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Photographs of Southwest Indians, including Mescalero

Photographer:
N. Brown & Son  Search this
Heister, H. T., (Henry T.), -1895  Search this
Names:
Cadete, 1874-1960  Search this
Extent:
4 mounted prints (albumen (including one stereograph))
Culture:
Indians of North America -- Southwest, New  Search this
Mescalero Indians  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
mounted prints
Stereographs
Photographs
Date:
undated
Scope and Contents note:
Photographs related to Cadete, a Mescalero Apache man, and other Southwest Indians. It includes studio portraits of Cadete, Cadete's daughters, and a woman wearing a blanket who is possibly also related to Cadete. Two portraits were made by N. Brown & Son. The collection also includes a stereograph by H. T. Heister of Colonel Frank W. Haskall and his wife with a group including Southwest Indians, possibly in Santa Fe. The photographs may have been collected by the Haskall family.
Local Call Number(s):
NAA Photo Lot 81M
Location of Other Archival Materials:
Additional Heister photographs held in National Anthropological Archives Photo Lot 90-1 and Photo Lot 24.
Restrictions:
The collection is open for research.

Access to the collection requires an appointment.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Genre/Form:
Stereographs
Photographs
Citation:
Photo lot 81M, Photographs of Southwest Indians, including Mescalero, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.PhotoLot.81M
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-photolot-81m

Lora Hadley photographs of the Southwest

Creator:
Hadley, Lora  Search this
Extent:
7 Prints (silver gelatin)
Culture:
Taos Indians  Search this
Pueblo Indians  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southwest, New  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Prints
Photographs
Place:
Puye (N.M.)
Mexico
Taos (N.M.)
Date:
circa 1910-1920
Scope and Contents note:
Photographs made by Lora Hadley during her healthcare work in the Southwest, which document pueblos, churches, and the pueblo remains at Puye, New Mexico, and include an image of a cross left during a funeral procession in the northern mountains of Mexico. Extensive descriptive notes are written on the versos, possibly by Hadley.
Biographical/Historical note:
Lora Hadley was a United States government healthworker educated in psychology and sociology at the State University of Iowa (BA, 1916) and the University of Pennsylvania (MA, 1917). She worked as an assistant for the Iowa Child Welfare Research Station in 1918. From about 1922-1925, Hadley was a psychologist and researcher for the Bureau of Child Welfare in Santa Fe, New Mexico, and served as acting director for part of this time. In 1925 Hadley was appointed Instructor of Sociology and Dean of Women at New Mexico State College (now New Mexico State University). She coauthored "Farm Children: An Investigation of Rural Child Life in Selected Areas of Iowa" with Bird T. Baldwin and Eva Abigail Fillmore (1930).
Restrictions:
The collection is open for research.

Access to the collection requires an appointment.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Citation:
Photo lot 84, Lora Hadley photographs of the Southwest, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.PhotoLot.84
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-photolot-84

Larz Anderson photographs of the American Southwest

Creator:
Anderson, Larz, 1866-1937 (probable photographer)  Search this
Names:
Anderson, Isabel, 1876-1948  Search this
Stevenson, Matilda Coxe, 1850-1915  Search this
Extent:
31 prints (silver gelatin)
Culture:
Zuni Indians  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southwest, New  Search this
Pueblo Indians  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Prints
Photographs
Date:
circa 1904
Scope and Contents note:
Photographs made by Larz Anderson in the Southwest, possibly on a trip to visit Matilda Coxe Stevenson, probably at Zuni Pueblo in 1904. The collection documents scenery, pueblos, American Indians, ranches, and cliff dwellings in the American Southwest, mostly New Mexico. There are also images of Larz Anderson, his wife Isabel Anderson, and friends.
Biographical/Historical note:
Larz Anderson III (1866-1937) was a wealthy American businessman and friend of BAE ethnologist Matilda Coxe Stevenson. He briefly served as US Minister to Belgium (1911-1912) and US Ambassador to Japan (1912-1913), and traveled extensively throughout the United States and abroad with his wife, Isabel Weld Perkins.
Local Call Number(s):
NAA Photo Lot 87-2R
Location of Other Archival Materials:
Correspondence from Anderson can be found in the National Anthropological Archives in the Matilda Coxe Stevenson Papers (MS 4689).
Two Zuni stone fetishes, given by Matilda Coxe Stevenson to Anderson's wife, can be found in the Department of Anthropology collections in accession 240140.
The Archives of American Gardens holds records and photographs relating to Anderson's estate in Brookline, Massachusetts.
Contained in:
Smithsonian Institution Bureau of American Ethnology photograph collections, undated
Restrictions:
The collection is open for research.

Access to the collection requires an appointment.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Cliff-dwellings  Search this
Pueblos  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Citation:
Photo Lot 87-2R, Larz Anderson photographs of the American Southwest, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.PhotoLot.87-2R
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-photolot-87-2r

