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MS 4867 The Yakima Indians in 1942

Creator:
Barnett, Homer Garner, 1908-  Search this
Extent:
157 Pages
39 mounted photographs
Culture:
Yakama Indians  Search this
Indians of North America -- Plateau  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Pages
Mounted photographs
Photographs
Date:
1969
Scope and Contents:
Report on "social, economic, educational, and political conditions among the Yakima Indians in the State of Washington."
Local Numbers:
NAA MS 4867
Local Note:
dittoed copy of typescript document
Topic:
Yakama Indians  Search this
Education  Search this
Yakama Indians  Search this
Government and politics  Search this
Yakima  Search this
Sahaptin  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Citation:
Manuscript 4867, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.MS4867
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-ms4867

Louis Bunce papers

Creator:
Bunce, Louis, 1907-1983  Search this
Names:
Fountain Gallery of Art  Search this
KOIN-TV (Television station : Portland, Or.)  Search this
Metropolitan Arts Commission (Portland, Or.)  Search this
Oregon Historical Society  Search this
Portland Center for the Visual Arts  Search this
Portland Museum School -- Faculty  Search this
Bunce, Edna  Search this
Bunce, Gloria  Search this
Griffin, Rachael  Search this
Hammack, John  Search this
Judd, Sally  Search this
Pollock, Jackson, 1912-1956  Search this
Russell, Pee Wee  Search this
Weber, Max, 1881-1961  Search this
Wells, Wendy  Search this
Extent:
9.1 Linear feet
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Interviews
Sound recordings
Sketches
Photographs
Sketchbooks
Video recordings
Transcripts
Scrapbooks
Date:
1890s-1983
Summary:
The papers of Portland, Oregon painter, printmaker, and educator Louis Bunce (1907-1983) measure 9.1 linear feet and date from the 1890s to 1983. Found are biographical materials, correspondence, writings and notes, interviews and interview transcripts, organizational records, personal business records, printed materials, nine scrapbooks, eighteen sketchbooks, artwork, and photographs. A few audiovisual recordings are scattered throughout series.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of Portland, Oregon painter, printmaker, and educator Louis Bunce (1907-1983) measure 9.1 linear feet and date from the 1890s to 1983. Found are biographical materials, correspondence, writings and notes, interviews and interview transcripts, organizational records, personal business records, printed materials, nine scrapbooks, eighteen sketchbooks, artwork, and photographs. A few audiovisual recordings are scattered throughout series.

Biographical materials include address and appointment books, awards, life documents, resumes, and Bunce family genealogical records. There is a video recording of Bunce's retirement party from the Portland Museum School and of Bunce hanging his artwork for a show at the Fountain Gallery.

Bunce's correspondence is with his wives, Eda and Gloria, family, friends, fellow artists, and galleries and institutions. Notable correspondents include Jackson Pollock, Pee Wee Russell, and Max Weber. Writings and notes by Bunce include a notebook containing sales information, lists of works of art, sketches, and artist's statements. There are also autobiographical sketches and a video recording of a 1961 television show hosted by Bunce entitled "The Jazz Arts" depicting Bunce painting while jazz musicians perform. There are a few writings about Bunce by others.

There are two recorded interviews and three transcripts of interviews with Bunce conducted by Rachel Griffin, Wendy Wells of the Fountain Gallery, the Oregon Historical Society, KOIN TV, and an art student.

Organizational records document Louis Bunce's association with the Portland Center for the Visual Arts and the Portland Building Public Art Selection Committee of the Metropolitan Arts Commission. Personal business records include agreements and contracts, including an agreement with Sally Judd to form a gallery, consignment records, income and sales records, price lists and inventories (see also series 3 for a notebook containing lists of artwork and sales information), and personal legal documents. Printed materials consist of bulletins, clippings, and exhibition catalogs and announcements. There is also a video recording of a broadcast of KGW-TV depicting Bunce painting an outdoor mural.

Nine mixed media scrapbooks contain sketches, notes, printed material, photographs, correspondence, project proposals, writings, notes, addresses, receipts and sales records. Many of the scrapbooks contain artwork drawn directly onto the paper while some have artwork pasted into the pages. Eighteen sketchbooks of Bunce depict abstract drawings, figures, portraits, landscapes, and street scenes in pencil, pen and watercolor. Also found is a Valentine's Day-themed flipbook by Bunce and unidentified sketches likely by John Hammack and others.

Photographs are of Bunce, Bunce's family, Bunce at events, Bunce with his art, and Bunce at work in his studio. Also found are photographs of travel, stills of footage used on KOIN-TV, works of art, and exhibitions.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as 11 series.

Series 1: Biographical Material, 1902-1983 (Box 1, 13; 0.7 linear feet)

Series 2: Correspondence, circa 1916-1983 (Box 1-3; 1.7 linear feet)

Series 3: Writings and Notes, 1940-1970s (Box 3; 0.2 linear feet)

Series 4: Interviews and Interview Transcripts, 1955-1982 (Box 3; 0.2 linear feet)

Series 5: Organizational Records, 1970s-1983 (Box 3; 0.1 linear feet)

Series 6: Personal Business Records, 1948-1983 (Box 3-4; 0.8 linear feet)

Series 7: Printed Material, 1930s-1980s (Box 4-6, 13; 1.7 linear feet)

Series 8: Scrapbooks, 1941-1982 (Box 6, 9-10; 1.0 linear feet)

Series 9: Sketchbooks, 1940-1960s (Box 6-7, 11; 1.2 linear feet)

Series 10: Artwork, circa 1944-1979 (Box 7, 13-15; 0.6 linear feet)

Series 11: Photographs, 1890s-1981 (Box 7-8, 12; 0.9 linear feet)
Biographical / Historical:
Louis Bunce (1907-1983) was a painter, printmaker, and educator active in Portland, Oregon. His modernist style influenced many artists in the Pacific Northwest.

Born in Wyoming in 1907, Bunce began his art education at the Museum Art School in Portland Oregon in 1925. After two years, he moved to New York City to study at the Art Students League. During the great Depression, Bunce returned to Oregon and worked for the federal WPA Section of Painting and Sculpture. He painted murals for post offices in Portland (St. Johns neighborhood), and Grants Pass. Bunce moved back to New York in 1940, where he continued working as a WPA mural and easel painter, and befriended fellow artists Jackson Pollock, Willem de Kooning, Robert Motherwell, Franz Kline, and other American modernists.

A prominent member of the arts scene of Portland, Bunce taught at the Museum Art School (now the Pacific Northwest College of Art) from 1946 until 1972. In 1949, he and his wife Gloria opened the Kharouba Gallery, the first art gallery in Portland to show modernist, avant-garde, and experimental art. In 1958, Bunce's abstract mural for the Portland International Airport created some controversy over its modernist style. The mural can still be seen in the airport.

