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In honor of Robert H. Goddard, "A method of Reaching Extreme Altitudes"

Designer:
Edward Fella, American, b. 1938  Search this
Medium:
Offset lithograph on cream cardstock
Type:
graphic design
print/poster
Object Name:
print/poster
Place:
USA
Made in:
USA
Date:
late 20th century
Credit Line:
Gift of Edward Fella
Accession Number:
1995-42-41
See more items in:
Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum Collection
Drawings, Prints, and Graphic Design Department
Data Source:
Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:chndm_1995-42-41

Jogbra, Inc. Records

Creator:
Jogbra, Inc.  Search this
Miller, Hinda  Search this
Extent:
16 Cubic feet (30 boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Slides (photographs)
Advertising
Photographs
Business records
Promotional literature
Scrapbooks
Articles
Date:
1977-2008
Summary:
The collection documents the invention of the Jogbra and includes biographical materials, business records, photographs, promotional, marketing and advertising materials, correspondence and audiovisual materials.
Scope and Contents:
The collection documents the invention of the sports bra primarily through marketing and promotional materials. The collection also documents the Jogbra, Inc. company activities, and includes biographical materials, business records, promotional, marketing and advertising materials, photographs, patent records, and audiovisual materials.
Arrangement:
The collection is divided into six series.

Series 1: Biographical Materials, 1980-2006

Series 2: Business Records, 1979-1999

Subseries 2.1: JBI, Inc., 1979-1996

Subseries 2.2: Champion Jogbra, 1988-1999

Series 3: Photographs, 1978-2008

Series 4: Promotional and Marketing Materials, 1979-2000

Series 5: Patent Records, 1978-2003

Series 6: Audiovisual Materials, 1993
Biographical / Historical:
Hinda Schreiber Miller (b. April 18, 1950-) was born in Montreal, Quebec, Canada. She attended the Parsons School of Design (B.F.A., 1972) and New York University (M.F.A., 1976). A costume designer by training, Miller was one of three co-inventors of the modern sports bra in 1977. She and her co-inventors, Lisa Lindahl and Polly Palmer Smith, made their prototype from a pair of men's jock straps in the Costume Department at the University of Vermont.

Miller started the company, Jogbra, Inc., which she renamed JBI, Inc. in 1977 and ran it until it was bought by Playtex Apparel, Inc. in 1990. Playtex Apparel was sold to the Sara Lee Corporation in 1991. Throughout these transitions, Miller continued to serve as president and became CEO of the Champion Jogbra Division of Sara Lee in 1994. Miller left the company in 1997 to pursue other interests. She later became a Vermont state senator (2002-2013) representing the Chittenden District which includes all of Chittenden County. Miller ran unsuccessfully for mayor of Burlington, Vermont in 2006. She is presently president of DeForest Concepts, a consulting firm specializing in small business and the promotion of women entrepreneurs. Miller is married to Dr. Joel Miller and they have one son and one daughter.

The introduction of the sports bra made more sports possible for many American women. Many women were reluctant to participate in sports such as running, basketball, or tennis because of the embarrassment and discomfort associated with the excessive breast motion experienced while participating in sports. The passage of Title IX (1972) and James Fixx's popular 1977 book The Complete Book of Running contributed to the increased popularity of sports for women. This increase in women's sports exposed the inadequacies of conventional brassieres for athletic use: weight shifts from bouncing caused straps on ordinary brassieres to slip around or off the shoulder; excessive motion caused friction and chafed skin; and hooks or other metallic elements tended to poke into the skin; excessive bouncing caused soreness.

Lisa Lindahl's sister, Victoria Woodrow, was frustrated by the inadequacy of her everyday brassiere when she began jogging in the 1970s. Lindahl also jogged and met with the same problems. They went to multiple stores and inquired, but could not find a bra that fit their needs--a bra that kept the breasts pressed flat against the chest and eliminated motion. They also wanted something without seams and hooks, wire or other metal elements. Miller and Palmer Smith created a few prototypes. At the suggestion of Lindahl's husband, the two sewed a pair of jockstraps together and found it to be better than any of their previous prototypes. Originally, they called their product the "JockBra" but later changed it to "JogBra", figuring that the word "jock" might be a turn-off for some women. US Patent 4,174,717 for an athletic brassiere was issued on November 20, 1979.

Marketing their new product (with start-up capital lent by Miller's father, Bruce L. Schreiber) was a challenge. According to Lindahl, buyers for sporting goods stores were "squeamish" about displaying bras, which did not look like lingerie, but an athletic garment. Stores that did feature the Jogbra were pleased by how well it sold. Miller placed strong emphasis on the point of purchase advertising and packaging. The Jogbra line of products expanded to include a women's and men's sport brief and the Thermobra and Thermobrief. Soon, a number of manufacturers, including Vanity Fair, Olga and Warner, were entering the sports bra market.
Related Materials:
Materials at Other Organizations

Vermont Historical Society

Champion jogbra [publicity folder], 1988-2004

Summary: This packet of information contains photocopies and reprints of articles and advertisements from various publications, and press releases, published or released between 1988-2004, about the creation and development of the women's sports bra, Jogbra, by its inventors Hinda Miller and Lisa Lindahl.

Original jogbra

The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Jogbra Brassiere, 1979. See Accession: 1980.51.
Separated Materials:
The Division of Culture and the Arts, National Museum of American History, holds Jogbra-related artifacts. See accession 2013.0322.
Provenance:
The collection was donated by Hinda Miller in 2013.
Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.

Reference copies do not exist. Use of these materials requires special arrangement. Gloves must be worn when handling unprotected photographs and negatives.

