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Pratt & Whitney F100-PW-100 Turbofan Engine

Manufacturer:
Pratt & Whitney  Search this
Materials:
Steel, Stainless Steel, Rubber, Inconel, Aluminum, Plastic, Titanium
Dimensions:
Length 486 cm (191 in.), Diameter 118 cm (46.5 in.)
Type:
PROPULSION-Turbines (Jet)
Country of Origin:
United States of America
Date:
Circa 1973
Credit Line:
Transferred from the U.S. Air Force, Kelly AFB, Texas
Inventory Number:
A19900276000
See more items in:
National Air and Space Museum Collection
Data Source:
National Air and Space Museum
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nasm_A19900276000

Pratt & Whitney J48-P-8C Turbojet Engine

Manufacturer:
Pratt & Whitney  Search this
Dimensions:
Length 279 cm (110 in.), Diameter 127 cm (50.0 in.)
Type:
PROPULSION-Turbines (Jet)
Country of Origin:
United States of America
Date:
Circa 1952
Credit Line:
Transferred from the U.S. Navy, Naval Surface Warfare Center, Dahlgren, Virginia
Inventory Number:
A19920002000
See more items in:
National Air and Space Museum Collection
Data Source:
National Air and Space Museum
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nasm_A19920002000

Pratt & Whitney J48-P-8C Turbojet Engine

Manufacturer:
Pratt & Whitney  Search this
Dimensions:
Overall: 2200lb. (997.9kg)
Other: 9 ft. 2 in. × 4 ft. 2 in. (279.4 × 127cm)
Storage: 158.7 × 297.2 × 165.1cm (5 ft. 2 1/2 in. × 9 ft. 9 in. × 5 ft. 5 in.)
Type:
PROPULSION-Turbines (Jet)
Country of Origin:
United States of America
Date:
Circa 1952
Credit Line:
Transferred from the U.S. Navy, Naval Surface Warfare Center, Dahlgren, Virginia
Inventory Number:
A19750601001
See more items in:
National Air and Space Museum Collection
Data Source:
National Air and Space Museum
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nasm_A19750601001

Product and Contract Records, 1984-2012

Creator:
Smithsonian Enterprises Product Development and Licensing  Search this
Subject:
Smithsonian Institution  Search this
Smithsonian Business Ventures Product Development and Licensing  Search this
Smithsonian Institution Office of Product Development and Licensing  Search this
Physical description:
1 cu. ft. (1 record storage box)
Type:
Manuscripts
Collection descriptions
Date:
1984
1984-2012
Topic:
Contracts  Search this
License agreements  Search this
Licensed products  Search this
New products  Search this
Product management  Search this
Local number:
SIA Acc. 14-041
Restrictions & Rights:
Restricted for 15 years, until Jan-01-2028; Transferring office; 08/16/1994 memorandum, Johnstone to Watson; Contact reference staff for details
See more items in:
Product and Contract Records 1971-2018 [Smithsonian Enterprises Product Development and Licensing]
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_arc_366595

Product and Contract Records, 1971-2018

Creator:
Smithsonian Enterprises Product Development and Licensing  Search this
Subject:
Smithsonian Business Ventures Product Development and Licensing  Search this
Smithsonian Institution Office of Product Development and Licensing  Search this
Physical description:
116.5 cu. ft. unprocessed holdings
Type:
Manuscripts
Contracts
Clippings
Color photographs
Color negatives
Catalogs
Compact discs
Floppy disks
Drawings
Illustrations
Brochures
Pamphlets
Electronic records
Date:
1971
1971-2018
Topic:
Product management  Search this
License agreements  Search this
Marketing  Search this
Contracts  Search this
New products  Search this
Licensed products  Search this
Local number:
SIA RS00241
Restrictions & Rights:
Materials less than 15 years old Restricted. Contact reference staff for details
See more items in:
Product and Contract Records 1971-2018 [Smithsonian Enterprises Product Development and Licensing]
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_arc_265532

Product and Contract Records, 1985-2008

Creator:
Smithsonian Business Ventures Product Development and Licensing  Search this
Subject:
Smithsonian Institution  Search this
Physical description:
6 cu. ft. (6 record storage boxes)
Type:
Manuscripts
Collection descriptions
Compact discs
Color photographs
Date:
1985
1985-2008
Topic:
Contracts  Search this
License agreements  Search this
Licensed products  Search this
New products  Search this
Product management  Search this
Local number:
SIA Acc. 09-079
Restrictions & Rights:
Restricted for 15 years. Any requests to access these records during the restriction period, including requests from the staff of Smithsonian Enterprises, must first receive permission, in writing, from the Director of Product Development and Licensing, until Jan-01-2024; Transferring office; 08/16/1994 memorandum, Johnstone to Watson; Contact reference staff for details
See more items in:
Product and Contract Records 1971-2018 [Smithsonian Enterprises Product Development and Licensing]
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_arc_282127

