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MS 1580 Comments on the etymology of "Altamaha" River of Georgia; Canadian River, Tugaloo; Pishtaka Lake; Gatineau River; Gila River

Collector:
Gatschet, Albert S. (Albert Samuel), 1832-1907  Search this
Extent:
5 pages
Culture:
Tugaloo  Search this
Pishtaka Lake -- etymology  Search this
Gatineau River  Search this
Gila River -- etymology  Search this
Creek Indians  Search this
Abnaki  Search this
Tanana Indians  Search this
Atimuca  Search this
Kalapuya Indians  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Abenaki Indians  Search this
Indians of North America -- Subarctic  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northwest Coast of North America  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southern States  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Pages
Date:
undated
Scope and Contents:
Also place and river names derived from Ati-muca language. 27 cards.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 1580
Local Note:
Of these 27 cards, only 1st 2 are Tim; others are miscellaneous, including Atfalati (= Kalapuya), Creek, miscellaneous North West Coast, 1 Abnaki reference, etc.
Topic:
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Creek (Muskogee)  Search this
Tugalo  Search this
Altamaha River (Georgia) -- etymology  Search this
Canadian River -- etymology  Search this
Citation:
Manuscript 1580, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS1580
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms1580

MS 2416 Letter from Col. Force addressed to Dr. Thomas

Creator:
Force, M. F. (Manning Ferguson), 1824-1899  Search this
Addressee:
Thomas, Cyrus, 1825-1910  Search this
Names:
Soto, Hernando de, approximately 1500-1542  Search this
Extent:
9 Pages
Culture:
Shawnee Indians  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Pages
Date:
1892 October
Scope and Contents:
Concerns the Shawnee as mound builders, and the identification of box stone graves with that tribe; mounds in Georgia, near Carthage; earthworks near Savannah on the Tennessee River; route of De Soto through Georgia; Shawnees not identified with Eries; charcoal pit constructed by De Soto(?).
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 2416
Topic:
Archeology -- Mounds  Search this
Mortuary customs -- Shawnee  Search this
Georgia -- Carthage -- Archeology  Search this
Tennessee -- Hardin County -- Savannah -- Archeology  Search this
Citation:
Manuscript 2416, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS2416
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms2416

MS 4233 Notes on Choctaw, Pottawatomi, Seminole, Chippewa (articles by Peter P. Pitchlynn)

Collector:
Swanton, John Reed, 1873-1958  Search this
Creator:
Godbey, Allen Howard, 1864-1948  Search this
Gilliam, Charles Edgar  Search this
Klakring, Alfred  Search this
Lang, Andrew, 1844-1912  Search this
Pitchlynn, Peter Perkins, 1806-1881  Search this
Barnwell, John, approximately 1671-1724  Search this
Culture:
Choctaw Indians  Search this
Chippewa  Search this
Cherokee  Search this
Seminole Indians  Search this
Potawatomi Indians  Search this
Iroquois -- Oneida  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Ojibwa Indians  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northwest Coast of North America  Search this
Oneida Indians  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southern States  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Maps
Date:
undated
Scope and Contents:
Also includes Cherokee history notes; Journal of John Barnwell, Virginia; Miami words from French Traveler of 1804 (this is only a bibliographic reference to Volney-View The Climate and Soil of the U. S. 1804). Ball game (Alonzo de Zurita (Zorita, Corita, etc.), Madrid, 1909; reference to Cherokee map drawn on deerskin (British Museum); Note on Mondongachate (Moneton Indians ?); Creek customs (Travels in North America, in 1827-8 by Captain Basil Hall, R.N.); memorandum re. "double axe question" and specimens from Georgia and North Carolina from Allen Godbey, Durham, North Carolina (1936); Appamatoc sites at Bermuda Hundred and Swift Creek, noted by Charles Edgar Gilliam, Petersburg, Virginia; note on the Arkansas from Narrative of Douey, in Shea, Discovery and Exploration of the Mississippi River; note on the Taensa villages, La Salle, etc., with excerpt from Tonti (Margry); excerpt from A Description of Carolana, by Col. Daniel Coxe (French Historical Collections, Louisiana, 1850, re. Arkansas Indians, and the Ouesperies; reference to Mississippi River tribes, from Tonti, in French Historical Collections, Louisiana, 1846.
A poem, in German, 17 stanzas, entitled "Makh-Piya-Luta" (Red Cloud), composed by a cousin of a friend named Alfred Klaking, once head draughtsman of Hydrographic Office. 2 pages. Letter from Andrew Lang, the author, dated February 6, (?), re. clans; mentions the Massim of New Guinea, the Tlingit, etc. (difficult to decipher). Excerpt from report ...of the Scots Society...who visited the Oneida and Mohekunuh Indians in 1796 (published in Collections Massachusetts Historical Society, 1st Series), re. plight of the educated Indian and his inability to adjust himself to either whites or to his own family and Indian environment. A map of "Environs du Fort D'Orleans", published by Missouri River Commission. (Pub. notice of "La Decouverte du Missouri et L'Histoire du Fort D'Orleans, by Baron Marc De Villers).
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 4233
Other Title:
Makh-Piya-Luta
Red Cloud
Topic:
Diaries -- Barnwell, John  Search this
American Indian  Search this
Games and toys -- ball game  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Massim  Search this
Kinship -- clans  Search this
Tlingit Indians  Search this
Kinship -- clans  Search this
Oneida Indians  Search this
Education -- educated Indian, plight of  Search this
Chippewa  Search this
Iroquois  Search this
Arkansas  Search this
Georgia  Search this
North Carolina  Search this
Genre/Form:
Maps
Maps
Citation:
Manuscript 4233, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS4233
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms4233

MS 4911 Letter to Miss Ann or Frances Shackelford

Creator:
Shackelford, Edmund Meredith, 1786-1857  Search this
Collector:
Swanton, John Reed, 1873-1958  Search this
Extent:
2 Pages
Culture:
Creek Indians  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southern States  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Pages
Date:
November 26-December 11, 1813
Scope and Contents:
Contains description of Creek square and houses.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 4911
Local Note:
Typescript copy of Autograph letter signed
Topic:
Habitations and other structures -- Creek  Search this
Creek (Muskogee)  Search this
Citation:
Manuscript 4911, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS4911
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms4911

Carol H. Krinsky papers

Author:
Krinsky, Carol Herselle  Search this
Extent:
2.92 Linear Feet ((7 boxes))
Culture:
Chippewa -- White Earth  Search this
Chippewa -- Red Lake  Search this
Hupa Indians  Search this
Tohono O'Odham  Search this
Pequot Indians  Search this
Paugusset Indians  Search this
Mohegan Indians  Search this
Iroquois Indians  Search this
Mohawk Indians  Search this
Hopi Indians  Search this
Navajo Indians  Search this
Pima Indians  Search this
Maricopa Indians  Search this
Pueblo Indians  Search this
Indians of North America  Search this
Ojibwa Indians  Search this
Winnebago Indians  Search this
Yakama Indians  Search this
Swinomish Indians  Search this
Makah Indians  Search this
Shinnecock Indians  Search this
Seneca Indians  Search this
Oneida Indians  Search this
Apache Indians  Search this
Tulalip Indians  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Clippings
Correspondence
Interviews
Photographs
Date:
1964-2004
Summary:
These papers consist of research materials collected and used by Professor Carol Herselle Krinsky for her book Contemporary Native American Architecture: Cultural Regeneration and Creativity.
Scope and Contents:
These papers consist of research materials collected and used by Professor Carol Herselle Krinsky for her book Contemporary Native American Architecture: Cultural Regeneration and Creativity. This book discusses the connection between trends in modern architecture and native culture, as well as how culture has been revived through architecture, and how existing structures are altered to better reflect the native culture they serve. These materials include correspondence, newspaper clippings, interview transcripts, and photographs. News clippings in this collection include articles in German.
Arrangement:
The Carol H. Krinsky Papers are divided into two main series based on the original order established by Dr. Krinsky.