Social Security numbers are present and numbers have been rendered unreadable and redacted. Researchers may use the photocopies in the collection. The remainder of the collection has no restrictions.
Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
Sporting goods  Search this
Brassieres -- 20th century  Search this
Sports for women  Search this
Sporting goods industry  Search this
Women's history -- United States  Search this
Women athletes  Search this
Genre/Form:
Slides (photographs) -- 20th century
Advertising -- 20th century
Photographs -- 20th century
Business records -- 20th century
Promotional literature
Scrapbooks -- 20th century
Articles -- 20th century
Citation:
Jogbra, Inc. Records, Archives Center, National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.1315
See more items in:
Jogbra, Inc. Records
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmah-ac-1315
Additional Online Media:

Brannock Device Company Records

Creator:
Park-Brannock.  Search this
Park, Ernest N.  Search this
Brannock, Otis C.  Search this
Brannock, Charles F., 1903-1992  Search this
Brannock Device Company.  Search this
Names:
Selby Shoe Company  Search this
United States. Armed Forces -- Supplies and stores  Search this
United States. Army -- Supplies and stores  Search this
Extent:
12 Cubic feet (34 boxes)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Patents
Trademarks
Slides (photographs)
Advertisements
Sales records
Photographs
Photographic prints
Filmstrips
Design drawings
Date:
1925 - 1998
Summary:
The Brannock Device Company began with the 1925 invention of the Brannock Device, a tool to measure foot length and width at the same time, by inventor and businessman Charles F. Brannock. Early in his career Brannock worked as a shoe salesman at the Park-Brannock shoe store, and in 1962 he became the CEO of the company. This collection documents both the Park-Brannock store and the Brannock Device. Materials in The Brannock Device Company Records, 1925-1998, include of correspondence, design drawings, United States and foreign patents and trademarks, advertisements, product information, sales records, photographs, and a film strip documenting the invention, promotion, and sale of the Brannock Device as well as the concurrent development of Park-Brannock as a leading shoe store in Syracuse, N.Y.
Scope and Contents:
The Brannock Device Company Records, 1925-1998, consist of correspondence, design drawings, United States and foreign patents and trademarks, advertisements, product information, sales records, photographs, and a film strip documenting the invention, promotion, and sale of the Brannock Device as well as the concurrent development of Park-Brannock as a leading shoe store in Syracuse, NY. The collection is useful to researchers for its stories of invention and entrepreneurship and its exemplification of the patent and trademark process in the United States and internationally in the early 20th century. The process of manufacturing and marketing in the shoe industry, and manufacturing of military supplies during World War II is also highlighted.

The collection is divided into two subgroups: The Brannock Device Company Records and Park-Brannock Shoe Store Records. The Brannock Device Company subgroup is arranged into six series: Series 1: Historical Background, 1928-1995; Series 2: Operational Records, 1926-1963; Series 3: Product Development Records, 1925-1981; Series 4: Advertising and Marketing Records, 1926-1980, 1998; Series 5: Sales and Distribution Records, 1925-1996; and Series 6: Photographs, circa 1930-1997. The Park-Brannock subgroup is similarly arranged into five series: Series 1: Historical Background, 1936-1963, 1981; Series 2: Operational Records, 1936-1972; Series 3: Advertising and Marketing Records, 1933-1962; Series 4: Sales Records, 1916-1918, 1927-1961; and Series 5: Photographs, 1934-1967.

Subgroup 1: The Brannock Device Company, 1925-1998

Series 1: Historical Background, 1928-1995

This series contains articles about Charles Brannock, the Brannock Device, the device in the military, and shoe-fitting in general. The series provides an understanding of the company and the shoe industry as shown both through trade magazines, popular magazines, and newspapers.

Series 2: Operational Records, 1926-1963

This series contains bookkeeping, correspondence, census, insurance, and financial records which account for the company as a whole. It is organized into seven subseries: Book for recording devices on hand, November 1927-January 1929; Correspondence, 1926-1951; Census, 1947-1963, 1980; Insurance Inventory, 1956; Royalties Accrued, January 1946-March 1951; Time Records, 1952, 1954, 1958; and Notes, undated.

The correspondence between Charles and Otis Brannock reflects the strong business relationship which existed between father and son. Charles Brannock put Florence Williams in charge when he was vacationing each July from 1928 to 1931. The often humorous correspondence between them reflects daily business at the factory. Correspondence with Dr. Joseph Levyfield, chairman of the National Foot Health Council, pertains to children's foot exams in schools. For sales analyses of the Brannock Device, see Series 5: Sales and Distribution Records, United States--Private Sector, Direct Sales, under Sales analyses, 1964-1973.

Series 3: Product Development Records, 1925-1981

This series documents the process from invention to manufacture of the Brannock Device. It is divided into four subseries: Competitors' Devices and Other Products, Fitting Stool, Design, and Manufacture. Patents and Trademarks are included in the Sales and Distribution series because they were granted after sale of the device had already commenced and the foreign patents and trademarks are intricately linked to foreign sales.

The Competitors' Devices and Other Products subseries is further refined: Competitors' Devices; Other Products; Correspondence, 1928-1981, and Memos and Reports, n.d. The subseries provides documentation on the other devices Brannock considered while designing and making modifications to his own device. It also includes sale or manufacture negotiations for other inventors' products. Most of these devices were designed later than the Brannock Device and had attributes of the Brannock Device. Charles Brannock liked to keep abreast of new developments in order to protect his own interests.

The Fitting Stool subseries is a product development file on the fitting stool Charles Brannock designed to accommodate his device which enabled salesmen to measure the foot while seated instead of kneeling or squatting. It consists of design drawings and correspondence with American Fixture and Showcase Manufacturing Company, Thonet, and Commonwealth Shoe and Leather Company about negotiating its manufacture.