Bunce married twice, to Eda Hult and Gloria Scott. With Eda, he had a son, Jon Bunce. Louis Bunce died in Portland, Oregon in 1983 from an aneurysm.
Related Materials:
Also in the Archives of American Art are two oral history interviews with Bunce, one conducted on October 29, 1965 by Dorothy Bestor and a second conducted on December 3-13, 1982 by Rachel Rosenfield, for the Archives of American Art's Northwest Oral History Project
Provenance:
The Louis Bunce papers were donated by the artist's son, Jon Bunce in 1984.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment. Use of archival audiovisual recordings with no duplicate access copy requires advanced notice.
Rights:
The Louis Bunce papers are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Occupation:
Painters -- Oregon -- Portland  Search this
Printmakers -- Oregon  Search this
Educators -- Oregon  Search this
Topic:
Artists' studios -- Photographs  Search this
Genre/Form:
Interviews
Sound recordings
Sketches
Photographs
Sketchbooks
Video recordings
Transcripts
Scrapbooks
Citation:
Louis Bunce papers, 1890s-1983. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.buncloui
See more items in:
Louis Bunce papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-buncloui

Brian Kazlov papers

Creator:
Kazlov, Brian, 1944-1991  Search this
Names:
Kazlov, Louise  Search this
Extent:
0.2 Linear Feet
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Date:
1959-1991
Summary:
The papers of painter and teacher Brian Kazlov measure 0.2 linear feet and date from 1959 to 1991. Included are letters written by Kazlov and his wife Louise to his parents, Gertrude and Peter, and other relatives. In his letters he wrote about his art education, his process of painting, the books he read, his relationships, and his emotional ups and downs as an artist. Also found are a few biographical documents, exhibition catalogs, and news clippings.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of painter and teacher Brian Kazlov measure 0.2 linear feet and date from 1959 to 1991. Included are letters written by Kazlov and his wife Louise to his parents, Gertrude and Peter, and other relatives. In his letters he wrote about his art education, his process of painting, the books he read, his relationships, and his emotional ups and downs as an artist. Also found are a few biographical documents, exhibition catalogs, and news clippings.
Arrangement:
Due to the small size of this collection, the papers are arranged as one series.
Biographical / Historical:
Brian Kazlov (1944-1991) was a painter and teacher in New York City and Yachats, Oregon. Kazlov received his MFA from Yale University and later taught at Western University and the University of Oregon. In 1964 he helped found the New York Studio School, and unaccredited art school in Soho.
Provenance:
Donated in 1992 by Gerturde Kazlov, Brian Kazlov's mother.
Restrictions:
Use of original paper requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C., Research Center.
Topic:
Art -- Study and teaching  Search this
Art teachers--Oregon  Search this
Painters -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Painters--Oregon  Search this
Painting -- Technique  Search this
Citation:
Brian Kazlov papers, 1959-1991. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.kazlbria
See more items in:
Brian Kazlov papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-kazlbria

James Graham Cooper Papers

Creator::
Cooper, J. G. (James Graham), 1830-1902  Search this
Extent:
0.54 cu. ft. (1 document box) (2 microfilm reels)
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Maps
Field notes
Manuscripts
Date:
1853-1870 and undated
Introduction:
This finding aid was digitized with funds generously provided by the Smithsonian Institution Women's Committee.
Descriptive Entry:
These papers consist of journals and manuscripts containing Cooper's descriptions of his travels in Oregon and Washington territories, California, and his homeward trip through Panama, and as far north as Cape Hatteras. Included are observations made while he was a part of the Isaac Stevens survey. The journals and manuscripts contain descriptions of geological features, weather observations, and technical notes on the plant and animal life of the area. Also included are specimen lists, maps, and sketches of his route while on the Stevens survey.
Historical Note:
Born and educated in New York City, James G. Cooper (1830-1902) was a naturalist and physician with Isaac Stevens' Pacific Railroad Survey expedition of 1853. One of the first to collect specimens in the Pacific Coast regions, he became an expert on the geological, biological, and zoological aspects of that area. He published material on the natural history of California and Oregon and wrote a chapter on zoology for Natural Wealth of California, edited by T. F. Cronise. After traveling extensively, he practiced medicine and lived in California until his death in 1902. The Cooper Ornithological Society was named in his honor.
Topic:
Natural history  Search this
Ornithology  Search this
Genre/Form:
Maps
Field notes
Manuscripts
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 7067, James Graham Cooper Papers
Identifier:
Record Unit 7067
See more items in:
James Graham Cooper Papers
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-faru7067
Additional Online Media:

Robert Tyler Davis Papers

Creator::
Davis, Robert Tyler  Search this
Extent:
0.94 cu. ft. (1 half document box) (1 16x20 box)
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Books
Clippings
Black-and-white photographs
Color photographs
Black-and-white negatives
Place:
Pasadena (Calif.)
Rochester (N.Y.)
Portland (Or.)
Miami (Fla.)
Washington (D.C.)
Date:
1924-1960, 1979
Descriptive Entry:
Robert Tyler Davis (1904-1978) was born in Los Angeles, California. He was a museum administrator and an educator in art and art history, specializing in Pacific Northwest Native American art, and decorative arts, particularly tapestries. He graduated from Franklin High School, Los Angeles, and studied art history, drawing, and painting at the University of California at Los Angeles, and at Harvard, A.B., 1926, A.M., 1928. He was a Carnegie Fellow (1927-1929), and studied fine arts abroad, taking courses at the Sorbonne. He taught drawing, painting and art history at the University of Rochester, in New York (1929-1933), and at the Erskine School for Girls, Boston, when he returned to Harvard for graduate museum studies between 1933 and 1934.

On September 6, 1934 Davis married mystery novelist Lillian Soskin, and became Director of Education at the Albright Gallery in Buffalo, New York. In 1939 Davis was named Director of the Portland Art Museum in Oregon, where he researched and collected Native American art. His book, Native Arts of the Pacific Northwest, was published in 1949. From 1947 to 1952 Davis was Director of the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts, and Professor of Fine Arts at McGill University in Montreal. Davis was Director of the Vizcaya-Dade County Art Museum, 1953-1957; Interim Director of the Joe and Emily Lowe Gallery, University of Miami, 1955-1956; and Coordinator of Humanities and Professor of Art at the University of Miami, Coral Gables, Florida, 1956-1959. Lillian Davis died October 12, 1957. Davis was remarried January 29, 1959 to Janet Evans Golby.

In 1960 Davis was hired as museum consultant and liaison for the French and Company art dealership in New York. In September 1968 Davis became Assistant Director of the National Collection of Fine Arts, Washington, D.C.; Acting Director, June 1969-January 1970; and later Special Assistant for the Collections, 1972-1975. His son, Martin M. Davis, died in 1969, and Janet Davis died in 1973. In 1975 Robert Tyler Davis retired to Lily Dale, New York, and traveled extensively. He died in 1978 in Pasadena, California.

This accession consists of a photograph album and miscellaneous photographs of Robert Tyler Davis and his family. Included are images of his wife, Lilian Soskin Davis, and their son, Martin M. Davis. The images follow the Davis family as they lived and worked in Pasadena, California; Rochester, New York; Portland, Oregon; Miami, Florida; and Washington, District of Columbia. Materials include a photograph album, images, negatives, and clippings.
Topic:
Art museums -- Educational aspects  Search this
Art museum directors  Search this
Photograph albums  Search this
Genre/Form:
Books
Clippings
Black-and-white photographs
Color photographs
Black-and-white negatives
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Accession 18-085, Robert Tyler Davis Papers
Identifier:
Accession 18-085
See more items in:
Robert Tyler Davis Papers
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-fa18-085

Oral history interview with Jennie V. Emlong

Creator::
Emlong, Jennie V. interviewee  Search this
Extent:
2 audiotapes (reference copies).
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Interviews
Audiotapes
Oral history
Date:
1980
Introduction:
The Smithsonian Institution Archives began its Oral History Program in 1973. The purpose of the program is to supplement the written documentation of the Archives' record and manuscript collections with an Oral History Collection, focusing on the history of the Institution, research by its scholars, and contributions of its staff. Program staff conduct interviews with current and retired Smithsonian staff and others who have made significant contributions to the Institution. There are also interviews conducted by researchers or student on topics related to the history of the Smithsonian or the holdings of the Smithsonian Institution Archives.