Product and Contract Records, 1971-2005

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution Smithsonian Business Ventures Product Development and Licensing  Search this
Physical description:
42 cu. ft. (42 record storage boxes)
Type:
Brochures
Collection descriptions
Clippings
Manuscripts
Compact discs
Floppy disks
Drawings
Illustrations
Color negatives
Color photographs
Date:
1971
1971-2005
Topic:
Contracts  Search this
License agreements  Search this
Licensed products  Search this
Marketing  Search this
New products  Search this
Product management  Search this
Local number:
SIA Acc. 07-001
Restrictions & Rights:
Restricted for 15 years. Any requests to access these records during the restriction period, including requests from the staff of Smithsonian Business Ventures, must first receive permission, in writing, from the Director of Product Development and Licensing, until Jan-01-2021; Transferring office; 08/16/1994 memorandum, Johnstone to Watson; Contact reference staff for details
See more items in:
Product and Contract Records 1971-2018 [Smithsonian Enterprises Product Development and Licensing]
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_arc_282239

Product and Contract Records, 1978-2006

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution Smithsonian Business Ventures Product Development and Licensing  Search this
Physical description:
9 cu. ft. (9 record storage boxes)
Type:
Manuscripts
Collection descriptions
Brochures
Clippings
Pamphlets
Date:
1978
1978-2006
Topic:
Contracts  Search this
License agreements  Search this
Licensed products  Search this
New products  Search this
Product management  Search this
Local number:
SIA Acc. 07-038
Restrictions & Rights:
Restricted for 15 years. Any requests to access these records during the restriction period, including requests from the staff of Smithsonian Business Ventures, must first receive permission, in writing, from the Director of Product Development and Licensing, until Jan-01-2022; Transferring office; 08/16/1994 memorandum, Johnstone to Watson; Contact reference staff for details
See more items in:
Product and Contract Records 1971-2018 [Smithsonian Enterprises Product Development and Licensing]
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_arc_282241

Playbill for A Flea in Her Ear

Published by:
Playbill, American, founded 1884  Search this
Used by:
Roundabout Theatre Company, American, founded 1965  Search this
Subject of:
Mark Linn-Baker, American, born 1954  Search this
Michael Countryman, American, born 1955  Search this
Wally Dunn, American, born 1960  Search this
George Hall  Search this
James Lally, American, born 1956  Search this
Bruce MacVittie  Search this
Mark Douglas Brown McKinney, Canadian, born 1959  Search this
Angie Phillips  Search this
Alice Playten, American, 1947 - 2011  Search this
Shaun Powell  Search this
Kali Rocha, American, born 1971  Search this
Camilla Sanes  Search this
Richard Shull, 1929 - 1999  Search this
Virginia Louise Smith  Search this
Medium:
ink on paper
Dimensions:
H x W: 8 1/2 x 5 1/4 in. (21.6 x 13.3 cm)
Type:
theater programs
Place used:
New York City, New York, United States, North and Central America
Date:
1998
Topic:
African American  Search this
Comedy (Theatre)  Search this
Credit Line:
Collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture, Gift of Kayla Deigh Owens
Object number:
2011.45.31
Restrictions & Rights:
Playbill used by permission. All rights reserved, Playbill Inc.
See more items in:
National Museum of African American History and Culture Collection
Classification:
Memorabilia and Ephemera
Data Source:
National Museum of African American History and Culture
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmaahc_2011.45.31
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Additional Online Media:

license, product

Object Name:
License, Product
Associated date:
1969 06 09
ID Number:
PL.307480.19
Catalog number:
307480.19
See more items in:
Political and Military History: Political History, General History Collection
Exhibition:
We the People
Exhibition Location:
National Museum of American History
Data Source:
National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmah_529486

The Flintstones Lunch Box

Maker:
Aladdin  Search this
Physical Description:
tin (overall material)
Measurements:
overall: 21 cm x 19 cm x 10 cm; 8 1/4 in x 7 1/2 in x 3 15/16 in
Object Name:
lunch box
Date made:
1962
Subject:
School Personal Equipment  Search this
Television  Search this
Credit Line:
Gift of Allan Woodall, Jr.
ID Number:
2001.3100.09.01
Nonaccession number:
2001.3100
Catalog number:
2001.3100.09.01
See more items in:
Cultural and Community Life: Entertainment
Popular Entertainment
Lunch Boxes
Family & Social Life
Data Source:
National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmah_1196968
Additional Online Media:

Minutes

Creator::
Smithsonian Institution. Board of Regents  Search this
Extent:
8.70 cu. ft. (9 document boxes) (7 12x17 boxes) (1 16x20 box)
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Manuscripts
Date:
1846-1995
Descriptive Entry:
These records are the official minutes of the Board. They are compiled at the direction of the Secretary of the Smithsonian, who is also secretary to the Board, after approval by the Regents' Executive Committee and by the Regents themselves. The minutes are edited, not a verbatim account of proceedings. For reasons unknown, there are no manuscript minutes for the period from 1857 through 1890; and researchers must rely on printed minutes published in the Annual Report of the Smithsonian Institution instead. Minutes are transferred regularly from the Secretary's Office to the Archives. Minutes less than 15 years old are closed to researchers. Indexes exist for the period from 1907 to 1946 and can be useful.
Historical Note:
The Smithsonian Institution was created by authority of an Act of Congress approved August 10, 1846. The Act entrusted direction of the Smithsonian to a body called the Establishment, composed of the President; the Vice President; the Chief Justice of the United States; the secretaries of State, War, Navy, Interior, and Agriculture; the Attorney General; and the Postmaster General. In fact, however, the Establishment last met in 1877, and control of the Smithsonian has always been exercised by its Board of Regents. The membership of the Regents consists of the Vice President and the Chief Justice of the United States; three members each of the Senate and House of Representatives; two citizens of the District of Columbia; and seven citizens of the several states, no two from the same state. (Prior to 1970 the category of Citizen Regents not residents of Washington consisted of four members). By custom the Chief Justice is Chancellor. The office was at first held by the Vice President. However, when Millard Fillmore succeeded to the presidency on the death of Zachary Taylor in 1851, Chief Justice Roger Brooke Taney was chosen in his stead. The office has always been filled by the Chief Justice since that time.