The Design subseries is further divided: Drawings and Ideas; Specifications; Correspondence, 1935-1975; Customer Comments; and Case of Child Cutting Finger on Device, July 1961-January 1962. The drawings and ideas are rough sketches done by Charles Brannock. The specifications include descriptions of materials used and assembly instructions. They were shipped with military orders for devices and are included in the text of patent applications. The design correspondence consists of actual and proposed modifications to the device. Of particular interest are the unsolicited modification proposals the company received. Customer comments were always appreciated and taken into account in the design process from 1946-1961. The case file of a child cutting her finger on a device resulted in a legal settlement in 1962.

The manufacture subseries contains correspondence with, and pamphlets about, companies that manufactured the device. Of particular interest are the Brannock Device Company's investigation into making plastic devices due to the shortage of aluminum in World War II, as outlined in the correspondence with the Eclipse Moulded Products Company. Also, a number of sample shoe company name plates and instruction plates which were screwed into free sections of the device are in this subseries.

Series 4: Advertising and marketing Records, 1926-1980, 1998

This series contains records from the company which contributed toward the goal of making a sale. It is divided into seven subseries: Correspondence, 1926-1974, 1998; Mailing Lists, 1947-1949; Ideas and Copy; Materials Printed with the Brannock Device Name; Advertisements and Product Information, 1934-1980; Measuring Device Instructions; and Advertising and Merchandising Plans, 1938, 1956, and undated.

The Correspondence, 1926-1974, 1998, contains letters between Brannock and various advertising agencies, printers, and magazines.

The Mailing Lists, 1947-1949, are partial listings of stores Brannock sent advertisements to.

The Ideas and Copy subseries consists of advertising ideas sketched by Brannock or proposed by the Proctor and Collier advertising agency or others. Also included are preliminary versions of advertisements and product information booklets.

Printed Materials with the Brannock Device Name, provides examples of stationery, business cards, and leases seen by potential customers.

The Advertisements and Product Information, 1934-1980, subseries contains various advertisements which appeared in magazines, newspapers, and displays, and product information leaflets which were mailed to customers. Also represented are advertisements by shoe stores which feature the Brannock Device and examples of the Brannock Device being used to advertise other products such as insurance, apartments, magazines, carpets, floorings, and die castings.

The Instructions subseries contains: Ideas and Copy, and Completed Instructions. Ideas and Copy are preliminary versions of the instruction sheets of individual models, including the Bran-X-Stick and a Sock-Measuring Device. The Completed Instructions are finished copies of the instruction sheets of many models.

The Advertising and Merchandising Plans, 1938, 1956, n.d. subseries contains information on three promotional schemes employed by the company: an early advertising plan, a Brannock Device Company merchandising campaign in 1938, and a cooperative effort with Miles Shoes in 1956.

Series 5: Sales and Distribution Records, 1925-1986

The largest series in the collection, the sales and distribution series documents Brannock's sales, partnerships he entered into, and the legal measures he took to ensure his company's success. The series is divided into three subseries: United States--Private Sector, United States--Military, and Foreign.

The United States--Private Sector subseries is further divided: Patents and Trademarks, 1928-1971; Direct Sales, 1926-1973; Salesmen Files, 1925-1935; and Shoe Fairs, 1938-1968.

The Patents and Trademarks, 1928-1971, contains patent and trademark certificates; correspondence with Brannock's lawyer, Theodore E. Simonton, and others in reference to obtaining patents and trademarks; and sales inquiries from those wishing to buy Brannock's patents.

The Direct Sales, 1926-1973, contains customer information and form letters; rental contracts, 1926-1927; customer correspondence, 1927-1989; customer service endeavors, and sales figures.

Arranged alphabetically, the Salesmen Files, 1925-1935 document the enthusiasm for the device experienced by shoe store owners across the country as they inquired about selling it followed by their disappointment with commission percentages and the fact that large shoe companies were getting the device at a discount and distributing it among their affiliates, and therefore not buying from salesmen.

The Shoe Fairs, 1938-1968, contains trade literature, visitation reports, and correspondence from Charles Brannock and his employees while attending the National Shoe Fair and the National Safety Congress and Exposition in Chicago from 1938 to 1968. It is organized chronologically by event. The information learned at the fairs was also useful in keeping abreast of the latest in shoe fashion for the Park-Brannock store.

The United States--Military, 1928-1972 subseries contains correspondence, contracts, and orders relating to the sale of the Brannock Device to the military. The subseries is arranged into seven smaller series: Army, 1939-1962; Coast Guard, 1932-1945; Marine Corps, 1943-1956; Merchant Marine, July 1944-August 1944; Navy, 1928-1970; Women's Army Corps, 1942-1944; and Miscellaneous Military Branches, undated. Arrangement within each smaller series is chronological.

Additional documentation on the Brannock Device in the military are in the following series: articles can be found in the Historical Background series; competitors' designs, drawings, specifications, and materials employed to make military devices are in the Product Development series; instructions and military-theme ads are in the Advertising and Marketing series, and photographs of military fittings and military devices are located in the photographs series.

The Foreign, 1937-1986, subseries documents the complex legal relationship between the Brannock Device Company, the Selby Shoe Company, the Brannock Device Company's lawyer, Theodore E. Simonton, and others as the companies strove for protection and distribution of the Brannock Device in foreign countries. It is arranged into five smaller series: Foreign Trademark Listings; Correspondence about Patents, Trademarks, and Distribution, 1928-1986; Patents and Trademarks; London Speech about Shoe-Fitting and the Company History; and Film Strip.

