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John Graham papers

Creator:
Graham, John, 1887-1961  Search this
Names:
Burliuk, David, 1882-1967  Search this
Davis, Stuart, 1892-1964  Search this
Gilot, Francoise, 1921-  Search this
Gorchov, Ron  Search this
Gorky, Arshile, 1904-1948 -- Photographs  Search this
Kitaj, R. B.  Search this
Mayer, Jack  Search this
Picasso, Pablo, 1881-1973 -- Photographs  Search this
Tobey, Mark  Search this
Ultra Violet  Search this
Extent:
11.2 Linear feet
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Sketchbooks
Photographs
Date:
1799-1988
bulk 1890-1961
Summary:
The papers of painter, collector, and writer John Graham measure 11.2 linear feet and date from 1799 to 1988, with the bulk of materials dating from 1890 to 1961. Papers document the life of John Graham, born Ivan Dombrowsky, through personal documents related to military service and family history, passports, artifacts, correspondence, appointment books, financial records, inventories, wills, extensive writings and notes, books, clippings, exhibition catalogs, photographs of Graham and his family and friends, and artwork created and collected by Graham.
Scope and Contents note:
The papers of painter, collector, and writer John Graham measure 11.2 linear feet and date from 1799 to 1988, with the bulk of materials dating from 1890 to 1961. Papers document the life of John Graham, born Ivan Dombrowsky, through personal documents related to military service and family history, passports, artifacts, correspondence, appointment books, financial records, inventories, wills, extensive writings and notes, books, clippings, exhibition catalogs, photographs of Graham and his family and friends, and artwork created and collected by Graham.

Biographical Materials and Artifacts include passports and other official documents, as well as records related to Graham's family, military service, and medical history. Among the artifacts are paint pots and a palette. Correspondence is with art and antique dealers and collectors, and includes significant correspondence and related documents of Jack Mayer, Graham's agent from the late 1950s. Several artists and famous friends are represented in Graham's correspondence including David Burliuk, Stuart Davis, Ultra Violet, Francoise Gilot, R.B. Kitaj, Marc Tobey, and Ron Gorchov.

Personal Business Records contain appointment books spanning 1931 to 1961 which record appointments but were also used as notebooks and sketchbooks. Other Business Records include inventories of Graham's books and antiques made by Graham, records of antique-related transactions, wills of Graham and his last wife, Marianne Strate, and extensive personal financial records from the last few years of his life.

Graham's writings are found scattered throughout the collection, as is his artwork. The Writings series is dominated by Graham's lengthy book projects, found in multiple drafts. The author's annotated published works are also found, as well as typescripts of several published essays by and about Graham. Lists, notes, and writings on a wide range of subjects are found on loose pages and in notebooks dated from 1931 to 1961. Among the Printed Materials are many annotated books from Graham's library, some of which contain drawings, and clippings and exhibition catalogs related to Graham's career going back to the 1920s. Reference files of printed ephemera and clippings collected by Graham are found on a variety of subjects, some of which contain pictorial subjects used in Graham's paintings.

Photographs depict Graham from childhood through his last years in cabinet card portraits, passport photographs, and snapshots. Photographs are also found of his parents, his five wives and four children, and a number of famous friends including Pablo Picasso, Françoise Gilot, their children, and Arshile Gorky. Artwork includes Graham's sketchbooks of 1934, 1960, and 1961, loose sketches, and a collection of file folders with many symbols and illustrations. Also found among the artwork are antique and contemporary prints and drawings collected by Graham.
Arrangement note:
The collection is arranged into 7 series:

Series 1: Biographical Materials and Artifacts, 1799, 1822, 1891-1961 (Boxes 1, 11-12, 17; 0.9 linear feet)

Series 2: Correspondence, circa 1932-1988 (Box 1; 0.6 linear feet)

Series 3: Personal Business Records, circa 1931-1962 (Boxes 1-3; 1.4 linear feet)

Series 4: Writings, 1839, circa 1923-1986 (Boxes 3-5, OV 13; 2.9 linear feet)

Series 5: Printed Materials, circa 1885-1961 (Boxes 6-9, OV 14; 3.7 linear feet)

Series 6: Photographs, circa 1860-1985 (Box 9-10, 17, OV 15; 0.9 linear feet)

Series 7: Artwork, circa 1852-1961 (Box 10, OV 16; 1 linear foot)
Biographical/Historical note:
The Russian émigré painter and writer John Graham, born Ivan Dombrowsky, was born in Kiev in 1886, 1887, or 1888. All three conflicting dates are found on various legal papers, licences, and passports. His parents were of minor nobility but with little means. He attended law school and served in the Circassian Regiment of the Russian army, earned the Saint George's Cross during World War I, and was imprisoned as a counterrevolutionary by the Bolsheviks after the assassination of Czar Nicholas II and his family in 1918. He fled for a time to his mother's native Poland, and finally in 1920, he emigrated with his second wife Vera and their son Nicholas to the United States. He began calling himself John in the US, and had his name officially changed to John Graham upon becoming a United States citizen in 1927. The name Graham may have been a transliteration of his father's name, Gratian. Graham is often described as a quixotic figure who cultivated a larger-than-life persona in the artistic circles of New York in the first half of the twentieth century through his authoritative philosophical and aesthetic arguments on the one hand, and his often fabulous tales of his early life on the other, including a story he wrote of his origins in which he was dropped as an infant onto a rock in the Caspian Sea by an enormous eagle.

In New York, Graham studied at the Art Students League, taking classes with John Sloan, William von Schlegell, and Allen Tucker. Among his fellow students were Dorothy Dehner and David Smith, Adolph Gottlieb, Alexander Calder, and Elinor Gibson, who married Graham in 1924. The couple lived briefly in Elinor's native Baltimore, Maryland, where he met Etta and Claribel Cone, collectors of modern European paintings. It may have been the Cone sisters who introduced Graham to their circle of avant-garde artists and art collectors in Paris in the late 1920s. Whatever its origin, Graham's early style has been compared to Cezanne, Braque, Derain, and Chirico, and his frequent trips to Europe made him a conduit for current art ideas and trends for the American artists who knew him.

Graham exhibited his paintings steadily in the late 1920s and early 1930s, including shows at the Society of Independent Arists (New York) in 1925, the Modernist Galleries (Baltimore) in 1926, Galerie Zaborowski (Paris) in 1928 and 1929, at Dudensing Galleries (New York) and Phillips Memorial Gallery (Washington) in 1929, the First Biennial at the Whitney Museum in 1932, and at 8th Street Gallery (New York) in 1933. During this period Graham and his wife Elinor lived in Paris, New York City, New Jersey, and upstate New York. He spent a year teaching at Wells College in Aurora, New York, where he also executed a series of wall panels in 1932. Graham's friendships with other artists during this period included Arshile Gorky, Stuart Davis, and Willem de Kooning. De Kooning is said to have called Davis, Gorky, and Graham the "three smartest guys on the scene."