Series 1, Tribes (1964-2004) [Boxes 1-4] Series 2, Subject Files (1967-2004) [Boxes 5-7]
Biographical / Historical:
Carol Herselle Krinsky is a professor of Fine Arts at New York University. She received a BA from Smith College in 1957, a M.A. from the NYU Institute of Fine Arts in 1960, and a PhD from NYU in 1965. Professor Krinsky has received many honors and awards throughout her career including the Miess Publication Award from the College Art Association (1985), the National Jewish Book Award (1986), a Merit of Distinction from the International Center for Holocaust Studies (1987), a Golden Dozen Teaching Award from NYU (1990) and; the Brunner Research Award from the New York City Chapter of the American Institute of Architects. She has also been named a Senior Fulbright Scholar.

Previous publications have included Synagogues of Europe, Rockefeller Center, and Gordon Bunshaft of Skidmore, Owings & Merrill.
Provenance:
The collection was donated by Dr. Carol Herselle Krinsky on March 3, 2004.
Restrictions:
Access to NMAI Archive Center collections is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment (phone: 301-238-1400, email: nmaiarchives@si.edu).
Rights:
Single photocopies may be made for research purposes. Permission to publish materials from the collection must be requested from the NMAI Archivist. The Archives has no information on the status of literary rights for the work of others found in these papers; researchers are responsible for determining any question of copyright.
Topic:
Indians of North America -- Wyoming  Search this
Indians of North America -- Virginia  Search this
Indians of North America -- North Dakota  Search this
Indians of North America -- Wisconsin  Search this
Indians of North America -- Washington (State)  Search this
Indians of North America -- New Mexico  Search this
Indians of North America -- California  Search this
Indians of North America -- Arizona  Search this
Indians of North America -- Georgia  Search this
Indians of North America -- Florida  Search this
Indians of North America -- Massachusetts  Search this
Indians of North America -- Maine  Search this
Indians of North America -- New Jersey  Search this
Indians of North America -- Montana  Search this
Indians of North America -- New York  Search this
Indians of North America -- North Carolina  Search this
Architecture, Modern  Search this
Indians of North America -- Government relations  Search this
Indians of North America -- Social life and customs  Search this
Indians of North America -- Alaska  Search this
Indians of North America -- Colorado  Search this
Indians of North America -- Connecticut  Search this
Indians of North America -- Idaho  Search this
Indians of North America -- Indiana  Search this
Indians of North America -- Illinois  Search this
Indians of North America -- Louisiana  Search this
Indians of North America -- Kansas  Search this
Indians of North America -- Minnesota  Search this
Indians of North America -- Michigan  Search this
Indians of North America -- Nevada  Search this
Indians of North America -- Nebraska  Search this
Indians of North America -- Rhode Island  Search this
Indians of North America -- Oregon  Search this
Indians of North America -- Tennessee  Search this
Indians of North America -- South Dakota  Search this
Indians of North America -- Oklahoma  Search this
Indians of North America -- Texas  Search this
Genre/Form:
Clippings
Correspondence
Interviews
Photographs
Citation:
Identification of specific item; Date (if known); Carol H. Krinsky Papers, Box and Folder Number; National Museum of the American Indian Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NMAI.AC.008
See more items in:
Carol H. Krinsky papers
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmai-ac-008

Frederick Starr negatives and lantern slides

Creator:
Starr, Frederick, 1859-1933  Search this
Photographer:
Lang, Charles B.  Search this
Grabic, Louis  Search this
Extent:
152 lantern slides
3344 negatives (photographic)
Culture:
Zoque Indians  Search this
San Felipe Pueblo (N.M.)  Search this
Mazatec Indians  Search this
Zapotec Indians  Search this
Mayas  Search this
Wampanoag Indians  Search this
Mazahua Indians  Search this
San Blas  Search this
Ute Indians  Search this
Sioux Nation  Search this
Mandan Indians  Search this
Tzotzil Indians  Search this
Taos Pueblo  Search this
Tzeltal Indians  Search this
Sauk and Fox Nation  Search this
Laguna (N.M.)  Search this
Triqui  Search this
Shuar Indians  Search this
Macusi Indians  Search this
Choco Indians  Search this
Nez Percé Indians  Search this
Ottawa Indians  Search this
Chol Indians  Search this
Totonac Indians  Search this
Osage Indians  Search this
Pawnee Indians  Search this
Tonkawa Indians  Search this
Otomi Indians  Search this
Chontal Indians  Search this
Navajo Indians  Search this
Tlingit Indians  Search this
Mixe Indians  Search this
Chinantec Indians  Search this
Mixtec Indians  Search this
Potawatomi Indians  Search this
Chibcha Indians  Search this
Pima Indians  Search this
Mehinacu Indians  Search this
Flathead Indians  Search this
Apache Indians  Search this
Cheyenne Indians  Search this
Ponca Indians  Search this
Menomini Indian Tribe  Search this
Cahuilla Indians  Search this
Hopi Indians  Search this
Haida Indians  Search this
Caraja Indians  Search this
Cherokee Indians  Search this
Cuna Indians  Search this
Arikara Indians  Search this
Cuicatec Indians  Search this
Eskimos  Search this
Assiniboine Indians  Search this
Crow Indians  Search this
Caddo Indians  Search this
Tepehua Indians  Search this
Kwakiutl Indians  Search this
Cochiti Pueblo  Search this
Acoma (N.M.)  Search this
Teotihuacan  Search this
Isleta Indians  Search this
Tarasco Indians  Search this
Arapaho Indians  Search this
Iroquois Indians  Search this
Iowa Indians  Search this
Ojibwa Indians  Search this
Huave Indians  Search this
Zuni Indians  Search this
Huastec Indians  Search this
Tlaxcala  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Lantern slides
Negatives (photographic)
Negatives
Lantern slides
Place:
Colombia
Washington
West Virginia
Kentucky
Kansas
New Mexico
Brazil
Ecuador
Missouri
Wisconsin
Oklahoma
Ohio
New York
Georgia
Mexico
Iowa
Arkansas
Illinois
Pennsylvania
Alaska
Date:
1894-1910
Summary:
The collection includes materials from cultures in the United States, Mexico, Brazil, Guatemala, Colombia, Ecuador, and Guiana: Acoma Pueblo, Apache, Arapaho, Arikara, Assiniboine, Caddo, Cahuilla, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chinantec, Chippewa (Ojibwa), Choco, Chol, Chontal, Cochiti Pueblo, Crow, Cuicatec, Eskimo, Flathead, Haida, Hopi, Huastec, Huave, Iowa, Iroquois, Isleta, Karaja, Kwakiutl, Laguna Pueblo, Macusi, Mandan, Maya, Mazahua, Mazatec, Mehinaku, Menomini, Mixe, Mixtec, Navajo, Nez Perce, Osage, Otomi, Ottawa, Pawnee, Pima, Ponca, Potawatomi, Salish, San Blas, San Felipe Pueblo, Sauk & Fox, Shuar, Sioux, Taos Pueblo, Tarasco, Teotihuacan, Tepehua, Tlaxcala, Tlingit, Tonkawa, Totonac, Triqui, Tzental, Tzotzil, Ute, Wampanoag, Zapotec, Zoque, Zuni.
Arrangement note:
Collection arranged by item number.
Biographical/Historical note:
Frederick Starr was born in Auburn, New York, on September 2, 1858. He received a Ph.D. in biology in 1884 at Coe College, where he was later appointed professor of biology. Starr did postgraduate work in anthropology at Yale. In 1889 he was appointed head of Ethnology at the American Museum of Natural History, and in 1892 he was chosen by William Harper to organize the Anthropology Department at the new University of Chicago. Starr remained at the University until his retirement in 1923. Besides his field studies with various Indian tribes in the United States, Starr traveled to Mexico, Brazil, Colombia, Guatemala, Ecuador, Guiana, Japan, the Philippines, and Africa. He died in Tokyo, Japan, on August 14, 1933. Starr was the author of several books and scholarly articles.
General note:
Starr hired professional photographers Charles B. Lang and Louis Grabic to accompany him on his field trips. One lantern slide of Moses Ladd (Menomini) was taken by William H. Jackson.
Provenance:
Dr. Frederick Starr, Purchased, circa 1929
Restrictions:
Access restricted. Researchers should contact the staff of the NMAI Archives for an appointment to access the collection.
Topic:
Indians of South America -- Brazil  Search this
Indians of Mexico  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southwest  Search this
Salish Indians  Search this
Indians of South America -- Colombia  Search this
Indians of North America -- Alaska  Search this
Indians of North America -- Basin  Search this
Indians of North America -- Plains  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southeast  Search this
Indians of North America -- Plateau  Search this
Indians of Central America -- Guatemala  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northwest  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Indians of North America -- Midwest  Search this
Indians of South America -- Ecuador  Search this
Indians of South America -- Guiana  Search this
Genre/Form:
Negatives
Lantern slides
Identifier:
NMAI.AC.052
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmai-ac-052