The foreign trademark listings were compiled periodically by the Brannock Device Company to keep track of their patents and trademarks. The correspondence is arranged chronologically. The actual patent and trademark certificates are arranged by country, and some folders also contain accompanying correspondence. This series does not contain all patents and trademarks issued to protect the Brannock Device internationally; some of the trademarks listed in the container list are renewals and therefore would not be the date of first issue. The London speech is a file of notes Charles Brannock used when giving a speech on his company's history and success in London, England. The sound-slide, instructional film strip is entitled "The Key to Repeat Sales." This series contains a transcript with a frame-by-frame description of each slide and accompanying narration.

Series 6: Photographs, circa 1930-1997

This series is divided into five subseries: Personal; Foot-Measuring Devices; Military; Employees and the Factory, 1949, 1997; and Negatives of Brannock Device, 1933-1958. The series contains black and white photos of Charles and Otis Brannock, competitors' devices, the Brannock device in window displays as well as in use and alone, the Women's Army Corps and various military men being fitted, employees, and the factory. There are also color photos, circa 1997, of the employees, the factory, and devices. Black and white, labeled negatives, 1933-1958, are also included here.

Subgroup 2: Park-Brannock Shoe Store Records, 1916-1918, 1927-1981

Series 1: Historical Background, 1936-1963, 1981

Newspaper and magazine articles about Park-Brannock anniversaries, moves into new stores, and the 1981 closing dominate this series. These articles are useful in understanding the rise of Park-Brannock as a leading shoe and accessory retailer. Photo-laden articles put the industrial design-influenced decor of each store into context.

Series 2: Operational Records, 1936-1972

This series is arranged into six subseries: Financial Materials, 1936-1972; Memos, December 1937-April 1944, January 1949, May 1958-May 1961; Business Course Tailored to Park-Brannock, undated; Store Planning, 1935-1961; New York City Business Trips, January 1949-August 1952; and Miscellaneous Notes, undated.

The Financial Materials, 1936-1972 subseries contains all available financial information for Park-Brannock. It is arranged into five smaller series: Correspondence, May 1937-December 1972; Annual Reports, 1945-1972; Department Sales Figures, 1957-1961; Merchandise Budget, August 1939-January 1941; and Miscellaneous Reports, 1936-1944.

The Memos, December 1937-April 1944, January 1949, May 1958-May 1961 subseries contains a limited amount of general internal correspondence. For correspondence between Charles and Otis Brannock, see the Operational Records series of subgroup 1, the Brannock Device Company. For other internal correspondence, see the correspondence with Alice Buxton in the Advertising and Marketing Records series in subgroup 2, Park-Brannock.

The Business course Tailored to Park-Brannock, undated is a file on how to be successful in the shoe business with advice specifically for Park-Brannock. The author is unknown, but it appears to be a commissioned service.

The Store Planning, 1935-1961 subseries contains architectural drawings for a proposed but not undertaken renovation of the original Park-Brannock building in 1935, and files containing store planning advertisements and correspondence used in the moves to new stores in 1937 and 1946.

The New York City Business Trips, January 1949-August 1952 subseries consists of a chronological file of notes taken by Charles Brannock on business accounts during trips to New York City.

The Miscellaneous Notes, undated, subseries contains various notes made by Charles Brannock.

Series 3: Advertising and Marketing, 1933-1962

Like the Advertising and Marketing Records series in the Brannock Device Company subgroup, this series contains records from the company which contributed toward the goal of making a sale. Correspondence documents the arrangements made by the company to create and post advertisements. Ideas and copy display early moments of this process. Materials printed with the Park-Brannock logo represent what the customers were given to remember their purchases: stationery, receipts, gift cards, bags, and box designs. Printed advertisements, radio advertisements, and form letters brought customers into the store. The Junior League of Syracuse file documents photographic advertising campaigns surrounding this group of fresh-faced young girls, as well as Park-Brannock's efforts to edge into this consumer group with advertisements in their newsletter. Correspondence with and reports from Alice Buxton have to do with her visits with doctors and nurses to promote the store along with evaluations of the company's advertising campaigns. The "Betsey Budget" lawsuit resulted from Park-Brannock copyrighting a commissioned advertising booklet which the artist would rather have had in her own name.

Series 4: Sales Records, 1916-1961

This series is arranged into seven subseries: Customer Correspondence, 1928-1944; Supplier Correspondence, 1927-1944; Florsheim Sales Instruction Manual; Inventories, 1961; Promotions; Receipts, 1916-1918; and Sales Floor Management.

The customer and supplier correspondence consists of mail orders, returns, and repair requests. An interesting aspect of the customer correspondence is the amount of shoe orders customers placed through the mail. Customers often received several pairs of shoes matching their descriptions, selected a pair, and mailed the remainder back to Park-Brannock. Sometimes customers would send in an outline of their foot to be sized or color swatches to match the shoes to a dress. Often the purchasing negotiations would require several letters between store and customer. The most prominent shoe supplier to correspond with Park-Brannock was the Selby Shoe Company, followed by Brown Shoe Company; Marshall, Meadows, and Stewart, Inc.; and LaValle, Inc.

Series 5: Photographs, 1932-1967

This series contains labeled, black and white, 8" x 10" photographs from each of the three stores as well as a booklet celebrating Park-Brannock's 50th anniversary in 1956, window displays from Park-Brannock and other stores, and labeled 8" x10" negatives.
Arrangement:
The collection is divided into two subgroups.