Ruth Leah Bunzel photographs of Quiche Indians of Guatemala

Creator:
Bunzel, Ruth Leah, 1898-1990  Search this
Extent:
49 prints (silver gelatin)
110 negatives (nitrate)
Culture:
Quiché Indians  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Prints
Negatives
Photographs
Place:
Guatemala
Date:
1930-1932
Scope and Contents note:
Photographs probably made by Ruth Bunzel during her fieldwork among the Quiche in Chichicastenango, Guatemala, in 1930-32. Images include Quiche Indians and families, a church (probably the Church of Santo Tomás), a procession and ceremony, and landscapes.
Biographical/Historical note:
Ruth Leah Bunzel (1898-1990) started a career in anthropology after acquiring a secretarial job with Franz Boas at Columbia University in 1922. With support from Boas, Bunzel regularly traveled to the Southwest to study Zuni potters from 1924-1929. Studying under Boaz, she earned a Ph.D. from Columbia University in 1929. Her papers on Zuni ceremonialism as well as creation myths, kachinas, and poetry were published in the 47th Annual Report of the Bureau of Ethnology. From 1930 to 1932 she studied the Highland Mayan village of Chichicastenango and later published Chichicastenango, A Guatemalan Village (1952). She also conducted fieldwork in the village of Chamula in Chiapas, Mexico, and published a comparative study of the two villages entitled "The Role of Alcoholism in Two Central American Communities" (1940).
Local Call Number(s):
NAA Photo Lot 2007-10
Location of Other Archival Materials:
The National Anthropological Archives holds the Ruth Lean Bunzel papers and drawings of Kachinas collected by Bunzel (MS 4609).
Correspondence between Bunzel and the BAE held in the National Anthropological Archives in MS 4846 and records of the Bureau of American Ethnology.
A photograph of Bunzel held in National Anthropological Archives Photo Lot 92-35.
A video oral history of Bunzel, created as part of the "History of Anthropology Series" produced by the University of Florida's Department of Anthropology, is held in the Human Studies Film Archive in HSFA 89.10.8.
Restrictions:
Nitrate negatives are in cold storage and require advanced notice for viewing.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Citation:
Photo Lot 2007-10, Ruth Leah Bunzel photographs of Quiche Indians of Guatemala, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.PhotoLot.2007-10
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-photolot-2007-10

H. S. Poley photographs of Southwest archeology and pueblos

Creator:
Poley, H. S. (Horace Swartley)  Search this
Extent:
52 prints (silver gelatin)
Culture:
Cochiti Indians  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southwest, New  Search this
Tewa Indians  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Prints
Place:
Yellow Jacket (Colo.)
Frijoles Canyon (N.M.)
Aneth (Utah)
Puye (N.M.)
Date:
circa 1910-1915
Scope and Contents note:
Photographs made by H. S. Poley in the American Southwest. There are depictions of archeological sites in New Mexico, Utah, and Colorado, as well as images of Tewa Indians at San Juan Pueblo and Cochiti Indians at Cochiti. Descriptions of the photographs are also available with the collection.
Biographical/Historical note:
Horace Swartley Poley was a professional photographer based in Colorado Springs, Colorado.
Local Call Number(s):
NAA Photo Lot 87-2J, NAA Photo Lot 87-2I
Location of Other Archival Materials:
Photo Lot 87-2I has been relocated and merged with Photo Lot 87-2J. These photographs were incorrectly identified as having been made by H. L. Standley. These photographs were made by H. S. Poley and form part of this collection.
Additional Poley photographs held in National Anthropological Archives MS 4251, MS 4570, and Photo Lot 24.
Correspondence from Poley held in the National Anthropological Archives in the Bureau of American Ethnology records.
Contained in:
Smithsonian Institution Bureau of American Ethnology photograph collections, undated
Restrictions:
The collection is open for research.

Access to the collection requires an appointment.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Cooking  Search this
Cliff-dwellings  Search this
Citation:
Photo lot 87-2J, H. S. Poley photographs of Southwest archeology and pueblos, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.PhotoLot.87-2J
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-photolot-87-2j

John K. Hillers photographs of the American Southwest

Photographer:
Hillers, John K., 1843-1925  Search this
Artist:
Nichols, Hobart, 1869-1962  Search this
Names:
Powell, John Wesley, 1834-1902  Search this
Extent:
40 mounted prints (circa, albumen)
Culture:
Cochiti Indians  Search this
Zuni Indians  Search this
Taos Indians  Search this
Navajo Indians  Search this
Hopi Indians  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southwest, New  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Mounted prints
Photographs
Place:
Chelly, Canyon de (Ariz.)
Date:
1870s-1880s
bulk 1879-1879
Scope and Contents note:
The collection primarily consists of photographs made by John K. Hillers for the Bureau of American Ethnology documenting pueblos, cliff and rock dwellings, and people in Arizona and New Mexico. The photographs depict Navajo, Zuni, Taos, Oraibi, Walpi, Tesuque, Sichomovi, Cochiti, Mishongnavi, and Shipaulovi Pueblo tribes. There are also pictures of mounds, possibly in West Virginia, and a Hobart Nichols drawing of the interior of a Southwest Indian dwelling. The bulk of the photographs are on BAE mounts, of which some are stamped "Compliments of J. W. Powell". Several of the images were taken during the United States Geological Survey in 1885. It is possible that Powell compiled the collection for the United States Geological Survey library, as he was the director of both institutions during that period.
Biographical/Historical note:
John K. Hillers (1843-1925) immigrated to the United States from Germany in 1852. He spent almost twenty years photographing American Indians and the landscape of the Indian Territories, California, the Southwest, and the Southeast, largely for the Bureau of American Ethnology and the United States Geological Survey. He began work on the Survey as a boatman on John Wesley Powell's second expedition down the Colorado River in 1871. He soon became the assistant, and then the main photographer (1872) for the expedition. From 1879 to 1900, Hillers served as the first staff photographer of Powell's Bureau of Ethnology, and in 1881 he took pictures for the United States Geological Survey.
Local Call Number(s):
NAA Photo Lot 143
Location of Other Archival Materials:
Additional Hillers photographs in the National Anthropological Archives can be found in Photo Lot 14, Photo Lot 24, Photo Lot 28, Photo Lot 40, Photo Lot 83-18, Photo Lot 87-2N, Photo Lot 90-1, Photo Lot 92-46, and the BAE historical negatives.
The National Anthropological Archives also holds Hillers's diary from 1871-1872 and 1874, 1875 (MS 4410).
The National Museum of the American Indian, Smithsonian American Art Museum, National Portrait Gallery, Duke University, Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology at University of California at Berkeley, Bancroft Library at the University of California at Berkeley, University of Oregon, and Southern Methodist University also hold photographs by Hillers.
See others in:
John K. Hillers photographs of the American Southwest, 1870s-1880s (bulk 1879)
Restrictions:
The collection is open for research.