Graham's European travels also enabled him to earn a living by buying primitive sculpture and antiques for collectors and dealers. In the 1930s he bought African Art for Vanity Fair editor and art collector Frank Crowninshield, and in 1936, Graham arranged an exhibition of Crowninshield's collection at Jacques Seligmann gallery. Graham and Elinor Gibson divorced in 1934 and he married Constance Wellman in Paris in 1936. They lived in Brooklyn Heights near Adolph Gottlieb, David Smith, and Dorothy Dehner, and worked for Hilla Rebay in her formation of the Museum of Non-Objective Painting, which became the Guggenheim Museum. Suffering financial hardship in the late years of the Depression, Constance and Graham lived in Mexico for several stretches of time, and Graham published several articles on Mexico and Mexican Art, and an essay entitled "Primitive Art and Picasso" in Magazine of Art.

Graham was a prolific writer, but only a few of his written works found their way into print. Aside from his essays, published works include a small book of poetry, Have It!, published in 1923, and a book which presented Graham's personal theories of art entitled System and Dialectics of Art, published in 1937 by Delphic Studios, an eclectic New York gallery and small press run by Alma Reed. The book was influential for a younger generation of American artists; Jackson Pollock and Lee Krasner in particular both expressed appreciation for Graham's ideas. For decades, Graham worked on several other major written works which were not published, including a highly stylized, symbolist work about his childhood and an encyclopedic collection of short, didactic essays on a wide range Grahamiam themes, a work which Graham usually referred to as Orifizio Mundi.

In 1942, Graham organized the exhibition "French and American Painters" at McMillen Gallery (New York) which showed Modigliani, Picasso, Braque, Rouault, and Matisse, alongside the Americans Jackson Pollock, Willem de Kooning, Lee Krasner, Stuart Davis, David Burliuk, and Walt Kuhn, among others. The show was well-received critically and, as it was Jackson Pollock's first public exhibition and Willem de Kooning's second, and the occasion of Pollock and Lee Krasner's meeting, could be considered a watershed event in contemporary American art.

Graham's own style made a pronounced shift away from abstraction in the 1940s. He began referencing renaissance art in his paintings, incorporating occult symbols, and signing them "Ioannus Magus," or "Ioannus San Germanus." His marriage to Constance ended acrimoniously around this time. He met Marianne Strate, a bookbinder, through her daughter Ileana Sonnabend and son-in-law Leo Castelli. They lived in Southampton, New York, where Graham was close to the Castellis, Paul Brach, Miriam Schapiro, and where he renewed his friendship with Willem de Kooning, who had a studio in Castelli's East Hampton home in the early 1950s. Marianne died in 1955.

Graham exhibited at the Stable Gallery in 1954, and at the newly-opened, uptown Whitney Museum of American Art in 1955. Jack Mayer became Graham's dealer in the late 1950s, held exhibitions at his Madison Avenue gallery, Gallery Mayer, in 1960, and arranged for an exhibition at the Tennessee Fine Arts Center in 1961, shortly before Graham's death. Graham left the United States for the last time in 1959, lived in Paris for two years, and died in June 1961 in a hospital in London. Gallery Mayer held a memorial exhibition at the end of 1961. Retrospective exhibitions of Graham's work have been held at the Art Institute of Chicago (1963), the Museum of Modern Art (1968), the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston (1969), and the Phillips Collection (1987).
Separated Materials note:
The Archives of American Art also holds material lent for microfilming (reel 5049) including six volumes of notebooks and several loose sketches. Loaned materials were returned to MoMA and are not described in the collection container inventory.
Provenance:
The papers of John Graham were given to the Archives of American Art in five separate accessions between 1985 and 1988. The bulk of papers were donated by Graham's son, John David Graham, in 1985, with later additions from Patricia Graham, the widow of John David Graham, in 1986, 1987, and 1988, via the Andre Emmerich Gallery, Inc. The Department of Prints and Drawings of the Museum of Modern Art donated more papers and loaned additional materials for microfilming in 1986.
Restrictions:
The collection has been digitized and is available online via the Archives of American Art website.
Rights:
The John Graham papers are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Art -- Collectors and collecting  Search this
Painting, Modern -- 20th century -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Artists as authors -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
World War, 1914-1918  Search this
Authors -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Works of art  Search this
Antiques  Search this
Painters -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sketchbooks
Photographs
Citation:
John Graham Papers, 1799-1988. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.grahjohn
See more items in:
John Graham papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-grahjohn
Additional Online Media:

Dorothy Dehner papers

Creator:
Dehner, Dorothy, 1901-1994  Search this
Names:
Philadelphia Art Alliance  Search this
Willard Gallery  Search this
Graham, John, 1887-1961  Search this
Smith, David, 1906-1965  Search this
Extent:
4.5 Linear feet
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Sound recordings
Interviews
Photographs
Date:
1920-1987
bulk 1951-1987
Summary:
The papers of Dorothy Dehner measure approximately 4.5 linear feet and date from 1920 to 1987, with the bulk of the material dating from 1951 to 1987. The collection documents the life and work of the sculptor. Papers include extensive correspondence, business and financial papers, writings, interviews, printed material, photographs, student papers, one item of art work, and scattered personal papers and material relating to David Smith.
Scope and Content Note:
The papers of Dorothy Dehner measure approximately 4.5 linear feet and date from 1920 to 1987, with the bulk of the material dating from 1951 to 1987. The collection documents the life and work of the sculptor. Papers include extensive correspondence, business and financial papers, writings, interviews, printed material, photographs, student papers, one item of art work, and scattered personal papers and material relating to David Smith.

Comprising a series of biographical material are interviews (mostly untranscribed), personal papers such as notes on Dehner's biography and career, list of things taken from Bolton Landing, recipes, and a wedding announcement for her stepdaughter, Abby Mann Thernstrom, and material relating to David Smith such as a copy of his last will and testament, a letter of introduction (dating from their trip to Europe in the mid-1930s), and a chronology of Smith's life.

Correspondence consists of numerous letters and enclosures concerning both professional and personal matters. Correspondents include artists, museums, galleries, art dealers, researchers, curators, friends, and relatives. Correspondence documents Dehner's various personal and professional relationships, the active role she played in promoting and exhibiting her art work, as well as the key role she played in fostering art historical research (on David Smith, herself, and other artists of her era), and her many other creative activities, including her various writing efforts.

Found amongst Dehner's business and financial papers are records relating to various galleries and/or exhibitions, including the Willard Gallery and exhibitions at the Philadelphia Art Alliance and Parsons-Dreyfuss Gallery, and to various projects, such as the Committee for the American Participation in the Triennale and the Great Southwest Industrial Park, as well as scattered records relating to personal business matters and finances, such as lists, tax records, authentication of art works, and sales agreements.