MS 1912 Assorted historical texts

Collector:
Mooney, James, 1861-1921  Search this
Addressee:
Preston, William Col  Search this
Creator:
Springstone, William  Search this
Names:
Raven Chief  Search this
Culture:
Chippewa  Search this
Potawatomi Indians  Search this
Ottawa Indians  Search this
Illinois Indians  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Ojibwa Indians  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Date:
undated
Scope and Contents:
Contains copy of letter dated August 9, 1780, addressed to Col William Preston, relative to a threatened attack by the Indians (Cherokee), signed by Jas. Martin. Also copy of an affidavit by William Springstone, formerly a trader in the Cherokee town of Sciligo (Tciligo) referring to a "treaty" between Raven Chief of the Cherokee and the British Agent in Georgia, and an agreement to attack the inhabitants of Virginia and Carolina. (undated) Includes note on "Black Padoucas" (Bowles, (1792) quoted by Bowen, 1876. Note on the Illinois, Ottawa, Chippewa and Potawatomi, and the Miami,-purchase of land by the U. S. Notes on Civil War, etc.
Bibliographic notes from "Arthur, John Preston- Western N. C., 1730 to 1913. Published by the D.A.R. of (?), Raleigh, Edwards and Broughton, 1914."
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 1912
Topic:
Treaties -- Cherokee  Search this
Land tenure and claims -- Miami  Search this
Odawa  Search this
Chippewa  Search this
Odawa  Search this
Citation:
Manuscript 1912, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS1912
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms1912
Additional Online Media:

MS 3153 Jeremiah Evarts Papers

Creator:
Evarts, Jeremiah, 1781-1831  Search this
Extent:
1,044 Items (ca 1044 pages)
1 Item (box )
Culture:
Choctaw Indians  Search this
Cherokee  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southern States  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Newsclippings
Date:
1818-1825
Scope and Contents:
Probable author, Jeremiah Evarts. Includes records of slave conditions, experiences of various individuals with the Indians, etc. Miscellaneous reports of Missions in the following countries: India (Bombay and Ceylon), Palestine, South America, Sandwich Islands, and among the American Indians. Miscellaneous correspondence, accounts, etc., etc. Reports, approximately 1044 pages. Other papers approximately 50 pages. Also a copy of the New York Observer, August 14, 1830, containing articles on the Choctaw and the Cherokee Indians. Evarts' journal: Trip [from Savannah ?] through Athens, Jefferson, the Chattahoochee River, Spring Place, a place 16 miles from Taloney [Talona ? , Cobsawathe [Georgia] and Brainerd [Tennessee].
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 3153
Topic:
Slavery  Search this
Diaries -- Evarts ?, Jeremiah  Search this
Missions -- India  Search this
Missions -- Ceylon  Search this
Missions -- Palestine  Search this
Missions -- South America  Search this
Missions -- Sandwich Islands  Search this
Missions -- Hawaii  Search this
American Indian  Search this
Missions  Search this
Genre/Form:
Newsclippings
Citation:
Manuscript 3153, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS3153
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms3153

MS 419 Notes on the manuscripts of Benjamin Hawkins (1754-1816) and of George Galphin

Creator:
Mooney, James, 1861-1921  Search this
Author:
Hawkins, Benjamin, 1754-1816  Search this
Galphin, George, -1780  Search this
Stiggins, George, 1788-1845  Search this
Extent:
4 pages
Culture:
Cherokee  Search this
Creek Indians  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southern States  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Pages
Date:
March 10, 1900
Scope and Contents:
Manuscript notes relate to Creek and Cherokee Indians, and are in the Georgia State Historical Society, and on a manuscript by George Stiggins written 1831-34, relating to the Creek Indians, in the State Historical Society of Wisconsin.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 419
Local Note:
Typescript and manuscript document
Topic:
Creek (Muskogee)  Search this
Citation:
Manuscript 419, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS419
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms419

Victor and Cosmos Mindeleff photographs of Pueblo architecture

Photographer:
Mindeleff, Victor, 1860-1948  Search this
Mindeleff, Cosmos, 1863-  Search this
Extent:
5 mounted prints (albumen)
Culture:
Hopi Indians  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southwest, New  Search this
Pueblo Indians  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Mounted prints
Photographs
Date:
circa 1885
Scope and Contents note:
Photographs made by Victor and Cosmos Mindeleff, possibly as part of their studies of Pueblo architecture. They depict houses and ovens at Pescado, New Mexico, and a Hopi house at Moenkopi, Arizona.
Biographical/Historical note:
In the 1880s, Victor Mindeleff (1860-1948) was employed by the Bureau of American Ethnology to conduct studies of Pueblo architecture. He hired His brother, Cosmos Mindeleff (1863-1938), to be his assistant. They worked at Zuni, Acoma, and Hopi villages, as well as among the Navajo; at ruins at Kin Tiel, Canyon de Chelly, and Chaco Canyon; and at Etowah Mound in Georgia.
Local Call Number(s):
NAA Photo Lot 83-14
Location of Other Archival Materials:
Additional Mindeleff photographs can be found in the National Anthropological Archives in Photo Lot 4362, Photo Lot 14, Photo Lot 24, Photo Lot 28, Photo Lot 40, Photo Lot 78, and the BAE historical negatives.
Victor Mindeleff's manuscript on the Origin of Pueblo architecture and correspondence describing his fieldwork can be found in the National Anthropological Archives in the records of the Department of Anthropology.
Mindeleff sketches, plans, and drawings relating to Pueblo architecture can be found in the National Anthropological Archives in MS 2138, MS 2926, and MS 2621.
Restrictions:
The collection is open for research.

Access to the collection requires an appointment.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Dwellings  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Citation:
Photo lot 83-14, Victor and Cosmos Mindeleff photographs of Pueblo architecture, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.PhotoLot.83-14
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-photolot-83-14

MS 2573 Miscellaneous papers and extracts on Florida

Collector:
Mooney, James, 1861-1921  Search this
Creator:
Adair, James, approximately 1709-1783  Search this
González Barcia, Andrés  Search this
Moore, Francis, active 1744  Search this
Hening, William Waller, 1768-1828  Search this
Fitzpatrick, Thomas  Search this
Dickinson, Jonathan, 1663-1722  Search this
Soto, Hernando de, approximately 1500-1542  Search this
Gatschet, Albert S. (Albert Samuel), 1832-1907  Search this
Names:
Narvaez  Search this
Culture:
Chichimee  Search this
Arawak  Search this
Creek Indians  Search this
Apalachee Indians  Search this
Timucua Indians  Search this
Yamassee Indians  Search this
Caloosa  Search this
Calusa Indians  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southern States  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Date:
undated
Scope and Contents:
Miscellaneous papers as follows: Gatschet,- The Timucua Language. Florida Linguistics-- Mouilla, Pareja, Sedeno. Florida Springs. Chichimees in Florida. Yamassee War, 1715. Mobilians. Yamasee. Creeks- Adair. Apalachees, Conchaques, Alibamons, Apalachicolys. Cannibals Defined, 1520. Narvaez, 1528. Timucua. Ais. Cuban Colony and the Arawaks. Caloosas and Neighbors- Spanish Captives 1564. Discovery of Florida- 1513. Remnant Tribes in Cuba- 1881. Jordan River, Florida. Cuban Colony in Florida. Florida Tribes in 1821. Caloosa Cannibals. Missions, Apalachee and Timucua. Spanish Indians, etc., in the Seminole War. Copy from the "General History of the vast continent and Islands of America", etc. (23 pages) Caloosas etc in Seminole War. Also many miscellaneous notes on these and other subjects. Florida Authorities. Caloosa, etc. 1566- Barcia, Ensayo. Voyage to Georgia, 1744 (Moore). Dictionary Sheets. Henning, Statutes of Virginia. Fitzpatrick, Thomas, Biographical Notes- 1823-1834. Florida- Barcia-Ensayo, Extract of, 1567-8-9. Florida- Dickinson, Narrative 1699. Florida Antillean Connection. Florida- Barcia, Ensayo- Miscellany 1544-1719 (2). Florida- Barcia, Ensayo Extracts of 1566. Florida- De Soto Narratives 1539. Florida- Notes by A. S. Gatschet, explaining "some names and terms of the Hernando de Soto relations." 2 pages foolscap.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 2573
Topic:
Cannibalism -- Caloosa  Search this
War -- Yamassee War  Search this
War -- Seminole War  Search this
Missions -- Apalachee  Search this
Missions -- Timucua  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Creek (Muskogee)  Search this
Yamasee  Search this
Florida  Search this
Citation:
Manuscript 2573, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS2573
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms2573

