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Oral history interview with Martha Mayer Erlebacher, 1990 December 7-1991 January 12

Interviewee:
Erlebacher, Martha Mayer, 1937-  Search this
Interviewer:
Hunter, Anne S.  Search this
Subject:
Paglia, Camille  Search this
Schoelkopf, Robert  Search this
Erlebacher, Walter  Search this
Pratt Institute  Search this
Topic:
Sound recordings  Search this
Women painters  Search this
Painting, Modern  Search this
Painters  Search this
Figurative painting  Search this
Interviews  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)12061
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)214557
AAA_collcode_erleba90
Theme:
Women
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_oh_214557

Martha Mayer Erlebacher: artist file, [photographs]

Artist:
Erlebacher, Martha Mayer 1937-  Search this
Type:
Photograph
Artist files
Topic:
Art, American  Search this
Image number:
VFM VF000991
See more items in:
Photograph Archives
Data Source:
Archives and Special Collections, Smithsonian American Art Museum
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_jul_138500

Robert Schoelkopf Gallery records, 1851-1991, (bulk 1962-1991)

Creator:
Robert Schoelkopf Gallery  Search this
Subject:
Stella, Joseph  Search this
Ito, Miyoko  Search this
Lachaise, Gaston  Search this
Cornell, Joseph  Search this
Aponovich, James  Search this
Bailey, William  Search this
Schoelkopf, Robert  Search this
Freund, Gisèle  Search this
Andrejevic, Milet  Search this
Matthiasdottir, Louisa  Search this
Storrs, John Henry Bradley  Search this
Evans, Walker  Search this
Dawson, Manierre  Search this
Cartier-Bresson, Henri  Search this
Bell, Leland  Search this
Nadelman, Elie  Search this
Driggs, Elsie B.  Search this
Fiske, Gertrude  Search this
Ligare, David  Search this
Laderman, Gabriel  Search this
Matulka, Jan  Search this
Brassaï  Search this
Cameron, Julia Margaret Pattle  Search this
Wiesenfeld, Paul  Search this
Erlebacher, Martha Mayer  Search this
Horton, William S.  Search this
Myers, Ethel May Klink  Search this
Zabriskie Gallery  Search this
Topic:
Gallery records  Search this
Illustrated letters  Search this
Photographs  Search this
Art, American  Search this
Realism in art  Search this
Works of art  Search this
Art, Modern  Search this
Photography, Artistic  Search this
Art galleries, Commercial  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)10988
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)214859
AAA_collcode_robeschg
Theme:
The Art Market
Photography
Art Gallery Records
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_coll_214859
Additional Online Media:

Martha Mayer Erlebacher, March 27-May 9, 1998

Author:
Erlebacher, Martha Mayer  Search this
More Gallery  Search this
Subject:
Erlebacher, Martha Mayer  Search this
Physical description:
[12] p. : col. ill. ; 23 cm
Type:
Books
Exhibitions
Date:
1998
Call number:
ND237.E699 A4 1998
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_622420

Untitled

Artist:
Martha Mayer Erlebacher, born 1937  Search this
Sitter:
Unidentified Woman  Search this
Medium:
Pencil on paper
Dimensions:
Stretcher: 46.4 x 38.1 cm (18 1/4 x 15" ), Accurate
Type:
Drawing
Date:
1974
Topic:
Unidentified Woman: Female  Search this
Portrait  Search this
Credit Line:
Owner: Arkansas Arts Center
Website: www.arkarts.com/
Object number:
88.14.2
See more items in:
Catalog of American Portraits
Data Source:
Catalog of American Portraits
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:npg_88.14.2

Self-portrait

Artist:
Martha Mayer Erlebacher, born 1937  Search this
Sitter:
Martha Mayer Erlebacher, born 1937  Search this
Medium:
Nero pencil on paper
Dimensions:
Mat: 42.5 x 40cm (16 3/4 x 15 3/4")
Frame: 46.4 x 43.8cm (18 1/4 x 17 1/4")
Type:
Drawing
Date:
2011
Topic:
Costume\Dress Accessory\Eyeglasses  Search this
Martha Mayer Erlebacher: Visual Arts\Artist  Search this
Martha Mayer Erlebacher: Female  Search this
Portrait  Search this
Credit Line:
Owner: Richard Davidson
Object number:
EXH.PC.216
Restrictions & Rights:
© Martha Mayer Erlebacher
See more items in:
Catalog of American Portraits
Data Source:
Catalog of American Portraits
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:npg_EXH.PC.216

Martha Mayer Erlebacher : recent still life paintings : April 1-May, 1999

Author:
Erlebacher, Martha Mayer  Search this
Hackett-Freedman Gallery  Search this
Subject:
Erlebacher, Martha Mayer  Search this
Physical description:
16 p. : col. ill. ; 23 cm
Type:
Books
Exhibitions
Date:
1999
Call number:
ND237.E699 A4 1999
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_623882

