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[Trade catalogs on Thermos products : thermos bottles, vacuum bottle products, food jars, carafes, lip jugs, service sets, coffee pots, trays, lunchboxes, picnic kits, motor kits, carrying cases, vacuum fillers, corks, nested cups, ice containers, shakers, tankard sets, dinner services, coffee servers ... ]

Author:
American Thermos Bottle Company  Search this
Smithsonian Libraries American History Trade Literature Collection DSI  Search this
Physical description:
<26> v. : ill. (some col.)
Type:
Catalogs
Trade catalogs
Date:
1926
1926-
Topic:
Thermos bottles  Search this
Vacuum technology  Search this
Lunchboxes  Search this
Pitchers  Search this
Coffeepots  Search this
Call number:
052829
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_694969

The aesthetics of the Japanese lunchbox / Kenji Ekuan ; edited by David B. Stewart

Author:
Ekuan, Kenji 1929-  Search this
Stewart, David B  Search this
Physical description:
195 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 27 cm
Type:
Books
Place:
Japan
Date:
1998
C1998
Topic:
Aesthetics, Japanese  Search this
Civilization  Search this
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_591803

He Can't Win With His Arm in a Sling ... (Second Prize, Newspaper Cartoonists' Contest, Safety Week, St. Louis)

Issuing body:
National Safety Council  Search this
Creator:
Sparks  Search this
National Safety Council  Search this
Collection Creator:
Princeton University  Search this
Extent:
1 Poster (1/4 size; Multi-color, 56 x 41 cm)
Container:
Box 23, Folder 2
Type:
Archival materials
Posters
Place:
United States
Image:
Main Image: Uncle Sam with his arm in a sling and carrying a lunchbox with a factory labeled "U.S. Industry" in background
Local numbers:
Princeton Poster# 6414
General:
Issued by: National Safety Council

Artist(s): Sparks
Series:
No. 731
Collection Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Collection Rights:
Copyright status of items varies. Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
Health/Industrial Safety  Search this
World War, 1914-1918  Search this
Industrial safety  Search this
World War, 1914-1918 -- Posters -- United States  Search this
Genre/Form:
Posters
Posters -- World War, 1914-1918 -- United States
Collection Citation:
Princeton University Posters Collection, Archives Center, National Museum of American History.
See more items in:
Princeton University Poster Collection
Princeton University Poster Collection / Series 2: World War One / United States
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmah-ac-0433-ref7644

Aladdin Industries, Inc. Records

Creator:
Johnson, Victor S., Sr., 1882-1943  Search this
Johnson, Victor, Jr., 1906-  Search this
Aladdin Industries, Inc. (Nashville, Tenn.).  Search this
Names:
Allen, Steve  Search this
Reagan, Ronald  Search this
Extent:
50 Cubic feet (120 boxes)
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Photographs
Newsletters
Commercial art
Picture postcards
Laboratory notebooks
Patents
Design drawings
Business records
Advertisements
Scrapbooks
Date:
1889-2003
Scope and Contents:
The collection consists of approximately 50 cubic feet of material documenting Aladdin Industries Inc., manufacturers of vacuum ware and lunch boxes. The majority of the material dates from 1947 to the 1970s. The strength of the collection is with the lunch box documentation and product development, marketing, and sales records. There is some interesting labor history—specifically United Steel Workers agreement. The files of Victor S. Johnson, Sr. and Victor S. Johnson, Jr. form the core of the collection and provide rich documentation on the company's activities.
Arrangement:
The collection is divided into seventeen series.