The Regents of the Smithsonian have included distinguished Americans from many walks of life. Ex officio members (Vice President) have been: Spiro T. Agnew, Chester A. Arthur, Allen W. Barkley, John C. Breckenridge, George Bush, Schuyler Colfax, Calvin Coolidge, Charles Curtis, George M. Dallas, Charles G. Dawes, Charles W. Fairbanks, Millard Fillmore, Gerald R. Ford, John N. Garner, Hannibal Hamlin, Thomas A. Hendricks, Garret A. Hobart, Hubert H. Humphrey, Andrew Johnson, Lyndon B. Johnson, William R. King, Thomas R. Marshall, Walter F. Mondale, Levi P. Morton, Richard M. Nixon, Nelson A. Rockefeller, Theodore Roosevelt, James S. Sherman, Adlai E. Stevenson, Harry S. Truman, Henry A. Wallace, William A. Wheeler, Henry Wilson.

Ex officio members (Chief Justice) have been: Roger B. Taney, Salmon P. Chase, Nathan Clifford, Morrison R. Waite, Samuel F. Miller, Melville W. Fuller, Edward D. White, William Howard Taft, Charles Evans Hughes, Harlan F. Stone, Fred M. Vinson, Earl Warren, Warren E. Burger.

Regents on the part of the Senate have been: Clinton P. Anderson, Newton Booth, Sidney Breese, Lewis Cass, Robert Milledge Charlton, Bennet Champ Clark, Francis M. Cockrell, Shelby Moore Cullom, Garrett Davis, Jefferson Davis, George Franklin Edmunds, George Evans, Edwin J. Garn, Walter F. George, Barry Goldwater, George Gray, Hannibal Hamlin, Nathaniel Peter Hill, George Frisbie Hoar, Henry French Hollis, Henry M. Jackson, William Lindsay, Henry Cabot Lodge, Medill McCormick, James Murray Mason, Samuel Bell Maxey, Robert B. Morgan, Frank E. Moss, Claiborne Pell, George Wharton Pepper, David A. Reed, Leverett Saltonstall, Hugh Scott, Alexander H. Smith, Robert A. Taft, Lyman Trumbull, Wallace H. White, Jr., Robert Enoch Withers.

Regents on the part of the House of Representatives have included: Edward P. Boland, Frank T. Bow, William Campbell Breckenridge, Overton Brooks, Benjamin Butterworth, Clarence Cannon, Lucius Cartrell, Hiester Clymer, William Colcock, William P. Cole, Jr., Maurice Connolly, Silvio O. Conte, Edward E. Cox, Edward H. Crump, John Dalzell, Nathaniel Deering, Hugh A. Dinsmore, William English, John Farnsworth, Scott Ferris, Graham Fitch, James Garfield, Charles L. Gifford, T. Alan Goldsborough, Frank L. Greene, Gerry Hazleton, Benjamin Hill, Henry Hilliard, Ebenezer Hoar, William Hough, William M. Howard, Albert Johnson, Leroy Johnson, Joseph Johnston, Michael Kirwan, James T. Lloyd, Robert Luce, Robert McClelland, Samuel K. McConnell, Jr., George H. Mahon, George McCrary, Edward McPherson, James R. Mann, George Perkins Marsh, Norman Y. Mineta, A. J. Monteague, R. Walton Moore, Walter H. Newton, Robert Dale Owen, James Patterson, William Phelps, Luke Poland, John Van Schaick Lansing Pruyn, B. Carroll Reece, Ernest W. Roberts, Otho Robards Singleton, Frank Thompson, Jr., John M. Vorys, Hiram Warner, Joseph Wheeler.

Citizen Regents have been: David C. Acheson, Louis Agassiz, James B. Angell, Anne L. Armstrong, William Backhouse Astor, J. Paul Austin, Alexander Dallas Bache, George Edmund Badger, George Bancroft, Alexander Graham Bell, James Gabriel Berrett, John McPherson Berrien, Robert W. Bingham, Sayles Jenks Bowen, William G. Bowen, Robert S. Brookings, John Nicholas Brown, William A. M. Burden, Vannevar Bush, Charles F. Choate, Jr., Rufus Choate, Arthur H. Compton, Henry David Cooke, Henry Coppee, Samuel Sullivan Cox, Edward H. Crump, James Dwight Dana, Harvey N. Davis, William Lewis Dayton, Everette Lee Degolyer, Richard Delafield, Frederic A. Delano, Charles Devens, Matthew Gault Emery, Cornelius Conway Felton, Robert V. Fleming, Murray Gell-Mann, Robert F. Goheen, Asa Gray, George Gray, Crawford Hallock Greenwalt, Nancy Hanks, Caryl Parker Haskins, Gideon Hawley, John B. Henderson, John B. Henderson, Jr., A. Leon Higginbotham, Jr., Gardner Greene Hubbard, Charles Evans Hughes, Carlisle H. Humelsine, Jerome C. Hunsaker, William Preston Johnston, Irwin B. Laughlin, Walter Lenox, Augustus P. Loring, John Maclean, William Beans Magruder, John Walker Maury, Montgomery Cunningham Meigs, John C. Merriam, R. Walton Moore, Roland S. Morris, Dwight W. Morrow, Richard Olney, Peter Parker, Noah Porter, William Campbell Preston, Owen Josephus Roberts, Richard Rush, William Winston Seaton, Alexander Roby Shepherd, William Tecumseh Sherman, Otho Robards Singleton, Joseph Gilbert Totten, John Thomas Towers, Frederic C. Walcott, Richard Wallach, Thomas J. Watson, Jr., James E. Webb, James Clarke Welling, Andrew Dickson White, Henry White, Theodore Dwight Woolsey.
Topic:
Museums -- Administration  Search this
Museum trustees  Search this
Genre/Form:
Manuscripts
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 1, Smithsonian Institution. Board of Regents, Minutes
Identifier:
Record Unit 1
See more items in:
Minutes
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-faru0001
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  • View Minutes digital asset number 1
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Warshaw Collection of Business Americana