Subgroup 1, The Brannock Device Company, 1925-1998

Series 1: Historical Background, 1928-1995

Series 2: Operational Records, 1926-1980

Subseries 1: Book for Recording Devices on Hand, 1927-1929

Subseries 2: Correspondence, 1926-1951

Subseries 3: Census, 1947-1980

Subseries 4: Insurance Inventory, 1956

Subseries 5: Royalties Accrued, 1946-1951

Subseries 6: Time Records, 1952-1958

Subseries 7: Notes, undated

Series 3: Product Development Records, 1925-1981

Subseries 1: Competitors' Devices and Other Products, c. 1928-1981

Subseries 2: Fitting Stool, 1936-1947

Subseries 3: Design, 1925-1975

Subseries 4: Manufacture, 1927-1959

Series 4: Advertising and Marketing Records, 1926-1998

Subseries 1: Correspondence, 1926-1998

Subseries 2: Mailing Lists, 1947-1950

Subseries 3: Ideas and Copy, undated

Subseries 4: Printed Materials with the Brannock Device Name (stationery, business cards, leases), undated

Subseries 5: Advertisements and Product Information, 1934-1980

Subseries 6: Measuring Device Instructions, undated

Subseries 7: Advertising and Merchandising Plans, 1938-1956

Series 5: Sales and Distribution Records, 1925-1986

Subseries 1: United States--Private Sector, 1925-1973

Subseries 2: United States--Military, 1928-1972

Subseries 3: Foreign, 1937-1986

Series 6: Photographs, c. 1930-1997

Subseries 1: Personal, undated

Subseries 2: Foot-Measuring Devices, undated

Subseries 3: Military, undated

Subseries 4: Employees and Factory, undated

Subseries 5: Negatives of Brannock Device, 1933-1958

Subgroup 2, Park-Brannock Shoe Store Records, 1916-1918, 1927-1981

Series 1: Historical Background, 1936-1981

Series 2: Operational Records, 1936-1972

Subseries 1: Financial Materials, 1936-1972

Subseries 2: Financial Materials, 1937-1961

Subseries 3: Business Course Tailored to Park-Brannock, undated

Subseries 4: Business Course Tailored to Park-Brannock, 1935-1961

Subseries 5: New York City Business Trips, 1945-1952

Subseries 6: Miscellaneous Notes, undated

Series 3: Advertising and Marketing Records, 1933-1962

Series 4: Sales Records, 1916-1977

Subseries 1: Customer Correspondence, 1928-1977

Subseries 2: Supplier Correspondence, 1927-1944

Subseries 3: Florsheim Sales Instruction Manual, undated

Subseries 4: Inventories, 1961

Subseries 5: Promotions, undated

Subseries 6: Receipts, 1916-1918

Subseries 7: Sales Floor Management, undated

Series 5: Photographs, 1932-1967
Biographical / Historical:
The Brannock Device Company began with the 1925 invention of the Brannock Device by Charles F. Brannock. Charles Brannock was working as a salesman in the Park-Brannock shoe store, co-owned by his father Otis C. Brannock and Ernest N. Park, in Syracuse, New York when he saw the need for an improved foot-measuring device. The Brannock Device soon gained favor over size-sticks because it measured foot length and width at the same time. Additionally, it measured heel-to-ball length, a feature which aided in fitting heeled shoes.

Charles F. Brannock (1903-1992) was an inventor and businessman. He began tinkering with the idea of a new foot-measuring device while attending Syracuse University, where he would get up in the middle of the night and work on sketches and calculations. Brannock obtained a patent for the device on August 28, 1928, but by then manufacture and sale of the device was already underway. Brannock assembled the device in the Park-Brannock shoe store and gave the device a trial on the sales floor. In 1926, Charles Brannock began offering the device to shoe retailers first on a rental basis and then by sale through the use of salesmen who lived throughout the country and each covered a geographic area. By 1929, the company began to phase out salesmen because it offered quantity discounts to shoe companies which distributed the devices to their stores at a lower price than salesmen could offer.

Brannock sold his device internationally beginning in 1929 through Mr. I. Singer of London, England. In 1936 distribution rights transferred to Henry Maitland Marler of Feature Shoes Limited of London, an affiliate of the Selby Shoe Company. Renewing and protecting foreign trademarks proved to be a legal challenge. Due to some confusion, Brannock's British patent was allowed to lapse. In order to prevent other companies from using the Brannock name in England, H.M. Marler set up Brannock Fitting Device Limited in October 1937. The company began manufacturing Brannock Devices in January 1946, but royalties accrued through European sale by 1951 did not even cover a third of the cost of trademarks, patents, and designs.

Fortunately for the Brannock Device Company, these costs were absorbed by the Selby Shoe Company, with whom it had entered into agreements about foreign distribution in November 1941. Selby had exclusive rights to distribute the Brannock Device in South America, South Africa, and other countries, and assisted Brannock in securing trademarks in many foreign countries.

In 1933 a United States Navy captain asked a shoe salesman to find the source of many sailors' foot problems. The salesman, after measuring sailors' feet with the Brannock device, declared that the Navy shoe was not the cause of the problem; the sailors were simply wearing the wrong size shoes. The captain was so happy that he would not have to order special shoes for his men that he wrote an article in the July 1933 issue of United States Naval Institute Proceedings which described how the Brannock Device had eliminated foot troubles aboard the ship. This gave Brannock an opportunity to promote his device in the Navy by sending the article to other ships. He calibrated his device for use in other branches of the military and by World War II the Brannock Device was being used by most of the armed forces. Several articles were written about the greater foot comfort enjoyed by the military after the introduction of the device. Charles Brannock was proud of his small but widespread role in the war effort and in the comfort of America's enlisted men and women.

Through the years Charles Brannock developed many different models of his device, including the women's, men's, junior, growing girl's, athletic, ski-boot, and military models. In 1947, Brannock moved the device company to a machine shop at 509 East Fayette Street in Syracuse, where it remained for 50 years.