Series 1: Historical and Background Materials, 1919-1997

Series 2: Victor S. Johnson Sr. Files, 1916-1945

Series 3: Victor S. Johnson Jr. Files, 1906-1983

Series 4: Employee and Personnel Records, 1910-2001

Series 5: Research and Development Records, 1910-1976

Series 6: Patent Records, 1889-1973

Series 7: Sales Records, 1939-2000

Series 8: Advertising and Marketing Records, 1931-2001

Series 9: School Lunch Kits, 1952-1989

Series 10: Lamps and Kerosene Heaters, 1911-2000

Series 11: Temp-Rite, 1972-2000

Series 12: Competitors, 1963-2001

Series 13: Style Guides, 1966-1998

Series 14: Newsletters, 1943-1998

Series 15: Photographs, 1923-1986

Series 16: Scrapbooks, 1908-1962

Series 17: Audiovisual Materials, 1993-1996
Biographical / Historical:
Victor Samuel Johnson Sr., (1882-1943) was born in Nebraska. As a soap salesman for the Iowa Soap Company, he became interested in kerosene mantle burners. Dissatisfied with the available kerosene lamps, he began selling and dealing U.S. made mantles and incorporated the Mantle Lamp Company of America in Chicago in 1908. Johnson selected the name "Aladdin" from the famous story, "Aladdin; or The Wonderful Lamp." Johnson began research and development of a mantle lamp that gave off a steady white light and did not smoke. The Mantle Lamp Company began manufacturing lamps in 1912, with Plume & Atwood Manufacturing Company burners, and marketed them as "Aladdin Lamps." The company diversified in 1917 and began producing insulated cooking dishes, known as Aladdin Thermalware jars, for the U.S. military. These jars had an aluminum or steel jacket wrapped around a heavy glass receptacle. The space between was filled with cork. The introduction of the thermalware began the company's venture into heat and cold retaining receptacles.

In 1919, Johnson organized a subsidiary of the Mantle Lamp Company of America, Aladdin Industries, Inc., to market and sell the Aladdin thermalware jars and vacuum ware. At the same time, Mantle lamp Company of America formed Aladdin Limited in Canada and England to sell thermalware as well as Pathfinder Radio Corporation, Cadillac Photograph Corporation, Aladdin Chemical Corporation, Aladdin Phonograph Corporation, Johnson Laboratories, Inc. (radio components), and Aladdin Radio Industries (magnetic and radio research). Pathfinder, Cadillac, Aladdin Chemical and Aladdin Phonograph all failed. In 1926, the Mantle Lamp Company acquired Lippincott Glass Company of Alexandria, Indiana, where it manufactured and fabricated glass chimneys, shades and lamp bases, mantles, wicks, and metal lamp bases. The Alexandria plant closed in 1952 and eventually moved to Nashville.

In 1943, Victor S. Johnson Sr. died and his son, Victor S. Johnson Jr. (1906-), succeeded him as president of Aladdin Industries Inc. Johnson Jr. moved Aladdin from Chicago to Nashville, Tennessee in 1949 to place the company strategically in mid-America to distribute its products. Aladdin's general offices, vacuum bottle production, and electric lamps and kerosene completed the move by 1952.

In 1950, Aladdin began illustrating flat metal school lunch kits (lunch boxes with liquid containers) with images of popular radio, movie and television figures. Hopalong Cassidy was the first character kit. This innovative marketing decision produced an explosive growth in the lunch kit market and made Aladdin a pioneer in image licensing. Character lunch boxes became a large part of the childhood experience and are collector's items today. Over the years, Aladdin extended the range of characters depicted and began manufacturing plastic and soft, vinyl lunch kits with printed themes. It also introduced "3D" embossing on the flat metal kits. Embossed metal lunch kits were completely phased out in 1986 due to high production costs. In addition to the school lunch kits, Aladdin also introduced wide mouth vacuum bottles (pint and quart size) in 1953. The wide mouth bottles also carried "adult" themes such as the "Angler" fisherman's bottle. The thermosware line eventually moved from metal to plastic jackets and from a glass insulated filler to foam.

In 1965, Aladdin purchased the Stanley steel bottle operation from Landers, Frary and Clark in New Britain, Connecticut. Aladdin's diversification strategy led to the introduction in 1968 of the Temp-Rite® meal distribution plan, an insulated thermal tray service for hospitals, the airline industry, and prisons. The Temp-Rite® system gave rise to a full line of products and services and Aladdin formed a subsidiary, known as Aladdin Synergetics, Inc., to handle its health care and food service operations. Aladdin Synergetics was sold to Welbilt Corporation in 1998; the new operation was named Aladdin Temp-Rite. Other products added over the years included electric lamps, shades, kerosene stoves, and an electronics division in 1956. This division was established from a small technical research group whose function was patent licensing. As a subsidiary of Aladdin Industries, it produced transformers and radio and telephone filters. The subsidiary was sold to Vernitron in October, 1979.

At various times, Aladdin established offices in Alexandria, Indiana; Chicago, Illinois; Nashville, Tennessee; Portland Oregon, Canada; Hungry; France; Australia, New Zealand; England; Iraq, Iran, Brazil, Japan, Peru, Venezuela, Chile, Uruguay, France, Germany, Iceland, Sweden, and South Africa to market and sell its products.