Eric Walker

Artist:
Martha Mayer Erlebacher, born 1937  Search this
Sitter:
Eric Walker, 1910 - 1995  Search this
Medium:
Oil on canvas (possibly tempera or acrylic)
Dimensions:
113 x 90.3 cm (44 1/2 x 35 9/16" ) Sight
Type:
Painting
Date:
1981
Topic:
Interior  Search this
Costume\Dress Accessory\Eyeglasses  Search this
Architecture\Fireplace  Search this
Costume\Robe  Search this
Eric Walker: Male  Search this
Eric Walker: Education\Administrator\University  Search this
Eric Walker: Education\Administrator\University\President  Search this
Portrait  Search this
Credit Line:
Owner: Palmer Museum of Art, Pennsylvania State University
Website: www.psu.edu/dept/palmermuseum/
Object number:
PA430034
See more items in:
Catalog of American Portraits
Data Source:
Catalog of American Portraits
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:npg_PA430034

Robert Schoelkopf Gallery records

Creator:
Robert Schoelkopf Gallery  Search this
Names:
Zabriskie Gallery  Search this
Andrejevic, Milet, 1925-  Search this
Aponovich, James, 1948-  Search this
Bailey, William, 1930-  Search this
Bell, Leland  Search this
Brassaï, 1899-  Search this
Cameron, Julia Margaret Pattle, 1815-1879  Search this
Cartier-Bresson, Henri, 1908-  Search this
Cornell, Joseph  Search this
Dawson, Manierre, 1887-1969  Search this
Driggs, Elsie, 1898-1992  Search this
Erlebacher, Martha Mayer  Search this
Evans, Walker, 1903-1975  Search this
Fiske, Gertrude, 1878-1961  Search this
Freund, Gisèle  Search this
Horton, William S., 1865-1936  Search this
Ito, Miyoko, 1918-1983  Search this
Lachaise, Gaston, 1882-1935  Search this
Laderman, Gabriel, 1929-  Search this
Ligare, David  Search this
Matthiasdottir, Louisa  Search this
Matulka, Jan, 1890-1972  Search this
Myers, Ethel  Search this
Nadelman, Elie, 1882-1946  Search this
Schoelkopf, Robert J., 1927-1991  Search this
Stella, Joseph, 1877-1946  Search this
Storrs, John Henry Bradley, 1885-1956  Search this
Wiesenfeld, Paul  Search this
Extent:
29 Linear feet
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Gallery records
Illustrated letters
Photographs
Date:
1851-1991
bulk 1962-1991
Summary:
The collection comprises 29 linear feet of records that document the day-to-day administration of the Robert Schoelkopf Gallery from 1962 to 1991, with additional items predating the founding of the gallery from 1851 to 1961. The collection records artist and client relations, exhibitions, and daily business transactions through artist files, correspondence, printed matter, and photographic material.
Scope and Content Note:
The records of the Robert Schoelkopf Gallery comprise 29 linear feet of material from 1851 to 1991, with some items predating the founding of the gallery. The bulk of the records date from 1962 to 1991, providing researchers with fairly comprehensive coverage of the gallery's development and operations from its inception in 1962 until its closure in 1991. Items dated prior to 1962 relate principally to the period of transition during which Robert Schoelkopf ended his partnership with the Zabriskie Gallery and established his own business. There are also some items relating to artists of the nineteenth and early twentieth century.

The collection consists primarily of artist files documenting relations with contemporary artists, representation of deceased artists, and other works of art handled by the gallery. It also chronicles the gallery's exhibition schedule and the day-to-day administration of the business. The types of material that can be found here include correspondence, exhibition inventories, price lists, accounting and consignment records, shipping and insurance records, printed material, and photographs.

The collection is a valuable source of information on twentieth-century American art history, focusing primarily on early-twentieth-century modernists as well as an important group of American realist painters and sculptors from the latter half of the century. The collection illuminates, in detail, the developing market for these schools and, in the case of the latter group, provides personal insights from artists on the realist perspective.

The records also document the Robert Schoelkopf Gallery's significant contribution to the resurgence of interest in fine art photography during the 1960s and 1970s as reflected in an increase in the value of works by important American photographers such as Walker Evans.

Much of the outgoing correspondence from the gallery consists of copies of letters written by Robert Schoelkopf, with additional business being handled by assistant staff and, from the mid-1970s, Schoelkopf's wife, Laura Jane Schoelkopf. The records offer insight into the personalities of the Schoelkopfs and how their congenial and candid management style influenced their relationships with the contemporary artists they represented.
Arrangement:
Originally the collection was organized as one large file arranged alphabetically by folder title, with titles ranging from names of artists to general subject headings such as "Correspondence." During processing it became clear that the gallery delineated operations into three main functions: artist relations, client-dealer relations, and exhibitions. Consequently the collection is arranged as three main series based on these areas of concern. A small group of miscellaneous photographs of artists constitutes an additional series at the end of the collection.

Originally paper records throughout the collection were generally arranged chronologically, although this order was not strictly adhered to. Frequently, correspondence and memoranda were attached to related records going back several years. To preserve the relationship between such documents, records stapled together in this way have been left together. They are arranged in reverse chronological order and filed in the folder corresponding to the primary date (i.e., the date of the first and most recent paper in the group). Researchers should be aware that date ranges provided on folders refer to the primary dates of documents contained therein and that some items in the folder may predate that range. Otherwise, the general chronological scheme has been retained throughout the collection, with undated material placed at the beginning of the appropriate file.

Printed material is arranged in chronological order, with undated material at the beginning of the folder, and may include press releases, exhibition announcements, exhibition catalogs, posters, clippings from newspapers, magazines, and journals, and other publicity material. Large amounts of printed material are broken down into several discrete folder units.