Access to the collection requires an appointment.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Pueblos  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Citation:
Photo lot 143, John K. Hillers photographs of the American Southwest, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.PhotoLot.143
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-photolot-143

Copies of Elizabeth Compton Hegemann photographs of Southwest Indians

Creator:
Hegemann, Elizabeth Compton, 1897-1962  Search this
Depicted:
Lummis, Charles Fletcher, 1859-1928  Search this
Morris, Earl Halstead, 1889-1956  Search this
Wetherill, John  Search this
Extent:
396 copy negatives (acetate, 35mm)
Culture:
Hopi Indians -- depicted  Search this
Navajo Indians -- depicted  Search this
Havasupai Indians -- depicted  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southwest, New  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Copy negatives
Photographs
Negatives
Place:
Hopi Indian Reservation (Ariz.)
Navajo Indian Reservation
Grand Canyon (Ariz.)
Date:
circa 1922-1934
Scope and Contents note:
Photographs made during Elizabeth Compton Hegemann's trips to Hopi and Navajo reservations in the 1920s and early 1930s. They include images of Navajo, Hopi, and some Havasupai Indians, as well as the Grand Canyon and trading posts. Her photographs relating to Southwest Indians depict agriculture, crafts, and ceremonies, including a Navaho Squaw Dance and Hopi Niman Kachina ceremonies. There are also some images of Charles F. Lummis, Earl Halstead Morris, and John Wetherill.
Biographical/Historical note:
Elizabeth Compton Hegemann (1897-1962) was born near Cincinatti, Ohio, though she spent many of her summers visiting her grandparents in Southern California. She married her first husband, Mike Harrison, in 1925 and moved with him to the South Rim of the Grand Canyon, where he worked for the National Park Service. They developed strong relationships with the Navajo, Hopi, and Havasupai Indians in that region. Hegemann separated from Harrison in 1928 and moved to Tuba City. She married Harry Rorick in 1929 and the two co-owned the Shonto Trading Post near Tsegi Canyon on the Navajo Reservation from 1929-1938.
Local Call Number(s):
NAA Photo Lot R81A
Reproduction Note:
Copy negatives made by Elizabeth Compton Hegemann.
Restrictions:
The collection is open for research.

Access to the collection requires an appointment.
Rights:
This copy collection has been obtained for reference purposes only. Copies may be obtained from the Huntington Library.
Topic:
Handicraft  Search this
Agriculture  Search this
Dance  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Negatives
Citation:
Photo lot R81A, Copies of Elizabeth Compton Hegemann photographs of Southwest Indians, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.PhotoLot.R81A
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-photolot-r81a

Fred Harvey Company collection of Carl Moon Southwest photographs

Photographer:
Moon, Carl, 1878-1948  Search this
Publisher:
Fred Harvey (Firm)  Search this
Extent:
434 Photographs
Container:
Box 1-13 and 404-405 (film negatives)
Culture:
Havasupai (Coconino)  Search this
Hopi Pueblo  Search this
A:shiwi (Zuni)  Search this
Acoma Pueblo  Search this
Diné (Navajo)  Search this
Tesuque Pueblo  Search this
San Felipe Pueblo (N.M.)  Search this
White Mountain Apache  Search this
Isleta Pueblo  Search this
Hopi -- Shipaulovi  Search this
Kewa (Santo Domingo Pueblo)  Search this
K'apovi (Santa Clara Pueblo)  Search this
Ohkay Owingeh (San Juan Pueblo)  Search this
Laguna Pueblo  Search this
Taos Pueblo  Search this
San Ildefonso Pueblo  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Photographs
Photographs
Place:
Arizona
New Mexico
Date:
1907-1914
Summary:
This collection contains photographs that were commissioned by Fred Harvey Co. and shot by Carl Moon circa 1907-1914. The photographs depict American Indian communities in the southwest including A:shiwi (Zuni), Acoma Pueblo, Diné (Navajo), Hopi, Laguna Pueblo, and Taos Pueblo among many others.
Scope and Contents:
This collection contains 203 glass transparencies, 2 nitrate negatives, and 1 autochrome (plus 228 copy negatives and copy transparencies) that were commissioned by Fred Harvey Co. and shot by Carl moon circa 1905-1914. The photographs depict the southwest American Indian communities of A:shiwi (Zuni), Acoma Pueblo, Dine (Navajo), Havasupai (Coconino), Hopi Pueblo, Isleta Pueblo, K'apovi (Santa Clara Pueblo), Kewa (Santo Domingo Pueblo), Laguna Pueblo, Nambe Pueblo, Ohkay Owingeh (San Juan Pueblo), San Felipe Pueblo, San Ildefonso Pueblo, Taos Pueblo, Tesuque Pueblo, and White Mountain Apache. Some images were also shot in Grand Canyon National Park in Arizona. The photographs are a mix of portraits, posed action shots, and architecture shots. Some of the photographs appear to have been staged by the photographer. There are a few photographs in this collection that may have been shot by Moon prior to his employment with the Fred Harvey Company.