Jennie V. Emlong was interviewed for the Oral History Program to provide a full picture of her talented and multi-faceted son, Douglas Ralph Emlong, who had close ties with the Department of Paleobiology, National Museum of Natural History.
Descriptive Entry:
Jennie V. Emlong was interviewed by Clayton E. Ray on 20 June 1980 to provide a full picture of her talented and multi-faceted son, who possessed the unique personality characteristics requisite to the really successful collector. The interview covers his family background, childhood, education, development of interests in collecting, relationships with paleontologists, major fossil finds, artistic activities, and personality.
Historical Note:
Jennie Emlong's son, Douglas Ralph Emlong (1942-1980), was an amateur field collector of fossils in the Pacific Northwest. He had close ties with the Department of Paleobiology, National Museum of National History (NMNH) which purchased many of his collections and often supported his field work. Douglas Emlong was self-educated in paleontology and displayed an early penchant for collecting. During his childhood, he spent much of his time roaming the hills and desert of Southern California, collecting cacti, minerals, agates, and fossils. When he was in the eighth grade, his family moved to the Oregon coast, and he began collecting marine fossils found on the beach and in surrounding cliffs. For several years after high school, he operated a fossil and rock museum and shop, and lectured extensively on the paleontology of the Oregon coast. He became acquainted with many prominent West Coast paleontologists, notable Arnold Shotwell, in his search for information on the complex geology of the region.

Douglas Emlong's first contact with the Smithsonian was with A. Remington Kellogg of the NMNH who was interested in his fossil cetaceans. His relationship with the museum was solidified by Clayton E. Ray, curator of the Department of Paleobiology, who encouraged and funded Emlong's fossil collecting, and purchased his unique marine fossils.

Emlong possessed the individualistic and brilliant mind of the gifted amateur collector. He was largely self-taught, worked alone, and was truly enthralled by the search for clues to the past. These searches produced many new specimens of fossils, ranging from plants to invertebrates to marine mammals, notably fifteen new species of marine mammals and two previously unknown families. Emlong was a creative and intuitive individual. He was a musician and composer, a painter and a writer. He was intrigued by mysticism, telepathy, and other frontiers of human intellect.
Topic:
Mammalogy  Search this
Paleontology  Search this
Paleobiology  Search this
Cetacea, Fossil  Search this
Collectors and collecting  Search this
Genre/Form:
Interviews
Audiotapes
Oral history
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 9518, Emlong, Jennie V. interviewee, Oral history interview with Jennie V. Emlong
Identifier:
Record Unit 9518
See more items in:
Oral history interview with Jennie V. Emlong
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-faru9518

John Davis Hatch papers

Creator:
Hatch, John Davis  Search this
Names:
St. John's College (Annapolis, Md.) -- Students  Search this
University of Massachusetts -- Faculty  Search this
University of Oregon -- Faculty  Search this
Bluemner, Oscar, 1867-1938  Search this
Browne, Henry Kirke  Search this
Callahan, Kenneth, 1905-1986  Search this
Clark, Ezra  Search this
Cranch, John, 1807-1891  Search this
Cropsey, Jasper Francis, 1823-1900  Search this
Darley, Felix Octavius Carr, 1822-1888  Search this
Davies, Arthur B. (Arthur Bowen), 1862-1928  Search this
Granger, C. H.  Search this
Guy, Seymour J., 1824-1910  Search this
Harvey, George W., 1855-  Search this
Hatch, Olivia Stokes  Search this
Henry, Edward Lamson, 1841-1919  Search this
Inman, Henry, 1801-1846  Search this
McNeill, Lloyd  Search this
Peale, Rembrandt, 1778-1860  Search this
Scott, Julian  Search this
Trumbull, John, 1756-1843  Search this
Vanderlyn, John, 1775-1852  Search this
Extent:
24.9 Linear feet
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Essays
Reviews (documents)
Photographs
Diaries
Sketchbooks
Notes
Lectures
Sketches
Date:
1790-1995
Summary:
The papers of art historian, collector, educator, and museum administrator John Davis Hatch measure 24.9 linear feet and date from 1790-1995. Within the papers are biographical materials; correspondence; personal business and legal documents; diaries; research, organization, and teaching files; writings; printed materials; photographs; and works of art (mostly sketches) by American artists. Research files regarding artists and specific subjects comprise the bulk of this collection.
Scope and Content Note:
The papers of art historian, collector, educator, and museum administrator John Davis Hatch measure 24.9 linear feet and date from 1790-1995. Within the papers are biographical materials; correspondence; personal business and legal documents; diaries; research, organization and teaching files; writings; printed materials; photographs; and works of art (mostly sketches) by American artists. Research files regarding artists and specific subjects comprise the bulk of this collection.

Scattered biographical materials include an invitation to the Hatch's anniversary party in 1964, short biographical sketches and resumes, certificates, report cards, a silhouette of the Hatch Family circa 1904, and a typecript of a diary written by Olivia Hatch as a child.

Correspondence includes professional correspondence between Hatch and colleagues; letters from family and friends; and some materials regarding exhibitions from the Hatch Collection. The bulk of correspondence spans Hatch's professional career although there are scattered letters from 1915-1943 from Hatch to his parents. Also found are letters addressed to an unidentified "Henry." Correspondence is also found in the research files.

Personal business and financial records consist of inventories, bills, receipts, and other records for artworks purchased, loaned, or donated by Hatch. Also found are records from the J. D. Hatch Associates Cultural Consultants, a draft of Hatch's will, stock and tax materials, and travel papers and passports.

Scattered diaries and journal fragments and a transcript date from 1925-1965. Thirteen "Daily Reflection Journals" date from 1975-1987.

Research files on artists and subjects are extensive, comprising one-half of the collection. Files are varied and may include primary research materials, correspondence, printed materials, notes, and writings. Some of the artists' letters and other materials dated from 1790-early 1800s may have been purchased by Hatch. Among many other items, there is an illustrated letter written by Oscar Bluemner and photographs of Bluemner; primary research materials dating from the early 1800s on John Vanderlyn including a will, receipts, and correspondence; a letter from Rembrandt Peale dated 1830, and an autograph letter from John Trumbull dated 1790. Also found is an index card file.

Organization files contain files and records related to Hatch's affiliations with many cultural organizations. A small amount of teaching and education files consist of Hatch's notes and lectures from the University of Oregon and the University of Massachusetts, and from his continuing education courses he took at St. John's College. Writings and notes include short essays by Hatch, mostly concerning art, exhibitions and museum administration; book reviews; general notes, lists, and reports.

Printed Materials are comprised of exhibition catalogs and announcements, including those from the American Drawing Annual in the 1940s-1950s; printed articles annotated by Hatch; clippings; pricelists; and published works.

