air and Space Museum collection; his career in the United States Navy during World War II; and the early years of the National Air Museum. The collection consists of 8.0 hours of audiotape recording and 187 pages of transcript, and occupies 0.5 linear meters of shelf space. There are two generations of tape for each session: original tapes and reference tapes. In total, this collection is comprised of 8 original 5" reel-to-reel tapes and 8 reference copy audiotape cassettes. Box 1 contains transcripts of the interviews and cassette copies of the original reel to reel recordings, which are in security storage.
Historical Note:
Paul Edward Garber (1899-1992), was the first Curator of the National Air Museum, now the National Air and Space Museum. Garber was born on August 31, 1899, in Atlantic City, New Jersey, and moved permanently to Washington, D.C., with his family in 1910. He developed an interest in flight early in life with kites, and it continued with airplanes when he saw Orville Wright fly at Fort Meyer, Virginia, in 1909 while on a trip to Washington with his father. His interest in flight continued to grow as he visited airplane exhibits at the Smithsonian and flew kites on his own. Once while flying a kite outside his family home on Connecticut Avenue, N.W., Washington, D.C., he met Alexander Graham Bell, who helped him fix it. During World War I, Garber joined the D.C. National Guard, and then transferred to the United States Army as a Sergeant where he learned to fly airplanes at Bolling Field. After the war, he joined the Air Mail Service as a ground crewman, headquartered at College Park, Maryland.

Garber joined the staff of the Smithsonian Institution in 1920 as a Preparator in the Division of Mechanical Technology where he repaired objects and built models for exhibition. This began his long career at the Smithsonian during which he followed his passion for flight and built a world-class collection of airplanes. Among the airplanes Garber acquired for the collection are the Curtiss NC-4, the first aircraft to fly across the Atlantic; Lincoln Ellsworth's Northrop Gamma Polar Star, which made the first flight across the Antarctic; Wiley Post's Winnie Mae, which established a number of speed records; and Charles A. Lindbergh's Spirit of St. Louis. During World War II, Garber took military leave from the Smithsonian from 1941 to 1946 and worked for the United States Navy. While a Commander in the Navy, he built recognition models of enemy planes to teach pilots, gunners and observers how to identify the enemy planes.

When the National Air Museum was officially founded on August 12, 1946, Garber was appointed its first Curator. During the early years of the museum, Garber spent much time commuting between Washington, D.C., and Park Ridge, Illinois, where the museum had a storage facility for military aircraft in a Douglas Company building used for airplane assembly during World War II. The Korean conflict made it essential that the storage facility be put back into operation, so Garber had the task of finding a new storage facility. He conducted aerial surveys of the D.C. area by airplane and found suitable land in the Silver Hill area of Maryland. The twenty-one acres of land was acquired by the Smithsonian, and storage and restoration facilities were built. In 1980 the facility was renamed the Paul E. Garber Preservation, Restoration, and Storage Facility.

In 1967, Garber, in association with The Smithsonian Associates, founded the annual Smithsonian Kite Festival which was first held on March 25, 1967. The festival included kite flying on the National Mall, kite-making workshops, a lecture series, and a special display of kites made by Garber and his wife. In 1969, at the age of 70, Garber retired after serving the Smithsonian for forty-nine years. He continued to work at the museum for another twenty years as Historian Emeritus, and he was the museum's first Ramsey Fellow. He died on September 23, 1992, at the age of 93.
Topic:
Aeronautical museums  Search this
Aerospace museums  Search this
Curtiss NC-4 (P2N-1)  Search this
Polar Star (Airplane)  Search this
Spirit of St. Louis (Airplane)  Search this
Winnie Mae (Airplane)  Search this
Museum curators -- United States -- Interviews  Search this
Genre/Form:
Interviews
Audiotapes
Oral history
Transcripts
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 9592, Oral history interviews with Paul Edward Garber
Identifier:
Record Unit 9592
See more items in:
Oral history interviews with Paul Edward Garber
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-faru9592

Oral history interviews with Francis Raymond Fosberg

Creator::
Fosberg, F. Raymond (Francis Raymond), 1908-1993, interviewee  Search this
Extent:
22 audiotapes (reference copies).
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Date:
1993
Introduction:
The Smithsonian Institution Archives began its Oral History Program in 1973. The purpose of the program is to supplement the written documentation of the Archives' record and manuscript collections with an Oral History Collection, focusing on the history of the Institution, research by its scholars, and contributions of its staff. Program staff conduct interviews with current and retired Smithsonian staff and others who have made significant contributions to the Institution. There are also interviews conducted by researchers or students on topics related to the history of the Smithsonian or the holdings of the Smithsonian Institution Archives.