The most consistent labeling system for photographic material apparent throughout the collection was title of work of art. The majority of images are not dated with a printing date or the date that the work of art was produced, and although many of them have a processing number, these are by no means consistent and there are no master lists that can be used to interpret them. Consequently, images are arranged primarily by media type and then alphabetically by title. Untitled images are placed at the beginning of a media group; "the" in a title is ignored. Exceptions to this method are addressed in the appropriate series descriptions.

Files labeled "Photographs of Works of Art" will typically include any or all of the following: black-and-white copy prints, black-and-white transparencies, color transparencies, slide transparencies, Polaroid prints, color snapshots, contact sheets, and separation sheets. Often the same image will be duplicated in several different formats. Any notes on photographic material found in or on the original folder in which the material was filed have been preserved with the material or transcribed onto a sheet of acid-free paper that either encloses or is placed directly before the item to which the information applies.

The designation "General" indicates that a file may contain any or all of the types of material outlined above.

Series 1: Artist Files, 1851-1991, undated (Boxes 1-23; 23 linear ft.)

Series 2: General Business Files, 1960-1991, undated (Boxes 24-28; 4.74 linear ft.)

Series 3: Group Exhibition Files, 1960-1988, undated (Boxes 28-29; 1 linear ft.)

Series 4: Photographs of Artists, undated (Box 29; 0.25 linear ft.)
Historical Note:
Robert Schoelkopf, Jr., was born in Queens, New York, in 1927. He graduated from Yale College in 1951 with a bachelor of arts degree and then taught briefly at his alma mater while conducting graduate research in art history. Schoelkopf began his career in commercial art in 1957 as an independent dealer of American painting and sculpture and became a member of the Art Dealers Association of America in 1958. In 1959 he formed a partnership with Virginia Zabriskie, of the Zabriskie Gallery in New York, that lasted until 1962. The gallery exhibited late-nineteenth and early-twentieth-century American painting, together with contemporary painting of a somewhat conservative style.

In 1962 Schoelkopf signed a three-year lease for the fourth floor of a building at 825 Madison Avenue in New York, where he opened the Robert Schoelkopf Gallery. From the outset, Schoelkopf aimed to specialize in American painting of the nineteenth and twentieth century and sculpture of all schools. He predicted a burgeoning market for the Hudson River School in particular, believing that American painting was increasingly perceived as being worthy of serious attention. In a letter dated January 3, 1963, Schoelkopf congratulated John Spencer for his decision to collect nineteenth-century American paintings for the Allen Memorial Art Museum at Oberlin College, assuring him that "progressive chauvanism [ sic] will operate to elevate prices in American painting. Every year more colleges teach Art History, and soon they shall have reached the level of sophistication and development where they will be obliged (for face) to offer tuition in specifically American art - hitherto neglected of academicians.... I and many other dealers have plans for exhibitions of nineteenth-century American painting, especially the Hudson River School."

Schoelkopf's instincts regarding the Hudson River School were undoubtedly correct, and consequently nineteenth-century American painters formed a permanent mainstay of his inventory. He is perhaps remembered more, however, for his dedication to reviving interest in lesser-known American painters from the turn-of-the-century who were impressionist or modernist in style. Schoelkopf developed something of a reputation for unearthing forgotten talent that, while sometimes mediocre or inconsistent, was occasionally exceptional and certainly worthy of note. He was committed to reinstalling Joseph Stella in the pantheon of major American artists, representing Stella's estate from 1963 to 1971 and holding regular exhibitions of the artist's work from 1962 on. In 1969 the gallery held the first New York exhibition of the paintings of Manierre Dawson, who was subsequently acclaimed by the critics for his important and innovative contributions to modernism. In 1970 Schoelkopf began showing the work of Jan Matulka, an artist whose work had been neglected since the 1930s, and his enthusiastic representation of the Matulka estate paved the way for a retrospective at the Whitney Museum of American Art in 1979.

Schoelkopf's interest in turn-of-the-century artists also extended to sculptors such as John Flannagan, Ethel Myers, Elie Nadelman, and John Henry Bradley Storrs, and he directed considerable energy to furthering Gaston Lachaise's reputation as an artist of major stature. When Lachaise died at the peak of his career in 1935, his estate was left to his wife, Isabel, and in 1957 to Isabel's son, Edward. When Edward died shortly thereafter, John B. Pierce, Jr., a nephew of Isabel Lachaise, was appointed trustee of the estate and formed the Lachaise Foundation. In 1962 Pierce entered an agreement with Robert Schoelkopf and Felix Landau to represent Lachaise's sculpture on the East and West Coasts, respectively. In this capacity Schoelkopf helped to launch a major retrospective of the artist's work at the Whitney Museum of American Art in 1964 and a traveling exhibition that began circulating in 1967.

The gallery's other major commitment was to painting and sculpture by contemporary American realists, many of whom worked in a figurative style and explored elements of allegory and classical mythology in their work, presenting landscapes, still lifes, and portraits from a realist perspective. The bulk of the gallery's exhibitions were, in fact, of work by contemporary artists, including metaphysical still-life painter William Bailey, colorist Leland Bell, figurative painter Martha Mayer Erlebacher, landscape and narrative painter Gabriel Laderman, and Icelandic artist Louisa Matthiasdottir. William Bailey was one of the gallery's most commercially successful artists, and his first one-person exhibition in New York was held there in 1968. Demand for Bailey's paintings often far exceeded his output, and by the late 1970s Schoelkopf invariably sold out his exhibitions and had compiled a lengthy waiting list for his work.