A small number of photographs are of Hatch, some by Dorothy Frazer; of his family and friends; and of artists. The bulk of the photographs are of works of art including those owned by Hatch.

Artwork includes two sketchbooks - one by Kenneth Callahan and another by Lloyd McNeill; and additional drawings and sketches by Julian Scott, Henry Kirke Browne, Kenneth Callahan, Ezra Clark, John Cranch, Jasper Francis Crospey, F. O. C. Darley, C. H. Granger, Seymour J. Guy, George Harvey, Edward Lamson Henry, Henry Inman, as well as unsigned or illegible names.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as 11 series:

Series 1: Biographical Information, circa 1900-1980s (Box 1; 8 folders)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1903-1990s (Box 1-3; 2 linear feet)

Series 3: Personal Business and Legal Records, Date (Box 3; 0.3 linear feet)

Series 4: Diaries and Journals, 1925-1987 (Box 3, 23; 1.2 linear feet)

Series 5: Research Files, 1790-1992 (Box 3-13, 20-21, 24; 12.7 linear feet)

Series 6: Organization Files, 1930s-1990s (Box 13-14; 1.0 linear feet)

Series 7: Teaching and Education Files, 1930s-1993 (Box 14-15; 1.0 linear feet)

Series 8: Writings and Notes, 1936-1990s (Box 15; 0.3 linear feet)

Series 9: Printed Material, 1870s-1990s (Box 15-19, 22, 25-26, OV1; 5.9 linear feet)

Series 10: Photographs, circa 1900-1990s (Box 22; 0.2 linear feet)

Series 11: Artwork, 1851-1973 (Box 22; 0.3 linear feet)
Biographical Note:
Art historian, collector, educator, and museum administrator John Davis Hatch (1907-1996) worked in the Boston and New England area, as well as the Pacific Northwest, and New York state. Hatch served as director of the Art Institute of Seattle, the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum, the Albany Institute of Art and History, and the Norfolk Museum of Art and Sciences.

John Davis Hatch was born in San Francisco, California in 1907. His father, grandfather, and great-grandfather were architects and Hatch studied landscape architecture at the University of California, Berkeley. He served as an apprentice to Lockwood de Forest. After abandoning landscape architecture, he accepted a position as director of the Seattle Fine Arts Society (1928-1931) at the age of twenty-one and taught art history courses at the University of Washington.

In 1932, Hatch accepted the position of assistant director of the Isabella Stewart Gardener Museum in Boston, Massachusetts. He also directed the federal Public Works of Art Project in New England. Additionally, Hatch served from 1940-1948 as director of the Albany Institute of Art and History and from 1950-1959 of the Norfolk Museum of Arts and Sciences. Hatch worked as an art advisor for exhibitions at five historically African-American colleges in Atlanta and in San Simeon in California. He founded the American Drawing Annual exhibition.

Hatch conducted extensive research on artists Oscar Bluemner and John Vanderlyn, American silverwork, and American drawing. In addition, Hatch collected American drawings and later donated many of works of art from his personal collection to the National Gallery in Washington, D.C. Aside from his early teaching in Washington state, Hatch taught at the University of Massachusetts and the University of Oregon. He was a member of numerous professional arts-related organizations.

In 1939, Hatch married Olivia Stokes with whom he had four children: Sarah, John, Daniel and James. He died in 1996.
Related Material:
The Archives of American Art holds two oral history interviews with John Davis Hatch: June 8, 1964 conducted by H. Wade White and 1979-1980 conducted by Robert F. Brown. Also found is a separately cataloged photograph of Hatch and Henry Francis Taylor from 1933.

Additional research materials complied by Hatch are located in the Albany Institute of History and Art, the Metropolitan Museum, the library of the National Gallery of Art, and the Senate House, Kingston, New York.

Hatch donated two hundred and seventy American drawings to the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C.
Separated Material:
Four books annotated by Bluemner, a letter from Bluemner, a letter from A. Stieglitz to Bluemner, photographs of works of art, and exhibition materials were removed from the papers and merged with the Oscar Bluemner papers at the Archives of American Art.
Provenance:
John Davis Hatch and the John Davis Hatch estate donated his papers to the Archives of American Art in several installments between 1960-1996. Many of the primary materials relating to John Vanderlyn were acquired by Hatch from a photographer in Kingston, New York who received them from a niece of Vanderlyn. Robert Graham of James Graham and Sons gave Vanderlyn's will to Hatch.
Restrictions:
Use of originals requires an appointment.
Rights:
The John Davis Hatch papers are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Painting, American  Search this
Drawing, American  Search this
Art, American  Search this
Artists -- United States  Search this
Art historians -- Massachusetts  Search this
Art -- Collectors and collecting  Search this
Art, American -- Study and teaching  Search this
Genre/Form:
Essays
Reviews (documents)
Photographs
Diaries
Sketchbooks
Notes
Lectures
Sketches
Citation:
John Davis Hatch, 1790-1995. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.hatcjohn
See more items in:
John Davis Hatch papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-hatcjohn

Paul Oman Papers

Creator::
Oman, Paul  Search this
Extent:
4.5 cu. ft. (9 document boxes)
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Manuscripts
Date:
circa 1930-1972
Descriptive Entry:
These papers consist of incoming and outgoing correspondence mostly documenting Oman's career as a research entomologist at the USDA and his study of leafhopper systematics. Most of the letters were exchanged between Oman and professional colleagues and concern the identification of specimens. Correspondence after 1950 was created primarily by David A. Young, Jr., and James P. Kramer, two USDA Homopterists who assumed responsibility for taxonomic studies after Oman's work became more administrative in nature.
Historical Note:
Paul Wilson Oman (1908-1996), an entomologist and specialist on leafhopper taxonomy, was educated at the University of Kansas (A.B., 1930; A.M., 1935) and the George Washington University (Ph.D., 1941). In 1930, Oman joined the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) as a Junior Entomologist with the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine. He remained with the USDA, in various research and administrative posts, until 1967 when he retired to join the faculty of Oregon State University. Oman served in the United States Army during World War II and the Korean War, conducting studies on medical entomology and the biological control of insects.
Topic:
Entomology  Search this
Entomologists  Search this
Leafhoppers  Search this
Genre/Form:
Manuscripts
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 7346, Paul Oman Papers
Identifier:
Record Unit 7346
See more items in:
Paul Oman Papers
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-faru7346

Robert Tyler Davis Papers

Creator::
Davis, Robert Tyler  Search this
Extent:
8.38 cu. ft. (7 record storage boxes) (2 16x20 boxes)
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Photographs
Diaries
Sketches
Art objects
Manuscripts
Date:
1918-1977 and undated
Descriptive Entry:
These papers document Robert Tyler Davis' education and career, 1918-1977. The majority of the material is dated 1937- 1977. A fair amount of incoming correspondence illustrates Davis' personal life, and, to a lesser extent, his professional career. Of special note are letters from Davis' second wife, Janet, and journals kept during his travels. Materials concerning his career consist largely of photographs, newspaper clippings, and research notes, and less often include official business papers and correspondence. The most detailed division regards his directorship of the Vizcaya Museum. Davis' research on the Gellatly Collection in the Smithsonian is also well documented. Other materials include travel photographs, artistic sketches drawn by Davis, and notes.
Historical Note:
Robert Tyler Davis (1904-1978) was born in Los Angeles, California. He was a museum administrator and an educator in art and art history, specializing in Pacific Northwest Native American art, and decorative arts, particularly tapestries. He graduated from Franklin High School, Los Angeles, and studied art history, drawing, and painting at the University of California at Los Angeles, and at Harvard, A.B., 1926, A.M., 1928. He was a Carnegie Fellow (1927-1929), and studied fine arts abroad, taking courses at the Sorbonne. He taught drawing, painting and art history at the University of Rochester, in New York (1929-1933), and at the Erskine School for Girls, Boston, when he returned to Harvard for graduate museum studies between 1933 and 1934.

