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Smithsonian Gardens Oral History Interviews, 2011

Creator:
Smithsonian Gardens  Search this
Subject:
Faust, Barbara  Search this
Lindell, Paul H  Search this
Monday, John  Search this
Buckler, James R  Search this
Miller, Caitlin  Search this
Ripley, S. Dillon (Sidney Dillon) 1913-2001  Search this
Smithsonian Gardens  Search this
Smithsonian Institution Office of Facilities Management Horticulture Services Division  Search this
Physical description:
0.25 cu. ft. (1 half document box)
Type:
Compact discs
Collection descriptions
Sound recordings
Transcripts
Date:
2011
Topic:
Horticulture  Search this
Gardening  Search this
Interviews  Search this
Oral history  Search this
Local number:
SIA RU009629
Restrictions & Rights:
The Lindell interview session is restricted and permission must be secured from the interviewee to use the interview transcript or cite/quote from the recording
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_arc_368187

Washington -- Landscape at the National Air and Space Museum

Landscape architect:
Lindell, Paul H.  Search this
Swanson, Karen  Search this
Architect:
Obata, Gyo, 1923-  Search this
Creator:
Hellmuth, Obata & Kassabaum  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Digital images
Slides (photographs)
Photographic prints
Negatives
Place:
United States of America -- District of Columbia -- Washington
General:
The seven-acre landscape that surrounds the massive National Air and Space Museum (NASM) in Washington, D.C. features multi-tiered terraces planted in plains of lawn and shrubs. It was installed to coincide with the museum's opening on July 1, 1976.
Congress first appropriated funds for NASM's construction in 1971, and architect Gyo Obata was hired to design a building large enough to display the huge exhibits (including airplanes and rockets) without dominating other nearby buildings, especially the U.S. Capitol. Obata accomplished this with two major techniques. First, he designed the long building to alternate between cubes of pink Tennessee marble and smaller, dark atria made of steel and glass. Second, he called for a walled terrace garden along the building's perimeter, softening the building's edges and obscuring the line between it and the ground plane.
The sheer size of the museum divides the garden into north and south microclimates, making it especially challenging to maintain. In 1996, landscape architects Paul Lindell and Karen Swanson of the Smithsonian's Horticulture Services Division (later Smithsonian Gardens) replaced the terraced lawn beds with hearty perennials, and also planted numerous trees. These stronger plantings made the maintenance of the enormous landscape more manageable, and further-obscured the line between the ground and building.
A "Flight Garden" for the Air and Space Museum is planned to demonstrate principles of flight by attracting flying animals. Interpretive signs will explain the flying abilities of insects and birds as well as methods of aerial seed dispersal by plants.
Plantings include catnip (Nepeta cataria), eastern redbud (Cercis canadensis 'Forest Pansy'), river birch (Betula nigra), dwarf palmetto (Sabal minor), Japanese banana (Musa basjoo), shrubby cinquefoil (Potentilla fruticosa), lily turf (Liriope muscari), palm sedge (Carex muskingumensis), Japanese apricot (Prunus mume), Siberian squills (Scilla siberica), star magnolia (Magnolia stellata), yellowwood (Cladrastis kentukea), smoketree (Cotinus coggygria), prairie dropseed (Sporobolus heterolepis), and bottlebrush buckeye (Aesculus parviflora).
People associated with this garden include: Gyo Obata (architect, 1971-1976). Hellmuth, Obata & Kassabaum (architectural firm, 1971-1976). Paul Lindell (landscape architect, 1996). Karen Swanson (landscape architect, 1996).
Related Materials:
Landscape at the National Air and Space Museum related holdings consist of (35mm slides (photographs), negatives, photographic prints, and digital images)
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher
Topic:
Gardens -- District of Columbia -- Washington  Search this
Genre/Form:
Digital images
Slides (photographs)
Photographic prints
Negatives
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Gardens Image Library, Archives of American Gardens, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAG.SGI, File SG009
See more items in:
Smithsonian Gardens Image Library
Smithsonian Gardens Image Library / Series 1: Garden Images / United States of America / District of Columbia
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-sgi-ref12