Aladdin was financially mismanaged in the 1990s and rapidly declined. Aladdin Industries Inc. reorganized in 1999 and became known as Aladdin Industries LLC. High labor costs and unsuccessful efforts to develop new products led to further decline. By January, 2002, Aladdin had sold its remaining product lines and closed its Nashville plant. Aladdin lamps are still sold today by the Aladdin Mantle Lamp Company of Clarksville, Tennessee.
Separated Materials:
The Division of Cultural History, National Museum of American History, holds 30 lunch boxes and 28 thermos bottles from Aladdin Industries, Nashville, Tennessee. Additionally, there is a pair of lamps. See Accession 2003.0255. Although the children's steel lunch boxes predominate, the collection represents the full spectrum of Aladdin box designs including vinyl, hard plastic, and fabric.
Provenance:
Donated to the Archives Center by Aladdin Industries in 2003.
Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
Lunchboxes  Search this
Character merchandising  Search this
Celebrities  Search this
Food containers  Search this
Food container industry  Search this
Thermos bottles  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs -- 20th century
Newsletters -- 20th century
Commercial art
Picture postcards -- 20th century -- United States
Laboratory notebooks
Patents -- 20th century
Design drawings -- 1950-2000
Business records -- 20th century
Advertisements -- 20th century
Scrapbooks -- 20th century
Citation:
Aladdin Industries, Inc. Records, 1889-2002, Archives Center, National Museum of American History.
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.0844
See more items in:
Aladdin Industries, Inc. Records
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmah-ac-0844
Additional Online Media:

Lunchbox, Lindbergh, King Collection

Materials:
Metal
Dimensions:
3-D: 15.9 x 10.2 x 7.6cm, 0.1kg (6 1/4 x 4 x 3 in., 3/16lb.)
Type:
MEMORABILIA-Popular Culture
Credit Line:
Gift of the Stanley King Family.
Inventory Number:
A20040289051
Restrictions & Rights:
Do not reproduce without permission from the Smithsonian Institution, National Air and Space Museum
See more items in:
National Air and Space Museum Collection
Data Source:
National Air and Space Museum
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nasm_A20040289051
Additional Online Media:

Julia Lunch Box

Collected for nmah:
Smithsonian Institution  Search this
Maker:
Thermos  Search this
Physical Description:
metal (overall material)
Measurements:
overall: 7 1/4 in x 8 3/4 in x 4 in; 18.415 cm x 22.225 cm x 10.16 cm
Object Name:
lunch box
Date made:
1969
Subject:
School Personal Equipment  Search this
Food Culture  Search this
Related Publication:
Allen Woodall and Sean Brickell. Illustrated Encyclopedia of Metal Lunch Boxes
ID Number:
1988.3160.37
Nonaccession number:
1988.3160
Catalog number:
1988.3160.37
See more items in:
Cultural and Community Life: Entertainment
Popular Entertainment
Lunch Boxes
Family & Social Life
Exhibition:
Taking America To Lunch
Exhibition Location:
National Museum of American History
Data Source:
National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmah_892861

Lunchbox and thermos featuring Diahann Carroll from the sitcom Julia

Manufactured by:
Thermos LLC, American, founded 1904  Search this
Designed by:
Nick LoBianco, American  Search this
Subject of:
Diahann Carroll, American, 1935 - 2019  Search this
Betty Beaird, American, born 1935  Search this
Marc Copage, American, born 1962  Search this
Michael Link, American, born 1962  Search this
Medium:
metal, plastic
Dimensions:
H x W x D (2013.108.13a Lunchbox Closed): 7 3/4 × 8 3/4 × 4 in. (19.7 × 22.2 × 10.2 cm)
H x W x D (2013.108.13a Lunchbox Open): 4 1/16 × 8 13/16 × 14 11/16 in. (10.3 × 22.4 × 37.3 cm)
H x W x D (2013.108.13b Thermos): 6 5/8 × 4 × 3 3/16 in. (16.8 × 10.2 × 8.1 cm)
Type:
lunchboxes
canteens (vessels)
Place used:
United States, North and Central America
Date:
1969
Topic:
African American  Search this
Actors  Search this
Children  Search this
Cooking and dining  Search this
Families  Search this
Medicine  Search this
Motherhood  Search this
Race relations  Search this
Sitcoms  Search this
Credit Line:
Collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture
Object number:
2013.108.13ab
See more items in:
National Museum of African American History and Culture Collection
Classification:
Memorabilia and Ephemera
Exhibition:
Taking the Stage
On View:
NMAAHC (1400 Constitution Ave NW), National Mall Location, Culture/Fourth Floor, 4 054
Data Source:
National Museum of African American History and Culture
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmaahc_2013.108.13ab
Additional Online Media:

Charles Rivers Photographs

Creator:
Rivers, Charles, 1904-1993  Search this
Names:
Chrysler Building (New York, N.Y.) -- Pictorial works  Search this
Empire State Building (New York, N.Y.) -- Construction--1929-1930  Search this
Pathe News  Search this
Bates, Ruby  Search this
Extent:
0.5 Cubic feet (4 boxes )
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Photographs
Scrapbooks
Albums
Place:
New York (N.Y.) -- 1920-1930
Washington (D.C.) -- 1960-1970
Date:
1929-1963
bulk 1929-1930
Scope and Contents:
The collection contains: twenty-nine silver gelatin photoprints mounted on Fome-Core, Masonite, and cardboard, ranging in size from 5-1/2" x 9-1/4" to 10-11/16" x 13-13/16"; three 5" x 7" unmounted silver gelatin photoprints; a scrapbook which originally contained 56 silver gelatin photoprints, ranging in size from 2" x 3" to 7-1/2" x 9-1/2"; and silver gelatin film negatives (presumably acetate) for the prints. The scrapbook includes a New York Daily News clipping about Rivers: "Builds a Bridge to Students" by Anthony Burton (dated May 12, 1970 by Rivers) with a photograph showing him speaking to a crowd, Most of the photographs depict the construction of the Chrysler and Empire State Buildings--iron workers on the job and relaxing during breaks, and pictures of the buildings at various stages of completion. Other subjects are: a demonstration to prevent World War II (1935), a color photoprint of the Civil Rights March and Demonstration in Washington, D.C. (1963), and two magazine clippings from a Soviet publication, New Times, in which Rivers's prize-winning "Self Portrait" (1930) was reproduced.

Most of these prints were made by Charles Rivers many years after the creation of the original negatives, probably ca.1970s 1980s. The collection is in generally good condition, except that many of the print surfaces are scratched.
Biographical / Historical:
Charles Rivers created a certain amount of confusion about his origins, whether accidentally or intentionally. Born Constantinos Kapornaros[1] (or Kostandinos Kapernaros)[2] in the small town of Vahos in Mani, an isolated area in the southern Peloponnesian region of Greece, on May 20, 1904, he emigrated to the United States as a child of five or six with his parents. His school record showed that he was enrolled in 1911 at the age of seven.[3] The family lived in Maine or New Hampshire, then Massachusetts, and later other locations in New York state. It is believed that his new name was derived from the Charles River in Boston.[4] The change may have been occasioned by a need to conceal his deep involvement in left-wing political and union activities.[5] Mr. Rivers settled in New York City in 1950 and resided there until 1993.[6] He sometimes identified his birthplace as Denver, Colorado,[7] but this may have been a fabrication or simplification, based on the fact that Greek church baptismal records were kept in Denver.[8] His sons James and Ronald believe that he never became an official American citizen. Late in life, in order to visit his birthplace, he was issued a passport, based on his school records, which stated that he was born in Denver. Rivers photographed the construction of the Chrysler Building (1929) and the Empire State Building (1930) in New York City. He was inspired to take up photography by seeing the work of the influential documentary photographer Lewis Hine, whose famous images of working children helped win passage of protective child labor laws. Rivers and Hine both photographed the Empire State Building and the men building it, yet Rivers apparently was unaware until years later that his idol had been present. Employed as an iron worker, Rivers traded his pail of tools for a Zeiss Ikon[9] camera during his lunch hour or when photographic opportunities arose. While the workers depicted in some of the photographs clearly are aware of the photographer's presence, Rivers's project presumably was conducted more or less surreptitiously. It is not known for certain if the paths of Rivers and Hine ever crossed, but his son Ron considers it unlikely: Hine photographed only the Empire State Building in connection with his "Men at Work" project,[10] not the earlier Chrysler Building, and Rivers did not work on the Empire State Building for a very long period. His self-portrait on the Empire State Building, "The Bolter-Up," may have been intended as a memento during one of his last days on that job.[11]

Rivers became unemployed in the Depression and consequently became involved in national efforts to create Social Security, unemployment insurance, and housing programs. These experiences apparently encouraged his active participation in politically leftist activities, as coverage about him in Soviet publications attests. A pacifist, in 1935 he was involved in demonstrations aimed at preventing World War II, and in the 1960s he took part in anti-Vietnam demonstrations and encouraged young people to continue such resistance.