On September 6, 1934 Davis married mystery novelist Lillian Soskin, and became Director of Education at the Albright Gallery in Buffalo, New York. In 1939 Davis was named Director of the Portland Art Museum in Oregon, where he researched and collected Native American art. His book, Native Arts of the Pacific Northwest, was published in 1949. From 1947 to 1952 Davis was Director of the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts, and Professor of Fine Arts at McGill University in Montreal. Davis was Director of the Vizcaya-Dade County Art Museum, 1953-1957, Interim Director of the Joe and Emily Lowe Gallery, University of Miami, 1955-1956, and Coordinator of Humanities and Professor of Art at the University of Miami, Coral Gables, Florida, 1956-1959. Lillian Davis died October 12, 1957. Davis was remarried January 29, 1959 to Janet Evans Golby.

In 1960 Davis was hired as museum consultant and liaison for the French and Company art dealership in New York. In September 1968 Davis became Assistant Director of the National Collection of Fine Arts, Washington, D.C.; Acting Director, June 1969-January 1970; and later Special Assistant for the Collections, 1972-1975. His son, Martin M. Davis, died in 1969, and Janet Davis died in 1973. In 1975 Robert Tyler Davis retired to Lily Dale, New York, and traveled extensively. He died in 1978 in Pasadena, California.
Topic:
Art  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Diaries
Sketches
Art objects
Manuscripts
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 7439, Robert Tyler Davis Papers
Identifier:
Record Unit 7439
See more items in:
Robert Tyler Davis Papers
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-faru7439

Reuben Tam papers

Creator:
Tam, Reuben  Search this
Names:
Alan Gallery (Charles Alan)  Search this
Brooklyn Museum of Art  Search this
Coe Kerr Gallery  Search this
Downtown Gallery (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation  Search this
Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture  Search this
Andrews, Dorothy, 1918-2008  Search this
Kienbusch, William, 1914-1980  Search this
Nesjar, Carl, 1920-  Search this
Solomon, Hyde, 1911-  Search this
Extent:
8.1 Linear feet
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Sketchbooks
Sound recordings
Poems
Drafts (documents)
Photographs
Prints
Diaries
Scrapbooks
Watercolors
Drawings
Date:
1931-2006
Summary:
The papers of landscape painter and educator Reuben Tam measure 8.1 linear feet and date from 1931 to 2006. The papers document his career as a painter in New York, Maine, and Hawaii through biographical material; correspondence with family, friends, art organizations, schools, and galleries; diaries, poetry, and other writings; exhibition catalogs, news clippings, other printed material; photographs; artwork, including seventeen sketchbooks; and eight scrapbooks.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of landscape painter and educator Reuben Tam measure 8.1 linear feet and date from 1931 to 2006. The papers document his career as a painter in New York, Maine, and Hawaii through biographical material; correspondence with family, friends, art organizations, schools, and galleries; diaries, poetry, and other writings; exhibition catalogs, news clippings, other printed material; photographs; artwork, including seventeen sketchbooks; and eight scrapbooks.

Biographical material includes school documents, records of his tenure as an instructor at the Brooklyn Museum of Art School, artwork consignment and sales records, and slides and accompanying audio cassette recording of the "Reuben Tam Show" about his work as an artist on Monhegan Island, Maine.

Correspondence is with family, fellow artists, including William Kienbusch and Hyde Solomon, as well as art organizations, schools, and museums, such as Brooklyn Museum of Art School, Guggenheim Memorial Foundation, Maine Coast Artists group, and the Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture. Also found is correspondence with the three galleries which represented his work: Downtown Gallery, Alan Gallery, and Coe Kerr Gallery.

The collection includes five bound diaries as well as diary entries written by Reuben Tam on loose sheets of paper, primarily documenting the 1940s. Other writings include drafts of poetry, one notebook, miscellaneous notes, and essays by others.

Printed material consists of school publications, exhibition catalogs and announcements for solo and group shows, brochures, flyers, magazines, bulletins, and news clippings. Eight scrapbooks found in this collection also include newspaper clippings, exhibition announcements and catalogs, as well as event invitations, membership cards, and letters, documenting 40 years of Reuben Tam's career.

Photographs are of Reuben Tam, Tam with friends and family, and artwork. One photograph album contains photographs from Tam's visits to Maine from 1946 to 1948, and includes photographs of fellow artists Hyde Solomon, Carl Nesjar, Dorothy Andrews, and William Kienbusch. Artwork in the collection includes prints, drawings, and watercolors as well as seventeen large sketchbooks documenting the coastal landscape of Monhegan Island, Maine.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as 8 series:

Series 1: Biographical Material, 1934-1993 (Box 1; 0.4 linear feet)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1931-2006 (Box 1-4; 3.5 linear feet)

Series 3: Diaries, 1932-1974 (Box 4-5; 0.4 linear feet)

Series 4: Writings, 1939-1987 (Box 5; 7 folders)

Series 5: Printed Material, 1935-1997 (Box 5-6, 9; 1.2 linear feet)

Series 6: Photographs, circa 1930-1990 (Box 6-7, 9; 1.0 linear foot)

Series 7: Artwork, circa 1936-1975 (Box 7, 9-10, OV 11; 0.7 linear feet)

Series 8: Scrapbooks, 1938-1978 (Box 7-8; 0.9 linear feet)
Biographical / Historical:
Reuben Tam (1916-1991) was a landscape painter and educator in New York, Maine, and Hawaii. Tam was born in Kapaa, Hawaii, in 1916. He received a degree in education in 1937 from the University of Hawaii and was briefly a public school teacher before attending graduate courses at the California School of Fine Arts. In 1941 he moved to New York and took courses in art history and philosophy at the New School for Social Research and Columbia University. Tam became affiliated with the Downtown Gallery in 1945 and was a prolific exhibitor in national and regional shows, winning critical praise as an abstract landscape painter. In 1948 he was awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship and first exhibited in the National Academy's annual exhibition in 1947.

Tam was an instructor at the Brooklyn Museum of Art School from 1946 to 1974. While there he taught advanced studies in painting and was chairman of the graduate painting department. He also served as a visiting professor at Oregon State University, Haystack, and Queens College, CUNY.