The copy negatives and transparencies were created by the Museum of the American Indian (NMAI's predecessor museum). There are sometimes multiple copy negatives and copy transparencies per glass plate transparency.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged into 17 series by culture group or location. Series 1: A:shiwi (Zuni), Series 2: Acoma Pueblo, Series 3: Diné (Navajo), Series 4: Havasupai (Coconino), Series 5: Hopi, Series 6: Isleta Pueblo, Series 7: K'apovi (Santa Clara Pueblo), Series 8: Kewa (Santa Domingo Pueblo), Series 9: Laguna Pueblo, Series 10: Nambe Pueblo, Series 11: Ohkay Owingeh (San Juan Pueblo), Series 12: San Felipe Pueblo, Series 13: San Ildefonso Pueblo, Series 14: Taos Pueblo, Series 15: Tesuque Pueblo, Series 16: White Mountain Apache, Series 17: Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona

The collection is physically arranged first by collection type (transparencies and negatives) and then in photo numeric order.
Biographical / Historical:
Born in 1878 in Wilmington, Ohio, Carl E. Moon (originally spelled Karl) took up photography after serving with the Ohio National Guard. He moved to Albuquerque, N.M. in 1903 and opened a photograph studio where he began photographing American Indians in the U.S. southwest region. After publishing and exhibiting many of his photographs nationally, he was commissioned by the Fred Harvey Company in 1907 to take photographs of American Indian communities in the southwest. The Fred Harvey Company was founded by Frederick Henry Harvey and consisted of a chain of successful gift shops, restaurants, and hotels know as Harvey Houses. Moon photographed individuals in his El Tovar Studio in the Grand Canyon, Ariz. and also traveled to communities in the region including A:shiwi (Zuni), Diné (Navajo), Hopi, and Laguna Pueblo, among many others. The Fred Harvey Company used these photographs in their postcards, brochures, and publications for the tourist industry. The Fred Harvey Company also partnered with the Sante Fe Railroad to help generate tourism to the southwest region and Moon became the official photographer for the railroad. Moon also took up drawing and painting and studied with American painter Thomas Moran. Moon stayed with the Fred Harvey Company until 1914.

After Moon left the Fred Harvey Company, he opened a studio in Pasadena, California and continued his career as a photographer and painter. During this period, Moon painted and donated 26 works depicting Southwest American Indians to the Smithsonian Institution (now in the Smithsonian American Art Museum's collection). He also sold 24 oil paintings and 293 photographic prints to Henry E. Huntington that are now part of the Huntington Library in San Marino California. With his wife Grace Purdie Moon, he also produced and illustrated children's books of collected Native American stories and legends. Moon died in San Francisco, Calif. in 1948.
Related Materials:
The Huntington Library in San Marino California holds a large collection of Carl Moon works, including oil paintings and photographic prints. The University of Arizona Libraries, Special Collections also holds photographs shot by Carl Moon and the Smithsonian American Art Museum holds 26 Carl Moon paintings.
Separated Materials:
Two nitrate negatives are stored at an offsite storage facility.
Provenance:
Donated to the Museum of the American Indian by the Fred Harvey Company in 1963.
Restrictions:
Access to NMAI Archive Center collections is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment (phone: 301-238-1400, email: nmaiarchives@si.edu).
Rights:
Single photocopies may be made for research purposes. Permission to publish or broadcast materials from the collection must be requested from National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center. Please submit a written request to nmaiarchives@si.edu.
Some images restricted: Cultural Sensitivity.
Topic:
Indians of North America -- Arizona  Search this
Indians of North America -- New Mexico  Search this
Citation:
Identification of specific item; Date (if known); Fred Harvey Company collection of Carl Moon Southwest photographs, Box and Photo Number; National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NMAI.AC.090
See more items in:
Fred Harvey Company collection of Carl Moon Southwest photographs
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmai-ac-090

Photograph collection relating to archeology, burial mounds, and the Southwest

Photographer:
Collins, Henry B. (Henry Bascom), 1899-1987  Search this
Hillers, John K., 1843-1925  Search this
Milner, James W.  Search this
Mindeleff, Cosmos, 1863-  Search this
Mindeleff, Victor, 1860-1948  Search this
Rennick, L. C. (Leverett C.), 1887-1953  Search this
Artist:
Rogers, W. A. (William Allen), 1854-1931  Search this
Extent:
1 Engraving
1 Print (platinum)
18 Prints (silver gelatin)
38 Prints (albumen)
Culture:
Zuni Indians  Search this
Indians of North America -- Great Plains  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southwest, New  Search this
Hopi Indians  Search this
Tohono O'Odham Indians  Search this
Dakota Indians  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Engravings
Prints
Place:
Pennsylvania -- Antiquities
West Virginia -- Antiquities
Louisiana -- Antiquities
Alabama -- Antiquities
Chelly, Canyon de (Ariz.)
Zuni Indian Reservation (N.M.)
Wyoming -- Antiquities
Date:
circa 1880s-1920s
Scope and Contents note:
Photographs relating to archeology, most of which were made by Bureau of American Ethnology photographers and ethnologists. Much of the collection consists of photographs by Cosmos and Victor Mindeleff of Southwest Indians, pueblos and remains. Images depict mounds and excavations (including Grant Mound in Pennsylvania and additional mounds in West Virginia, Alabama, Louisiana, and elsewhere); Hopi Sipaulovi village; petroglyphs in Wind River, Wyoming; ancient artifacts; Standing Rock; Tohono O'odham Indians; Canyon de Chelly; and Clear Creek. Photographers represented include John K. Hillers; C. H. Bryan of Mt. Sterling, Kentucky; the Mindeleff brothers; Henry Bascom Collins; L. C. Rennick; J. W. Milner; Hattons Studio in Lansing, Michigan; and a drawing by W. A. Rogers.
Local Call Number(s):
NAA Photo Lot 28
Location of Other Archival Materials:
William Dinwiddie photographs documenting Papago Indians, previously filed in Photo Lot 28, have been relocated to National Anthropological Archives Photo Lot 89.
Additional Mindeleff photographs can be found in the National Anthropological Archives in Photo Lot 4362, Photo Lot 14, Photo Lot 24, Photo Lot 40, Photo Lot 78, and the BAE historical negatives.
Additional Hillers photographs can be found in the National Anthropological Archives in Photo Lot 14, Photo Lot 24, Photo Lot 40, Photo Lot 143, Photo Lot 83-18, Photo Lot 87-2N, Photo Lot 90-1, Photo Lot 92-46, and the BAE historical negatives.
Additional Collins photographs can be found in the National Anthropological Archives in Photo Lot 24, Photo Lot 82-23, Photo Lot 86-42, Photo Lot 86-43, and Photo Lot 86-59.
See others in:
Photograph collection relating to archeology, burial mounds, and the Southwest, 1880s-1920s
Restrictions:
The collection is open for research.