Creator:
Warshaw, Isadore, d. 1969  Search this
Extent:
1,150 Cubic feet (approximately. Series 1 contains approximately 1108 cubic feet consisting of approximately 2050 boxes, approximately 326 oversize boxes, and map case material. Additional material in Series 2-4 is unquantified. With also, some digital images of select collection materials.)
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Posters
Letterheads
Advertisements
Maps
Business ephemera
Calendars
Trade cards
Broadsides
Ephemera
Stationery
Advertising cards
Sheet music
Photomechanical prints
Sales catalogs
Chromolithographs
Place:
business ephemera -- Adirondack Mountains (N.Y.)
Albany (N.Y.)
Date:
circa 1708-1977
Scope and Contents:
The Warshaw Collection consists of approximately 1,150 cubic feet of material currently contained in approximately 2,050 vertical document boxes, approximately 326 flat oversize boxes, 34 map case drawers of oversize materials, 56 volumes of photographic photo prints, 17 boxes of 4 x 5 color transparencies and black and white photonegatives, 11 boxes of stereographs, and a videodisc. It consists of a large body of business ephemera. Ephemera is used to refer to the transient everyday items which are usually printed on paper however in some cases fabric, leather and wood have been used. This material is manufactured for a specific limited use and then meant to be thrown away. The collection also contains samples of ephemera that were meant to be saved for a short period of time and discarded later such as stock certificates. This material dates from the late eighteenth century to about 1977, but the bulk of the material is late from the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.

The largest advertising history collection in the Archives Center, the Warshaw Collection is organized into five major categories: I. Business Ephemera -- - Vertical Files, II. Business Ephemera - - Oversize, III. Other Collection Divisions, IV. Isadore Warshaw Personal Papers and V. Photographic Reference Materials. Scope and content notes and a detailed description of the contents for all of these divisions are found in the following sections of the register.

Series 1: Business Ephemera, circa 1724-1977, makes up the largest portion of the collection. It is divided into 538 subject and geographic categories created by Mr. Warshaw and is contained in 2,050 vertical document boxes. Materials include vast numbers of advertising cards, scraps, stock cards, trade catalogs, price lists, menus, pamphlets, labels, lithographs, photographs, business letterheads, bills, receipts, greeting cards, post cards, calendars, printed advertisements, periodicals, newspaper clippings, broadsides, shipping documents, handbills, premiums, promotional items, announcements, business cards, packaging and point of purchase displays.

II. BUSINESS EPHEMERA - - OVERSIZE FILES, ca. 1850-1960, consists of approximatley 326 flat oversize boxes and 34 map case drawers of materials. Materials include posters, newspapers, point of purchase displays, packaging, printed advertisements, periodical illustrations, lithographs, labels, shipping documents, promotional items, trade catalogs, pattern sheets, maps, art reproductions, fashion design drawings, membership certificates and price lists. The material is organized by the same subject and geographical categories as materials in the vertical document boxes.

III. OTHER COLLECTION DIVISIONS, ca. 1790-1957, represents a significant accumulation of one type of material rather than a mix of various types of ephemera. Materials generally relate to one subject. Most of the material is stored in flat oversize boxes. Materials include cinema lobby cards, fire insurance maps, photographs and scrapbooks of liquor and wine labels.

IV. ISADORE WARSHAW PERSONAL PAPERS, ca. 1917-1966, consists of three document boxes of materials relating to how Mr. Warshaw maintained the collection as a business. Most of this material is correspondence sent to him in response to his research inquiries. A smaller portion of the material is printed advertisements and circulars created by Mr. Warshaw to advertise his services and the collection. Magazine articles, letterhead stationery and photographs make up the remainder of the material.

V. PHOTOGRAPHIC REFERENCE MATERIAL, consists of photographs, slides and transparencies of items found in the collection. These materials were created for a number of purposes. Some were created in response to requests by researcher for images to be used in publications, exhibitions, and for other purposes. Others were created as a quick reference source for researchers. Several thousand photographic images from the Warshaw Collection were also transferred to an experimental videodisc by the Institution's Office of Photographic and Printing Services (OPPS). The videodisc is available for viewing on equipment in the Archives Center.