In the 1950s Rivers worked in steel fabrication, in a chemistry lab as a technician, and briefly as a legislative aide for a New York state senator.

In 1986 Rivers submitted his 1930 self-portrait, posed on the Chrysler Building, to the International Year of Peace art contest sponsored by the New Times, published in Moscow: it was awarded a prize and diploma.

Mr. Rivers died in 1993, only two weeks after moving to Arlington, Texas to enter a nursing home near his sons' homes.

1. The page on Rivers in New York University=s Robert F. Wagner Labor Archives web site (http://laborarts.org/collections/item.cfm?itemid=82) --noted 5 June 2002), claims Rivers was born in 1905 and changed his name Ato resemble those of the Mohawk Indians working on the high steel of New York City=s skyscrapers and bridges".

2. This spelling is given in an e-mail from James Rivers to Helen Plummer, Aug. 19, 2002.

3. Ibid.

4. Telephone conversation between Ron Rivers and the author, 6 June 2002. Additional information was provided by Ron Rivers in electronic mail messages, 5 June and 12 June 2002.

5. James Rivers, op. cit.

6. Telephone conversation with Ron Rivers, 6 June 2002.

7. In a biographical statement for the Amon Carter Museum of Western Art (copy supplied by Helen Plummer), Charles Rivers called Denver his birthplace. The George Eastman House photographer database also included this apparently erroneous information, probably derived from the Amon Carter statement (telephone conversation with Helen Plummer, 3 June 2002).

8. Ron Rivers, telephone conversation, 6 June 2002.

9. Identified by Charles Rivers as the camera used in the skyscraper photographs: interview by Carol Sewell, "Photographer looked at U.S. from high view," Fort Worth Star-Telegram, Dec. 27, 1986. Rivers also used a Rolleiflex, according to Ron Rivers (see note above), but the folding Zeiss Ikon camera would have been a more convenient addition to a lunchbox than the bulkier Rolleiflex. The collection negatives are not in the Rolleiflex square format, moreover.

10. See Judith Mara Gutman, Lewis W. Hine and the American social conscience. New York: Walker, 1967.

11. Ron Rivers, telephone conversation, 6 June 2002.
Related Materials:
Materials at the Smithsonian Institution

Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden

Included Rivers's self-portrait, "The Bolter Up," in its summer 2002 exhibition, "Metropolis in the Machine Age," in the form of a new print made from a digital copy of the Archives Center's original negative. The author discussed the new print from the Rivers negative and other photographs in this exhibition in an invited gallery lecture, "The Skyscraper Photographs of Lewis Hine and Charles Rivers," Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, June 6, 2002.

Materials at Other Organizations

Amon Carter Museum, Fort Worth, Texas

See Barbara McCandless and John Rohrbach, Singular moments: photographs from the Amon Carter Museum, with select entries by Helen Plummer. Reproduction of a Rivers photograph, with description and analysis, p. 30. Additional information has been generously supplied by Ms. Plummer, curatorial associate, and Barbara McCandless, curator of photography, Amon Carter Museum of Western Art, Fort Worth Texas.

Robert F. Wagner Labor Archives at New York University

Museum of the City of New York

Some of his photographs were included in the Amon Carter Museum of Western Art exhibition, "Looking at America: Documentary Photographs of the 1930s and 1940s," December 1986.
Provenance:
The collection is a gift from Mr. Charles Rivers, 1989.
Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Rights:
Archives Center claims copyright. Rights were conveyed to the Archives Center through a Deed of Gift signed by the donor.
Topic:
Self-portraits, American  Search this
Iron and steel workers -- 1920-1930 -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Construction workers -- 1900-1950 -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Structural steel workers -- 1920-1930 -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Labor unions  Search this
Civil rights demonstrations -- 1960-1970  Search this
Skyscrapers -- 1920-1930 -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Civil rights  Search this
Peace movements -- 1960-1970  Search this
Peace movements -- 1930-1940  Search this
Scottsoro boys case  Search this
Fires  Search this
Scottsboro Trial, Scottsboro, Ala., 1931  Search this
Self-portraits  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs -- 1900-1950
Scrapbooks -- 20th century
Albums
Photographs -- Black-and-white photoprints -- Silver gelatin -- 1970-1990
Citation:
Charles Rivers Photographs, 1929-1963, Archives Center, National Museum of American History
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.0360
See more items in:
Charles Rivers Photographs
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmah-ac-0360
Additional Online Media:

Space-themed Lunchbox and Thermos Bottle

Author:
Collins, Martin J.  Search this
Weitekamp, Margaret A.  Search this
Object Type:
Smithsonian staff publication
Electronic document
Year:
2007
Topic:
Flight  Search this
Space sciences  Search this
Flight  Search this
Aeronautics  Search this
Space sciences  Search this
Data source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:SILSRO_101394

Hello Kitty Bento Box

Physical Description:
plastic (overall material)
Measurements:
overall: 7 in x 7 1/2 in x 3 1/2 in; 17.78 cm x 19.05 cm x 8.89 cm
Object Name:
bento box
Date made:
ca 2000
Subject:
Eating  Search this
School Personal Equipment  Search this
ID Number:
2012.0151.01
Catalog number:
2012.0151.01
Accession number:
2012.0151
See more items in:
Cultural and Community Life: Domestic Life
Food
FOOD: Transforming the American Table 1950-2000
Exhibition:
Food: Transforming the American Table 1950-2000
Exhibition Location:
National Museum of American History
Data Source:
National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmah_1425272

Lunch box depicting the 2001 San Fransisco Giants baseball team

Depicted:
San Francisco Giants  Search this
Physical Description:
metal (overall material)
Measurements:
overall: 6 1/2 in x 8 in x 4 1/2 in; 16.51 cm x 20.32 cm x 11.43 cm
Object Name:
lunch box
Date made:
2001
Subject:
Sports  Search this
Baseball  Search this
Professional  Search this
School Personal Equipment  Search this
ID Number:
2013.3001.015
Nonaccession number:
2013.3001
Catalog number:
2013.3001.015
See more items in:
Cultural and Community Life: Sport and Leisure
Data Source:
National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmah_1433879
Additional Online Media:

Harry Potter

Physical Description:
vinyl (overall material)
plastic (overall material)
Measurements:
overall: 10 in x 8 1/4 in x 3 in; 25.4 cm x 20.955 cm x 7.62 cm
Object Name:
lunchbox
Subject:
School Personal Equipment  Search this
Movie  Search this
Education  Search this
ID Number:
2013.0225.01
Accession number:
2013.0225
Catalog number:
2013.0225.01
See more items in:
Cultural and Community Life: Entertainment
Data Source:
National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmah_1451304
Additional Online Media:

lunch box

Measurements:
overall: 7 1/2 in x 7 1/4 in x 5 cm; 19.05 cm x 18.415 cm x 1 31/32 in
Object Name:
Lunch Box
Subject:
School Personal Equipment  Search this
School Personal Equipment  Search this
ID Number:
CL.69.147
Catalog number:
69.147
Accession number:
284895
See more items in:
Cultural and Community Life: Community Life
Data Source:
National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmah_676713

Pets N' Pals Lunch Box

Maker:
Thermos  Search this
Physical Description:
steel (overall material)
Measurements:
overall: 23 cm x 20 cm x 9 cm; 9 1/16 in x 7 7/8 in x 3 9/16 in
Object Name:
box
lunch box
Date made:
1962
Subject:
School Personal Equipment  Search this
Television  Search this
ID Number:
2001.3087.11.01
Nonaccession number:
2001.3087
Catalog number:
2001.3087.11.01
See more items in:
Cultural and Community Life: Entertainment
Popular Entertainment
Lunch Boxes
Family & Social Life
Exhibition:
Wonder Place
Exhibition Location:
National Museum of American History
Data Source:
National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmah_1020108

Space Shuttle Orbiter Enterprise Lunch Box

Collected for nmah:
Smithsonian Institution  Search this
Maker:
Thermos  Search this
Physical Description:
metal (overall material)
Measurements:
overall: 7 1/4 in x 8 3/4 in x 4 in; 18.415 cm x 22.225 cm x 10.16 cm
Object Name:
lunch box
Date made:
1979
Subject:
School Personal Equipment  Search this
Related Publication:
Allen Woodall and Sean Brickell. Illustrated Encyclopedia of Metal Lunch Boxes
ID Number:
1988.3160.35
Catalog number:
1988.3160.35
Nonaccession number:
1988.3160
See more items in:
Cultural and Community Life: Entertainment
Popular Entertainment
Lunch Boxes
Family & Social Life
Data Source:
National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmah_1054202
Additional Online Media:

The Fall Guy Lunch Box

Collected for nmah:
Smithsonian Institution  Search this
Maker:
Aladdin  Search this
Physical Description:
metal (overall material)
Measurements:
overall: 8 1/4 in x 8 in x 4 in; 20.955 cm x 20.32 cm x 10.16 cm
Object Name:
lunch box
Date made:
1981
Subject:
School Personal Equipment  Search this
Television  Search this
Related Publication:
Allen Woodall and Sean Brickell. Illustrated Encyclopedia of Metal Lunch Boxes
ID Number:
1988.3160.38
Catalog number:
1988.3160.38
Nonaccession number:
1988.3160
See more items in:
Cultural and Community Life: Entertainment
Popular Entertainment
Lunch Boxes
Family & Social Life
Data Source:
National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmah_1054211
Additional Online Media:

The Magic of Lassie Lunch Box

Collected for nmah:
Smithsonian Institution  Search this
Maker:
Thermos  Search this
Physical Description:
metal (overall material)
Measurements:
overall: 7 1/4 in x 8 3/4 in x 4 in; 18.415 cm x 22.225 cm x 10.16 cm
Object Name:
lunch box
Date made:
1978
Subject:
School Personal Equipment  Search this
Lassie  Search this
Dogs  Search this
Television  Search this
Television  Search this
Related Publication:
Allen Woodall and Sean Brickell. Illustrated Encyclopedia of Metal Lunch Boxes
ID Number:
1988.3160.39
Catalog number:
1988.3160.39
Nonaccession number:
1988.3160
See more items in:
Cultural and Community Life: Entertainment
Popular Entertainment
Lunch Boxes
Family & Social Life
Data Source:
National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmah_1054212
Additional Online Media:

The Life and Times of Grizzly Adams Lunch Box

Collected for nmah:
Smithsonian Institution  Search this
Maker:
Aladdin  Search this
Physical Description:
metal (overall material)
Measurements:
overall: 9 in x 8 in x 4 1/2 in; 22.86 cm x 20.32 cm x 11.43 cm
Object Name:
lunch box
Date made:
1977
Subject:
School Personal Equipment  Search this
Television  Search this
Television  Search this
Related Publication:
Allen Woodall and Sean Brickell. Illustrated Encyclopedia of Metal Lunch Boxes
ID Number:
1988.3160.41
Catalog number:
1988.3160.41
Nonaccession number:
1988.3160
See more items in:
Cultural and Community Life: Entertainment
Popular Entertainment
Lunch Boxes
Family & Social Life
Data Source:
National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmah_1054214
Additional Online Media:

The Partridge Family Lunch Box

Collected for nmah:
Smithsonian Institution  Search this
Maker:
Thermos  Search this
Physical Description:
metal (overall material)
Measurements:
overall: 7 1/4 in x 8 3/4 in x 4 in; 18.415 cm x 22.225 cm x 10.16 cm
Object Name:
lunch box
Date made:
1971
Subject:
School Personal Equipment  Search this
Television  Search this
Television  Search this
Related Publication:
Allen Woodall and Sean Brickell. Illustrated Encyclopedia of Metal Lunch Boxes
ID Number:
1988.3160.42
Catalog number:
1988.3160.42
Nonaccession number:
1988.3160
See more items in:
Cultural and Community Life: Entertainment
Popular Entertainment
Lunch Boxes
Family & Social Life
Exhibition:
Taking America To Lunch
Exhibition Location:
National Museum of American History
Data Source:
National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmah_1054215

Thundercats Lunch Box

Collected for nmah:
Smithsonian Institution  Search this
Maker:
Aladdin  Search this
Physical Description:
metal (overall material)
Measurements:
overall: 8 1/4 in x 8 in x 4 in; 20.955 cm x 20.32 cm x 10.16 cm
Object Name:
lunch box
Date made:
1985
Subject:
School Personal Equipment  Search this
Television  Search this
ID Number:
1988.3160.43
Catalog number:
1988.3160.43
Nonaccession number:
1988.3160
See more items in:
Cultural and Community Life: Entertainment
Popular Entertainment
Lunch Boxes
Family & Social Life
Data Source:
National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmah_1054216
Additional Online Media:

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