Washington -- Kathrine Dulin Folger Rose Garden

Landscape architect:
Lindell, Paul H.  Search this
Swanson, Karen  Search this
Donor:
Folger, Lee M.  Search this
Lead horticulturist:
Gaskins, Shelley.  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Digital images
Slides (photographs)
Photographic prints
Negatives
Place:
United States of America -- District of Columbia -- Washington
General:
The Kathrine Dulin Folger Rose Garden is located immediately east of the Smithsonian Institution Building (commonly referred to as the Castle) and north of the Smithsonian's Arts and Industries Building, on Constitution Avenue. This area was previously home to a smaller fragrance garden dating from the 1970s. Landscape architects Paul Lindell and Karen Swanson of the Smithsonian's Horticulture Services Division (now Smithsonian Gardens) designed the Folger Rose Garden in 1997. Installation began that year, and the garden was dedicated on October 7, 1998. The garden was made possible by a donation from Mr. and Mrs. Lee Merritt Folger, in honor of Folger's mother, Kathrine Dulin Folger (1904-1997). Kathrine was an advocate of horticulture and the Smithsonian Institution. In 2016, the garden underwent a redesign which continued to follow the original vision - to create a four-season garden with year-round interest.
The Folger Rose Garden features modern rose varieties created after 1867, particularly those which are disease-resistant. Roses in this garden have won awards from the All-American Rose Selections and the Royal Horticultural Society. Different varieties bloom from spring through autumn, while conifers and evergreens stand out in the winter. Groundcovers and other perennials are present to attract pollinators and provide plant diversity.
The garden's three-tiered cast-iron fountain was manufactured in the 1880s by the J. W. Fiske Iron Works Company. In 1977, the Smithsonian purchased it from the estate of Nanette F. Dunlop. The fountain first stood in the Victorian Garden (now the Enid A. Haupt Garden) adjacent to the Castle. It was restored in 1998 through the donations of Narinder and Rajinder Keith, and moved to the Folger Rose Garden. The Keiths named the fountain the Gur-Karma-Rana Keith Fountain, using the first letters of several Keith family members' names.
Plantings in winter include holly (Ilex x 'Emily Bruner') and winterberry (Ilex verticillata). Roses include hybrid tea (Rosa 'Andeli' Double Delight), floribunda (Rosa Europeana'), shrub (Rosa 'Amiga Mia'), and polyantha (Rosa 'The Fairy').
Persons associated with the garden include: Lee M. Folger (donor, 1998). Paul Lindell (landscape architect, 1997-1998). Karen Swanson (landscape architect, 1997-1998). Narinder Keith (donor, 1998). Rajinder K. Keith (donor, 1998). Shelly Gaskins (lead horticulturist, 2003- ). J. W. Fiske Iron Works Company (fountain manufacturer, circa 1885).
Related Materials:
Kathrine Dulin Folger Rose Garden related holdings consist of 339 35mm slides (photographs), 1 photographic print, and digital images
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher
Topic:
Gardens -- District of Columbia -- Washington  Search this
Genre/Form:
Digital images
Slides (photographs)
Photographic prints
Negatives
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Gardens Image Library, Archives of American Gardens, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAG.SGI, File SG003
See more items in:
Smithsonian Gardens Image Library
Smithsonian Gardens Image Library / Series 1: Garden Images / United States of America / District of Columbia
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-sgi-ref6

Washington -- Common Ground Garden

Landscape architect:
Lindell, Paul H.  Search this
Swanson, Karen  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Digital images
Slides (photographs)
Photographic prints
Negatives
Place:
United States of America -- District of Columbia -- Washington
Varying Form:
Heirloom Garden formerly known as.
General:
The Heirloom Garden is a one-third-acre terrace garden which surrounds the National Museum of American History in Washington, D.C. It was originally designed by landscape architects Paul Lindell and Karen Swanson of the Smithsonian's Horticulture Services Division (later Smithsonian Gardens), and opened in 1998.
The Heirloom Garden was comprised of plant varieties that were planted in American gardens from colonial times up until 1950, when agricultural practices became more industrialized. The garden was filled with annuals, perennials, bulbs, shrubs and trees, all of which are either natural species or varieties that have long been cultivated. Broadly considered "old-fashioned," these plant varieties are typically not used in large-scale agriculture, and are even uncommon in modern gardens. Heirloom plants were sprouted from seeds and bulbs carried from European homelands to America, where they have been passed down through generations of gardeners. Many of these classic flowers and herbs have historical uses rooted in folkways and/or legitimate medicine, including those from Medieval England and Ancient Greece.
In 2017, the Heirloom Garden was re-named Common Ground: Our American Garden to connect to the "Many Voices, One Nation" exhibition at the National Museum of American History. Common Ground shares the stories of Americans who have grown flowers and herbs as a way of honoring memory, providing healing, promoting discovery, and inspiring ingenuity.
Plantings in the former Heirloom Garden included Japanese wisteria (Wisteria floribunda), valerian (Centranthus ruber), feverfew (Tanacetum parthenium), golden columbine (Aquilegia chrysantha), crape myrtle (Lagestroemia 'Sioux'), chive (Allium schoenoprasum), purple sage (Salvia officinalis 'Purpurea'), zinnia (Zinnia acerosa 'Cut and Come Again'), nasturtium (Tropaeolum majus 'Vesuvius').
People associated with this garden include: Paul Lindell (landscape architect, 1998), Karen Swanson (landscape architect, 1998).
Related Materials:
Common Ground Garden related holdings consist of (35mm slides (photographs), negatives, photographic prints, and digital images)
Collection Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu
Collection Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher
Topic:
Gardens -- District of Columbia -- Washington  Search this
Genre/Form:
Digital images
Slides (photographs)
Photographic prints
Negatives
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Gardens Image Library, Archives of American Gardens, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAG.SGI, File SG010
See more items in:
Smithsonian Gardens Image Library
Smithsonian Gardens Image Library / Series 1: Garden Images / United States of America / District of Columbia
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aag-sgi-ref13

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