Victor Mindeleff photograph albums of Pueblo architecture

Creator:
Mindeleff, Victor, 1860-1948  Search this
Photographer:
Hillers, John K., 1843-1925  Search this
Jackson, William Henry, 1843-1942  Search this
Mindeleff, Cosmos, 1863-  Search this
Extent:
383 Prints (circa 383 prints, 3 photo albums, albumen ()
Culture:
Indians of North America -- Southwest, New  Search this
Tewa Indians  Search this
Hopi Indians  Search this
Zuni Indians  Search this
Acoma Indians  Search this
Navajo Indians  Search this
Pueblo Indians  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Prints
Place:
Arizona
New Mexico
Date:
circa 1879-1887
Scope and Contents note:
Three photograph albums made by Victor Mindeleff documenting pueblo architecture, villages, and people. Some photographs, including those published in the Eighth Annual Report of the Bureau of American Ethnology, were made by Hillers, according to notations on file prints in Bureau of American Ethnology.
Biographical/Historical note:
In the 1880s, Victor Mindeleff (1860-1948) was employed by the Bureau of American Ethnology to conduct studies of Pueblo architecture. He hired His brother, Cosmos Mindeleff (1863-1938), to be his assistant. They worked at Zuni, Acoma, and Hopi villages, as well as among the Navajo; at ruins at Kin Tiel, Canyon de Chelly, and Chaco Canyon; and at Etowah Mound in Georgia. Victor Mindeleff left the BAE in 1890 for a career in architecture.
Local Call Number(s):
NAA Photo Lot 4362
Location of Other Archival Materials:
Sketches and ground plans, also made by Victor Mindeleff or his brother Cosmos, were sent to the Bureau of American Ethnology with these photograph albums. Now held in National Anthropological Archives MS 2926.
Original negatives for some of these photographs held in National Anthropological Archives Photo Lot 14.
Additional Mindeleff photographs can be found in the National Anthropological Archives in Photo Lot 24, Photo Lot 28, Photo Lot 40, Photo Lot 78, and the BAE historical negatives.
Victor Mindeleff's manuscript, Origins of Pueblo Architecture (1887), and correspondence describing his fieldwork can be found in the National Anthropological Archives in the records of the Department of Anthropology.
Mindeleff sketches, plans, and drawings relating to Pueblo architecture held in National Anthropological Archives MS 2138 and MS 2621.
Contained in:
Numbered manuscripts 1850s-1980s (some earlier)
See others in:
Victor Mindeleff photograph albums of Pueblo architecture, 1886-1887
Restrictions:
The collection is open for research.

Access to the collection requires an appointment.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Cliff-dwellings  Search this
Architecture  Search this
Pueblos  Search this
Dwellings  Search this
Citation:
Photo Lot 4362, Victor Mindeleff photograph albums of Pueblo architecture, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.PhotoLot.4362
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-photolot-4362

MS 566-b Second copy, Myths of the Creeks

Collector:
Tuggle, William Orrie, 1841-1884  Search this
Names:
Chufee  Search this
Istepahpah  Search this
Extent:
117 pages
Culture:
Creek Indians  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southern States  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Pages
Date:
undated
Scope and Contents:
Stories Numbers 32 and 40 are not included in these copies.
Contents: Myths of the Creeks: 1-The Tar Person, 9 pages. 2-The King of the Tie-snakes, 5 pages. 3-How day and night were divided, 2 pages. 4-The rabbit and wolf go courting, 3 pages. 5-How the rabbit deceived the other animals, 7 pages. 6-How the rabbit won the widow's beautiful daughter, 6 pages. 7-Rabbit pulling against the tie-snake, 13 pages ?. 8-Sharp breast and good snake, 1 page. 9-How Chufee deceived the tie-snake and the lion, 2 pages. 10-Origin of the tiger clan, 2 pages. 11-How the rabbit lost his long tail, 3 pages. 12-Why the possum has no hair on his tail, 1 page. 13-Disease, 1 page. 14-Medicine songs, 15 pages. 15-Snake sickness, 1 page. 16-Race between the crane and the humming bird, 1 page. 17-Creation of the earth, 6 pages. 18-Chufee discontented, 3 pages.
19-The Big Rock man, 1 page. 20-The Big Terrapin, 2 pages. 21-The Widow's son, 6 pages. 22-There are three worlds, 1 page. 23-How Chufee stole fire, 2 pages. 24-About the wind, 1 page. 25-How the terrapin got his back broken, 1 page. 26-The rainbow, Eclipse of the moon, 1 page. 27-Lightning, 1 page. 28-The terrapin runs a race with the deer, 1 page. 29-Baby songs, 5 pages. 30-Took-a-batche tradition, 1 page. 31-The sacred vessels, 3 pages. 33-The lion and the little girl, 8 pages. 34-The origin of the turkey breast-lock; The wolf races with the terrapin; Istepahpah (man-eater) and Chufee; How the alligator's nose was broken, 8 pages.
35-Origin of the Bear clan, 2 pages. 36-Why the 'possum has no hair on his tail, 1 page. 37-Why the 'possum looks so ashamed, 1 page. 38-The Sar-ee-yah or Great Charm, 1 page. 39-The Turkey, turtle and rattlesnake, 2 pages. 41-The bat, 3 pages. 42-The panther and coon fool the deer, 3 pages. 43-How Chufee the rabbit won his wife's sister for his second wife, 4 pages. 44-The rabbit and alligator. 45-Why the rabbit steals. 46-How the terrapin outran the deer. 47-The daughter of Tullopee-Tustenuggee-How the terrapin's eyes became red. 48-How the terrapin's back came to lie in checks. 49-The Buffalo girls. 50-The monkey girl.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 566-b
Other Title:
The Tar Person
The King of the Tie-snakes
How day and night were divided
The rabbit and wolf go courting
How the rabbit deceived the other animals
How the rabbit won the widow's beautiful daughter
Rabbit pulling against the tie-snake
Sharp breast and good snake
How Chufee deceived the tie-snake and the lion
Origin of the tiger clan
How the rabbit lost his long tail
Why the possum has no hair on his tail
Disease
Medicine songs
Snake sickness
Race between the crane and the humming bird
Creation of the earth
Chufee discontented
The Big Rock man
The Big Terrapin
The Widow's son
There are three worlds
How Chufee stole fire
About the wind
How the terrapin got his back broken
The rainbow, Eclipse of the moon
Lightning
The terrapin runs a race with the deer
Baby songs
Took-a-batche tradition
The sacred vessels
The lion and the little girl
The origin of the turkey breast-lock; The wolf races with the terrapin; Istepahpah (man-eater) and Chufee; How the alligator's nose was broken
Origin of the Bear clan
Why the 'possum has no hair on his tail
Why the 'possum looks ashamed
The Sar-ee-yah or Great Charm
The Turkey, turtle and rattlesnake
The bat
The panther and coon fool the deer
How Chufee the rabbit won his wife's sister for his second wife
The rabbit and alligator
Why the rabbit steals
How the terrapin outran the deer
The daughter of Tullopee-Tustenuggee-How the terrapin's eyes became red
How the terrapin's back came to lie in checks
The Buffalo girls
The monkey girl
Topic:
Folklore -- Creek  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Creek (Muskogee)  Search this
Citation:
Manuscript 566-b, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS566B
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms566b

Seasonality and human mobility along the Georgia Bight : proceedings of the Fifth Caldwell Conference, St. Catherines Island, Georgia, May 14-16, 2010 / Elizabeth J. Reitz, Irvy R. Quitmyer, and David Hurst Thomas, editors and contributors ; with contributions by C. Fred T. Andrus ... [et al.]