Use of the prints, slides, and videodisc reduces wear and tear on the collection, permits rapid searching through many images, and assures the researcher - - in most cases that a photographic negative of transparency already exists, and that copies can be reproduced relatively quickly and inexpensively. Searching the collection's photographic reproductions is especially appropriate for researchers who want to see general images of subjects such as "women in advertising" or an advertisement from a particular year.

The Warshaw Collection originally contained books, three-dimensional objects and food crate labels. Those books that did not directly relate to the collection were transferred to the Smithsonian Libraries. Remaining publications are stored in the Business Ephemera-Vertical Files document boxes within the appropriate subject category.

Mr. Warshaw collected three-dimensional objects to illustrate packaging, to convey information about product content, shape and size, and to document advertising in three-dimensional forms. Such items included hair product packaging, games, patent medicine containers, cosmetics, tobacco tins, food containers, and liquor bottles. There were also a number of objects, mostly made of glass, tin, and wood, including trays and stained glass signs advertising products such as patent medicine, tobacco, phonographs, refrigerators, stoves, hair products, meat, agricultural tools and implements, whiskey, bakery goods, and beer. Some of these objects were framed. All these objects have been transferred to the appropriate divisions in the Museum. Information on the locations of these items can be obtained in the Archives Center reference room.

Food crate labels were once an important advertising device. Used to develop loyalty to particular growers, these labels were appealing because of the commercial artwork. Some of the labels were mounted on wood. These labels also were transferred to a curatorial unit. The un-mounted labels are in the "foods" section of the Business Ephemera - - Vertical Files.

Research Strengths and Limitations

The strength of the Warshaw Collection lies in its size, its variety, and its extraordinarily rich visual imagery. These images illustrate how Americans perceived themselves or wished to be perceived, how they saw others, their work patterns, their recreation habits, and other aspects of American culture from the late eighteenth to the mid-twentieth centuries. They provide an alternative source to written and printed historical materials, sometimes conveying information about values and practices not otherwise documented. These images stand as a powerful reminder that the origins of modern, visual mass communications go much farther back than the invention of television.

Most of the imagery, of course, is a vision of American life as seen through the eyes of advertising agencies and of the businesses they represented. Researchers working with the collection find it an especially rich source for examining the dynamic relationship between advertising and American culture over the centuries.

There are some problems, however, interpreting American culture through these materials. Most of the advertisements in the collection represent Anglo-American mainstream culture. African Americans, Native Americans, Asian Americans and members of other ethnic groups are only occasionally depicted in the advertisements. Much of this imagery is stereotypical and fails to recognize ethnic groups as consumers. Despite these limitations the ethnic imagery offers penetrating insights into American culture and its changing values and tastes. The Archives Center's Ethnic Imagery Project has identified thousands of items within the Warshaw Collection, and in other Center collections, which depict race and ethnicity. The Project also is seeking to expand the range of such imagery within the Center's collections to provide a better rounded view of how Americans see themselves and each other.

There are few indications in the collection of consumer response. The materials mostly consist of end products, what customers received. Testimonials and celebrity endorsements are among the materials but do not constitute a large portion of it, nor do they appear in every subject category. There is also little documentation on the success or failure of advertisements. Evidence about advertisers' decisions to use specific advertisements is extremely rare.

There is no complete history of any one company represented in the collection. For many of the businesses, the material consists of fragments of the advertising materials created to sell their products or services. Biographical information on founders or the early developments of the company may be included on letterhead stationery or bills and receipts but not always. Occasionally one finds company publications that discuss the history of the business. These were usually produced for anniversaries and more often for larger companies that had existed for a long time, such as Proctor & Gamble.

Most of the businesses represented in the Collection were east of the Mississippi River. This is probably due to the collecting possibilities for Mr. Warshaw. It also may be due to the concentration of many industries in this region.

Despite its limitations, the Warshaw Collection is the most heavily used collection in the Archives Center. Researchers in the Collection often find information unavailable elsewhere. Researchers in the Collection have included academic historians, Smithsonian curatorial staff , and outside museum staff interested in the collection for exhibition purposes. Smithsonian Shops buyers and others interested in motifs for licensed products, collectors and hobbyists find the collection a rich source for such research.
Series 1: Business Ephemera:
Dates -- circa 1544-1988

Contents -- Series 1: Business Ephemera1.1: Subject Categories1.2: Geographical Categories
Series 2: Other Collection Divisions:
Dates -- circa 1850-1957

Contents -- Series 2: Other Collection Divisions2.1: Business Records [Obsolete as of 2017]2.2: Cinema Lobby Cards2.3: Fire Insurance Maps2.4: Liquor and Wine Labels and Advertisements2.5: Photographs2.6: Stereographs2.7: Sheet Music2.8: Rewards and Wanted Posters
Series 3: Isadore Warshaw Personal Papers:
Dates -- circa 1917-1966

Contents -- Series 3: Isadore Warshaw Personal Papers3.1: Correspondence3.2: Secondary Writings about Warshaw and the Collection3.3: Business Materials3.4: Miscellaneous
Series 4: Photographic Reference Material:
Dates -- undated

Contents -- Series 4: Photographic Reference Material4.1: Photoprints4.2: 35mm color slides4.3: Color transparencies4.4: Videodisc
Arrangement note:
The collection is divided into four series.