Dehner's writings include poems (including one dated from high school and drafts of ones published in Tracks), various pieces on John Graham (including versions of a memoir, which were published as a foreword to the re-issue of System and Dialectics of Art and as an article in Leonardo) and on David Smith (including articles on their first meeting and on Smith's 1940 work, "Medals for Dishonor"), lectures and speeches, and various pieces on art and other topics. Writings shed light on other aspects of Dehner's creativity and concern. Also included are writings of others, some of which shed light on Dehner's life and work.

Also found amongst Dehner's papers are printed material, including exhibition catalogs, announcements, and clippings (on herself and Smith, and to a limited extent, on other artists); an undated etching by Dehner which seems to have originally belong to Garnett McCoy, former Curator of the Archives; and photographs of Dehner, her second husband, Ferdinand Mann, John Graham, and various works of art, as well as an abstract photograph by David Smith, dating from circa 1934.
Arrangement:
The Dorothy Dehner papers are arranged into 7 series:

Series 1: Biographical Material, 1935-1982 (bulk 1950s-1982) (Box 1; 0.5 linear feet)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1927-1987 (Boxes 1-4; 2.6 linear feet)

Series 3: Business and Financial Papers, 1940-1985 (Box 4; 0.3 linear feet)

Series 4: Writings, 1920, 1951-1987 (Box 4; 0.3 linear feet)

Series 5: Printed Material, 1940-1987 (Boxes 4-5; 0.6 linear feet)

Series 6: Art Work, undated (OV1; 1 item)

Series 7: Photographs, 1930s-1986 (Box 5; 0.1 linear feet)

The collection has not been re-filmed to reflect the above arrangement. In an effort to provide continued access to the existing microfilm, microfilm reel information was gathered from previous box and folder labels and is provided, where possible, in parentheses after folder titles in the container listing below. Unfilmed material has likewise been noted. Researchers should note that reel numbers have not been verified.
Biographical Note:
Dorothy Dehner was born in Cleveland, Ohio in 1901. Her father died when she was about ten and the family moved to Pasadena, California in 1915. After the death of her mother and sister, she was raised by her mother's sister, Aunt Florence. Dehner was exposed to art as a child, receiving instruction in drawing and painting. She studied drama for a year at UCLA in 1922-1923 before moving to New York with the intention of pursuing a theatrical career. In 1925, she traveled alone to Europe, where she visited Italy, Switzerland, and France and where she began to draw seriously.

Upon her return to New York, Dehner enrolled in the Art Students League intending to study sculpture, but, uninspired by the work of William Zorach's sculpture class, ended up studying drawing with Kimon Nicolaides instead. In 1926, she met fellow artist David Smith in the rooming house they shared. At her suggestion, he too enrolled in the Art Students League. In 1927, they were married.

At the League, Dehner and Smith studied with the modernist painter, Jan Matulka, and befriended Weber and Thomas Furlong, through whom they met the Russian painter and theoretician, John Graham. Graham introduced them to the avant-garde art world and ended up having a profound influence on them both and their work. Around this time, they also befriended other young artists, such as Adolph Gottlieb, Mark Rothko, and Edgar and Lucille Corcos Levy. In 1929, after a visit to the Furlong's summer home in upstate New York, Dehner and Smith bought a farm in Bolton Landing, which became their permanent home in 1940 and was later named Terminal Iron Works. They spent eight months in the Virgin Islands, in 1931-1932, where Dehner painted abstract still lifes of shells and marine life. In the fall of 1935, they traveled to Europe, where they met up with Graham in Paris, spent five months in Greece, and toured the Soviet Union, with other stops along the way.

During her years at Bolton Landing (from 1940 to 1950), Dehner progressed in her work, producing a series of paintings titled Life on the Farm and embarking upon a series of abstract geometric drawings in ink and watercolor. In 1943, she had a joint exhibition with Smith at the Albany Institute of History and Art. Three years later, she participated in the annual exhibition of Audubon Artists and was awarded a first prize for drawing; and in 1948, she had her first one-woman show at Skidmore College.

Dehner left Bolton Landing in 1950 (she was divorced from Smith two years later) and returned to school, earning her degree from Skidmore College in 1952. She moved back to New York City, and supported herself over the next several years by teaching at various schools, including the Barnard School for Girls. She had her first solo exhibition in the city at the Rose Fried Gallery, and studied engraving at Stanley William Hayter's Atelier 17. At this point, Dehner started making sculpture, first experimenting in wax and then casting her wax sculptures in bronze. In 1955, she began working at the Sculpture Center, and from this point on, focused mainly on sculpture with occasional forays in drawing and print-making. In addition to works in bronze, she went on to create sculptures in wood (during the 1970s) and steel (during the 1980s).

In 1955, Dehner married the New York publisher, Ferdinand Mann. That same year, she joined the Willard Gallery, run by Marian Willard. She had her first exhibition of drawings there in 1955 (which led to a solo exhibition at the Art Institute of Chicago) and her first sculpture show there in 1957; she continued to show at the Willard Gallery regularly until 1976. Over the next several decades, Dehner's work was frequently exhibited in solo and groups shows at museums and galleries across the country, and was acquired for both public and private collections.

In addition to her art work, Dehner was also a published poet and writer. She wrote the foreword to the 1971 re-issue of John Graham's System and Dialectics of Art, and an essay on David Smith's "Medals for Dishonor," which was published in Art Journal in 1977. And two of her poems, "Past Tense" and "Two Lines," appeared in the journal Tracks in 1977.

Dehner continued to work into her nineties. She passed away in 1994.
Related Material:
Other resources in the Archives relating to Dorothy Dehner include oral history interviews with Dehner, October 1965 and December 1966, and a photograph of Dehner by Dena, 1966.
Separated Material:
The Archives of American Art also holds microfilm of material lent for microfilming on reels D298 (portions), D298A, 1269 (portions) and 1372, including photographs of Dorothy Dehner and David Smith, sketchbooks, correspondence between Dehner and Smith, an inventory, and some printed material. Lent materials were returned to the lender. To aid researchers, an attempt has been made to note the corresponding reel number for each folder in the collection container listing.
Provenance:
The Dorothy Dehner papers were donated 1967-1987 in increments by Dorothy Dehner. She also lent materials for microfilming between 1967 and 1977, some of which was subsequently donated. The art work in the collection most likely belonged to Garnett McCoy originally, and was included in the collection during processing in 2005.
Restrictions:
The collection is open for research. Use requires an appointment and is limited to the Washington, D.C. research facility.
Rights:
The Dorothy Dehner papers are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Works of art  Search this
Women sculptors -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Sculpture, Modern -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Art -- Study and teaching  Search this
Art -- Economic aspects  Search this
Sculptors -- New York (State) -- New York -- Interviews  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Photographs
Citation:
Dorothy Dehner papers, 1920-1987 (bulk 1951-1987). Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.dehndoro
See more items in:
Dorothy Dehner papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-dehndoro
Additional Online Media:

Fritz Bultman papers

Creator:
Bultman, Fritz, 1919-1985  Search this
Names:
Boghosian, Varujan  Search this
Bultman, Jeanne  Search this
Cicero, Carmen, 1926-  Search this
Cornell, Joseph  Search this
Drexler, Sherman  Search this
Fromboluti, Sideo, 1921-  Search this
Graham, John, 1887-1961  Search this
Hofmann, Hans, 1880-1966  Search this
Hofmann, Maria, 1885-1963  Search this
Hopkins, Budd, 1931-  Search this
Kees, Weldon, 1914-1955  Search this
Krasner, Lee, 1908-1984  Search this
Manso, Leo  Search this
Motherwell, Robert  Search this
Newman, Annette  Search this
Newman, Barnett, 1905-1970  Search this
Ossorio, Alfonso, 1916-1990  Search this
Ponsold, Renate  Search this
Reynal, Jeanne, 1903-  Search this
Rothschild, Judith  Search this
Sills, Thomas, 1914-  Search this
Simon, Sidney, 1917-1997  Search this
Smith, Tony, 1912-1980  Search this
Speyer, Nora  Search this
Tworkov, Jack  Search this
Vevers, Tony  Search this
Windham, Donald  Search this
Extent:
11.9 Linear feet
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Photographs
Interviews
Paintings
Drawings
Sketches
Sketchbooks
Diaries
Date:
1928-2010, bulk 1940s-1990s
Summary:
The papers of New York School painter and sculptor Fritz Bultman, 1928-2010, bulk 1940s-1990s, measure 11.9 linear feet. They document Bultman's professional activities, ties to the Abstract Expressionist movement, and his personal life. Letters from friends and family include many from Hans and Maria Hofmann. Letters by Bultman are mostly to family; also found are a few drafts and copies of business and personal letters. Writings and notes are by and about Bultman. Notebooks/sketchbooks (39 volumes) include autobiographical writings, notes on dreams and thoughts while in psychoanalysis, many sketches and some completed drawings. Subject files reflect Bultman's professional activities, interests, and relationships; Hans Hofmann is the most thoroughly documented subject. Extensive printed material concerns Bultman's activities and exhibitions; also included are his published writings. Most photographs are of artwork, Bultman, his family and friends. Also found are biographical materials, 4 diaries, 6 interviews with Fritz Bultman and Jeanne Bultman, and a small amount of artwork.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of New York School painter and sculptor Fritz Bultlman, 1928-2010, bulk 1940s-1990s, measure 11.9 linear feet. They document Bultman's professional activities, ties to the Abstract Expressionist movement, and his personal life. Letters from friends and family include many from Hans and Maria Hofmann. Letters by Bultman are mostly to family; also found are a few drafts and copies of business and personal letters. Writings and notes are by and about Bultman. Notebooks/sketchbooks (39 volumes) include autobiographical writings, notes on dreams and thoughts while in psychoanalysis, many sketches and some completed drawings. Subject files reflect Bultman's professional activities, interests, and relationships. Extensive printed material concerns Bultman's activities and exhibitions; also included are his published writings. Most photographs are of artwork, Bultman, his family and friends. Also found are biographical materials, 4 diaries, 6 interviews with Fritz Bultman and Jeanne Bultman, and a small amount of artwork.

Biographical materials include school records and notice of Bultman's army classification.

Most letters are addressed to Fritz Bultman and his parents. Fritz's education in Munich and studying with Hans Hofmann is well-documented. Many letters are from Miz Hofmann and Hans Hofmann. Also found are a smaller number of letters from museums, galleries, universities, and arts organizations. The surviving letters by Bultman are mainly to his family. Most were written when he was a student in Munich or traveling in Europe. There are some drafts and copies of letters concerning professional activities, arrangements for lectures, exhibitions, and Cynthia Goodman's editing "Form and Color in the Creative Process: The Painter's Primer" by Hans Hofmann.

Most interviews focus on Bultman's career. An interview with Jeanne and Fritz Bultman is about John Graham, and one of the interviews with Jeanne Bultman concerns Hans Hofmann.

Bultman's writings and notes include articles, lectures and talks about Hans Hofman, lectures about his own work, and a book review. Among the writings about Bultman are articles, a catalog essay and exhibition review.

Notebooks/sketchbooks (39 volumes) contain a variety of writings and notes, including some that are autobiographical, along with sketches and several finished drawings. Some volumes consist of writings and notes with a few sketches and doodles while others are mainly sketchbooks containing a few stray notes and brief writings; many contain approximately the same amount of text and drawings.

Diaries (4 volumes) contain entries about his work, professional and personal activities. One volume is a record of his October 1978 trip to Istanbul.

Subject files contain varying combinations of correspondence, photographs, printed material, and manuscripts. The most extensive file relates to Hans Hofmann and includes copies of writings by him. Other files of note concern Joseph Cornell, the exhibitions "Forum '49" and "Forum '49 Revisited," Weldon Kees, Tony Smith, and Donald Windham.

The largest series, printed material, consists of exhibition catalogs, announcements, reviews, articles and clippings about or mentioning Bultman.

Noteworthy among the small amount of artwork by Bultman is an early print; also found are loose drawings and paintings on paper.

Photographs of artwork document the full range of Bultman's production --paintings, sculpture, drawings, collage, stained glass, interior design and decoration. Also found are a few photographs of works by other artists. Photographs of Fritz Bultman include many by Renate Ponsold. Other indentified individuals include parents Fred and Pauline Bultman, sister Muriel Bultman, childhood nurse Katie Belle, son Johann Bultman, Sherman Drexler, Hans Hofmann, Miz Hofmann, Miss Katsura, Lee Krasner, Annalee Newman, Barnett Newman, Alfonso Ossorio, Jeanne Reynal, Thomas Sills, Jack Tworkov, and Wally Tworkov. A group portrait of the artists of Long Point Gallery includes: Varujan Boghosian, Fritz Bultman, Carmen Cicero, Sideo Fromboluti, Budd Hopkins, Rick Klauber, Lee Manso, Sidney Simon, Robert Motherwell, Judith Rothschild, Nora Speyer, and Tony Vevers. Also found in this series are photographs of Bultman exhibition installations and views of miscellaneous places.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged in 10 series:

Series 1: Biographical Materials,1928-2003 (Box 1; 0.1 linear feet)

Series 2: Letters, 1930-1995 (Box 1; 0.4 linear feet)

Series 3: Interviews, 1968-1998 (Box 1; 0.4 linear feet)

Series 4: Writings and Notes, 1935-circa 1980s (Boxes 1-2; 0.8 linear feet)

Series 5: Notebooks/Sketchbooks, 1937-circa 1979 (Boxes 2-3, 11; 0.7 linear feet)

Series 6: Diaries, 1977-1979 (Box 3; 0.3 linear feet)

Series 7: Subject Files, 1942-2010 (Boxes 3-5, 11; 2.3 linear feet)

Series 8: Printed Material, 1941-2006 (Boxes 5-9, OV 12; 3.5 linear feet)

Series 9: Artwork, circa 1930s-1956 (Boxes 9, 11; 0.1 linear feet)

Series 10: Photographs, 1935-1997 (Boxes 9-10; 0.6 linear feet)
Biographical / Historical:
Fritz Bultman (1919-1985), a New York School painter and sculptor who lived and worked in Provincetown, Massachusetts and New York City, was also a collagist, stained glass artist, and educator.