Access to the collection requires an appointment.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Mounds  Search this
Pueblos  Search this
Petroglyphs  Search this
Citation:
Photo Lot 28, Bureau of American Ethnology photograph collection relating to archeology and burial mounds, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.PhotoLot.28
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-photolot-28

Postcard photographs

Photographer:
Horn, Grace Chandler  Search this
Extent:
43 prints
Culture:
Chippewa  Search this
Pueblo Indians -- (identification uncertain)  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Ojibwa Indians  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southwest, New  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Prints
Date:
undated
Scope and Contents:
Relates to Chippewa and [Southwest Pueblo ?] Indians, made by Grace Chandler Horn, at various locations, copyright 1910. Includes 24 duplicates.
Catalog Number 4703: (1)-(27) Tribe: Chippewa Description: Poses and reenactments of the Hiawatha Players from Wa Ya Ga Mug, Michigan Photographer: Grace Chandler Horn Date: Copyright 1910. (28) [Southwest Pueblo Indians ? "Indian potter at work." Grace Chandler Horn Copyright 1910.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 4703
Local Note:
Filed: Original Prints, Chippewa.
Topic:
Photographs  Search this
Chippewa  Search this
Citation:
Manuscript 4703, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS4703
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms4703

Nellie Mae Whitted photographs of Acomita and Indians of the American Southwest

Creator:
Whitted, Nellie Mae  Search this
Extent:
22 items (22 prints, postcards and greeting cards, color halftone)
36 prints (silver gelatin (some on postcard stock))
Culture:
Acoma Indians  Search this
Navajo Indians  Search this
Laguna Indians  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southwest, New  Search this
Taos Indians  Search this
Tewa Indians  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Prints
Photographs
Place:
Acoma (N.M.)
San Ildefonso (N.M.)
Taos Pueblo (N.M.)
Pueblo of Laguna (N.M.)
Date:
circa 1938-1941
Scope and Contents note:
Photographs made by Nellie Mae Whitted in Paguote (1939) and Acomita, New Mexico. They include images of Acomita day school and its students and teachers, as well as houses and Eagle dancers. The collection also includes postcards and commercial prints relating to Navajo Indians, Santo Domingo Pueblo, Santa Clara Pueblo, Ildefonso Pueblo, Taos Pueblo, and Laguna Pueblo. There are also Christmas cards with reproductions of paintings by Joni Falk and other artists and some correspondence to Whitted.
Biographical/Historical note:
Nellie Mae Whitted taught at the Acomita Day School set up by the Bureau of Indian Affairs in Pueblo of Acoma, New Mexico, circa 1938-1941.
Local Call Number(s):
NAA Photo Lot 98-75
Location of Other Archival Materials:
Pottery, dolls, baskets, and other artifacts given to Whitted by students in Acomita held in the Department of Anthropology collections in accession 390889.
Restrictions:
The collection is open for research.

Access to the collection requires an appointment.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Schools  Search this
Handicraft  Search this
Indian dance -- North America  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Citation:
Photo Lot 98-75, Nellie Mae Whitted photographs of Acomita and Indians of the American Southwest, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NAA.PhotoLot.98-75
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-photolot-98-75

Sally V. Cooke photograph collection of Southwest Indians and scenery

Collector:
Cooke, Sally V.  Search this
Names:
Adamson, Glenn  Search this
Stevenson, Matilda Coxe, 1850-1915  Search this
Photographer:
Steinberg, G.  Search this
Wittick, Ben, 1845-1903  Search this
Extent:
24 copy prints
Culture:
Navajo Indians  Search this
Acoma Indians  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southwest, New  Search this
Zuni Indians  Search this
Hopi Indians  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Copy prints
Place:
New Mexico -- Antiquities
Hopi Indian Reservation (Ariz.)
Petrified Forest National Park (Ariz.)
Fort Apache (Ariz.)
Zuni (N.M.)
Acoma (N.M.)
Date:
circa 1875-1900
Scope and Contents note:
Photographs depicting pueblos, dances, cliff dwellings, pottery, weaving, rock art, Matilda Coxe Stevenson, and other scenes in and around the pueblos in New Mexico and Arizona. Locations depicted include Moqui Pueblo, Acoma Pueblo, Zuni Pueblo, Fort Apache, and the Wood Yard in Arizona's Petrified Forest. The collection also includes one image of inscriptions on Pawnee Rock in Kansas, 1878. Most photographs in the collection were made by George Ben Wittick, with some by G. Steinberg of Juarez, Mexico.
Biographical/Historical note:
G. Ben Wittick (1845-1903) was official photographer for the Atlantic & Pacific Railroad and operated studios in Santa Fe, Albuquerque, Gallup, and Fort Wingate. The first to photograph the Hopi Snake Dance, his photographs mostly documented Southwest scenery and Navajo, Hopi and Zuni Indians.
Local Call Number(s):
NAA Photo Lot 89-19
Reproduction Note:
Copy prints made by Smithsonian Institution, 1989.
Location of Other Archival Materials:
Additional Wittick photographs can be found in the National Anthropological Archives in MS 4638, Photo Lot 24, Photo Lot 37, Photo Lot 59, Photo Lot 87-2P, Photo Lot 90-1, Herbert William Krieger's papers, and the BAE historical negatives.
Restrictions:
The collection is open for research.