In its early years the Robert Schoelkopf Gallery contributed considerably to the development of interest in fine art photography that fostered an increasingly lucrative market for photographic prints during the 1960s and 1970s. In 1965 Schoelkopf began incorporating photography into the gallery's exhibition schedule and, in the spring of 1974, opened a gallery dedicated to photography on the second floor at 825 Madison Avenue. Between 1965 and 1979 Schoelkopf's was the only serious New York gallery dealing in painting and sculpture that also regularly exhibited photography as fine art. His interests lay primarily in antiquarian photography and the work of nineteenth-century and twentieth-century masters including Eugéne Atget, Mathew Brady, James Robertson, and Carleton Watkins. Schoelkopf organized shows examining specific photographic processes, the photogravure and the cyanotype, and presented surveys of genres such as portrait and landscape photography. In 1967 he held the first exhibition in many years of the work of Julia Margaret Cameron, an important figure in the history of Victorian photography, timing it to coincide with a show at the Metropolitan Museum of Art that focused on Cameron as one of four Victorian photographers.

Schoelkopf also handled the work of several influential contemporaries, most notably Brassaï, Henri Cartier-Bresson, Walker Evans, and Gisèle Freund. The gallery held Freund's first exhibition in the United States in 1975 and was, for a time, the only place in New York where one could see and purchase prints by Cartier-Bresson. Schoelkopf began exhibiting Evans's work in 1966 and regularly thereafter, including a 1971 exhibition that coincided with a major retrospective at the Museum of Modern Art.

In the fall of 1976 the second-floor gallery space was turned over to Marcuse (Cusie) Pfeifer, then the gallery's director, who planned to use it to show the work of young photographers in a gallery under her own name. Schoelkopf continued to hold several photography exhibitions a year in the fourth-floor gallery but decided to concentrate primarily on nineteenth-century masters.

In March 1971 a fire in the building at Madison Avenue resulted in substantial water damage to the gallery space. Although very little of the inventory was destroyed, the incident forced Schoelkopf to close until September. This temporary loss of revenue compounded with a nationwide recession cut into Schoelkopf's financial resources and left him questioning his commission policy and his level of commitment to contemporary work in all media. A letter to artist Adolph Rosenblatt dated May 3, 1971, records how Schoelkopf had become increasingly disenchanted with "all contemporary work" and would begin taking 40 percent commission on sales, instead of 33.3 percent. "Beside the matter of enthusiasm is the matter of economics," Schoelkopf remarked, "and the last year and a half have been really dreadful for the art business."

This difficult period was followed immediately by more prosperous times. January 1973 proved to be the gallery's most successful month to date, encouraging Schoelkopf to purchase a house in Chappaqua, New York, later that year. In November 1974 Schoelkopf wrote to Anthony D'Offay that business "is as slow as it has ever been, but what sales we make are big ones" and revealed that auctions had, at that point, become his primary avenue for trade.

Around 1975 Schoelkopf's wife of eleven years, Laura Jane Schoelkopf, began working in the gallery. Although seemingly dubious of the work at first, she became a considerable asset to the business and reputedly complemented her husband's relationship with the gallery's contemporary artists through her warmth and hospitality, qualities often noted by artists who corresponded regularly with the couple.

The financial instability that characterized the 1970s undoubtedly influenced Schoelkopf's decision to cease exhibiting photography in 1979. By 1978 however, his investment in early-twentieth-century art appeared to be paying off. Jan Matulka, Joseph Stella, and John Henry Bradley Storrs had all been represented in exhibitions at major museums, and sales of their work had increased considerably. Gaston Lachaise's reputation continued to grow, and the traveling exhibition still circulated, garnering far more interest than had originally been anticipated.

Although contemporary artists continued to take up the largest portion of the gallery's changing exhibitions, Schoelkopf's interest in contemporary work was growing more conservative, tending toward a narrower focus on the narrative and allegorical. By 1979 he no longer exhibited contemporary sculpture, admitting to a lack of enthusiasm for the work of any of the current figurative sculptors and a dislike of all contemporary abstract work. In a letter to Lillian Delevoryas, dated March 17, 1982, he confessed, "With age has come a hardening of the aesthetic arteries perhaps. What we have been showing is realism, but getting tighter all the time."

In April 1984 the gallery was moved to 50 West Fifty-seventh Street, and, during the years that followed, the Schoelkopfs pared down the number of contemporary artists they represented, handling only those to whom they felt most strongly committed while continuing to specialize in nineteenth-century and early-twentieth-century American painting and sculpture. As the gallery approached its thirtieth anniversary, Schoelkopf's achievements were considerable. He had operated a successful New York gallery for almost three decades, rejuvenated the reputations of several important American artists, and was respected by artists and clients alike for the integrity, intelligence, and humor with which he conducted his business affairs. In 1987 he had been appointed to the board of trustees of the Williamstown Regional Art Conservation Laboratory. By this time he was also a member of the advisory board to the National Academy of Design, and in 1988 he became a co-trustee of the Joseph and Robert Cornell Memorial Foundation.