Brannock advertised both the store and the device in local papers, and the device in trade literature such as Boot and Shoe Recorder. He encouraged other shoe stores to promote themselves by using the device in their advertising. He also attended the annual National Shoe Fair in Chicago from 1938 to 1968 in order to promote the device as well as learn about shoe-fashion trends for the Park-Brannock shoe store.

Concurrently, Charles Brannock also played a significant role in the Park-Brannock shoe store. His father, Otis C. Brannock and Ernest N. Park founded Park-Brannock in 1906 in a small store at 321 South Salina Street, focusing on women's shoes. In February 1937, they moved to a three-story building at 427 South Salina Street. Finally, in 1946, a six-story store was built at 473-475 South Salina Street through 129 East Onondaga Street. While waiting for the newest store to be built, Park-Brannock temporarily moved to the Chimes Building at 510-512 South Salina Street and 113 West Onondaga Street. Park-Brannock gained fame in Syracuse for a wide selection of men's, women's and children's shoes, handbags, millinery, hose, and accessories. In an advertisement, the store declared itself "one of America's finest shoe stores." The design of the two newer stores was state-of-the-art, and Park-Brannock was featured in shoe magazine articles. For example, the men's department was designed to look like a great room inside a ship. Charles Brannock became the CEO of Park-Brannock after both his father and Ernest Park died in 1962. Park-Brannock closed its doors in 1981, after the Hotel Syracuse offered to purchase the property for its new Hilton Tower.

Charles Brannock died on November 22, 1992, at the age of 89. The company was purchased in 1993 from the Brannock Estate by Salvatore Leonardi. Leonardi continues to manufacture Brannock devices in a small factory in Liverpool, New York. Over a million Brannock Devices have been manufactured, and it remains the shoe industry standard
Related Materials:
Materials at the National Museum of American History

Artifacts (several Brannock Devices and competitors' devices) are in the Division of Culture and the Arts and the Division of Armed Forces History.
Provenance:
The collection was donated to the National Museum of American History by Salvatore Leonardi on November 4, 1998.
Restrictions:
This collection is open for research use.
Gloves must be worn when handling unprotected photographs and negatives.
Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning intellectual property rights. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
World War, 1939-1945 -- Equipment and supplies  Search this
Show-windows -- New York -- Syracuse  Search this
Shoes -- Sizes  Search this
Shoe industry -- New York -- Syracuse  Search this
Shoes -- Fitting  Search this
Shoe machinery  Search this
Foot -- Measurement  Search this
Design, Industrial -- New York -- Syracuse  Search this
Military supplies  Search this
Measuring instruments industry  Search this
Measuring instruments  Search this
Genre/Form:
Patents
Trademarks
Slides (photographs)
Advertisements
Sales records
Photographs -- Black-and-white negatives -- Glass -- 1890-1920
Photographs -- 20th century
Photographic prints
Filmstrips
Design drawings
Citation:
Brannock Device Company Records, dates, Archives Center, National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.0672
See more items in:
Brannock Device Company Records
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmah-ac-0672
Additional Online Media:

Bacharach Steam Engine Indicator

Maker:
Bacharach Industrial Instrument Co.  Search this
Physical Description:
wood (case material)
metal (case material)
nickel plated brass (overall material)
aluminum (overall material)
Measurements:
overall: 5 7/8 in x 8 3/4 in x 9 in; 14.9225 cm x 22.225 cm x 22.86 cm
Object Name:
indicator, steam engine
Place made:
United States: Pennsylvania, Pittsburgh
Date made:
early 20th century
ID Number:
MC.325992
Catalog number:
325992
Accession number:
308486
Serial number:
50597
See more items in:
Work and Industry: Mechanical and Civil Engineering
Work
Industry & Manufacturing
Indicators
Engineering, Building, and Architecture
Data Source:
National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmah_847365
Additional Online Media:

Machine for Wrapping Wire-Rope, Patent Model

Inventor:
Roebling, John A.  Search this
Physical Description:
brass (overall material)
wood (overall material)
Measurements:
overall: 11 in x 10 1/2 in x 9 1/2 in; 27.94 cm x 26.67 cm x 24.13 cm
Object Name:
wire rope making machine
wire - rope making machine
patent model, rope making machine, wire
Associated place:
United States: Pennsylvania, Saxonburg
Date made:
1842
Patent date:
1842-07-16
ID Number:
MC.308790
Accession number:
89797
Catalog number:
308790
Patent number:
2,720
See more items in:
Work and Industry: Mechanical and Civil Engineering
Industry & Manufacturing
Data Source:
National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmah_1403809

Indicator with Reducing Wheel

Measurements:
overall: 8 7/8 in x 6 1/2 in x 9 1/2 in; 22.5425 cm x 16.51 cm x 24.13 cm
Object Name:
indicator, steam engine
Place made:
United States: Massachusetts
Related Publication:
Frank A. Taylor. Catalog of the Mechanical Collections of the Division of Engineering United States National Museum, Bulletin 173
Credit Line:
Gift of Crosby Steam Gage & Valve Co., Boston, MA.
ID Number:
MC.309833
Catalog number:
309833
Accession number:
109635
See more items in:
Work and Industry: Mechanical and Civil Engineering
Work
Industry & Manufacturing
Indicators
Bulletin 173
Engineering, Building, and Architecture
Data Source:
National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmah_847421