Series 1: Business Ephemera

Series 2: Other Collection Divisions

Series 3: Isadore Warshaw Personal Papers

Series 4: Photographic Reference Material
Biographical / Historical:
The Warshaw Collection of Business Americana is the result of the foresight and energy of Isadore Warshaw. Warshaw believed that the history of America was closely tied to the history of American business. He observed, however, that the business community often looked to the future rather than the past and tended not to retain historical company records. As a result, a number of businesses had no coherent record of their past. Warshaw realized that these records could be of value one day.

"Sonny" Warshaw, as he was known to family and friends, was born June 12, 1900 and reared in Albany, New York, the second youngest of ten children of Rubin and Ray (Mackler) Warshaw. Although he received little formal education, he started in business as a book scout in 1915 searching for rare publications for dealers and collectors. Later he became a rare book dealer and collector himself. His hobbies included sketching and painting, and several pieces of this self-taught artist's work were exhibited in local banks.

Warshaw's interest in collecting business ephemera began in 1928 when an important event inspired him. In the process of searching for books, he often ran across various pieces of ephemera. In these posters, labels, ledgers, invoices, calendars, business cards, correspondence on letterhead stationery, and advertising cards, he could see the romantic side of big business. One day he ran across an invoice signed by John Forsythe, founder of a New York haberdashery, and sent it to the store. In reponse, he received a thank-you note along with an invitation to select six shirts in appreciation for the item he found. This combination of events encouraged Warshaw to begin a lifelong mission. He opened an office at 61 Columbia Street in Albany, New York, announcing to the business community that he had their history and would make it available.

In 1942, Isadore Warshaw moved from Albany to New York City where he opened an office at 752 West End Avenue. In 1944, he married Augusta Levy, a former buyer for a group of women's ready-to-wear shops in Miami, Florida. They had no children. A portion of their apartment was used as an office where Mrs. Warshaw handled all the correspondence. The Warshaws lived with the fear of a fire destroying the collection because this was their sole source of income. Insurance companies informed them that in order to insure the collection, each piece would have to be counted. As a result, the collection was never insured. A fire did occur once in the building but only a small portion of their vast holdings suffered from smoke damage.

Warshaw spent a great deal of time at the New York Public Library, museums, and historical societies, gathering ideas and information relating to his business pursuits. He never referred to his time spent researching and collecting as a hobby. As his business began to grow, he relied on as many as forty scouts across the country to hunt for material. He acquired material from companies going out of business, buildings about to be demolished, garage sales, auctions, antique shows, stamp dealers and collectors, old safes, small country merchants, and bookstores. He also advertised in catalogues for the book industry throughout the country.

Warshaw's approach at first was to purchase pieces of Americana in hope of finding a buyer. He mailed thousands of advertisements to his five hundred corporate clients. Rejected items went to a brownstone building that he referred to as his warehouse. Warshaw later discovered that there was more profit in renting materials or selling reproduction rights to the very materials he had once carted away. Companies rented objects or entire packaged displays to commemorate anniversaries, for sales conventions, annual reports, trade shows, lectures, and window displays. A few of his major clients included Johnson & Johnson, Kaiser Steel Company, the Riegel Paper Company, the American Can Company, and the Western Electric Company. Reward posters and gold-rush prints were used as props for TV westerns.

Warshaw used the collection to do various kinds of research for a number of businesses. Sometimes he investigated the history of a firm to supply it with founding dates. He found evidence of expansion and product diversification in various documents in the collection. For example, company records showed that Procter and Gamble began as a soap and candle manufacturer before it expanded to a wide variety of products.

Warshaw also had clients outside the business community. Members of the legal profession relied on his collection for various purposes. Lawyers contacted him when they wanted to convert personal property from estates to cash, and he also served as an expert witness, providing evidence in disputes involving trademarks, copyrights, and slogans.

American Heritage, Life, and other publications wishing to illustrate articles found graphics in the collection. Warshaw swapped items with local libraries and historical societies. Joseph N. Kane used the collection to document information for his book, Famous First Facts. Commenting on the many uses of his collection, Warshaw stated:

I have been fortunate. As a collector of things that now document the rapid growth of industry, I have been able to find wide use for my collection. People are beginning to realize that while the romance of war, fashion and science, for instance, is well preserved in swords, wax dolls, and fascinating models...the romance of business in the form of ledgers, sample books, posters, and tin cans tends to perish in debris. Now people come to me to illustrate histories and to get pictures of things as they were.

As Warshaw aged, he began to look for a buyer for the collection. Ralph M. Hower, at one time a professor of business at Harvard, recommended that the collection be purchased and indexed by the Baker Library at Harvard's Business School. He regarded it as a wealth of evidence on such topics specialization, diversification, and integration of business firms and the location of trade and industry.

Discussions about the Warshaw Collection among the staff of the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History (then the Museum of History and Technology) began in 1961. The primary reason for the Museum's interest in purchasing the collection was to prevent the dispersal of a unique resource that could never be assembled again. In the opinions of Smithsonian staff, it provided evidence of things that could be found nowhere else.

Although negotiations for buying the collection and bringing it to the Museum began in 1966, the collection was not actually purchased and transported to the Museum until August 1967. Warshaw had moved his business several times and at the time of the sale, it was located in three rooms on the second floor of 270 West 96th Street in New York. Packing the collection took four days and it was transported to Washington by two tractor trailers.