Title:
Proceedings of the Fifth Caldwell Conference, St. Catherines Island, Georgia, May 14-16, 2010
Author:
Caldwell Conference (5th : 2010 : Saint Catherines Island, Ga.)  Search this
Reitz, Elizabeth Jean 1946-  Search this
Quitmyer, Irvy R  Search this
Thomas, David Hurst  Search this
Andrus, C. Fred T. 1967-  Search this
American Museum of Natural History  Search this
Saint Catherines Island Foundation  Search this
Physical description:
236 p. : ill. (some col.), maps ; 26 cm
Type:
Congresses
Place:
Atlantic Coast (South Atlantic States)
Georgia
Saint Catherines Island
South Atlantic States
Saint Catherines Island (Ga.)
Date:
2012
C2012
Topic:
Land settlement patterns, Prehistoric  Search this
Food supply--Seasonal variations  Search this
Coastal settlements  Search this
Migration, Internal  Search this
Indians of North America--Food  Search this
Fish remains (Archaeology)  Search this
Animal remains (Archaeology)  Search this
Plant remains (Archaeology)  Search this
Coastal archaeology  Search this
Call number:
CC77.5 .C35 2010
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_1003787

MS 4146 Copies of material regarding American Indians from various publications

Collector:
Swanton, John Reed, 1873-1958  Search this
Creator:
Lanman, Charles, 1819-1895  Search this
Stanley, John Mix, 1814-1872  Search this
Cooper, John M. (John Montgomery), 1881-1949  Search this
Béranger, Jean  Search this
González Barcia, Andrés  Search this
Serrano y Sanz, Manuel, 1868-1932  Search this
Ruidíaz y Caravia, Eugenio, 1849-1896  Search this
Capers, William, 1790-1855  Search this
Hall, Basil, 1788-1844  Search this
Lincecum, Gideon, 1793-1874  Search this
Régis du Roullet, Louis Joseph Guillaume de  Search this
Hawkins, Benjamin, 1754-1816  Search this
Ribaut, Jean, approximately 1520-1565  Search this
Le Moyne de Morgues, Jacques, 1533?-1588  Search this
Fernández de Oviedo y Valdés, Gonzalo, 1478-1557  Search this
Laudonnière, René Goulaine de  Search this
Le Page du Pratz, -1775  Search this
Margry, Pierre, 1818-1894  Search this
Kerlérec, Louis Billouart, chevalier de, 1704-1770  Search this
Pope, John, 1749-1802  Search this
Du Ru, Paul, 1666-1741  Search this
Smith, John, 1580-1631  Search this
Escalante Fontaneda, Hernando d'  Search this
Extent:
371 Pages
23 Items (slips )
Culture:
Cherokee -- Folklore  Search this
Catawba -- Folklore  Search this
Choctaw -- Folklore  Search this
Siouan -- Eastern  Search this
Natchez -- town  Search this
Creek Indians  Search this
Natchez Indians  Search this
Caddo Indians  Search this
Indians of North America -- Great Plains  Search this
Siouan Indians  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southern States  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Pages
Date:
undated
Scope and Contents:
Contents:

1. Myths and customs of the Cherokee, Catawba, and Choctaw, from "Adventures in the Wilds of the United States and British Provinces," by Charles Lanman, 2 volumes, Philadelphia, 1856- 60 pages.

2. Legends of Caddo Paintings by J. M. Stanley, from "Portraits of North American Indians, with sketches of scenery, etc., Washington, 1852. 1 page".

3. Corrections of McNutt's translations of the section on Chicora in Peter Martyr's "De Orbe Novo," by Dr John M. Cooper. 1 page and letter.

4. Memoirs of Berenger, La Harpe's captain on his exploration of the Texas coast. Copied from manuscript in Newberry Library, Chicago. (Linguistic sections omitted but published by Du Terrage and Rivet in Journal de la Societe des Americanistes de Paris. 34 pages.

5. Excerpts from Barcia's "Ensayo Cronologico a la Historia de la Florida." 23 pages.

6. Excerpts from Serrano y Sanz, "Documentos Historicos de la Florida y la Luisiana." 14 pages with additional slips.

7. Excerpts from Eugenio y Caravia, "La Florida." 2 volumes, 12 pages.

8. Extract from the Journal of the Reverend William Capers, printed in the Methodist Magazine for June, 1822, pages 232-236. 4 pages.

9. Extract from Captain Basil Hall's "Travels in North America in the years 1827 and 1828, Philadelphia, 1929. 18 pages (in duplicate.)

10. Notes from Dr Gideon Lincecum's manuscript entitled "Traditional History of the Chahta Nation", owned by the University of Texas, and never published in its entirety though the Choctaw migration legend was primted by the Mississippi Historical Commission. 21 pages.

11. Three pages of Manuscript material from the library of Col. William Preston, in Virginia State Library. 3 pages. Re Cherokee ca. 1780. Cf.Manuscript # 1912, transcript by Mooney, Same ?

12. Notes from Library of Congress copy of French documents by Regis de Roullet; printed also in Journal de la Societe des Americanistes de Paris. 6 pages.

13. Notes on sewan (Wampum) from "Original Narratives of New Netherlands". 2 pages.

14. Notes on Creek Indians from Manuscripts afterward printed by Grant Foreman in "A Traveler in Indian Territory." 23 pages.

15. Excerpts from a Memoir printed at Luxemberg, a copy of which is in the Library of Congress. 5 pages.

16. Excerpts from the "Letters" of Benjamin Hawkins, printed by the Georgia Historical Society. 23 pages.

17. Excerpts from the Narrative of Jean de Ribault from French's Historical Collections of Louisiana, 1875, 159-190. 4 pages.

18. Excerpts from Narrative of Jacques le Moyne translated and printed in Boston, 1875. 3 pages.

19. Excerpt from Oviedo, "Historia General y Natural," volume 3, 630-631. 3 pages.

20. Excerpt from Relation of Penicaut in Margry, V, page 457. 5 pages.

21. Miscellaneous extracts from Barcia's Ensayo (see Number 5). 44 pages and additional slips.

22. Extracts from Rene Gourlaine de Laudonniere, Paris, 1853, "L'Histoire Notable de la Florida." 44 pages.

23. A page on the Natchez language from Le Page du Pratz, "La Louisiane," Paris, 1758; and lists of Natchez and Taensa villages from Margry. 1 page.

24. Relation of Captain Penalosa's voyage to Florida, from Ruidiaz, "La Florida," volume II, pages 473-476. 4 pages.

25. Excerpt from Iberville's Journal in Margry, volume IV, pages 512-514. 2 pages.

26. Excerpt from de Kerelec's Report in Compte Rendu du Congres Internacional des Americanistes, Quebec, 1907. 1 page.

27. Excerpts from Pope's "Tour". 1 page.

28. Excerpt from Journal of Pere du Ru in Journal de la Societe des Americanistes de Paris (N.S.), Volume XVII, pages 119-135. 6 pages.