Anthony Fred Bultman, III --always known as Fritz --was from a prominent and cultured New Orleans family. He began studying art as a boy and one of his teachers was Morris Graves, a family friend. His last 2 years of high school were spent at the Munich Preparatory School, boarding with Mrs. Hans Hofmann whose husband was working in New York for an extended period. Bultman attended the New Bauhaus in Chicago before studying for three years with Hans Hofmann in New York City and Provincetown, Massachusetts. As well as being a major influence on Bultman's development as a painter, Hofmann became a life-long friend.

Fritz Bultman met dancer and model Jeanne Lawson (1918-2008), when she was posing in Hofmann's studio during the summer of 1941. They married in 1943 and the following year bought a house in Provincetown. In 1945, Bultman built a studio designed by a friend from the New Bauhaus, sculptor and architectural designer Tony Smith, who also helped with its construction.

His first solo exhibition was held in 1947 at the Hugo Gallery, New York; others followed in 1950, again at Hugo Gallery and at Kootz Gallery, New York. After receiving an Italian Government Grant for Exchange Fellowship, Bultman spent 1950-1951 in Florence, Italy, where he learned the process of casting and began making metal sculpture. In 1952 the Bultmans moved to New York City. Depressed and beset by anxiety, Bultman began Freudian psychoanalysis, and between 1952 and 1956 produced very little artwork.

In 1958 Bultman resumed exhibiting and continued to show regularly for the remainder of his life. He enjoyed solo exhibitions in New York City, Paris, New Orleans, North Carolina, Provincetown, and other venues. Between 1958 and 1963 Bultman taught painting at Hunter College and was an instructor in design and painting at Pratt Institute. Bultman spent 1964-1965 in Paris on a Fulbright Grant painting and sculpting, studying European methods of bronze casting, and meeting French artists. Bultman maintained his reputation as a highly regarded art instructor and in later years was a sought after guest lecturer at a various colleges. While artist-in-residence at Kalamazoo College, Michigan in 1981, he designed and produced a stained glass mural with technical assistance from his wife, Jeanne Bultman, a skilled artisan.

Fritz Bultman died of cancer in Provincetown, Massachusetts, in 1985.
Related Materials:
An oral history interview with Fritz Bultman, 1986 January 6, was conducted by Irving Sandler for the Archives of American Art (available on microfilm reel 3196).
Provenance:
Gift of Fritz Bultman in 1984, which included material lent for microfilming in 1970 and 1971. Additions donated by Jeanne Bultman, his widow, in 1988 and 2000, and by his sons, Anthony F. Bultman, IV and Ellis Johann Bultman, in 2013.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment. Use of archival audiovisual recordings with no duplicate access copy requires advance notice.
Rights:
The Fritz Bultman papers are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Sculptors -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Painting, Modern -- 20th century -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Painters -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
New York school of art  Search this
Abstract expressionism  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Interviews
Paintings
Drawings
Sketches
Sketchbooks
Diaries
Citation:
Fritz Bultman papers, 1928-2010, bulk 1940s-1990s. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.bultfrit
See more items in:
Fritz Bultman papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-bultfrit

Belle Krasne Ribicoff papers

Creator:
Ribicoff, Belle Krasne, 1924-  Search this
Names:
Storm King Art Center  Search this
Wadsworth Atheneum  Search this
Albee, Edward, 1928-  Search this
Arp, Jean, 1887-1966  Search this
Ashton, Dore  Search this
Bailey, William, 1930-  Search this
Bazaine, Jean, 1904-2001  Search this
Benn, Ben, 1884-  Search this
Bloom, Claire, 1931-  Search this
Chelimsky, Oscar  Search this
Cornell, Joseph  Search this
D'Harnoncourt, Rene, 1901-1968  Search this
De Vries, Peter, 1910-1993  Search this
Dorazio, Piero, 1927-  Search this
Dorazio, Virginia Dortch  Search this
Ferren, John, 1905-1970  Search this
Fitzsimmons, James, 1919-1985  Search this
Foote, Horton  Search this
Frankenthaler, Helen, 1928-2011  Search this
Geist, Sidney  Search this
Gottlieb, Adolph, 1903-1974  Search this
Graham, John, 1887-1961  Search this
Greenberg, Clement, 1909-1994  Search this
Greene, Balcomb, 1904-1990  Search this
Holty, Carl, 1900-1973  Search this
Kazan, Elia  Search this
Kelly, Ellsworth, 1923-  Search this
Krautheimer, Richard, 1897-  Search this
Lamos, Mark  Search this
Lebrun, Rico, 1900-1964  Search this
Matisse, Pierre, 1900-1989  Search this
Morris, George L. K., 1905-1975  Search this
Parsons, Estelle  Search this
Pearlstein, Philip, 1924-  Search this
Ribicoff, Abraham, 1910-1998  Search this
Richardson, Edgar Preston, 1902-1985  Search this
Ritchie, Andrew Carnduff  Search this
Rosenborg, Ralph M., 1913-1992  Search this
Roszak, Theodore, 1907-1981  Search this
Saarinen, Eero, 1910-1961  Search this
Salpeter, Harry  Search this
Shapiro, Karl Jay, 1913-  Search this
Skinner, Cornelia Otis, 1901-  Search this
Smith, David, 1906-1965  Search this
Soby, James Thrall, 1906-1979  Search this
Travers, P. L.(Pamela Lyndon), 1899-1996  Search this
Valentin, Curt, 1902-1954  Search this
Van Doren, Mark, 1894-1972  Search this
Yunkers, Adja, 1900-1983  Search this
Extent:
1.6 Linear Feet
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Sketches
Drafts (documents)
Photographs
Prints
Illustrated letters
Postcards
Christmas cards
Date:
1942-circa 2010
bulk 1945-2004
Summary:
The papers of Belle Krasne Ribicoff measure 1.6 linear feet and date from 1942-circa 2010, with the bulk of the collection dating from 1945-2004. Papers include biographical materials; correspondence with artists, art historians, writers, museum directors, and others; individual files relating to Belle and Irving Ribicoff's art collection and the Friends of Abe Ribicoff's campaign for the United States Senate; artwork; printed material, e.g., clippings, announcements, exhibition catalogues, brochures; and photographs. The collection documents Ribicoff's career as an arts editor, critic, and her involvement in civic and arts organizations for the State of Connecticut.
Scope and Content Note:
The papers of Belle Krasne Ribicoff measure 1.6 linear feet and date from 1942-circa 2010, with the bulk of the collection dating from 1945-2004. Papers include biographical materials; correspondence with artists, art historians, writers, museum directors, and others; individual files relating to Belle and Irving Ribicoff's art collection and the Friends of Abe Ribicoff's campaign for the United States Senate; artwork; printed material, e.g., clippings, announcements, exhibition catalogues, brochures; and photographs. The collection documents Ribicoff's career as an arts editor, critic, and her involvement in civic and arts organizations for the State of Connecticut.