When the collection arrived at the Museum, it consisted primarily of advertising ephemera. There were also a number of three-dimensional objects, including shoes, clothing, jewelry, furs, ashtrays, coffee and tobacco tins, carpets, patent medicines, cosmetics, hair products, paperweights, whiskey bottles, and food packages. The collection was divided into hundreds of subject headings created by Warshaw. Some of Warshaw's personal papers revealing his business transactions were included, as well as advertisements used by Warshaw to solicit business from manufacturers and retailers. Most of the rest of Warshaw's own papers were destroyed by Mrs. Warshaw when she left New York in 1973.

Following the sale of the collection to the Museum, Warshaw found himself unable to relinquish his life's work. He continued to do research for a number of old clients, relying on such sources as the public library, historical societies, collectors, and dealers in this type of material. In the process he acquired additional material. The volume of this portion of the collection was equal to the size of a station wagon. It was offered to the Museum by Mrs. Warshaw in 1971, and Museum staff went to the New Jersey home of Mrs. Warshaw's brother to pick up the new collection in November 1971.

Curators from the Museum were encouraged to spend time with the collection after its arrival to determine its content in their subject areas. At that time the collection was stored in shirt boxes. Efforts were made to put the materials in vertical document boxes, keeping them in the subject categories created by Warshaw. As time went on, it was clear that the method used by Warshaw was not adequate for research use. Warshaw located materials by hunch rather than by system and there was little cross-referencing in the collection. Not only was it inaccessible to outside researchers, but many of the objects were fragile and required more protection than they had in their original storage containers.

When the Archives Center was established in 1982, it was intended to be a repository for documents and other archival material in the Museum, assuring proper storage and a place where researchers could come to use collections.

The Warshaw Collection was one of the greatest concerns of the Archives Center because of its heavy use. In 1983 the Archives Center and the Division of Conservation worked together to develop a plan to integrate archival principles with conservation methods and techniques, thus taking the first steps in creating a re-housing project.

The first part of the re-housing project began with a survey of the collection to analyze content and condition of the materials. Faith Zieske, a conservator, conducted the survey. She chose a standard statistical analytical method, randomly using 70 vertical document boxes as samples, to analyze the entire collection. Zieske consulted both the Library of Congress Preservation Office and the conservation staff of the Folger Shakespeare Library. A plan was then developed for implementing the survey. After examining the results of the survey, Zieske developed a phased plan for reorganizing and preserving the collection.

Conservation technician Carolyn Long and museum specialist Lorene Mayo began the pilot project in the summer of 1983, testing recommendations made in the survey. During this period Long wrote guidelines for handling the collection. Long and Mayo also developed new storage containers for housing objects of unusual shape.

As the re-housing project developed, finding aids were created for the processed portions of the collection. This was a crucial step that allowed staff and researchers to find items without actually going through the collection. Archives Center staff continue to develop means of making the collection more accessible to researchers who come to the Museum to use the collection, as well as to increase awareness of the existence of the collection in the research community outside the Museum.

List of Sources

"Cashing In On Old Office Records." Business Week, (December 6, 1958).

"A Glimpse at Industrial Advertising of the 80's." Industrial Marketing, (February 1946).

Interview by Vanessa Broussard-Simmons with Mrs. Augusta Levy Warshaw and Correspondence in Control File for Warshaw Collection.

Kahn, Joseph. "Trademark Detective: The Colorful Past of American Business is the 'Beat' of a Sleuth Who has Pioneered a New Kind of History." The Rotarian, ( December 2, 1957) .

Kramer, A. Stanley. "What's Old on Madison?" Madison Avenue. (March 1961).

Menuez, Caroline Bird. "There's Gold in Your Attic." Esquire, (1946).
General:
Several specific companies or proprietors repeatedly appear in various subseries of this collection. These records were dispersed through many subseries and prior arrangement efforts, including those done by the collector as well as post-acquisition staff, which focused on a category or business name of the vendors rather than retaining the record source original provenance and order. As of 2016, there is not a plan to cull through the collection and reconstitute such records, however if such an effort was made, it would likely result in reasonably comprehensive business records for several entities. A few have been noted here but an exhaustive survey of the collection in regards to the this trend of dispersal has not been conducted.

Jacob House (occasionally with variant spellings), which often account for some of the earliest business record within the Warshaw Business Americana Collection, particularly those documents dating in the 1700s and early 1800s.

Luddington, F.L. ... (see Hardware)

Stemmeler...(see Whiskey...)

[Note to be completed, NB 2016-10-18]
Related Materials:
Materials in the Archives Center

Archives Center Collection of Business Americana (AC0404)
Provenance:
The Warshaw Collection of Business Americana, Accession AC0060, was purchased from Isadore Warshaw in 1967. Warshaw continued to accumulate similar material until his death, which was donated in 1971 by his widow, Augusta. For a period after acquisition, related materials from other sources (of mixed provenance) were added to the collection so there may be content produced or published after Warshaw's death in 1969. This practice has since ceased.
Restrictions:
Sears, Roebuck & Co. catalogs restricted due to fragile condition. Researchers should consult microfilm in NMAH library for 1880-1983 editions, drawer 692.
Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
Insurance, Fire -- Maps  Search this
Periodicals  Search this
Fires -- Insurance  Search this
Genre/Form:
Posters
Letterheads
Advertisements
Maps
Business ephemera
Calendars
Trade cards
Broadsides
Ephemera
Stationery
Advertising cards
Sheet music
Photomechanical prints
Sales catalogs
Chromolithographs
Citation:
Warshaw Collection of Business Americana, Archives Center, National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.0060
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmah-ac-0060
Additional Online Media:

Program Files

Creator::
Smithsonian Institution. Office of Elementary and Secondary Education  Search this
Extent:
0.25 cu. ft. (1 half document box)
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Collecting cards
Date:
1992-1993
Descriptive Entry:
This accession contains an incomplete set of collecting cards produced by the company Club Pro Set in 1992-1993. The sets were separated by their assigned reading level: Gold - High School, Silver - Middle School, and Bronze - Elementary School. These cards were a licensed product and were produced through the Office of Product Development and Licensing with Club Pro Set and curated by staff in the Office of Elementary and Secondary Education.
Topic:
Museums -- Educational aspects  Search this
Genre/Form:
Collecting cards
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Accession 05-046, Smithsonian Institution. Office of Elementary and Secondary Education, Program Files
Identifier:
Accession 05-046
See more items in:
Program Files
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-fa05-046

Product and Contract Records

Creator:
Smithsonian Business Ventures, Product Development and Licensing  Search this
Extent:
6 cu. ft. (6 record storage boxes)
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Manuscripts
Compact discs
Color photographs
Date:
1985-2008
Descriptive Entry:
This accession consists of records which document the processes of Product Development and Licensing at Smithsonian Business Ventures. The unit's primary function is to generate revenue for the Smithsonian Institution through the licensing and development of products related to collections within the Smithsonian museums. Some of these products include greeting cards, quilts, educational toys, books, home furnishings, and posters. Materials include correspondence, memoranda, notes, color photographs, contracts, royalty files, and proofs. Some materials are in electronic format.
Rights:
Restricted for 15 years. Any requests to access these records during the restriction period, including requests from the staff of Smithsonian Enterprises, must first receive permission, in writing, from the Director of Product Development and Licensing, until Jan-01-2024; Transferring office; 08/16/1994 memorandum, Johnstone to Watson; Contact reference staff for details.
Topic:
Contracts  Search this
License agreements  Search this
Licensed products  Search this
New products  Search this
Product management  Search this
Genre/Form:
Manuscripts
Compact discs
Color photographs
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Accession 09-079, Smithsonian Business Ventures, Product Development and Licensing, Product and Contract Records
Identifier:
Accession 09-079
See more items in:
Product and Contract Records
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-fa09-079

I Love My Wild Mommy, I Love My Wild Baby - Just Mommy and Me (Sloth Bears) (Parker)

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Business Ventures, Product Development and Licensing  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Collection Rights:
Restricted for 15 years. Any requests to access these records during the restriction period, including requests from the staff of Smithsonian Enterprises, must first receive permission, in writing, from the Director of Product Development and Licensing, until Jan-01-2024; Transferring office; 08/16/1994 memorandum, Johnstone to Watson; Contact reference staff for details.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Accession 09-079, Smithsonian Business Ventures, Product Development and Licensing, Product and Contract Records
See more items in:
Product and Contract Records
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-sia-fa09-079-refd1e1001

I Love My Wild Mommy, I Love My Wild Baby - Just Mommy and Me (Swans) (Parker)

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Business Ventures, Product Development and Licensing  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Collection Rights:
Restricted for 15 years. Any requests to access these records during the restriction period, including requests from the staff of Smithsonian Enterprises, must first receive permission, in writing, from the Director of Product Development and Licensing, until Jan-01-2024; Transferring office; 08/16/1994 memorandum, Johnstone to Watson; Contact reference staff for details.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Accession 09-079, Smithsonian Business Ventures, Product Development and Licensing, Product and Contract Records
See more items in:
Product and Contract Records
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-sia-fa09-079-refd1e1007

Animal Pals - Ready for Anything (Parker)

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Business Ventures, Product Development and Licensing  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Collection Rights:
Restricted for 15 years. Any requests to access these records during the restriction period, including requests from the staff of Smithsonian Enterprises, must first receive permission, in writing, from the Director of Product Development and Licensing, until Jan-01-2024; Transferring office; 08/16/1994 memorandum, Johnstone to Watson; Contact reference staff for details.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Accession 09-079, Smithsonian Business Ventures, Product Development and Licensing, Product and Contract Records
See more items in:
Product and Contract Records
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-sia-fa09-079-refd1e1014

Animal Pals - Panda Pals (Parker)

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Business Ventures, Product Development and Licensing  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Collection Rights:
Restricted for 15 years. Any requests to access these records during the restriction period, including requests from the staff of Smithsonian Enterprises, must first receive permission, in writing, from the Director of Product Development and Licensing, until Jan-01-2024; Transferring office; 08/16/1994 memorandum, Johnstone to Watson; Contact reference staff for details.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Accession 09-079, Smithsonian Business Ventures, Product Development and Licensing, Product and Contract Records
See more items in:
Product and Contract Records
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-sia-fa09-079-refd1e1020

Animal Pals - My Wild Pets (Parker)

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Business Ventures, Product Development and Licensing  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Collection Rights:
Restricted for 15 years. Any requests to access these records during the restriction period, including requests from the staff of Smithsonian Enterprises, must first receive permission, in writing, from the Director of Product Development and Licensing, until Jan-01-2024; Transferring office; 08/16/1994 memorandum, Johnstone to Watson; Contact reference staff for details.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Accession 09-079, Smithsonian Business Ventures, Product Development and Licensing, Product and Contract Records
See more items in:
Product and Contract Records
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-sia-fa09-079-refd1e1026

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