29. John Smith's version of the "Huskanaw" ceremony, Tyler ed., pages 112-113. 2 pages.

30. Corrections of translations of Fontaneda by an unknown writer and of doubtful value. 23 slips.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 4146
Topic:
Folklore -- Cherokee  Search this
Folklore -- Catawba  Search this
Folklore -- Choctaw  Search this
Expeditions -- La Harpe  Search this
Wampum  Search this
"Huskanaw"  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Sioux  Search this
Creek (Muskogee)  Search this
Citation:
Manuscript 4146, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS4146
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms4146

MS 566-a-c Myths of the Creeks

Creator:
Tuggle, William Orrie, 1841-1884  Search this
Names:
Chufee  Search this
Istepahpah  Search this
Extent:
173 pages
Culture:
Creek Indians  Search this
Indians of North America -- Southern States  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Pages
Date:
March 1, 1887
Scope and Contents:
Filed with the manuscript are papers describing it and relating to its history (566-c) as follows: Folder 1-Bureau of American Ethnology correspondence, 1883-87, relating to history of Tuggle manuscript. 3 pages original and 15 photostats, with typed abstract covering all correspondence, 1 page typed. Folder 2-Description and comparison of the 2 copies of the Tuggle manuscript in Bureau of American Ethnology, by William C. Sturtevant, 1956, 9 pages typed. Folder 3-Miscellaneous notes and correspondence relating to search for information on Tuggle manuscript, 1932, 1956-57.
Contents: Myths of the Creeks: 1-The Tar Person, 9 pages. 2-The King of the Tie-snakes, 5 pages. 3-How day and night were divided, 2 pages. 4-The rabbit and wolf go courting, 3 pages. 5-How the rabbit deceived the other animals, 7 pages. 6-How the rabbit won the widow's beautiful daughter, 6 pages. 7-Rabbit pulling against the tie-snake, 13 pages ?. 8-Sharp breast and good snake, 1 page. 9-How Chufee deceived the tie-snake and the lion, 2 pages. 10-Origin of the tiger clan, 2 pages. 11-How the rabbit lost his long tail, 3 pages. 12-Why the possum has no hair on his tail, 1 page. 13-Disease, 1 page. 14-Medicine songs, 15 pages. 15-Snake sickness, 1 page. 16-Race between the crane and the humming bird, 1 page. 17-Creation of the earth, 6 pages. 18-Chufee discontented, 3 pages.
19-The Big Rock man, 1 page. 20-The Big Terrapin, 2 pages. 21-The Widow's son, 6 pages. 22-There are three worlds, 1 page. 23-How Chufee stole fire, 2 pages. 24-About the wind, 1 page. 25-How the terrapin got his back broken, 1 page. 26-The rainbow, Eclipse of the moon, 1 page. 27-Lightning, 1 page. 28-The terrapin runs a race with the deer, 1 page. 29-Baby songs, 5 pages. 30-Took-a-batche tradition, 1 page. 31-The sacred vessels, 3 pages. 32-Origin of Indian corn, 7 pages. 33-The lion and the little girl, 8 pages. 34-The origin of the turkey breast-lock; The wolf races with the terrapin; Istepahpah (man-eater) and Chufee; How the alligator's nose was broken, 8 pages.
35-Origin of the Bear clan, 2 pages. 36-Why the 'possum has no hair on his tail, 1 page. 37-Why the 'possum looks so ashamed, 1 page. 38-The Sar-ee-yah or Great Charm, 1 page. 39-The Turkey, turtle and rattlesnake, 2 pages. 40-How the mark was caused on the Phe-tuk-kee's tail, 1 page. 41-The bat, 3 pages. 42-The panther and coon fool the deer, 3 pages. 43-How Chufee the rabbit won his wife's sister for his second wife, 4 pages. 44-The rabbit and alligator. 45-Why the rabbit steals. 46-How the terrapin outran the deer. 47-The daughter of Tullopee-Tustenuggee-How the terrapin's eyes became red. 48-How the terrapin's back came to lie in checks. 49-The Buffalo girls. 50-The monkey girl.
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 566-a-c
Other Title:
The Tar Person
The King of the Tie-snakes
How day and night were divided
The rabbit and wolf go courting
How the rabbit deceived the other animals
How the rabbit won the widow's beautiful daughter
Rabbit pulling against the tie-snake
Sharp breast and good snake
How Chufee deceived the tie-snake and the lion
Origin of the tiger clan
How the rabbit lost his long tail
Why the possum has no hair on his tail
Disease
Medicine songs
Snake sickness
Race between the crane and the humming bird
Creation of the earth
Chufee discontented
The Big Rock man
The Big Terrapin
The Widow's son
There are three worlds
How Chufee stole fire
About the wind
How the terrapin got his back broken
The rainbow, Eclipse of the moon
Lightning
The terrapin runs a race with the deer
Baby songs
Took-a-batche tradition
The sacred vessels
Origin of Indian corn
The lion and the little girl
The origin of the turkey breast-lock; The wolf races with the terrapin; Istepahpah (man-eater) and Chufee; How the alligator's nose was broken
Origin of the Bear clan
Why the 'possum has no hair on his tail
Why the 'possum looks ashamed
The Sar-ee-yah or Great Charm
The Turkey, turtle and rattlesnake
How the mark was caused on the Phe-tuk-kee's tail
The bat
The panther and coon fool the deer
How Chufee the rabbit won his wife's sister for his second wife
The rabbit and alligator
Why the rabbit steals
How the terrapin outran the deer
The daughter of Tullopee-Tustenuggee-How the terrapin's eyes became red
How the terrapin's back came to lie in checks
The Buffalo girls
The monkey girl
Topic:
Folklore -- Creek  Search this
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Creek (Muskogee)  Search this
Citation:
Manuscript 566-a-c, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS566AC
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms566ac

William C. Sturtevant papers

Topic:
Handbook of North American Indians
Creator:
Sturtevant, William C.  Search this
Names:
National Museum of Natural History (U.S.)  Search this
Six Nations  Search this
Extent:
220 Linear feet (The total extent of the collection is 191.41 linear feet (consisting of 473 document boxes and 2 record boxes) plus 254 sound recordings, 94 computer disks, 42 card file boxes, 85 oversize folders, 9 rolled items, 18 binder boxes, and 3 oversize boxes. Of the total extent, 4.79 linear feet (14 boxes) are restricted.)
Culture:
Indians of North America -- Southeast  Search this
Indians of North America -- Northeast  Search this
Indians of North America  Search this
Iroquois Indians  Search this
Seminole Indians  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Realia
Research
Notes
Office files
Theses
Slides (photographs)
Sound recordings
Exhibition catalogs
Field notes
Clippings
Correspondence
Photographs
Microfilms
Newsletters
Manuscripts
Memorandums
Articles
Card files
Books
Artifacts
Negatives
Date:
1952-2007
Summary:
This collection contains the professional papers of William Curtis Sturtevant and documents his activities as Curator of North American Ethnology at the National Museum of Natural History, his work as the editor-in-chief of the Handbook of North American Indians, his research among the Seminole and Iroquois people, and other professional activities. The collection is comprised of books, sound recordings, research and field notes, realia, artifacts, clippings, microfilm, negatives, slides, photographs, manuscripts, correspondence, memorandums, card files, exhibition catalogs, articles, and bibliographies.
Scope and Contents:
This collection contains the professional papers of William Curtis Sturtevant and documents his activities as Curator of North American Ethnology at the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of Natural History, his work as the editor-in-chief of the Handbook of North American Indians, his research among the Seminole and Iroquois people, and his involvement in various professional activities. The collection is comprised of research and field notes, sound recordings, realia, clippings, negatives, slides, prints, published and unpublished writings, correspondence, memorandums, conference papers and meeting notes, card files, exhibition catalogs, articles, bibliographies, student files such as class notes and papers from Sturtevant's years as an anthropology student, teaching materials including lecture notes and exams, daily planners, passports, military records, artwork including prints and lithographs, maps, and computer files.