Biographical materials include documentation of the Buttenweiser Prize awarded to Belle Krasne by the Art History Departmental Honors at Vassar College in 1945 and curriculum vitae.

Correspondence, primarily incoming letters consists of letters, postcards, draft versions, and copies of e-mails. Belle Krasne Ribicoff was friends with many artists; their letters focus on daily activities, work, and the art world. Among the correspondents are Oscar and Eleanor Chelminsky, Joseph Cornell, Piero and Virginia Dorazio, John and Rae Ferren, Helen Frankenthaler, James Fitzsimmons, Adolph Gottlieb, John Graham, Ellsworth Kelly, Frank Modell, George L.K. Morris, Philip Pearlstein, Eero Saarinen, David Smith, and Adja Yunkers. There is substantial correspondence from Ben Benn, Sidney Geist, Leon Hartley, Ralph Rosenborg, and Theodore Roszak. Also found are love letters to Belle Krasne Ribicoff from Jean Bazaine. Many of the artists' letters are illustrated. Of note, are a letter from Carl Holty to J.B. Neumann and an artist's statement written by Adolph Gottlieb.

Ribicoff had a professional and personal relationship with a number of prominent writers, actors, and other individuals known for their work in the arts, such as Edward Albee, Claire Bloom, Peter DeVries, Horton Foote, Elia Kazan, Mark Lamos, Estelle Parsons, Karl Shapiro, Cornelia Otis Skinner, and P.L. Travers. There are letters from museum directors, art historians, and other well-known cultural figures, such as Dore Ashton, Clement Greenberg, Balcomb Greene, Rene d'Harnoncourt, Pierre Matisse, E. P. Richardson, Andrew C. Ritchie, Harry Salpeter, Curt Valentin, and Mark Van Doren. Also found are files of holiday cards, many original artwork; letters to Ribicoff upon her departure from Art Digest; letters from representatives at Storm King Art Center Museum and the Wadsworth Atheneum; and letters from unidentified correspondents.

The Ribicoff collection relates to the personal art collection of Belle and Irving Ribicoff; materials document the purchase and sale of artwork and the lending of artwork for exhibitions. There is a file of petition letters sponsored by the Friends of Abe Ribicoff campaign for the United States Senate.

Original artwork includes prints by Jean Arp and Adja Yunkers and pencil sketches of Sarai Ribicoff by William Bailey. Printed material consists of news clippings; a periodical; exhibition announcements; brochures; an offprint of an article by Cleve Gray; and miscellaneous printed material.

Photographs contain black and white photographs of Belle Krasne Ribicoff, Ben and Velida Benn, Richard Krautheimer, and of the jurors attending the Carnegie International exhibition (circa 1954), including Jean Bazaine, Rico Lebrun, Eric Newton, and James Thrall Soby.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged into 7 series:

Series 1: Biographical Material, 1945, circa 2010 (Box 1; 1 folder)

Series 2: Belle Krasne Ribicoff Correspondence, 1942-2007 (Boxes 1, 3; 1.0 linear feet)

Series 3: The Ribicoff Collection, 1949-1988 (Box 1; 0.2 linear feet)

Series 4: Friends of Abe Ribicoff Campaign, 1968 (Box 1; 0.1 linear feet)

Series 5: Artwork, circa 1950s-1978 (Box 1, OV 4; 0.1 linear feet)

Series 6: Printed Material, 1948-2000 (Box 1; 0.1 linear feet)

Series 7: Photographs, 1945-circa 2007 (Boxes 1-2; 0.1 linear feet)
Biographical Note:
Belle Krasne Ribicoff (b. 1924) lives in Hartford, Connecticut and has served as an arts editor, critic, and university administrator.

Ribicoff was born and raised in New York City. She graduated Phi Beta Kappa with a degree in art history from Vassar College in 1945. After a brief stint with an advertising agency in New York, Ribicoff became Assistant Editor at Magazine of Art (1946-1947), where she developed an interest in contemporary art. She served as editor for such publications as Art News (1948-1949), Art Digest (1949-1954), and Craft Horizons (1954-1955).

In 1955, she married Irving S. Ribicoff (1915-1994), an attorney and moved to Hartford, Connecticut. The Ribicoffs' had two daughters, Dara (b. 1956) and Sarai (1957-1980).

Ribicoff has held various positions at the University of Hartford: Development Director at the Hartford School of Art (1980-1981), Development Liaison to the Office of President (1982-1988), and Associate Vice President for Public Affairs (1980-1983). Belle Krasne Ribicoff has served as a professional volunteer for educational and cultural organizations in Connecticut; she has been involved in efforts to make the arts a part of the school curriculum. She was Vice-President of the Hartford Board of Education (1961-1967; 1965-1971) and was Chairman of the State of Connecticut's Commission on the Arts (1965-1971). Ribicoff is a Life Director at the Hartford Stage Company and a Life Regent at the University of Hartford. She is a Sterling Fellows at Yale University and sits on the President's Advisory Committee at Vassar College.

Belle Krasne Ribicoff has received recognition for her professional and public service contributions by a number of institutions. In 1954, she received the Frank Jewett Mather Award for critical writing from the College Art Association. Other honors have included: Charter Oak Leadership Medal for Distinguished Service (1968), the University of Hartford Medal for Distinguished Service (1995), and the Spirit of Vassar award for outstanding commitment and service to Vassar or another community (2005).
Related Material:
Also found at the Archives of American Art is Belle Krasne's letter to Philip Pavia, May 14, 1954 on microfilm reel 3470.
Provenance:
The collection was donated by Belle Krasne Ribicoff to the Archives of American Art in 2008.
Restrictions:
Use of original material requires an appointment.