Fosberg was interviewed for the Oral History Collection because of his distinguished scientific career, contributions to the field of Pacific science, and career as a botanist at the National Museum of Natural History. Additional information about Fosberg can be found in the F. Raymond Fosberg Papers, which are also housed in Smithsonian Insitution Archives.
Descriptive Entry:
The F. Raymond Fosberg Interviews were conducted by Smithsonian Institution Archives Historian, Pamela M. Henson, during six sessions in 1993. Fosberg discusses his early life and influences; education and reminiscences of William Atwood Hilton and Philip Alexander Munz at Pomona, Harold St. John at Hawaii, and Jack Fogg at Pennsylvania; work on the Mangareva Expedition; his career at the USGS and USDA and work on the Colombian Cinchona Mission and the Marshall Islands and Micronesia surveys; work on Cinchona while on a Guggenheim Fellowship; career at the NMNH and reminiscences of Sachet; work in the international systematics community specifically on plant taxonomy and nomenclature, and work on the Pacific Science Congress; and his multidisciplinary, ecological view of science. The collection consists of 11 hours of audiotape recordings which have been remastered digitally into 22 .wav files and 22 .mp3 files for reference, and c. 250 pages of transcript.
Historical Note:
Francis Raymond Fosberg (1908-1993) was born in Spokane, Washington, and grew up in Turlock, California, with an early interest in natural history. He received his B.A. in botany from Pomona College in 1930. After graduation, he took a position at the Los Angeles County Museum researching plants of the desert Southwest and islands off the coast of California. This research led to his interests in island ecosystems, and in 1932 he moved to Honolulu to accept a position as a research assistant at the University of Hawaii. While in Hawaii, he was invited to participate in the Mangareva Expedition. He received his M.S. in botany from the University of Hawaii in 1937 and his Ph.D. from the University of Pennsylvania in 1939. Fosberg accepted a position at the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) and was sent to Colombia to identify stands of Cinchona for quinine production for the war effort. After World War II, he participated in a survey of economic resources in the Micronesian Islands. Upon his return to the United States, he and his new assistant, Marie-Hélène Sachet, began vegetation work for the newly formed Pacific Science Board under the National Research Council. Fosberg was also involved in the development of a joint program of the South Pacific Commission and the Pacific Science Board called the Coral Atoll Program, publishing papers twice a year.

Fosberg began his fifteen-year career at the United States Geological Survey (USGS) in 1951, mapping the military geology of islands in the Pacific. During his years there he also participated in many conferences, congresses, and scientific organizations such as the Pacific Science Association; United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization; the Pacific Science Board; and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. In 1966, Fosberg took a position at the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History (NMNH) in the tropical biology branch of the Ecology Program. Sachet was also appointed to the Program, allowing a continuation of their joint research. In 1968, with the demise of the Program, he and Sachet transferred to the Department of Botany, where Fosberg became Curator. He became Senior Botanist in 1976 and continued his career as Botanist Emeritus from 1978 to 1993.
Rights:
Restricted. Contact reference staff for details.
Topic:
Ecology  Search this
Botany  Search this
Geology  Search this
Records of meetings, organizations, and professional societies  Search this
Museum curators -- United States -- Interviews  Search this
Genre/Form:
Interviews
Audiotapes
Oral history
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 9572, Oral history interviews with Francis Raymond Fosberg
Identifier:
Record Unit 9572
See more items in:
Oral history interviews with Francis Raymond Fosberg
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-faru9572