The materials in this collection document Sturtevant's career as a preeminent North American ethnologist, museum curator, university professor, his role as General Editor of the Handbook of North American Indians, and his contributions to the field of Anthropology. From his early work with the Seminole Indians of Florida to his forays into Burma, and his decades-long study of how Native Americans have been depicted in artistic and popular culture, Sturtevant's diverse intellectual interests are represented in his research files. A copious note taker, Sturtevant captured his observations and opinions of everything from meetings with colleagues to museum exhibits. Sturtevant's commitment to the anthropological profession can be found in the notes and programs of the many conferences, symposiums, and lecture series he attended and at which he presented. He also held numerous leadership positions in various professional associations and sat on the board of directors/trustees for several cultural organizations including Survival International and the Museum of the American Indian-Heye Foundation. Sturtevant was respected for his vast knowledge of indigenous peoples and he received a voluminous amount of correspondence from colleagues who often included copies of their papers and grant proposals. He kept many of these works, which, it appears he used as reference material. Sturtevant's own work is reflected in his writings; he published over 200 scholarly papers, articles, and books.
Arrangement:
This collection is organized in 14 series: 1. Correspondence, 1951-2008; 2. Research Files, 1851, 1860s, 1880s, 1890, 1939-2006; 3. Writings, 1952-2006; 4. Professional Activities, 1952-2006; 5. Smithsonian, 1954-2008; 6. Handbook of North American Indians, 1971-2007; 7. Biographical Files, 1933-2007; 8. Student Files, 1944-1985; 9. Subject Files, 1902-2002; 10. Photographs, 1927-2004; 11. Artwork, 1699-1998; 12. Maps, 1949-1975; 13. Sound Recordings, 1950-2000; 14. Computer Files, 1987-2006.
Biographical/Historical note:
William C. Sturtevant (1926-2007), preeminent North American ethnologist, museum curator, and university professor, was best known for his contributions to Seminole ethnology, as curator of North American Ethnology in the Department of Anthropology at the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of Natural History, and for his work as the general editor of the Handbook of North American Indians.

Sturtevant's passion for studying Native peoples began at a young age. In third grade "after a class on American Indians, he asked his father what kind of people study Indians, and his father replied, 'Anthropologists.' Sturtevant decided then that he would make anthropology his career" (Merrill 11). After graduating with honors from the University of California at Berkeley in 1949, Sturtevant went on to Yale University to complete his graduate work in anthropology. When it came time to decide on what area of North America he should focus his research, one of his faculty members at Yale, Irving Rouse, "suggested he consider the Seminoles of south Florida. By the end of his first fieldwork season, Sturtevant was convinced that the dearth of ethnographic information about these Seminoles and their status as one of the least acculturated of all North American Indian societies justified ethnographic research among them and offered the possibility of making an important contribution to North American ethnology" (Merrill 13). Sturtevant spent the summers of 1950 and 1951 conducting preliminary fieldwork among the Mikasuki-speaking Seminole and in 1952 he took up temporary residence at Big Cypress Reservation to undertake research for his dissertation, "The Mikasuki Seminole: Medical Beliefs and Practices." This work focused on Seminole medicine, but also included Sturtevant's analysis of Seminole worldview, religion, history, inter-ethnic relations, material culture, economy, kinship, language, and social organization.

In 1954, while he was finishing his dissertation, Sturtevant made the transition from student of anthropology to professional anthropologist. He was hired as an instructor in Yale's Anthropology Department and began his career in museum work as an assistant curator of anthropology at the Yale Peabody Museum. After receiving his PhD from Yale in 1955, Sturtevant moved on to the Smithsonian Institution, where he accepted a position as a research anthropologist at the Bureau of American Ethnology (BAE). This position afforded Sturtevant the chance to continue to explore his many research interests in ways that a full time professorship or museum curatorship could not. Over the next ten years he studied the Catawba in South Carolina; the Seneca and Cayuga nations of the Iroquois League in New York, Oklahoma, and Ontario; continued his work with the Seminole; visited European museums to examine early ethnographic examples and possible European prototypes of eastern North American Indian material culture; and spent a year in Burma. In 1963, Sturtevant and his wife, Theda Maw, the daughter of a prominent Burmese family, took their three young children to Burma so that they could visit with Maw's family. Sturtevant took this as an opportunity to branch out from his Native American research and spent the year visiting neighborhoods in Rangoon and villages in the surrounding countryside, examining archival materials, studying the Burmese language, learning about Burmese clothing and other aspects of the culture, and taking photographs. He also collected 386 items of clothing and other objects for the Smithsonian.

When Sturtevant returned from Burma, he found the BAE had been dissolved. In 1965, he was transferred from the now-defunct BAE to the Department of Anthropology at the National Museum of Natural History (NMNH), where he became curator of North American Ethnology, a position he held for the next forty-two years. During his tenure at NMNH Sturtevant oversaw all the North American ethnology collections, planned exhibitions, served on committees, and sponsored interns and fellows. One of Sturtevant's primary duties at NMNH was serving as the General Editor of the Handbook of North American Indians, "a major multi-volume reference work summarizing anthropological, linguistic, and historical knowledge about native peoples north of Mexico" (Jackson). Each volume was designed to represent a geographic or topical area of Americanist study. As General Editor, Sturtevant selected volume editors, chapter authors, oversaw office staff, and proofread manuscripts over the course of production.

Besides focusing on the Handbook, much of Sturtevant's time was taken up by responsibilities he held outside the Institution. Sturtevant was extremely involved in professional anthropological associations and held many leadership positions. Fresh out of graduate school, he began a three-year term on the Board of Governors of the Anthropological Society of Washington in 1957. He later became a member of the executive committee of the Florida Anthropological Society, served as book-review editor and associate editor of the American Anthropologist from 1962-1968, was a member of the American Anthropological Association's Committee on Anthropological Research in Museums and was both vice president and president of the committee once it became the Council for Museum Anthropology, was on the American Anthropological Association's Committee on Archives, served three terms on the Board of Trustees of the Museum of the American Indian-Heye Foundation from 1976-1982 and was appointed to a fourth term between 1984 and 1986, and sat on the Board of Directors of Survival International from 1982-1988. He was President of the American Society for Ethnohistory, the American Ethnological Society, the American Anthropological Association, and the Anthropological Society of Washington. Sturtevant also taught classes at Johns Hopkins University as an adjunct professor in the Department of Anthropology, served as a consultant on exhibits at other museums, and reviewed manuscripts for scholarly publications.

Sturtevant remained active in the profession throughout his later years. After divorcing Theda Maw in 1986, he married Sally McLendon, a fellow anthropologist, in 1990 and they undertook several research projects together. Sturtevant was recognized for his dedication and contributions to the field of anthropology in 1996 when he was awarded an honorary doctorate in humane letters by Brown University, and in 2002 when his colleagues published a festschrift in his honor, Anthropology, History, and American Indians: Essays in Honor of William Curtis Sturtevant.

Sturtevant died on March 2, 2007 at the Collingswood Nursing and Rehabilitation Center in Rockville, MD after suffering from emphysema.

Sources Consulted

Estrada, Louie. 2007. William C. Sturtevant; Expert on Indians. Washington Post, March 17. http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2007/03/16/AR2007031602273.html, accessed August 31, 2012.

Jackson, Jason Baird. 2007. William C. Sturtevant (1926-2007). http://museumanthropology.blogspot.com/2007/03/william-c-sturtevant-1926-2007.html, accessed August 31, 2012.

Merrill, William L. 2002. William Curtis Sturtevant, Anthropologist. In Anthropology, History, and American Indians: Essays in Honor of William Curtis Sturtevant. William L. Merrill and Ives Goddard, eds. Pp. 11-36. Washington D.C.: Smithsonian Institution Press.