Access to the collection requires an appointment.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Pottery  Search this
Dances  Search this
Pueblos  Search this
Cliff-dwellings  Search this
Citation:
Photo Lot 89-19, Sally V. Cooke photograph collection of Southwest Indians and scenery, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.PhotoLot.89-19
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-photolot-89-19

Photographs of baskets

Extent:
2 mounted prints (albumen)
1 print (silver gelatin)
Culture:
Indians of North America -- Southwest, New  Search this
Indians of North America -- California  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
mounted prints
prints
Photographs
Date:
undated
Scope and Contents note:
Photographs depicting collections of baskets that were probably made by Southwest or California Indians. Photographs may have been made by or for the Bureau of American Ethnology. Some of the photographs have numbererical identifiers, as though for illustration or exhibition.
Local Call Number(s):
NAA Photo Lot 87-2B
Contained in:
Smithsonian Institution Bureau of American Ethnology photograph collections, undated
Restrictions:
The collection is open for research.

Access to the collection requires an appointment.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Baskets  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Citation:
Photo lot 87-2B, Photographs of baskets, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.PhotoLot.87-2B
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-photolot-87-2b

MS 7547 The Pistol River Site of Southwest Oregon

Creator:
Heflin, Eugene  Search this
Extent:
33 Items (pages+2 pages of notes )
1 Map
5 Photographs
Culture:
Chetleschantunne  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northwest Coast of North America  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Maps
Photographs
Date:
Probably 1960s
Local Numbers:
NSS MS 7547
Local Note:
Typescript
Silver gelatin prints
Citation:
Manuscript 7547, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS7547
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms7547

Manuscripts, Bibliography, and Photographs

Creator:
Cook, O. F. (Orator Fuller), 1867-1949  Search this
Author:
Archer, William Andrew  Search this
Photographer:
Waite, C. B.  Search this
Extent:
57 Pages
71 Photographs
Culture:
Pima Indians  Search this
Hohokam  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southwest, New  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Pages
Photographs
Place:
Arizona
Date:
undated
Scope and Contents:
Includes "Pima Baskets with Labyrinth Designs," with apparently related shorter manuscripts, bibliographic data, and photographs of Casa Grande and baskets, some in use. Also includes W. Andrew Archer's "Bibliography of O.F. Cook," June 15, 1950. In addition, photographs of artifacts, most anthropomorphic; a Hohokam pottery collection from southern Arizona; and photographs of mummies and Mexican antiquities by C.B. Waite.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 7137
Other Title:
Pima Baskets with Labyrinth Designs
Bibliography of O.F. Cook
Topic:
Basket making -- Pima  Search this
Archeology -- Arizona  Search this
Archeology -- Mexico  Search this
Pima (Akimel O'odham)  Search this
Mexico  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Citation:
Manuscript 7137, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS7137
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms7137

Photographs of Maria Martinez

Names:
Martínez, María Montoya  Search this
Extent:
1 postcard (1 color photographic postcard)
1 print (silver gelatin)
Culture:
Tewa Indians  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southwest, New  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
postcards
prints
Photographs
Place:
San Ildefonso (N.M.)
Date:
undated
Scope and Contents note:
Photographs depicting Maria Martinez of San Ildefonso holding examples of her pottery, probably at San Ildefonso Pueblo.
Biographical/Historical note:
Maria Martinez (1887-1980) was an internationally-known potter from San Ildefonso Pueblo. With her husband Julian and the rest of her family, she created contemporary pottery inspired by traditional Pueblo styles and techniques. The family demonstrated their craft at expositions, world's fairs, and the Renwick Gallery in Washington, DC.
Local Call Number(s):
NAA Photo Lot 81-14, USNM ACC 339407
Location of Other Archival Materials:
Additional photographs of Maria Martinez and her pottery can be found in the National Anthropological Archives in Photo Lot 79-18, Photo Lot 80-4, and Photo Lot 89-43.
Pottery by Martinez can be found in the Department of Anthropology in accession 339407.
Restrictions:
The collection is open for research.

Access to the collection requires an appointment.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Pottery craft  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Citation:
Photo lot 81-14, Photographs of Maria Martinez, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.PhotoLot.81-14
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-photolot-81-14

David Grant Noble photographs

Photographer:
Noble, David Grant  Search this
Extent:
16 Photographic Prints
Culture:
Mohawk  Search this
Mohawk [Kahnawake (Caughnawaga)]  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Photographic Prints
Photographic prints
Place:
New York (State) -- New York City
Date:
1970-1971
Summary:
This collection contains 16 gelatin silver photographs shot by photographer David Grant Noble that depict Mohawk ironworkers constructing a building in New York City, 1970-1971.
Scope and Contents:
This collection contains 16 gelatin silver prints shot by photographer David Grant Noble from 1970-1971. The photographs depict Mohawk ironworkers at a construction site at Park Avenue and 53rd Street in New York City. These action shots depict the men at work many stories above street level. Walter Jay Goodleaf, Arnold Goodleaf, Roger Horne, Jay Jacobs, and Sparky Rice are among the Mohawk ironworkers depicted in the images.