In March 1990, Robert Schoelkopf was diagnosed with leukemia and underwent a regimen of cancer treatment that resulted in a brief remission by the summer. Schoelkopf returned to work temporarily, but by 1991 his condition had worsened and he died in April of that year. Having known for some time that her husband's prognosis was poor, Laura Jane Schoelkopf had apparently decided that she would not continue the gallery in the event of his death. With the help of the youngest of their two sons, Andrew, she settled final accounts and assisted the gallery's contemporary artists in finding representation elsewhere before closing the business in August 1991.
Provenance:
Twenty-seven linear feet of records were donated to the Archives of American Art by Laura Jane Schoelkopf, Robert Schoelkopf's widow, and the Coe Kerr Gallery in 1991 and 1992. An additional gift of 3.4 linear feet was donated by Laura Jane Schoelkopf in 1996. The collection was reduced slightly during processing.
Restrictions:
The collection is open for research. Use requires an appointment.
Rights:
The Robert Schoelkopf Gallery records are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Art, Modern -- 20th century  Search this
Works of art  Search this
Photography, Artistic  Search this
Realism in art  Search this
Art, American  Search this
Art galleries, Commercial -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Genre/Form:
Gallery records
Illustrated letters
Photographs
Citation:
Robert Schoelkopf Gallery records, 1851-1991, bulk 1962-1991. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.robeschg
See more items in:
Robert Schoelkopf Gallery records
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-robeschg
Additional Online Media:

Martha Mayer Erlebacher [Folder]

Contents:
Folder(s) may include exhibition announcements, newspaper and/or magazine clippings, press releases, brochures, reviews, invitations, illustrations, resumes, artist's statements, exhibition catalogs.
Topic:
Artists  Search this
Location:
Art & Artist files at the Smithsonian American Art Museum/ National Portrait Gallery Library
Data source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:SILAF_28825

Artist Files

Collection Creator:
Robert Schoelkopf Gallery  Search this
Extent:
(boxes 1-23, 23 linear ft.)
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1851-1991, undated
Scope and Contents note:
This series forms the core of the collection and comprises files relating to more than three hundred artists whose work the gallery represented or handled at some point. The main types of material that can be found here include correspondence with artists and clients interested in borrowing, consigning, or purchasing their work; printed material documenting exhibitions of individual artists at the Robert Schoelkopf Gallery and related events; general reference material about gallery artists; photographic images of works of art dealt with by the gallery; and photographs of artists. Items of particular interest are noted in parentheses after the folder title.

Individual artists are represented by groups of material ranging from a single file to several linear feet of files, depending on the gallery's level of involvement with their work. Groups of files of particular interest are described in greater detail below. A list of all known group and one-person exhibitions held at the gallery is provided as an appendix and can be used to identify the dates of exhibitions for specific artists.

Relations with many of the gallery's contemporary artists are particularly well documented in this series. The gallery's interest in figurative painting that incorporated elements of allegory, myth, fantasy, and dreams is evinced in files relating to artists such as Milet Andrejevic, Bruno Civitico, Martha Mayer Erlebacher, and David Ligare. Gabriel Laderman, another artist who worked extensively with allegorical themes, is also well represented in this series, and of particular interest are his letters describing his experiences living and working in Malaysia. Correspondence files relating to the painter Caren Canier contain personal letters from the artist that detail her attitude to her work and her relationships with her husband, artist Langdon Quin, and their two children. Paul Wiesenfeld, a realist painter who specialized in portraits and finely detailed interiors, also wrote to the gallery from Germany disclosing aspects of his personal life that affected his work. Correspondence with sculptor Isabel McIlvain contains detailed explanations by the artist of her attitudes to her work and her sculpting methods. McIlvain's files also chronicle her commission to produce a sculpture of John F. Kennedy that was unveiled in Boston in 1990.

Files relating to William Bailey record many aspects of his relationship with the Schoelkopfs. Correspondence files primarily comprise letters to and from clients interested in Bailey's work but are interspersed with correspondence with Bailey and his wife that often details personal aspects of their lives as well as providing insight into Bailey's artistic development and his experiences living in Italy, where he and his family resided much of the time. Consignments and sales of Bailey's work are well documented here, as is the gallery's role in the compilation and publication of three books about the artist. An extensive collection of news clippings records various stages of his career and the growth of his commercial success.

Two substantial groups of files document the gallery's representation of painter Louisa Matthiasdottir and her husband, Leland Bell. Correspondence with Bell includes mention of his time spent in Europe and his teaching experiences, and reveals his sardonic wit.

Several files of correspondence with Miyako Ito offer rich insight into a short period during the artist's life. The bulk of the material comprises letters written by Ito to Robert Schoelkopf in 1960 and 1961, occasionally on a daily basis and often of a very poetic and deeply reflective and emotional nature.

Folders relating to Joseph Cornell contain some correspondence with the artist that offers insight into his personality. They also record Schoelkopf's bid, albeit in vain, to represent the artist's estate following his death in 1972 and the gallery's commitment to Cornell through continued consignment of his work.

Files concerning Manierre Dawson document the gallery's representation of the artist's estate and arrangements for the first one-person exhibition of his paintings in New York only a few months before his death in the summer of 1969. The files include correspondence with Dawson in which he discusses preparations for the exhibition, supplies information concerning dates and locations of his paintings, and expresses concerns about his illness. Letters from Dawson's wife, Lillian, written immediately after his death, can also be found here as well as several marked-up copies of the catalog for the 1969 exhibition that includes an introduction written by the artist. The Dawson files document the activities of the partnership formed by Frank J. McKeown, Jr., Dr. Lewis Obi, and Lefferts L. Mabie, Jr., to purchase paintings from the Dawson estate and provide details of how the partnership worked with Schoelkopf as the sole gallery agency for Dawson's paintings. The files also record the distribution of loans and gifts from the partnership to various art institutions.