Marian Gore "Art Scene" interviews and papers

Creator:
Gore, Marian L.  Search this
Names:
Ankrum Gallery  Search this
Ceeje Gallery  Search this
Comara Gallery  Search this
Dwan Gallery (Los Angeles, Calif.)  Search this
Ferus Gallery (Los Angeles, Calif.)  Search this
KPFK (Radio staion : Los Angeles, Calif.)  Search this
Silvan Simone Gallery  Search this
Albers, Josef  Search this
Albert, Michel (artist)  Search this
Ankrum, Joan  Search this
Blair, Streeter, 1888-1966  Search this
Brigante, Nicholas P., 1895-1989  Search this
Carter, Earl  Search this
Cremean, Robert, 1932-  Search this
Cuevas, José Luis, 1934-  Search this
Elliot, James, 1943-2011  Search this
Falkenstein, Claire, 1908-1997  Search this
Geoffrey, J. Iqbal, 1939-  Search this
Gerchik, Paul  Search this
Goeritz, Mathias, 1915-1990  Search this
Greene, Balcomb, 1904-1990  Search this
Hansen, Jurgen  Search this
Hopps, Walter  Search this
Kuntz, Roger, 1926-1975  Search this
Leavitt, Thomas W.  Search this
Lebrun, Rico, 1900-1964  Search this
Lipchitz, Jacques, 1891-1973  Search this
Luna, Mario  Search this
Mallary, Robert, 1917-1997  Search this
Nevelson, Louise, 1899-1988  Search this
Ortiz, Emilio, 1936-  Search this
Robles, Esther  Search this
Schniede, Otto  Search this
Schwaderer, Fritz (Fritz Karl), 1901-  Search this
Siqueiros, David Alfaro  Search this
Tamayo, Rufino, 1899-  Search this
Vicente, Esteban, 1903-2001  Search this
Wark, Robert R.  Search this
Wayne, June, 1918-2011  Search this
Extent:
2.2 linear feet
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Date:
1958-1969
Summary:
The Marian Gore "Art Scene" interviews and papers measure 2.2 linear feet and date from 1958 to 1969, with all sound recordings dated between 1962 and 1964. The core of the collection consists of 37 radio programs recorded by Marian Gore for KPFK radio in Los Angeles, California, consisting of interviews with artists, collectors, gallerists, and museum curators. A series of artist files contains notes, correspondence and other materials related to her interview subjects, and a printed materials series contains mainly exhibition posters, programs, and announcements produced by the art spaces with which her subjects were affiliated.
Scope and Contents:
The Marian Gore "Art Scene" interviews and papers measure 2.2 linear feet and date from 1958 to 1969, with all sound recordings dated between 1962 and 1964. The core of the collection consists of 37 radio programs recorded by Marion Gore for KPFK radio in Los Angeles, California, consisting of interviews with artists, collectors, gallerists, and museum curators. A series of artist files contains notes, correspondence and other materials related to her interview subjects, and a printed materials series contains mainly exhibition posters, programs, and announcements produced by the art spaces with which her subjects were affiliated.

The "Art Scene" Interviews series contains 36 interviews from Gore's "Art Scene" radio series of interviews relating to the contemporary art scene in Los Angeles, particularly galleries and artists showing on La Cienega Boulevard in West Hollywood. Also found is a single episode of another KPFK program called "Seen at the galleries" and hosted by Earl Carter, featuring an interview with Jacques Lipchitz on the occasion of his retrospective at UCLA. Two interviews, with Mathias Goeritz and David Siqueiros, were conducted in Mexico City. Other interview subjects include Michel Albert, Josef Albers, Joan Ankrum, Streeter Blair, Nick Brigante, Robert Cremean, José Luis Cuevas, James Elliott, Claire Falkenstein, Balcomb Greene, Paul Gerchik, Jurgen Hansen, Walter Hopps, Roger Kuntz, Rico Lebrun, Dr. Thomas Leavitt, Jacques Lipchitz, Mario Luna, Robert Mallary, Louise Nevelson, Emilio Ortiz, Esther Robles, Otto Schniede, Fritz Schwaderer, Rufino Tamayo, Esteban Vicente, Robert Wark, and June Wayne.