Letters from Jean Bazaine to Belle Krasne Ribicoff and sketches of Sarai Ribicoff by William Bailey are access restricted. Their use requires written permission.
Rights:
The Belle Krasne Ribicoff papers are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Editors  Search this
Art critics  Search this
Art -- Collectors and collecting  Search this
Art, American  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sketches
Drafts (documents)
Photographs
Prints
Illustrated letters
Postcards
Christmas cards
Citation:
Belle Krasne Ribicoff papers, 1942-circa 2010 bulk 1945-2004. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.krasbell2
See more items in:
Belle Krasne Ribicoff papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-krasbell2

Primitive art and Picasso / John D. Graham

Author:
Graham, John 1887-1961  Search this
Smithsonian Libraries African Art Index Project DSI  Search this
Subject:
Picasso, Pablo 1881-1973 Criticism and interpretation  Search this
Type:
Books
Date:
1937
Topic:
Art, African--Influence  Search this
Art, Primitive--Influence  Search this
Call number:
AP1.A784 A8
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_688934

Miscellaneous Personal Correspondence in English, French, and Spanish

Collection Creator:
Graham, John, 1887-1961  Search this
Extent:
2 Folders
Container:
Box 1, Folder 80-81
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
circa 1934-1961
Scope and Contents note:
Includes 2 letters from Graham, one a fragment; and letters from Joan Graftmueller, Edwin Walker, Paule Peron, Charles Schante, Harry Dickman, an Abrams (possibly Ruth Abrams), Marguerite Mergin, Mrs. M. Graham, Ilse Pichler, Islmail Loutfi, Coucha, Katie (a nurse in London), Wilfred (possibly Zogbaum), Betsy (possibly Elizabeth Sparhawk Jones), Jean Marie, Blanche (possibly Blanche Battaglia) and several unsigned letters.
Collection Restrictions:
The collection has been digitized and is available online via the Archives of American Art website.
Collection Rights:
The John Graham papers are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Collection Citation:
John Graham Papers, 1799-1988. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
John Graham papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-grahjohn-ref103
Additional Online Media:

Personal Business Records

Collection Creator:
Graham, John, 1887-1961  Search this
Extent:
1.4 Linear feet (Box 1-3)
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
circa 1931-1962
Scope and Contents note:
This series contains address books, appointment books, contracts, receipts, banking documents, property inventories, stock records, tax records, notes, notebooks, wills and other legal documents, and scattered correspondence related to Graham's finances. Apart from the appointment books and inventories which are earlier, records in this series are dated from the late 1950s to Graham's death.

Appointment books contain intermittent records of business and personal appointments from 1931 to 1938, and from 1948 to 1961. As with most of Graham's papers, they are heavily annotated and often contain sketches; a 1937 appointment book in particular contains numerous color drawings. Annotations range from notes about Graham's antique trade to personal matters and writings on Graham's wide-ranging interests. Some of these notes appear to have been made years after the year for which the book was made. One of the folders containing the address files is also annotated and illustrated. Notebooks found in the Writings series contain similar notes, writings, and sketches.

Bank account records include check ledgers, deposit slips, and account statements. Financial notebooks consist of check ledgers that were re-used as notebooks, usually to keep track of antique objects and collectors. Additional notes related to antiques are found in financial notes, along with notes on personal assets and Graham's dealings with the Stable Gallery. Scattered drafts of letters are found among financial notes. Additional financial correspondence is also found filed with wills, stock records, and tax records.

The book inventory and catalog of antiques and books are both annotated typescripts with notes in Graham's handwriting.

Other details about the contents of folders are noted in the folder list.

Additional correspondence related to Graham's business transactions can be found in Correspondence. In particular, letters related to Graham's estate can be found with Elinor Graham's correspondence.
Collection Restrictions:
The collection has been digitized and is available online via the Archives of American Art website.
Collection Rights:
The John Graham papers are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Collection Citation:
John Graham Papers, 1799-1988. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.grahjohn, Series 3
See more items in:
John Graham papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-grahjohn-ref108

Address Books

Collection Creator:
Graham, John, 1887-1961  Search this
Extent:
2 Folders
Container:
Box 1, Folder 84-85
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
circa 1950-1961
Collection Restrictions:
The collection has been digitized and is available online via the Archives of American Art website.
Collection Rights:
The John Graham papers are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Collection Citation:
John Graham Papers, 1799-1988. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
John Graham papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-grahjohn-ref109
Additional Online Media:

Bank Account at Chase Manhattan Bank

Collection Creator:
Graham, John, 1887-1961  Search this
Extent:
6 Folders
Container:
Box 2, Folder 17-22
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1957-1961
Scope and Contents note:
Not scanned
Collection Restrictions:
The collection has been digitized and is available online via the Archives of American Art website.
Collection Rights:
The John Graham papers are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Collection Citation:
John Graham Papers, 1799-1988. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
John Graham papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-grahjohn-ref133

Bank Account at Union Bank of Switzerland

Collection Creator:
Graham, John, 1887-1961  Search this
Extent:
3 Folders
Container:
Box 2, Folder 23-25
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1958-1961
Scope and Contents note:
not scanned
Collection Restrictions:
The collection has been digitized and is available online via the Archives of American Art website.
Collection Rights:
The John Graham papers are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Collection Citation:
John Graham Papers, 1799-1988. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
John Graham papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-grahjohn-ref135

"Catalog of Antiques and Books for Insurance Purposes,"

Collection Creator:
Graham, John, 1887-1961  Search this
Extent:
2 Folders
Container:
Box 2, Folder 27-28
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1942-1952
Collection Restrictions:
The collection has been digitized and is available online via the Archives of American Art website.
Collection Rights:
The John Graham papers are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Collection Citation:
John Graham Papers, 1799-1988. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
John Graham papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-grahjohn-ref138
Additional Online Media:

Biographical Materials and Artifacts

Collection Creator:
Graham, John, 1887-1961  Search this
Extent:
0.9 Linear feet (Boxes 1, 11-12, 17)
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1799
1822
1891-1961
Scope and Contents note:
This series consists of documents related to John Graham's military service, legal matters, medical history, family members, as well as three-dimensional artifacts belonging to Graham.

Many of the documents in this series are in Polish or Russian, and typescript translations are often available. Translations appear to have been annotated and perhaps written by Graham. These documents include a baptism certificate, a certificate of nobility, documents related to Graham's military service and nationality, and certificates of identity. Graham's marriages and divorces are documented through legal records, invitations, correspondence in Russian with a third party related to his divorce from Vera Alexandrovna, and an identity paper of Constance Wellman with a photograph issued in France.

Two scrapbooks related to Archer Gibson, Graham's father-in-law by his third marriage to Elinor Gibson and a well-known organist, are found. The first contains primarily newspaper clippings related to Gibson's musical career. The second contains letters and telegrams from well-known politicians, industrialists, and other celebrities for whom Gibson gave concerts. For photographs of Archer Gibson, see the Photographs series.

Medical documents include a report of Graham's death issued by the State Department and x-rays taken in 1961, shortly before his death.

Among the artifacts are four vellum-bound books, two of which bear dates from the late 18th and early 19th century. Some of the Artwork among Graham's papers appears to have been made on paper taken from these books. Also found is a fragment of music on vellum, which is likely the Nicene Creed. Relating to David Graham is a naval patch representing the rank of a Recruit Chief Petty Officer.