Beginning in 1948, Tam and his wife, Geraldine, spent summers at their home and studio on Monhegan Island, Maine. Tam's work was deeply influenced by coastal landscapes both in Maine and in his native Hawaii. In 1981 he and his wife moved back to Kapaa, Hawaii, where he continued to paint and exhibit his new works until his death in 1991.
Related Materials:
Reuben Tam papers, 1958-1966, are also located at Syracuse University.
Provenance:
Scrapbooks were lent for microfilming 1970 by Reuben Tam and were subsequently donated in 2009 along with additional papers by Geraldine King Tam, Reuben Tam's widow.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Rights:
The Reuben Tam papers are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Painters -- Maine  Search this
Painters -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Educators -- Hawaii  Search this
Educators -- Maine  Search this
Educators -- New York (State)  Search this
Painters -- Hawaii  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sketchbooks
Sound recordings
Poems
Drafts (documents)
Photographs
Prints
Diaries
Scrapbooks
Watercolors
Drawings
Citation:
Reuben Tam papers, 1931-2006. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.tamreub
See more items in:
Reuben Tam papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-tamreub
Additional Online Media:

Morton Traylor papers

Creator:
Traylor, Morton P., 1918-1996  Search this
Names:
Virginia Art Institute  Search this
Extent:
3.4 Linear Feet
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Photographs
Scrapbooks
Date:
1936-2003
Summary:
The papers of painter and teacher Morton Traylor measure 3.4 linear feet and date from 1936 to 2003. The papers document his career as an artist and administrator of the Virginia Art Institute through biographical material, correspondence, writings, personal business records, printed material, photographs, and scrapbooks. The bulk of the collection consists of photographs, slides, and albums of artwork by Traylor. Three scrapbooks document his education and early career through clippings, photographs, exhibition materials, and letters.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of painter and teacher Morton Traylor measure 3.4 linear feet and date from 1936 to 2003. The papers document his career as an artist and administrator of the Virginia Art Institute through biographical material, correspondence, writings, personal business records, printed material, photographs, and scrapbooks. The bulk of the collection consists of photographs, slides, and albums of artwork by Traylor. Three scrapbooks document his education and early career through clippings, photographs, exhibition materials, and letters.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as 7 series.

Series 1: Biographical Material, circa 1944-1996 (5 folders; Box 1)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1943-2003 (7 folders; Box 1)

Series 3: Writings, circa 1944-1991 (0.3 linear feet; Box 1)

Series 4: Personal Business Records, circa 1950s-1984 (0.3 linear feet; Box 1)

Series 5: Printed Material, 1939-1998 (5 folders; Box 1)

Series 6: Photographic Material, 1936-1994 (1.6 linear feet; Boxes 2-3, 5-6)

Series 7: Scrapbooks, 1939-1956 (0.8 linear feet; Boxes 3-4, 6)
Biographical / Historical:
Morton Traylor (1918-1996) was a painter and teacher in Los Angeles, California, and Charlottesville, Virginia. Traylor founded and taught at the Virginia Art Institute.

Morton Traylor was born in Petersburg, Virginia, and studied art at Los Angeles City College, Chouinard Art Institute, and Jepson Art Institute. He also attended the Ecole des Beaux-Arts in 1947. From 1942 to 1946 he served in the U.S. Navy as a Radio and Radar man, spending time in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. In 1950 he worked as the personal assistant to artist Rico Lebrun, and during the 1950s worked in commercial art at several companies in California. After moving to Virginia with his wife in 1960, he taught at the Holden School of Fine and Applied Arts, and in 1966 opened the Virginia Art Institute in Charlottesville. The school closed in 1975. Traylor regularly exhibited his work throughout his career and won several awards. In 1985 Traylor and his wife moved to Days Creek, Oregon, where he continued to paint and exhibit his work until his death in 1996.
Provenance:
The collection was donated in 2012 by Nathan Simon, Morton Traylor's friend.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment.
Rights:
The Morton Traylor papers are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Art -- Study and teaching  Search this
Arts administrators -- California -- Los Angeles  Search this
Arts administrators -- Virginia  Search this
Art teachers -- California -- Los Angeles  Search this
Art teachers -- Virginia  Search this
Painters -- Virginia -- Charlottesville  Search this
Painters -- California -- Los Angeles  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Scrapbooks
Citation:
Morton Traylor papers, 1936-2003. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.traymort
See more items in:
Morton Traylor papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-traymort

Theodore H. Reed Interviews

Creator:
Reed, Theodore H. interviewee  Search this
Extent:
35 audiotapes (reference copies).
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Interviews
Audiotapes
Oral history
Date:
1989-1994
Introduction:
The Smithsonian Institution Archives began its Oral History Program in 1973. The purpose of the program is to supplement the written documentation of the Archives' record and manuscript collections with an Oral History Collection, focusing on the history of the Institution, research by its scholars, and contributions of its staff. Program staff conduct interviews with current and retired Smithsonian staff and others who have made significant contributions to the Institution. There are also interviews conducted by researchers or students on topics related to the history of the Smithsonian or the holdings of the Smithsonian Institution Archives.

Reed was interviewed for the Oral History Collection because of his distinguished veterinary and management career, contributions as a Smithsonian administrator, and long tenure as director of the National Zoological Park. Additional information about Reed can be found in the Records of the National Zoological Park which are also housed in Smithsonian Archives.
Descriptive Entry:
These interviews of Reed by Pamela M. Henson discuss his youth; education; veterinary practice; experiences at the Portland Zoo; and career at the NZP, including his tenure as Veterinarian and achievements as Director, especially renovation and modernization of facilities, development of the Cap-chur Gun, acquisition of such animals as the Giant Pandas, Komodo dragon, and white tigers, development of research and educational programs, creation of an endangered species program and the CRC, participation in the Species Survival Program, his role in the American Association of Zoological Parks and Aquariums and the International Union of Directors of Zoological Gardens; and reminiscences of such colleagues as William Mann, John Perry, and Leonard Carmichael. An additional interview of Reed by Pamela M. Henson, Historian, Smithsonian Institution Archives, and Caroline Winslow, Graphics Department, National Zoological Department was conducted in 1992. Reed was interviewed about the 1958 Safety Brochure that was created by the Zoo in response to the death a little girl by a lion at NZP. The collection consists of 13 interviews totaling 31.5 hours of audio recordings and 790 pages of transcript. Box 1 contains transcripts of the interviews. Box 2 contains cassette recordings of the original reel-to-reel recordings, which are in security storage.
Historical Note:
Theodore H. Reed (1922- ), veterinarian and zoo administrator, received the D.V.M. in 1945 from the School of Veterinary Medicine, Kansas State College. From 1946 to 1955, he practiced as a veterinarian in Oregon and Idaho. He gained experience with exotic animals while serving as a veterinarian to the Portland Zoological Park from 1951 to 1955. In 1955, Reed was appointed Veterinarian at the National Zoological Park (NZP). In 1956, he was named Acting Director after the retirement of William M. Mann, and in 1958, he advanced to Director. During his tenure, Reed oversaw a capital renovation of the NZP; development of the Conservation and Research Center (CRC) in Front Royal, Virginia, in 1974; a transition from display of exotic specimens to breeding of endangered species; and many advances in exotic animal care and medicine. Reed retired from administration in 1983 and from the NZP in 1984.
Rights:
Restricted.
Topic:
Conservation of natural resources  Search this
Zoos  Search this
Records of meetings, organizations, and professional societies  Search this
Genre/Form:
Interviews
Audiotapes
Oral history
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 9568, Reed, Theodore H. interviewee, Theodore H. Reed Interviews
Identifier:
Record Unit 9568
See more items in:
Theodore H. Reed Interviews
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-faru9568

Margaret De Patta papers

Creator:
De Patta, Margaret, 1903-1964  Search this
Names:
California College of Arts and Crafts (San Francisco, Calif.)  Search this
California Labor School  Search this
Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America  Search this
Nanny's Design Gallery  Search this
Oregon State System of Higher Education  Search this
San Francisco Metal Arts Guild  Search this
Barson, Fred  Search this
Bielawski, Eugene  Search this
Davis, Adelle  Search this
Designs Contemporary  Search this
Fleisher, Janet  Search this
Flory, Alice  Search this
McHendrie, Janet  Search this
Ries, Victor, 1907-  Search this
Untracht, Oppi  Search this
Extent:
3.7 Linear feet
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Photographs
Sketchbooks
Designs
Drawings
Date:
circa 1930-2012
Summary:
The papers of California jewelry designer Margaret De Patta measure 3.7 linear feet and date from circa 1930 to 2012. The papers include correspondence, writings, teaching files, exhibition files, personal business records, printed material, artwork and sketchbooks, and photographs.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of California jewelry designer Margaret De Patta measure 3.7 linear feet and date from circa 1930 to 2012. The papers include correspondence, writings, teaching files, exhibition files, personal business records, printed material, artwork and sketchbooks, and photographs.