According to Noble, the ironworkers were from the Kahnawake Reserve on the St. Lawrence River near Montreal, Canada. During the construction project, the men lived in the North Gawanus neighborhood of Brooklyn, but would drive home to Kahnawake on the weekends.

All the photographs are signed by the photographer.
Arrangement:
The photographs are arranged in 4 folders.
Biographical / Historical:
David Grant Noble is a professional photographer, author, and editor living in Santa Fe, New Mexico. After attending Yale University, Noble served in the U.S. Army in 1962 where he began his photography career.

In 1970, Noble was shooting street photography when he befriended Mohawk ironworkers constructing a building at Park Avenue and 53rd Street in New York City. They invited him to document their work including photographing them many stories above street level.

From 1971-1989, Noble worked at the School for Advanced Research (SAR) in Santa Fe where he photographed and studied American southwest archaeological ruins, cliff dwellings, rock art, and landscapes. His books include Ancient Ruins of the Southwest: an Archaeological Guide, Search of Chaco: New Approaches to an Archaeological Enigma, and In the Places of the Spirits.

Noble's photographs are in the collections of numerous public institutions including Yale University's Beinecke Library, Museum of New Mexico, and New York City Public Library. He is also the recipient of the 2011 Emil Haury Award from the Western National Parks Association and the 2003 Victor Stoner Award from the Arizona Archaeological and Historical Society.
Provenance:
The photographs in this collection were a Museum purchase and gift of David Grant Noble.
Restrictions:
Access to NMAI Archive Center collections is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment (phone: 301-238-1400, email: nmaiarchives@si.edu).
Rights:
Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center. Please submit a written request to nmaiphotos@si.edu.
Topic:
Indians of North America -- Québec (Province)  Search this
Construction workers  Search this
Structural steel workers  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographic prints
Citation:
Identification of specific item; Date (if known); David Grant Noble photographs, Box and Photo Number; National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NMAI.AC.113
See more items in:
David Grant Noble photographs
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmai-ac-113
Additional Online Media:

H. Scudder Mekeel photographs

Creator:
Mekeel, H. Scudder (Haviland Scudder), 1902-1947  Search this
Names:
Laboratory of Anthropology (Museum of New Mexico)  Search this
Collier, John, 1884-1968  Search this
Kroeber, A. L. (Alfred Louis), 1876-1960  Search this
Photographer:
Fiske, Frank Bennett, 1883-1952  Search this
Rise, Carl H., 1888-1939  Search this
Extent:
1 Print (photochrom)
443 Negatives (nitrate)
235 Prints (silver gelatin)
Culture:
Taos Indians  Search this
Pueblo Indians  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southwest, New  Search this
Hopi Indians  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Indians of North America -- Great Plains  Search this
Teton Indians  Search this
Ojibwa Indians  Search this
Oglala Indians  Search this
Siouan Indians  Search this
Osage Indians  Search this
Hualapai Indians  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Prints
Negatives
Place:
Standing Rock Indian Reservation (N.D. and S.D.)
Oraibi (Ariz.)
Pine Ridge Indian Reservation (S.D.)
Date:
bulk 1930-1933
circa 1920-1947
Scope and Contents note:
The photographs primarily document ceremonies, people, and lands of American Indians in the Plains and Southwest, taken during Mekeel's field research from 1929 to 1936. A large portion of the collection depicts Mekeel's research during the early 1930s among the Oglala of the Pine Ridge Reservation in South Dakota. Another large portion of the collection includes personal photos depicting Mekeel's homes and children.
Biographical/Historical note:
H. Scudder Mekeel (1902-1947) was an anthropologist who studied social and psychological aspects of American Indian cultures. Educated at Harvard University (BA, 1928), the University of Chicago (MA, 1929), and Yale University (PhD, 1932), he was a member of the 1929 Laboratory of Anthropology (Santa Fe) ethnological field school led by Alfred L. Kroeber. In 1929-1932, he carried out three field expeditions to the Sioux Indians of South Dakota, working mainly on the Pine Ridge Reservation. He joined the Bureau of Indian Affairs as Director of Applied Anthropology under Commissioner John Collier in 1935. Two years later, he was appointed Director of the Laboratory of Anthropology at Santa Fe and continued there until 1940, when he accepted a teaching position at the University of Wisconsin.
Local Call Number(s):
NAA Photo Lot 94-21
Location of Other Archival Materials:
The National Anthropological Archives holds copies of Mekeel's Field Notes from the summers of 1930 and 1931 in the White Clay District of the Pine Ridge Reservation, South Dakota (MS 7088). Originals of these field notes and Mekeel's population notes on the White Clay District are held by the American Museum of Natural History, Division of Anthropology Archives (.M454).
The Human Studies Film Archives holds Mekeel's film footage of a Lakota Sioux Sundance from 1930 (HSFA 92.8.1).
Correspondence from Mekeel held in the National Anthropological Archives in the William Duncan Strong papers, Raoul Weston LaBarre Papers, and Bureau of American Ethnology Administrative File.
Restrictions:
Original nitrate negatives are in cold storage and require special arrangements for viewing.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Citation:
Photo Lot 94-21, the H. Scudder Mekeel photographs, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.PhotoLot.94-21
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-photolot-94-21