More than two feet of records offer detailed coverage of Robert Schoelkopf's interest in Gaston Lachaise and his involvement in the administration of the Lachaise Foundation. Correspondence files chronicle relations among Schoelkopf, John B. Pierce, Jr. (trustee of the foundation), and Felix Landau and record decisions taken regarding publications about the artist, policies for casting and limiting editions of his sculpture, and strategies for promoting Lachaise through exhibitions. The traveling exhibition that opened in September 1967 and was still circulating in 1991 is well documented here, as are other practical concerns such as maintaining accounting and storage records of the artist's work.

Files relating to Ethel Myers include correspondence with the artist's daughter, Virginia Downes, and document Schoelkopf's handling of Myers's estate and his involvement in exhibitions to promote her work. The files include one undated letter and one copy of a letter from Myers to Downes, dated 1941, and a copy of a letter from Henry McBride to Myers from 1913. Copies of autobiographical notes written by Myers about her childhood, artists she knew, her marriage to Jerome Myers, and the outbreak of war in Europe can also be found here.

Several files document the appointment and activities of Robert Schoelkopf and Felix Landau as exclusive agents for the sale of works of art from the estate of Elie Nadelman.

A substantial group of files relating to Joseph Stella chronicle Schoelkopf's involvement with Michael and Sergio Stella, trustees of Joseph Stella's estate, and his representation of the estate from 1963 until 1971, when he withdrew from the position following a dispute over commissions. The gallery continued to consign work from the Stella estate until 1991, and these files contain details of those consignments and reflect Schoelkopf's lifelong commitment to promoting Stella's work.

Files relating to John Henry Bradley Storrs document Schoelkopf's relationship with the artist's daughter, Monique Storrs Booz, who designated Schoelkopf as the new agent for works of art from her father's estate when her contract with the Downtown Gallery was terminated in 1969. Schoelkopf continued to represent Storrs's work when Monique Storrs Booz died in 1985, leaving the estate in the hands of two of the artist's grandchildren. Details of the gallery's relationship with Noel Frackman, who conducted important research on Storrs, can also be found here. Of additional interest are two sets of photographs attributed to John Storrs: a group of eleven platinum prints (apparently there were originally thirteen), primarily portraits of children, and a group of twenty-seven silver gelatin prints of rural and coastal scenes.

Another significant component of this series is the number of files documenting the gallery's relationship with various contemporary photographers. Files of correspondence concerning Brassaï contain substantial correspondence with the photographer himself, who frequently wrote to the gallery in French. Records relating to Walker Evans detail Evans's consignments to the gallery and include some letters from him of a more personal nature, such as one describing his observations during a trip to London in 1966. Photographer Giséle è wrote regularly to the gallery, and her letters include detailed descriptions of the processes she employed in printing her work.

Correspondence relating to Julia Margaret Cameron contains several items of interest including a letter from Cameron dated August 10, 1873, to a Mrs. Way concerning photographs of Way's daughter, and an article on Cameron by Charles Harvard with notes containing biographical details about the photographer.

Within its artist files the gallery retained a group of files marked "Miscellaneous." These files contain small amounts of material, often only one or two pieces, relating to various artists for whom an individual file was not maintained or who were unidentified. These records are placed at the end of the alphabetical files and contain primarily copy prints, transparencies, and slide transparencies. Material is arranged alphabetically by name of artist, with records relating to unidentified artists placed at the beginning. To retain the alphabetical arrangement various media formats are filed together and dated material is interfiled with undated material, which forms the bulk of the contents.

The gallery tended to group various types of paper records together with correspondence in a single file. The term "correspondence" in this series, therefore, refers not only to incoming and outgoing letters but also to accounting and consignment records, reports (such as inventory lists), artists' résumés, exhibition lists, price lists, and other miscellaneous notes. In cases where a certain type of "correspondence" was originally filed separately from other material of this kind, and represents a significant amount of material, that material is filed in a separate folder (e.g., Accounting and Consignment Records).

Generally, arrangement of photographs in this series follows the system outlined under Organization and Arrangement, with some notable exceptions. Photographs of works of art by Gaston Lachaise and Elie Nadelman were originally arranged in a numbering system that is fairly consistent, and this basic original order has been retained. Also, for large groups of photographs of works of art, such as those by Gaston Lachaise, Joseph Stella, and John Henry Bradley Storrs, the gallery filed photographs by media in which the work of art was created; such delineations are reflected in the final arrangement.

The gallery maintained a collection of negatives, primarily of works of art by artists found in Series 1: Artist Files, in addition to other artists not represented there. There is also a small number of negatives of installation shots. The negatives are arranged alphabetically by artist name, with unknown artists at the beginning, and are stored, for preservation reasons, in containers separate from other records in the series. Negative numbers found on the original sleeves have been transcribed onto the paper enclosures now housing the negatives, so that they may be matched to prints in Series 1: Artist Files, in cases where prints exist. An appendix provides an alphabetical list of artists whose work is represented in the negative collection. In some cases, names of artists are incomplete because of insufficient information on the original negative sleeves.