Personal and professional correspondence is with family, friends, artists, galleries, museums, and universities. Notable correspondents include Fred Barson, Adelle Davis, Janet Fleisher, Alice Flory, Janet McHendrie, Victor Ries, Oppi Untracht, and Nanny's Design Gallery.

Writings include essays, personal statements, and notes. There is also an outline for a book on design and an annotated calendar.

Teaching files consist of course materials, administrative records, meeting minutes, and limited correspondence from the California Labor School. There are also a few folders from the California College of Arts and Crafts and the Oregon State System of Higher Education.

Exhibition files include announcements, correspondence, inventories, price lists, loan forms, and other material for Margaret De Patta shows at museums and galleries.

Personal business records consist of financial, legal, and administrative records on Margaret De Patta's jewelry designs and sales, as well as material related to Designs Contemporary, the jewelry production business created and managed by De Patta and her husband Eugene Bielawski. There is also material on large gifts and loans to museums and universities, and files relating to the San Francisco Metal Arts Guild.

Printed materials are mostly clippings about Margaret De Patta and other subjects, along with a few magazines and periodicals, including the San Francisco Metal Arts Guild newsletters, 1952-1964.

There is one sketchbook and several folders of drawings, jewelry designs, and flatware designs.

The bulk of the photographs are of jewelry and other objects designed by Margaret De Patta. There are a few photographs of Margaret De Patta working on jewelry and other subjects, such as a trip to Japan and her house on Laidley Street in California.
Arrangement:
This collection is arranged as 8 series.

Series 1: Correspondence, 1946-2011 (0.4 linear feet; Box 1)

Series 2: Writings, circa 1935-1963 (0.1 linear feet; Box 1)

Series 3: Teaching Files, 1944-1969 (0.2 linear feet; Box 1)

Series 4: Exhibition Files, 1948-2012 (0.4 linear feet; Boxes 1-2)

Series 5: Personal Business Records, 1943-2001 (0.9 linear feet; Box 2)

Series 6: Printed Material, 1938-1981 (0.1 linear feet; Box 3)

Series 7: Artwork and Sketchbook, circa 1930-circa 1960 (0.2 linear feet; Box 3)

Series 8: Photographs, circa 1935-1967 (0.4 linear feet; Boxes 3-4, OV 5)
Biographical / Historical:
San Francisco contemporary jewelry designer Margaret De Patta, née Strong, was born in Tacoma, Washington in 1903 and raised in San Diego, California. She was among the first contemporary studio jewelers and a proponent of modernism. De Patta studied painting at the San Diego Academy of Fine Arts from 1921-1923, the California School of Fine Arts from 1923-1925, and the New York Art Students League from 1926-1929.

Margaret De Patta began to create jewelry when she designed her own modernist wedding ring for her marriage to Sam De Patta in 1929. By the mid-1930s, she had become an accomplished jeweler whose work was frequently shown in galleries and museums. Her jewelry was featured in the 1939 Golden Gate International Exposition in San Francisco. Around 1939, De Patta also started collaborating with Francis Sperisen, a noted San Francisco lapidary. De Patta designed the shapes of the jewelry using Lucite and wood, and Sperisen would use her models as a reference for the actual gem cutting.

From 1940-1941, De Patta attended the Chicago Bauhaus (now the Institute of Design) where she studied under Laszlo Moholy-Nagy. De Patta's time at the school was formative and Moholy-Nagy was tremendously impressed with her work. She also met her future second husband Gene Bielawski while she was a student in Chicago.

In 1941, De Patta returned to San Francisco, divorced Sam De Patta, and renovated her Laidley Street house in Glen Park. In 1946, she married Eugene Bielawski. The couple taught at the California Labor School. They also moved to Napa and founded Designs Contemporary, a business for producing jewelry that was as high quality as De Patta's handcrafted pieces at more affordable prices. Since all aspects of the business were conducted by the two of them, the workload became overwhelming and Designs Contemporary closed in 1957.

In 1951, Margaret De Patta was a founding member of the San Francisco Metal Arts Guild, established to promote the metal arts and specifically address the unique needs of studio jewelers. During her lifetime, she befriended many artists and continued to create jewelry, teach, and lecture. De Patta committed suicide in 1964. Her innovative jewelry designs continue to be influential today.
Provenance:
The Margaret De Patta papers were donated in two installments in 2003 and 2015 by Martha Bielawski, the second wife of Margaret De Patta's second husband, Eugene Bielawski. These papers were collected as part of the Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Rights:
The Margaret De Patta papers are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Occupation:
Jewelers -- California  Search this
Jewelry making -- Study and teaching  Search this
Design -- Study and teaching  Search this
Topic:
Designers -- California  Search this
Women artists  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Sketchbooks
Designs
Drawings
Citation:
Margaret De Patta papers, circa 1930-2012. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.depamarg
See more items in:
Margaret De Patta papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-depamarg

Historic Gardens Postcard collection

Names:
Smithsonian Institution  Search this
United States Capitol (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Extent:
200 postcards (black and white, color ;)
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Postcards
Postcards
Place:
White House (Washington, D.C.)
Date:
circa 1887-1947
Summary:
The Historic Gardens Postcard Collection includes 200 postcards of historic views of various public gardens, parks, monuments, and buildings throughout the United States and some foreign countries, including Canada, France and Cuba. Some private gardens and estates and many Washington, D.C. attractions are also represented. Roughly half of the postcards were mailed; the remaining postcards were not written on or posted. Areas represented include Arizona, California, Colorado, Delaware, Florida, Illinois, Indiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Nebraska, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Texas and Virginia. Foreign views show gardens in Havana, Paris, and Canada. About a dozen cards feature various views of Smithsonian Institution museums along the National Mall in Washington, D.C.
Arrangement note:
This collection is unprocessed.
Restrictions:
Access to original images by appointment only. Researcher must submit request for appointment in writing. Certain items may be restricted and not available to researchers. Please direct reference inquiries to the Archives of American Gardens: aag@si.edu.
Rights:
Archives of American Gardens encourages the use of its archival materials for non-commercial, educational and personal use under the fair use provision of U.S. copyright law. Use or copyright restrictions may exist. It is incumbent upon the researcher to ascertain copyright status and assume responsibility for usage. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by Archives of American Gardens.
Topic:
Gardens -- Cuba  Search this
Gardens -- Canada  Search this
Gardens -- United States  Search this
Gardens -- France  Search this
Historic sites  Search this
Washington Monument (Washington, D.C.) -- 1900-1910  Search this
Parks  Search this
Monuments  Search this
Buildings  Search this
Genre/Form:
Postcards
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution, Archives of American Gardens, Historic gardens postcard collection.
Identifier:
AAG.PTC
See more items in:
Historic Gardens Postcard collection
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Gardens
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aag-ptc