Matilda Coxe Stevenson photographs

Creator:
Stevenson, Matilda Coxe, 1850-1915  Search this
Photographer:
Wittick & Russell  Search this
Cobb, William Henry, 1859-1909  Search this
Names:
We'wha, 1849-1896  Search this
Extent:
3,352 prints (modern contact prints and reprints, silver gelatin, albumen, and platinum)
2,139 negatives (nitrate)
118 negatives (glass)
657 copy negatives
Culture:
Zuni Indians  Search this
Taos Indians  Search this
Zia Indians  Search this
Cochiti Indians  Search this
Jemez Indians  Search this
Navajo Indians  Search this
Tewa Indians  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southwest, New  Search this
Pueblo Indians  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Prints
Negatives
Copy negatives
Photographs
Place:
Santa Fe (N.M.)
Date:
1882-1914
bulk 1904-1912
Scope and Contents note:
Photographs made during Matilda Coxe Stevenson's field studies among Southwest Indians, particularly at Zuni. Images primarily document pueblos, people, ceremonies, and daily activities, as well as some photographs of Santa Fe, New Mexico, and ranches, probably those belonging to Stevenson or her friends. The collection includes photographs by William Henry Cobb and Wittick & Russell, as well as Stevenson's assistant May S. Clark and "Mr. Gray," a photographer that Stevenson hired as an assistant.
Biographical/Historical note:
Matilda Coxe Stevenson (1849-1915; though her birth year is often erroneously listed as 1850) was the first woman to study the American Southwest and the first (and for a long time the only) female anthropologist hired by the US government. Born Matilda Coxe Evans in 1849 in San Augustine, Texas, Stevenson was brought to Washington, D.C., as an infant. She was educated at Miss Anable's English, French, and German School in Philadelphia and through private studies with her father and Dr. William M. Mew of the Army Medical Museum. In 1872 she married James Stevenson, a geologist with the US Geological Survey of the Territories. From 1872-1878, Matilda joined James on Ferdinand V. Hayden's geological surveys to Colorado, Idaho, Wyoming, and Utah, and assisted him by compiling geological data. When the Bureau of American Ethnology (BAE) was created in 1879, Matilda Stevenson was appointed "volunteer coadjutor [sic] in ethnology" and she went with James on his BAE expeditions to the Southwest.

After James Stevenson's death in 1888, BAE Director John Wesley Powell hired Matilda Stevenson to organize her husband's notes. In 1889, Stevenson became regular BAE staff. From 1890 to 1907, Stevenson did substantial individual fieldwork at Zuni and published "The Zuni Indians: Their Mythology, Esoteric Fraternities, and Ceremonies" in the Bureau of American Ethnology's Twenty-Third Annual Report (1901-2). Starting in 1904, Stevenson conducted comparative studies at Zia, Jemez, San Juan, Cochiti, Nambe, Picarus, Tesuque, Santa Clara, San Ildefonso, and Taos. In 1907 she purchased a ranch (Ton'yo) near San Ildefonso, which became her base for fieldwork. Stevenson died in Maryland on June 24, 1915.
Local Call Number(s):
NAA Photo Lot 23
Location of Other Archival Materials:
Stevenson photographs previously filed in BAE number 4325, MS 4624, MS 4717, Photo Lot 14, and Photo Lot 33 have been relocated and merged with Photo Lot 23. These photographs were also made by Stevenson and form part of this collection.
Additional glass negatives made by Stevenson are held in the National Anthropological Archives in the BAE historical negatives.
The National Anthropological Archives holds Matilda Coxe Stevenson's papers in MS 4689.
Photographic images and portraits of Stevenson are in the National Anthropological Archives in the following collections: Photo Lot 33, Photo Lot 70, Photo Lot 89-19, and Photo Lot 90-1.
Additional photographs of We'wha, probably commissioned by Stevenson at a studio in Washington, D.C., are in National Anthropological Archives Photo Lot 2004-03.
Restrictions:
The collection is open for research.

Access to the collection requires an appointment.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Rites and ceremonies  Search this
Pueblos  Search this
Ranches  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Citation:
Photo lot 23, Matilda Coxe Stevenson photographs, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.PhotoLot.23
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-photolot-23

Photographs of drawings of kachinas

Creator:
Fewkes, Jesse Walter, 1850-1930  Search this
Extent:
12 prints (silver gelatin)
Culture:
Indians of North America -- Southwest, New  Search this
Pueblo Indians  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Prints
Photographs
Date:
circa 1890s
Scope and Contents note:
Photographs of drawings depicting kachinas, which may have been collected for Jesse Walter Fewkes' papers on Hopi and Tusayan kachinas.
Biographical/Historical note:
Naturalist, anthropologist, and archeologist Jesse Walter Fewkes (1850‐1930) served as chief of the Bureau of American Ethnology from 1918 until his death in 1928. Fewkes received a Ph.D. in marine zoology from Harvard in 1877, and was curator of lower invertebrates at the Museum of Comparative Zoology until 1887. He developed an interest in the culture and history of the Pueblo Indians while on a collecting trip in the western United States. In 1891, Fewkes became director of the Hemenway Southwestern Archeological Expedition and editor of the Journal of American Archeology and Ethnology. In 1895 he embarked on various archeological explorations for the Bureau of American Ethnology, during which he conducted excavations in the Southwest, the West Indies, and Florida.
Local Call Number(s):
NAA Photo Lot 134D
Restrictions:
The collection is open for research.

Access to the collection requires an appointment.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Kachinas  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Citation:
Photo Lot 134D, Photographs of drawings of kachinas, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NAA.PhotoLot.134D
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-photolot-134d

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