See Appendix A for a list of artists represented in the negatives of works of art found in Series 1.
Appendix A: Artists Represented in Negatives of Works of Art:
Albright, Ivan

[Allston]

Anderson, Lennart

Andrejevic, Milet

Anshutz, Thomas Pollock

Aponovich, James

Bailey, William

Ballaine, G.

Balthus

Barye

Bazelon, Cecile Gray

Beauchamp

Beckwith

Bell, E.

Bell, Leland

Bellows, George

Benton, Thomas Hart

Bernard

Birch, Thomas

[Blauvelk]

Bluemner, Oscar

Blythe, David Gilmour

Bolles, Jesse H.

Bouvier, August

Bradford, William

Branchard, Emile Pierre

Brassaï

Bratby, John

Breckenridge, Hugh H.

Bricher, A. T.

Brook, Alexander

Brown, John George

Burchfield, Charles

Burra, Edward

Carles, Arthur B.

Carlsen

Cartier-Bresson, Henri

Charkow, Natalie

Chase, William Merritt

Chiriani, Richard

Civitico, Bruno

Clark, Alson Skinner

Codman, Charles

Cohen, Frederick

Cole, Thomas

Coleman, Glenn O.

Conrad, Kramer

Cornell, Joseph

Cropsey, Jasper Francis

Currier, [J. Frank]

Dallman, Daniel

Dalou, Jules

Dasburg, Andrew

Daugherty, James Henry

[Davidson]

Davidson, Jo

Davies, Arthur B.

Davis, Stuart

Dawson, Manierre

Degas, Edgar

De Kooning, Willem

Demuth, Charles

Dewing, Thomas Wilmer

Dickinson, Preston

Diederich, William Hunt

[Dix, Otto]

Du Bois, Guy Péne

Duchamp, Marcel

Duveneck, Frank

Eaton

Edmonson, Will

[Eilshemius]

Epstein, [Sir Jacob]

Erlebacher, Martha Mayer

Evans, Walker

Fellini

Fisher, M.

Fiske, Gertrude

Flannagan, John Bernard

Forbes, Charles

Frazier, John Robinson

Freckelton, Sondra

Frieseke, Frederick C.

Gallatin, A. E.

Gay, Walter

Gifford, R. Swain

Gifford, Sanford Robinson

Gignoux, R.

Glackens, William J.

Gleizes, Albers

Goodnough, Robert

Goodwin, Arthur Clifton

Gorky, Arshile

Gorsline

Graham, John

Graham, William

Grant

Grausman, Philip

Graves, Morris

Groz

Guglielmi, Louis

Guillaume

Halsall

Han, Raymond

Hardy, DeWitt

Hart, William

Hartley, Marsden

Hartman, Bertram C.

Harvey, Anne

Hatke, Walter

Hawthorne, Charles Webster

Heade, Martin Johnson

Henri, Robert

Hill, T.

Hirst, Claude R.

Hitchcock

Hohwiller, L. M.

Hopper, Edward

Horton, William S.

Johnson, David

Johnson, Eastman

Johnson, Lester

Jones, Bern

Kane, John

Karfunkle, David

Kelly, L.

Kensett, John Frederick

Klee, Paul

Klimt, Gustav

Kline, Franz

Knaths, Karl

[Kresch]

Kruger, Louise

Kuhn, Walt

Kuniyoshi, Yasuo

Lachaise, Gaston

Laderman, Gabriel

Lawrence, Jacob

Lawson, Ernest

Lechay, Myron

Leibowitz, Leonard

Leutz

Levinson, Abraham F.

Ligare, David

Lipchitz

Luks, George

MacDonald-Wright, Stanton

MacMonnies, Frederick William

Manolo

Manship, Paul

Manzu

Marin, John

Martin, Homer D.

Matthiasdottir, Louisa

Matulka, Jan

Maurer, Alfred Henry

McFee Henry

McIlvain, Isabel

Melchers

Metcalf, Willard Leroy

Mills

[Morandi, Giovanni]

Muybridge, Eadweard

Müller, Jan

Muller, Lisa

Myers, Jerome

Nadelman, Elie

Nakian, Reuben

Nevelson, Louise

Newman, A. L.

Nick, George Bentley

Of, George F.

O'Keeffe, Georgia

Orozco, José Clemente

Peterson, Jane

Peto, John Frederick

Pfreim, Bernard

Picasso, Pablo

Piccolo, Richard

Pollet, Joseph

Pollock, Jackson

Poor, H.

Powers, Hiram

Prendergast, Maurice Brazil

Price

Prior, William Matthew

Quin, Langdon

Raiselis, Richard

Ream, C. P.

Reid, Robert

Richards, William Trost

Rimmer, William

Robinson, T. W.

Rodin, Auguste

Romero, Orozco

Rummelspacher

Russell, Morgan

Ryan, Richard

[Ryder, Albert Pinkham]

Saint-Gaudens, Augustus

Salemme, Antonio

Salemme, Attilio

Sargent, John Singer

Schamberg, Morton L.

Schiele, Egon

Schmidt, Edward

Schultz, E. N.

Scott, J. W. A.

Shahn, Ben

Shaw, Sidney Dale

Sheeler, Charles

Shinn, Everett

Sklarski, Bonnie

Sloan, John

Smith, Hope

Staples, W. L.