Artist files include mainly brief, typewritten notes created for Gore's radio interviews, with the questions she asked her interview subjects and brief introductory or concluding remarks. Correspondence is also found in files for Robert Cremean, Iqbal Geoffrey, Balcomb Greene, Robert Mallary, Emilio Ortiz, and Esteban Vicente. Louise Nevelson's file also contains a transcript of her interview with Gore. Also found scattered in some files are notes, photographs, clippings, press releases, resumes, and exhibition programs. Note that not every person in this series has a corresponding sound recording in Series 1, and not every interviewee in Series 1 has a corresponding file in this series.

Most of the material in the Printed Materials series consists of exhibition announcements, programs, and posters from Galleries in the Los Angeles, California area, particularly those along La Cienega Boulevard. Of these, Ankrum Gallery, Ceeje Gallery, Comara Gallery, Dwan Gallery, Ferus Gallery, and Silvan Simone Gallery on Olympic Boulevard contain the most material, with many of the other files containing only one or two pieces. Of note are original prints promoting exhibitions at the Ferus and Ceeje Galleries, and a poster for an art walk along La Cienega Boulevard in the file for the Los Angeles County Museum of Art.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged in 3 series:

Series 1: "Art Scene" Interviews (1.3 linear feet, Boxes 1-2, 4)

Series 2: Artist Files (0.2 linear feet, Boxes 2, 4)

Series 3: Printed Materials (0.7 linear feet, Boxes 3-4, OV 5)
Biographical / Historical:
Marian L. Gore (1914-2009) volunteered as a radio interviewer for KPFK between 1962-1964, conducting a series of interviews with Los Angeles-area artists, curators, collectors, and gallerists in response to a growing awareness of Los Angeles' rapidly growing role as a creative center and art market.

Born Marian Lucille Moore on Feb. 27, 1914, in Los Angeles to Fred and Lucille Moore. Fred Moore, an attorney, defended Nicola Sacco and Bartolomeo Vanzetti in the infamous 1921 trial. Following her divorce in the early 1960s, Gore approached the radio station KPFK, who was looking for someone to interview local artists. In a 1997 letter that accompanied her donation of the collection to the Archives, Gore writes,

"The early 1960's were an interesting and probably unique period for the Southern California art world. In Los Angeles on La Cienega Boulevard galleries had sprung up like mushrooms, and on Friday nights those who were interested in this scene would go from one gallery to another noting what artists were featured and what trends were apparent. It was a pleasurable way to meet artists as well as a social event where one could see friends and exchange impressions.

"Because I was searching for something to do, at the suggestion of a friend I had gone to radio station KPFK to volunteer my services in any way possible. It turned out to be a most fortuitous time for this offer. The management was interested in possible intervie3ws with artists, and so it all began. I had never done an interview in my life and was astounded to discover how easy it was to get artists, gallery owners, and even museum personnel to talk aobut what they did. Once this began I was swaped with requests for taped interviews, far more than I could manage."

Gore later became an antiquarian bookseller specializing in books on food and drink. She retired in 1994 and donated her book collection to the Los Angeles Public Library.
Provenance:
Donated 1997 by Marian Gore.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment.
Rights:
The KPFK "Art Scene" interviews are owned by the Archives of America Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Art -- Collectors and collecting -- California -- Los Angeles  Search this
Curators -- California -- Los Angeles  Search this
Gallery owners -- California  Search this
Artists -- California -- Los Angeles  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Photographs
Interviews
Transcripts
Citation:
KPFK "Art Scene" interviews, 1950-1969. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.goremari
See more items in:
Marian Gore "Art Scene" interviews and papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-goremari