Additional biographical documents, including Graham's will and lists of assets, are found in Personal Business Records.
Collection Restrictions:
The collection has been digitized and is available online via the Archives of American Art website.
Collection Rights:
The John Graham papers are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Collection Citation:
John Graham Papers, 1799-1988. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.grahjohn, Series 1
See more items in:
John Graham papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-grahjohn-ref14

Stocks and Taxes

Collection Creator:
Graham, John, 1887-1961  Search this
Extent:
4 Folders
Container:
Box 3, Folder 3-6
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1957-1961
Scope and Contents note:
not scanned
Collection Restrictions:
The collection has been digitized and is available online via the Archives of American Art website.
Collection Rights:
The John Graham papers are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Collection Citation:
John Graham Papers, 1799-1988. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
John Graham papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-grahjohn-ref142

Writings

Collection Creator:
Graham, John, 1887-1961  Search this
Extent:
2.9 Linear feet (Box 3-5, OV 13)
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1839
circa 1923-1986
Scope and Contents note:
This series contains writings by Graham and others in the form of book-length manuscripts, annotated books, card files, essays, lists, notes, notebooks, poetry, and handwritten prayers. Books and notebooks comprise the bulk of materials.

Books are generally found in multiple drafts in the form of manuscripts and annotated typescripts. Two works are published books containing Graham's annotations: a 1923 book of poems, Have It, and Graham's most well-known work, Systems and Dialectics of Art, published in 1937. Another published work found here in manuscript form is a catalog of African art Graham created with Frank Crowninshield.

The remaining manuscripts include a comparative history of art, some of which appears to have been incorporated into Systems and Dialectics of Art; a stylized, often abstract autobiographical work usually entitled Muerte Kalaka y Casa Nada (Child-hood) (Child Within), which has sometimes been referred to as Childhood in the literature on Graham; and a large collection of brief, alphabetically-arranged essays, which appear to have been worked on over the course of decades under various titles including Don Giovanni, Finale I-V, and Orifizio Mundi. Dates, format, and the text of these works overlap significantly, and appear to have been incorporated into one another in different versions at various stages of the writing. Manuscripts in this series have been filed according to titles found on the works or on binders containing the works, and dated according to scattered postmarks and dated items found among the papers. Card files contain handwritten versions of the same essays that appear in Orifizio Mundi and were likely preliminary to the typed manuscripts. Additional notes describing the various versions of book manuscripts are found in the folder list.

Essays by Graham include typescripts, usually annotated, of published essays by Graham. Essays about Graham include photocopied typescripts of two essays written after his death. For additional published essays and articles about Graham, see Printed Materials.

Lists are found on a wide range of subjects, often banal or personal and sometimes cryptic. For lists of artwork or other assets, see Correspondence and Personal Business Records.

Miscellaneous notes and writings consist of notes, musings, essays, and aphorisms written or copied by Graham on a variety of subjects. Graham often applied brief titles to these apparently spontaneous writings, and where possible such items have been grouped together under his headings or other obvious subject matter. The folder entitled "Psychoanalysis" contains a lengthy, handwritten self-analysis dated from May through July of 1939. Miscellaneous notes and writings without titles or obvious subject matter are filed chronologically.

Notebooks contain sketches, symbols, essays, and notes and are written in multiple languages and scripts, including Russian, Latin, Greek, French, and English. Some notebooks are written in appointment books, but do not seem to record any information specific to dates. Any appointment books Graham used to actually record appointments are filed with Personal Business Records, although they may also contain notes, essays, and sketches.

Poetry includes poems by Graham, many of which are written in Russian, and poems about Graham, including one by the French poet Fernand Marc.

Additional writings are found throughout the collection, notably in Personal Business Records, Printed Materials, and Artwork.
Collection Restrictions:
The collection has been digitized and is available online via the Archives of American Art website.
Collection Rights:
The John Graham papers are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Collection Citation:
John Graham Papers, 1799-1988. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.grahjohn, Series 4
See more items in:
John Graham papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-grahjohn-ref148

African Art

Collection Creator:
Graham, John, 1887-1961  Search this
Extent:
2 Folders
Container:
Box 3, Folder 10-11
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
circa 1937
Scope and Contents note:
(a catalog, in collaboration with Frank Crowninshield; multiple drafts interfiled)
Collection Restrictions:
The collection has been digitized and is available online via the Archives of American Art website.
Collection Rights:
The John Graham papers are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Collection Citation:
John Graham Papers, 1799-1988. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
John Graham papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-grahjohn-ref150
Additional Online Media:

Comparative History of Art, Tyepscript 2

Collection Creator:
Graham, John, 1887-1961  Search this
Extent:
2 Folders
Container:
Box 3, Folder 13-14
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1930
Collection Restrictions:
The collection has been digitized and is available online via the Archives of American Art website.
Collection Rights:
The John Graham papers are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Collection Citation:
John Graham Papers, 1799-1988. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
John Graham papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-grahjohn-ref153
Additional Online Media:

Comparative History of Art; Charts, Notes, and Plans

Collection Creator:
Graham, John, 1887-1961  Search this
Extent:
4 Folders
Container:
Box 3, Folder 15-18
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1930
Scope and Contents note:
see also OV 13
(contains binder with heading "systems and dialectics of art," but the material within the binder appears to be for this art history work, versions of which bear the date 1930)
Collection Restrictions:
The collection has been digitized and is available online via the Archives of American Art website.
Collection Rights:
The John Graham papers are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Collection Citation:
John Graham Papers, 1799-1988. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
John Graham papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-grahjohn-ref154
Additional Online Media:

Don Giovanni Manuscript

Collection Creator:
Graham, John, 1887-1961  Search this
Extent:
4 Folders
Container:
Box 3, Folder 19-22
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
circa 1949-1954
Collection Restrictions:
The collection has been digitized and is available online via the Archives of American Art website.
Collection Rights:
The John Graham papers are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Collection Citation:
John Graham Papers, 1799-1988. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
John Graham papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-grahjohn-ref157
Additional Online Media:

Don Giovanni Typescript

Collection Creator:
Graham, John, 1887-1961  Search this
Extent:
3 Folders
Container:
Box 3, Folder 23-25
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
circa 1954
Collection Restrictions:
The collection has been digitized and is available online via the Archives of American Art website.
Collection Rights:
The John Graham papers are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Collection Citation:
John Graham Papers, 1799-1988. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
John Graham papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-grahjohn-ref158
Additional Online Media:

Finale I

Collection Creator:
Graham, John, 1887-1961  Search this
Extent:
4 Folders
Container:
Box 3, Folder 26-29
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
circa 1936-1959
Scope and Contents note:
(titles with roman numerals for the Finale manuscripts taken from binders created by Graham; Finale I, II, and V appear to comprise a continuous typescript; Finale IV appears complete but is much shorter than other versions; Finale I contains front matter and alphabetically arranged entries from Abracadabra to Justice)
Collection Restrictions:
The collection has been digitized and is available online via the Archives of American Art website.
Collection Rights:
The John Graham papers are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Collection Citation:
John Graham Papers, 1799-1988. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
John Graham papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-grahjohn-ref159
Additional Online Media:

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