Steene

Steichen, Edward

Stella, Joseph

Storrs, John Henry Bradley

Stuart, Frederick, T.

Suba, Miklos

Tamayo, Rufino

Tanguy, Yves

Tanner, Henry Ossawa

Taylor, Henry Fitch

Tillim, Sidney

Touster, Irwin

Turner, Helen

Twachtman, John Henry

Urness, Scott

[V., F.]

Van Beest

Van Everen, Jay

Vedder, Elihu

Vespignani

Vonnoh, Robert William

Walcutt, William

[Wall]

Weber, Max

Weir, Julian Alden

Weiss, George

Whistler, James McNeill

Whittredge, Worthington

Wiesenfeld, Paul

Woking

Wood, Thomas Waterman

Wyant, A. H.

Wyeth, Andrew

Zorach, [William]
Collection Restrictions:
The collection is open for research. Use requires an appointment.
Collection Rights:
The Robert Schoelkopf Gallery records are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Collection Citation:
Robert Schoelkopf Gallery records, 1851-1991, bulk 1962-1991. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.robeschg, Series 1
See more items in:
Robert Schoelkopf Gallery records
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-robeschg-ref13

Erlebacher, Martha Mayer

Collection Creator:
Fischbach Gallery  Search this
Container:
Box 30, Folder 24
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1992-1997
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment. Written permission from the donor is also required to view the series of financial records and the 2015 addition of card indexes. Contact the Reference Services Department for more information.
Collection Rights:
The Fischbach Gallery records are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Collection Citation:
The Fischbach Gallery records, 1937-2015, bulk 1963-1977. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Fischbach Gallery records
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-fiscgall-ref1601

Correspondence

Collection Creator:
Robert Schoelkopf Gallery  Search this
Container:
Box 5, Folder 36-42
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1972-1987
Collection Restrictions:
The collection is open for research. Use requires an appointment.
Collection Rights:
The Robert Schoelkopf Gallery records are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Collection Citation:
Robert Schoelkopf Gallery records, 1851-1991, bulk 1962-1991. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Robert Schoelkopf Gallery records
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-robeschg-ref217

Exhibition Lists and Inventories

Collection Creator:
Robert Schoelkopf Gallery  Search this
Container:
Box 6, Folder 1
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1972-1985, undated
Collection Restrictions:
The collection is open for research. Use requires an appointment.
Collection Rights:
The Robert Schoelkopf Gallery records are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Collection Citation:
Robert Schoelkopf Gallery records, 1851-1991, bulk 1962-1991. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Robert Schoelkopf Gallery records
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-robeschg-ref218

Printed Material, Announcements, Catalogs

Collection Creator:
Robert Schoelkopf Gallery  Search this
Container:
Box 6, Folder 2
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1973-1984
Collection Restrictions:
The collection is open for research. Use requires an appointment.
Collection Rights:
The Robert Schoelkopf Gallery records are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Collection Citation:
Robert Schoelkopf Gallery records, 1851-1991, bulk 1962-1991. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Robert Schoelkopf Gallery records
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-robeschg-ref219

Printed Material, Clippings

Collection Creator:
Robert Schoelkopf Gallery  Search this
Container:
Box 6, Folder 3
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1972-1985, undated
Collection Restrictions:
The collection is open for research. Use requires an appointment.
Collection Rights:
The Robert Schoelkopf Gallery records are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Collection Citation:
Robert Schoelkopf Gallery records, 1851-1991, bulk 1962-1991. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Robert Schoelkopf Gallery records
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-robeschg-ref220

Résumés

Collection Creator:
Robert Schoelkopf Gallery  Search this
Container:
Box 6, Folder 4
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
[circa 1973]-1987, undated
Collection Restrictions:
The collection is open for research. Use requires an appointment.
Collection Rights:
The Robert Schoelkopf Gallery records are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Collection Citation:
Robert Schoelkopf Gallery records, 1851-1991, bulk 1962-1991. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Robert Schoelkopf Gallery records
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-robeschg-ref221

Photographs of the Artist

Collection Creator:
Robert Schoelkopf Gallery  Search this
Container:
Box 6, Folder 5
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
undated
Collection Restrictions:
The collection is open for research. Use requires an appointment.
Collection Rights:
The Robert Schoelkopf Gallery records are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Collection Citation:
Robert Schoelkopf Gallery records, 1851-1991, bulk 1962-1991. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Robert Schoelkopf Gallery records
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-robeschg-ref222

Photographs of Works of Art

Collection Creator:
Robert Schoelkopf Gallery  Search this
Container:
Box 6, Folder 6-9
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
undated
Collection Restrictions:
The collection is open for research. Use requires an appointment.
Collection Rights:
The Robert Schoelkopf Gallery records are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Collection Citation:
Robert Schoelkopf Gallery records, 1851-1991, bulk 1962-1991. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Robert Schoelkopf Gallery records
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-robeschg-ref223

Erlebacher, Martha, Mayer

Collection Creator:
Fendrick Gallery  Search this
Container:
Box 16, Folder 6-7
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1980-1990, undated
Collection Restrictions:
The collection is open for research. Use of unmicrofilmed material requires an appointment.
Collection Rights:
The Fendrick Gallery records are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Collection Citation:
Fendrick Gallery records, 1952-2001. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Fendrick Gallery records
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-fendgall-ref125

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