Oral history interviews with Frank A. Taylor 1974, 1979-1980, 1982, 2005

Interviewee:
Taylor, Frank A (Frank Augustus) 1903-2007  Search this
Interviewer:
Freilicher, Miriam S  Search this
Henson, Pamela M  Search this
Field, Cynthia R  Search this
Uniform title:
The Torch (Serial)  Search this
Subject:
Taylor, Frank A (Frank Augustus) 1903-2007  Search this
National Museum of History and Technology Director  Search this
United States National Museum Director  Search this
United States National Museum Assistant Director  Search this
United States National Museum Director General of Museums  Search this
American Association of Museums  Search this
International Council of Museums  Search this
National Museum Act Program  Search this
United States National Museum National Museum of History and Technology  Search this
National Museum of History and Technology United States National Museum  Search this
United States National Museum Division of Mechanical Technology  Search this
Department of Engineering and Industries (USNM)  Search this
United States National Museum Exhibits Modernization Program  Search this
Physical description:
26 audiotapes (Reference). 45 digital .mp3 files (Reference copies)
Type:
Interviews
Collection descriptions
Audiotapes
Oral history
Date:
1974
1974-1982
1974, 1979-1980, 1982, 2005
Topic:
Museum techniques  Search this
History of science and technology  Search this
Records of meetings, organizations, and professional societies  Search this
Museum curators  Search this
Museum directors  Search this
Museum architecture  Search this
Local number:
SIA RU009512
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_arc_217680

National Museum of Natural History 100th Anniversary Interviews

Extent:
15 digital audio files; 42 digital video files
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Date:
2009-2011
Introduction:
The Smithsonian Institution Archives (SIA) began its Oral History Program in 1973. The purpose of the program is to supplement the written documentation of the Archives' record and manuscript collections with an Oral History Collection, focusing on the history of the Institution, research by its scholars, and contributions of its staff. Program staff conduct interviews with current and retired Smithsonian staff and others who have made significant contributions to the Institution. There are also reminiscences and interviews recorded by researchers or students on topics related to the history of the Smithsonian or the holdings of the Smithsonian Institution Archives.

As part of the celebration of the Centennial of the National Museum of Natural History (NMNH), oral history interviews were conducted with museum staff members from an array of professions and subject areas, by SIA Institutional History Division staff, American University students, and volunteers from 2009 to 2011. Interviewees were nominated by NMNH staff and the project was coordinated by Heather P. Ewing. Interviews were recorded in digital audio and digital video, and deposited in the Smithsonian Institution Archives Oral History Collection.
Descriptive Entry:
These interviews discuss their careers at the NMNH, work with collections, research, scientific illustration, exhibits, taxidermy, museum security, interaction with the public and staff.

The NMNH Centennial Interviews consist of c. 38.75 hours of interview with 21.25 hours of digital audio recordings, 17.5 hours of digital video recordings, and c. 500 pages of transcript.
Historical Note:
National Museum of Natural History interviewees include Andre R. Bell, Protection Services, NMNH; Audrey Butler, Food Services; Alan H. Cheetham, Curator of Paleobiology; R. "Chip" Clark, museum photographer; Roy S. Clarke, Jr., Curator of Meteorites; Donald Davis, Curator of Entomology; Elizabeth Dietrich, Supervisory Museum Specialist, Museum Support Center; Nathan Erwin, manager, Insect Zoo; Frank M. Greenwell, taxidermist; Kristofer M. Helgen, Curator of Mammals; Gary F. Hevel, Museum Specialist, Department of Entomology; David Hunt, Museum Specialist, Department of Anthropology; James J. Krakker, Museum Specialist, Department of Anthropology; Storrs L. Olson, Curator of Birds; David L. Pawson, Curator of Invertebrate Zoology; Paul W. Pohwat, Museum Specialist, Department of Mineral Sciences; Paul D. Rhymer, exhibits specialist; Mary E. Rice, director Emeritus, Smithsonian Marine Station at Fort Pierce; Martha Rosen, Natural History Branch Librarian for Smithsonian Institution Libraries; George F. "Rusty" Russell, Supervisory Museum Specialist, Department of Botany; and George Venable, scientific illustrator, Department of Entomology.

Interviewers included Inci Bowman, Mignon Davis, and Mark White from NMNH, Lauren Dare and Pamela M. Henson from Smithsonian Institution Archives, Emma Lang, John Minks, James Nelson, Cigdem Pakel, William Stapleton, and Bridget Sullivan from American University, and Courtney Shaw and Mary A. Thomas from Smithsonian Institution Libraries.
Topic:
Anniversaries  Search this
Natural history museums  Search this
Exhibitions  Search this
Museum curators  Search this
Museums -- Collection management  Search this
Taxidermists  Search this
Genre/Form:
Interviews
Oral history
Sound recordings
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 9622, National Museum of Natural History 100th Anniversary Interviews
Identifier:
Record Unit 9622
See more items in:
National Museum of Natural History 100th Anniversary Interviews
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-faru9622

Oral history interviews with Henry Bascom Collins, Jr.