1926 -- Born July 26 in Morristown, NJ

1944 -- Entered the University of California at Berkeley as a second-semester freshman

1944 -- Attended summer school at the Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico in Mexico City where he took courses on Mexican archaeology and South American ethnology

1945 -- Drafted into the United States Navy

1946 -- Received an honorable discharge from the Navy with the rank of pharmacist's mate third class and returned to UC Berkeley

1947 -- Attended the University of New Mexico's summer field school in Chaco Canyon, New Mexico

1949 -- January: Received his Bachelor's degree with honors in anthropology from UC Berkeley

1949 -- Began graduate studies at Yale University

1950-1951 -- Spent the summers of 1950 and 1951 in Florida conducting fieldwork among the Mikasuki-speaking Seminole

1951 -- Conducted his first research study of the Iroquois, a classification of Seneca musical instruments, their construction and use, with Harold Conklin

1952 -- May: Moved to Big Cypress Reservation in Florida to conduct research for his dissertation. He focused on Seminole medicine, but also collected physical anthropological data such as blood-type frequencies, handedness, and color blindness

1952 -- July 26: Married Theda Maw

1954 -- Hired by Yale University as an instructor in the Department of Anthropology and as an assistant curator of anthropology in the Yale Peabody Museum

1955 -- Received PhD in anthropology from Yale University

1956 -- Joined the staff of the Smithsonian Institution's Bureau of American Ethnology (BAE) as a research anthropologist

1957 -- Began a three-year term on the Board of Governors of the Anthropological Society of Washington

1957 -- Traveled to Rock Hill, South Carolina to collect linguistic data from Sam Blue, the last member of the Catawba tribe to have maintained some proficiency in the Catawba language. While there, he made a small collection of Catawba pottery for the United States National Museum

1957-1958 -- Spent seven weeks continuing his research among the New York Seneca

1959 -- Returned to Florida to study Seminole ethnobotany. He also collected ethnographic materials, especially objects made for the tourist market, which he deposited in the United States National Museum

1959-1960 -- Member of the executive committee of the Florida Anthropological Society

1960 -- July and August: Visited 17 European museums to examine early ethnographic examples and possible European prototypes of eastern North American Indian material culture

1961-1962 -- Spent the summers of these years conducting ethnographic fieldwork among the Seneca-Cayuga in Oklahoma

1962 -- October: Visited the Six Nations Reserve in Ontario, Canada to conduct fieldwork among the Seneca and Cayuga there

1962-1968 -- Book-review editor and associate editor of the American Anthropologist

1963 -- October: Spent the year in Burma; visited neighborhoods in Rangoon and villages in the surrounding countryside, examined photographs in several archives, studied the Burmese language, and read extensively about the country's history and culture. Assembled notes on Burmese clothing and other aspects of the culture, took hundreds of photographs, and made a collection of 386 items of clothing and other objects for the Smithsonian

1964 -- Visited Inle Lake in the Southern Shan States southeast of Mandalay, where he examined local approaches to artificial island agriculture

1964-1981 -- Became a member of the American Anthropological Association's Committee on Anthropological Research in Museums, which became the Council for Museum Anthropology in 1974. Sturtevant was the Council's first vice president, serving two terms between 1974 and 1978, and was its president from 1978 to 1981

1965 -- Became curator of North American Ethnology in the Department of Anthropology at the National Museum of Natural History after the dissolution of the BAE

1965-1966 -- President of the American Society for Ethnohistory

1966 -- Named the editor of the Handbook of North American Indians

1967-1968 -- Fulbright scholar and lecturer at Oxford University's Institute of Social Anthropology

1969 -- Began serving on the American Anthropological Association's Committee on Archives

1974-1989 -- Adjunct Professor in the Department of Anthropology at Johns Hopkins University

1976-1982 -- Served three terms on the Board of Trustees of the Museum of the American Indian-Heye Foundation and was appointed to a fourth term between 1984 and 1986

1977 -- President of the American Ethnological Society

1980-1981 -- President of the American Anthropological Association

1981 -- Spent part of the spring semester at the University of California Berkeley as a Regents Lecturer

1982-1988 -- Board of Directors of Survival International

1986 -- Divorced Theda Maw

1986-1987 -- Smithsonian Fellow at Oxford University's Worcester College

1990 -- Married Sally McLendon

1992 -- President of the Anthropological Society of Washington

1996 -- Awarded an honorary doctorate in humane letters at Brown University

2007 -- Died March 2 in Rockville, MD
Related Materials:
Other materials relating to William C. Sturtevant at the National Anthropological Archives are included in the following collections:

Manuscript 4504

Manuscript 4595

Manuscript 4806

Manuscript 4821

Manuscript 4972

Manuscript 7045

Photo Lot 59

Photo Lot 79-51

Photo Lot 80-3

Photo Lot 81R

Photo Lot 86-68 (6)

Photo Lot 86-68 (7)

American Society for Ethnohistory records

Committee on Anthropological Research in Museum Records

Handbook of North American Indians records

Records of the Department of Anthropology, National Museum of Natural History

Gordon Davis Gibson Papers, Sound Recordings

SPC Se Powhatan Confederacy Mattapony BAE No # 01790700

DOE Oceania:Amer Poly:Hi:Hawaiian Helmet:Sturtevant 04913800

DOE Oceania:Amer Poly:Hi:Hawaiian Helmet:Sturtevant 04913900

DOE Oceania:Amer Poly:Hi:Hawaiian Helmet:Sturtevant 04914000

Negative MNH 1530

Negative MNH 1530 B

Sturtevant is listed as a correspondent in the following NAA collections:

Administrative file, 1949-1965, Records of the Bureau of American Ethnology

John Lawrence Angel Papers

James Henri Howard Papers

Donald Jayne Lehmer Papers

John Victor Murra Papers

Records of the Society for American Archaeology

Albert Clanton Spaulding Papers

Waldo Rudolph Wedel and Mildred Mott Wedel Papers

Copies of sound recordings made by William C. Sturtevant can be found at The California Language Archive at UC Berkeley in two collections, The William Sturtevant collection of Creek/Seminole sound recordings, which includes 31 minutes of Northern Muskogean linguistic field recordings from 1951, and The William Sturtevant collection of Mikasuki sound recordings, which includes 33 minutes of Mikasuki linguistic field recordings from 1951. Two sound tape reels of Seminole music Sturtevant recorded in Florida in 1951 can be found at Wesleyan University's World Music Archives. Folk songs on these recordings include "Scalping Sickness," "Bear Sickness with blowing," "Bear sickness without blowing," "Lullaby," "Feather Dance," "Snake Dance," and "Crazy Dance." Performers include Josie Billie, Lee Cypress, Harvey Jumper, Boy Jim, Charlie (Johnny?) Cypress, Little Tiger Tail, Billy Ossiola, and Charlie Billy Boy.
Separated Materials:
One video tape, "Seminole History and Tradition", was transferred to the Human Studies Film Archives. Series 2.2, Tukabahchee Plate: Glass negative of spectrogram from FBI (Box 135), removed for storage with other glass plate negatives.
Provenance:
These papers were transferred to the National Anthropological Archives by the Department of Anthropology at the National Museum of Natural History.
Restrictions:
Files containing Sturtevant's students' grades have been restricted, as have his students' and colleagues' grant and fellowships applications. Restricted files were separated and placed at the end of their respective series in boxes 87, 264, 322, 389-394, 435-436, 448, 468, and 483. For preservation reasons, his computer files are also restricted. Seminole sound recordings are restricted. Access to the William C. Sturtevant Papers requires an apointment.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Ethnology  Search this
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Genre/Form:
Realia
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Sound recordings
Exhibition catalogs
Field notes
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Correspondence
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Newsletters
Manuscripts
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Citation:
William C. Sturtevant papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.2008-24
See more items in:
William C. Sturtevant papers
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-2008-24
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W.P.A. excavations at Irene Mound

Author:
Fewkes, Vladimir J  Search this
United States Work Projects Administration  Search this
Physical description:
v. illus. 28 cm
Type:
Books
Place:
Chatham County (Ga.)
Date:
1938
1938-]
Topic:
Irene (Mound)  Search this
Antiquities  Search this
Call number:
E78.G3 F48Z
E78.G3F48Z
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_254826

Native athletes in sport & society : a reader / edited by C. Richard King

Title:
Native athletes in sport and society
Author:
King, C. Richard 1968-  Search this
Physical description:
xxxiii, 264 p. : ill. ; 22 cm
Type:
Books
Place:
United States
Date:
2005
C2005
Topic:
Indian athletes--History  Search this
Sports--History  Search this
Social conditions  Search this
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_794898

Indian Flageolet

Donor Name:
Mrs. Georgia Stout  Search this
Culture:
Papago (Tohono O'odham)  Search this
Object Type:
Flute
Place:
Arizona, United States, North America
Accession Date:
1877-Jun-02
Topic:
Ethnology  Search this
Accession Number:
77A00050
USNM Number:
E27844-0
See more items in:
Anthropology
Data Source:
NMNH - Anthropology Dept.
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmnhanthropology_8381586
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