Copy of Sickels' Patent Model of a Steam Engine Cut-Off Valve

Inventor:
Sickels, Frederick E.  Search this
Object Name:
engine, steam, valve gear, model
patent model, valve gear, steam engine
patent model copy, valve gear, steam engine
Place made:
United States: Missouri
Associated place:
United States: New York, New York City
Date made:
1842
Patent date:
1842-05-20
Subject:
Patent Models  Search this
Steam Engines  Search this
Related Publication:
Frank A. Taylor. Catalog of the Mechanical Collections of the Division of Engineering United States National Museum, Bulletin 173
Credit Line:
Frederick Elsworth Sickels, Kansas City, Mo.
ID Number:
MC.180973
Catalog number:
180973
Accession number:
24427
Patent number:
2,631
See more items in:
Work and Industry: Mechanical and Civil Engineering
Patent Models
Engineering, Building, and Architecture
Exhibition:
Power Machinery
Exhibition Location:
National Museum of American History
Data Source:
National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmah_846135

Turck Model 510 Comptometer

Maker:
Felt & Tarrant Manufacturing Company  Search this
Physical Description:
steel (overall material)
plastic (overall material)
wood (overall material)
Measurements:
overall: 12 cm x 26 cm x 31 cm; 4 23/32 in x 10 1/4 in x 12 7/32 in
Object Name:
adding machine
Place made:
United States: Illinois, Chicago
Date made:
1916
Subject:
Mathematics  Search this
Credit Line:
Gift of Victor Comptometer Corporation
ID Number:
MA.323645
Catalog number:
323645
Accession number:
250163
See more items in:
Medicine and Science: Mathematics
Science & Mathematics
Adding Machines
Data Source:
National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmah_690469
Additional Online Media:

Comptograph with Typewriter

Maker:
Felt & Tarrant Manufacturing Company  Search this
Physical Description:
metal (overall material)
wood (overall material)
ceramic (overall material)
cloth (overall material)
rubber (overall material)
glass (overall material)
Measurements:
overall: 38 cm x 50 cm x 51.2 cm; 14 31/32 in x 19 11/16 in x 20 5/32 in
Object Name:
adding machine
Place made:
United States: Illinois, Chicago
Date made:
1900
Subject:
Mathematics  Search this
Credit Line:
Gift of Victor Comptometer Corporation
ID Number:
MA.323636
Catalog number:
323636
Accession number:
250163
See more items in:
Medicine and Science: Mathematics
Science & Mathematics
Adding Machines
Data Source:
National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmah_694187
Additional Online Media:

Tabulating Machine Company Card Punch

Distributor:
Tabulating Machine Company  Search this
Maker:
Tabulating Machine Company  Search this
Physical Description:
rubber (overall material)
iron (overall material)
steel (overall material)
Measurements:
overall: 10.6 cm x 43.3 cm x 13 cm; 4 3/16 in x 17 1/16 in x 5 1/8 in
Object Name:
card punch
Place distributed:
United States: New York, New York City
Date made:
ca 1902
Subject:
Mathematics  Search this
Credit Line:
Gift of the Estate of Herman Hollerith, Jr.
ID Number:
MA.335634
Accession number:
1977.0114
Catalog number:
335634
See more items in:
Medicine and Science: Mathematics
Tabulating Equipment
Computers & Business Machines
Data Source:
National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmah_694428
Additional Online Media:

Tabulating Machine Company Card Punch

Distributor:
Tabulating Machine Company  Search this
Maker:
Tabulating Machine Company  Search this
Physical Description:
rubber (overall material)
iron (overall material)
steel (overall material)
Measurements:
overall: 10.9 cm x 43.5 cm x 14 cm; 4 9/32 in x 17 1/8 in x 5 1/2 in
Object Name:
card punch
Place distributed:
United States: New York, New York City
Date made:
ca 1902
Subject:
Mathematics  Search this
Credit Line:
Gift of the Estate of Herman Hollerith, Jr.
ID Number:
MA.335635
Accession number:
1977.0114
Catalog number:
335635
See more items in:
Medicine and Science: Mathematics
Tabulating Equipment
Computers & Business Machines
Data Source:
National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmah_694429
Additional Online Media:

William W. Wythes Cyclo-Ellipto-Pantograph Patent Model

Maker:
Wythes, William W.  Search this
Physical Description:
brass (overall material)
metal (overall material)
hardwood (overall material)
ivory (overall material)
Measurements:
overall: 8 cm x 40.8 cm x 13.5 cm; 3 5/32 in x 16 1/16 in x 5 5/16 in
Object Name:
ellipsograph
Place made:
United States: Pennsylvania, Philadelphia
Date made:
1858
Subject:
Mathematics  Search this
ID Number:
MA.308910
Accession number:
89797
Catalog number:
308910
See more items in:
Medicine and Science: Mathematics
Science & Mathematics
Ellipsographs
Data Source:
National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmah_904481
Additional Online Media:

Ellipsograph

Maker:
Stanley, William Ford  Search this
Physical Description:
metal (overall material)
hardwood (overall material)
brass (overall material)
felt (overall material)
Measurements:
overall: 13.3 cm x 27 cm x 13.7 cm; 5 1/4 in x 10 5/8 in x 5 13/32 in
Object Name:
ellipsograph
Place made:
United Kingdom: England, London
Date made:
ca 1888
Subject:
Mathematics  Search this
Credit Line:
Smtihsonian Astrophysical Observatory
ID Number:
MA.314861
Accession number:
211531
Catalog number:
314861
See more items in:
Medicine and Science: Mathematics
Science & Mathematics
Ellipsographs
Data Source:
National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmah_904483
Additional Online Media:

Hart Combination Protractor, Rule, and Square

Designer:
Hart, Walter Wilson  Search this
Physical Description:
paper (overall material)
Measurements:
overall: .1 cm x 13.5 cm x 8.2 cm; 1/32 in x 5 5/16 in x 3 7/32 in
Object Name:
protractor
Place made:
United States: Wisconsin, Madison
Date made:
after 1930
Date made:
post 1930
Subject:
Mathematics  Search this
Protractor  Search this
Education, High School  Search this
Credit Line:
Gift of Brown University Department of Mathematics
ID Number:
MA.304722.06
Accession number:
1973304722
Catalog number:
304722.06
See more items in:
Medicine and Science: Mathematics
Protractors
Science & Mathematics
Data Source:
National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmah_904307

Duboscq Colorimeter

Maker:
Bausch & Lomb Optical Company  Search this
Physical Description:
brass (overall material)
steel (overall material)
Measurements:
overall: 40.7 cm x 16 cm x 14 cm; 16 1/32 in x 6 5/16 in x 5 1/2 in
case: 38 cm x 18.5 cm x 17.5 cm; 14 15/16 in x 7 5/16 in x 6 7/8 in
overall in case: 14 7/8 in x 7 9/16 in x 6 7/8 in; 37.7825 cm x 19.20875 cm x 17.4625 cm
Object Name:
Colorimeter
Place made:
United States: New York, Rochester
Subject:
Color  Search this
Optics  Search this
Chemistry  Search this
National Bureau of Standards  Search this
Credit Line:
National Bureau of Standards
ID Number:
CH.326630
Catalog number:
326630
Accession number:
261654
See more items in:
Medicine and Science: Chemistry
Measuring & Mapping
Saccharimeters
Data Source:
National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmah_2502
Additional Online Media:

Richardson Direct Reading Slide Rule

Maker:
George W. Richardson  Search this
Physical Description:
plastic (part material)
aluminum (overall material)
paper (part material)
Measurements:
overall: 28 cm x 4.2 cm x .4 cm; 11 1/32 in x 1 21/32 in x 5/32 in
Object Name:
slide rule
Place made:
United States: Illinois, Chicago
Date made:
ca 1909
Subject:
Mathematics  Search this
Rule, Calculating  Search this
Patented  Search this
General Calculation  Search this
Credit Line:
Gift of Michael Konshak
ID Number:
2009.0038.02
Accession number:
2009.0038
Catalog number:
2009.0038.02
See more items in:
Medicine and Science: Mathematics
Science & Mathematics
Slide Rules
Data Source:
National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmah_1346566
Additional Online Media:

Oyster Shucking Knife

Maker:
Swift, Jack  Search this
Physical Description:
ferrous metal (overall material)
Measurements:
overall: 5 11/16 in x 1/2 in x 5/16 in; 14.44625 cm x 1.27 cm x .79375 cm
Object Name:
oyster knife
knife, oyster
Oyster processing began here in first half of 19th century:
United States: Maryland, Baltimore
Date made:
1900
Subject:
Fishing  Search this
Related event:
The Development of the Industrial United States  Search this
Related Publication:
On the Water online exhibition
Related Web Publication:
http://americanhistory.si.edu/onthewater
ID Number:
2008.0052.01
Accession number:
2008.0052
Catalog number:
2008.0052.01
See more items in:
Work and Industry: Maritime
Work
Food
On the Water exhibit
Exhibition:
On the Water
Exhibition Location:
National Museum of American History
Data Source:
National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmah_1336043

Hemmi Duplex Slide Rule Retailed by Post (Versalog 1460)

Maker:
SUN HEMMI JAPAN CF  Search this
Inventor:
Frederick Post Co.  Search this
Physical Description:
bamboo (overall material)
plastic (laminate material)
glass (cursor material)
leather (case material)
fabricoid (case material)
metal (part material)
Measurements:
overall: 37.6 cm x 7.5 cm x 4.6 cm; 14 13/16 in x 2 15/16 in x 1 13/16 in
Object Name:
slide rule
Place made:
Japan: Tōkyō, Tokyo
Date made:
1959
Subject:
Mathematics  Search this
Engineering, General  Search this
Rule, Calculating  Search this
Credit Line:
Gift of William K. Krutz
ID Number:
1978.0800.01
Catalog number:
336682
Accession number:
1978.0800
See more items in:
Medicine and Science: Mathematics
Science & Mathematics
Slide Rules
Data Source:
National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmah_1215024
Additional Online Media:

1926 Ford Model T roadster

Founder of Ford Motor Company:
Ford, Henry  Search this
Maker:
Ford Motor Company  Search this
Measurements:
overall: 66 in x 66 1/2 in x 141 in; 167.64 cm x 168.91 cm x 358.14 cm
Object Name:
roadster
automobile
Place made:
United States: Michigan, Detroit
Date made:
1926
Related Publication:
A Nation of Nations
Credit Line:
John T. Sickler
ID Number:
TR.333777
Accession number:
305326
Catalog number:
333777
See more items in:
Work and Industry: Transportation, Road
Industry & Manufacturing
America on the Move
Automobiles
Transportation
Road Transportation
Exhibition:
America On The Move
Exhibition Location:
National Museum of American History
Data Source:
National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmah_739493

Brennan’s Monorail Car

Maker:
Central Scientific Company  Search this
Measurements:
overall: 9 3/4 in x 20 in x 9 5/8 in; 24.765 cm x 50.8 cm x 24.4475 cm
Object Name:
Gyroscope
Place made:
United States: Illinois, Chicago
Date made:
early 20th century
Subject:
Science & Scientific Instruments  Search this
ID Number:
PH.322967
Catalog number:
322967
Accession number:
249200
See more items in:
Medicine and Science: Physical Sciences
Data Source:
National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmah_1167224
Additional Online Media:

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