Topic:
Arctic Bibliography
Creator::
Collins, Henry Bascom, 1899- interviewee  Search this
Extent:
7 audiotapes (reference copies). 14 digital .mp3 files (reference copies).
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Date:
1985
Introduction:
The Smithsonian Institution Archives began its Oral History Program in 1973. The purpose of the program is to supplement the written documentation of the Archives' record and manuscript collections with an Oral History Collection, focusing on the history of the Institution, research by its scholars, and contributions of its staff. Program staff conduct interviews with current and retired Smithsonian staff and others who have made significant contributions to the Institution. There are also interviews conducted by researchers or student on topics related to the history of the Smithsonian or the holdings of the Smithsonian Institution Archives.

Collins was interviewed for the Oral History Collection because of his long and distinguished career as an anthropologist and his role as a Smithsonian administrator.
Descriptive Entry:
Collins was interviewed on four occasions in 1985 by Pamela M. Henson for the Smithsonian Archives Oral History Program. The interviews cover Collins' youth, education, career at the Smithsonian from field worker to acting director of the BAE, anthropological research, directorship of the Ethnogeographic Board, role in the Arctic Institute and Arctic Bibliography, as well as reminscences of colleagues such as Matthew W. Stirling and Neil M. Judd.
Historical Note:
Henry Bascom Collins, Jr., was born in 1899 in Geneva, Alabama. Upon receiving the B.A. in geology from Millsaps College in 1922, he traveled to Washington, D. C., to secure a field work position with geologist and Secretary of the Smithsonian, Charles D. Walcott. Collins joined instead the archeological field party exploring Chaco Canyon, New Mexico, under the leadership of Smithsonian anthropologist, Neil M. Judd, thus beginning a sixty-five year career in anthropology. Collins worked for the Mississippi Department of Archives and History in 1923, but returned to the Smithsonian as aide in the Division of Ethnology, United States National Museum (USNM), from 1924 to 1925. After receiving his M.A. in anthropology from the George Washington University in 1925, Collins was appointed Assistant Curator of Ethnology, USNM. He advanced to Associate Curator in 1938 but the following year transferred to the Smithsonian's other anthropological unit, the Bureau of American Ethnology (BAE), as Senior Ethnologist. He served as acting Director of the BAE from 1963-1965, overseeing its dissolution and merger into the Department of Anthropology of the National Museum of Natural History (NMNH). He was Senior Scientist in the department from 1965-1966, and upon retirement, continued his research as archeologist emeritus until his death in 1987.

Collins' first exposure to archeological investigations was in the Southwest assisting Judd. When he began his own research, he shifted focus to Southeast prehistory, especially pottery types found in mounds. In 1927, however, Smithsonian physical anthropologist, Ales Hrdlicka sent his aide, T. Dale Stewart, and Collins on a field trip to Alaska. Fascinated by the area, Collins devoted the next sixty years to the study of Eskimo prehistory. He was noted for his innovative interpretation of cultural sequences, based especially on his excavations at the Eskimo village of Gambell on St. Lawrence Island. In 1936, he was awarded the gold medal of the Royal Danish Academy of Sciences for this work. During World War II, he served as Director of the Ethnogeographic Board, an interagency liaison group which facilitated communications between academics and the military. Following the war, he was instrumental in establishing the Arctic Institute of North America, and from 1947 to 1967 served as Chairman of the committee responsible for producing the Arctic Bibliography.
Restrictions:
(1) Restricted; (2) see finding aid for details on restrictions.
Topic:
Anthropology  Search this
Archaeology  Search this
Museum curators -- Interviews  Search this
Genre/Form:
Audiotapes
Oral history
Transcripts
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 9528, Oral history interviews with Henry Bascom Collins, Jr.
Identifier:
Record Unit 9528
See more items in:
Oral history interviews with Henry Bascom Collins, Jr.
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-faru9528
Additional Online Media:

Modify Your Search






or


Narrow By