Glen Lukens papers

Creator:
Lukens, Glen  Search this
Extent:
1.6 Linear feet
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Date:
1920-1983
Summary:
The papers of ceramicist Glen Lukens measure 1.6 linear feet and date from 1920 to 1983. The bulk of the papers consist of letters from Lukens to family members, and other correspondence with family, friends, and colleagues. Notably, letters describe Lukens' time working in Haiti to establish a ceramic industry, his views on United States involvement in World War II, and the Watts Riots in Los Angeles in 1965. Also found are biographical materials, scattered writings and notes on ceramics and other subjects, printed materials, and photographs.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of ceramicist Glen Lukens measure 1.6 linear feet and date from 1920 to 1983. The bulk of the papers consist of letters from Lukens to family members, and other correspondence with family, friends, and colleagues. Notably, letters describe Lukens' time working in Haiti to establish a ceramic industry, his views on United States involvement in World War II, and the Watts Riots in Los Angeles in 1965. Also found are biographical materials, scattered writings and notes on ceramics and other subjects, printed materials, and photographs.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as five series.

Series 1: Biographical Material, 1920-1977 (0.2 linear feet; Box 1)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1933-1983 (1.0 linear feet; Boxes 1-2, OV5)

Series 3: Writings and Notes, circa 1937-circa 1960 (0.2 linear feet; Box 2)

Series 4: Printed Material, 1940s-1960s (0.1 linear feet; Box 2)

Series 5: Photographs, circa 1936-1966 (0.6 linear feet; Box 3-4)
Biographical / Historical:
Glen Lukens (1887-1967) was a ceramicist, educator, and writer active in Southern California. He taught at the University of Southern California where he founded the school's ceramics department and later established the ceramics industry in Haiti.

Glen Lukens was born in Missouri and attended the Oregon State Agricultural School where he was introduced to ceramics. He proved to be an innovator and created a blue glaze made out of metals he found in the Mojave desert. Lukens was active with a group of studio ceramicists, including Beatrice Wood, who elevated the artform through writing, innovation, and teaching. Lukens created simple pottery with bold color and glazing techniques. He spent much of his career teaching ceramics at the University of Southern California but also worked with glass and created jewelry.

In the 1940s, Lukens traveled to Haiti to teach ceramics and establish an industry for the creation of pottery on the island. Lukens was focused on teaching Haitians to use sanitary clay vessels for food rather than gourds. He formed friendships with many of his students and encouraged their further study of ceramics in the United States.

Glen Lukens died in Los Angeles in 1967.
Related Materials:
The Archives of American Art also holds the Glen Lukens letters to Roy Walker, circa 1930-1945. The collection contains about 150 letters from Lukens to Roy Walker.
Provenance:
The Glen Lukens papers were donated by his niece, Vera O'Dell in 1983.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C., Research Center.
Citation:
Glen Lukens papers, 1930-1983. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.lukeglen
See more items in:
Glen Lukens papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-lukeglen

Amos Burg photographs of Argentina and Chile

Creator:
Burg, Amos  Search this
Names:
Ethnogeographic Board (Washington, D.C.), printer  Search this
United States. Office of Naval Intelligence, printer  Search this
Extent:
200 prints (circa, silver gelatin (including contact prints))
Culture:
Yahgan Indians  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
prints
Photographs
Place:
Magellan, Strait of (Chile and Argentina)
Buenos Aires (Argentina)
Chiloé Island (Chile)
Chile
Argentina
Date:
1933-1934
Scope and Contents note:
Photographs made by Amos Burg in the coastal areas between Buenos Aires,Argentina, and Chiloe Island, Chile. Most depict the area around the Strait of Magellan, and include images of terrain, harbors, ships and shipping facilities, industries, and towns, though there are also some images relating to Yahgan Indians.
Biographical/Historical note:
Amos Burg (1901-1986) was a writer, photographer, and filmmaker for National Geographic, Encyclopaedia Britannica, and ERPI Classroom Films. He sailed around Cape Horn in a small boat in 1933-1934 and documented the trip for the National Geographic Society (NGS). Burg later obtained the release of negatives and prints from NGS to the Ethnogeographic Board, a World War II agency located in the Smithsonian. In turn, the board furnished copies to the US Navy and Army. Burg moved to Alaska in the 1950s, where he established the Alaska Department of Fish and Game's Information and Education Section.
Local Call Number(s):
NAA Photo Lot 88-36
Location of Other Archival Materials:
An additional Burg photograph can be found in the National Anthropological Archives in Photo Lot 8.
A film by Burg can be found in the Human Studies Film Archives in HSFA 94.9.1.
The Alaska State Library and Oregon Historical Society hold Burg's papers and photographs, including original negatives.
Records relating to the Ethnogeographic Board can be found in the National Anthropological Archives in the papers of Henry Bascom Collins and Homer Garner Barnett.
Records of the Ethnogeographic Board can be found in the Smithsonian Institution Archives in SIA RU000087.
Restrictions:
The collection is open for research.

Access to the collection requires an appointment.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Boats and boating  Search this
Dwellings  Search this
Harbors  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Citation:
Photo Lot 88-36, Amos Burg photographs of Argentina and Chile, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.PhotoLot.88-36
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-photolot-88-36

Sylvia Achter Photography Collection

Creator:
Achter, Sylvia  Search this
Names:
Ptarmigan Airway LTD  Search this
Tri-Rotor Spray & Chemical  Search this
Extent:
0.01 Cubic Feet ((1 folder))
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Digital images
Date:
bulk 1980-2003
Scope and Contents:
This collection consists of 49 scanned photographs relating to Sylvia Achter and her aviation career. The scans were produced by the National Air and Space Museum's Archives Division, from originals lent by, and returned to, Ms. Achter.
Biographical / Historical:
Sylvia Achter (b. 1968) has amassed over 3000 hours of commercial flying hours, including over 800 agricultural spraying hours. Born and raised in Alberta, Canada, she graduated from Lethbridge Community College in 1989, and is currently taking distance education courses from Oregon State University. From 1995 until 1997 Achter was first a flight attendant, and then a charter line pilot, with First Air / Ptarmigan Airways (Northwest Territories). From Ptarmigan Airways, Achter moved to NTair Inc. (Prince George, British Columbia), where she was a scheduled and charter line pilot. She then worked from 1998 until 2000 as a charter and medevac airline pilot for Alkan Air (Whitehorse, Yukon), and also as a charter line pilot for Centennial Flight Center (Edmonton, Alberta). From May of 2000 until June of 2002, Achter worked at ranches, feed yards and Can-Am Horse Transport before becoming employed in March of 2002 by Tri-Rotor Spray and Chemical, a Division of J & L Smith Farms, located in Ulysses, Kansas. Over her aviation career, she has flown the following aircraft: Beech Super King Air 200; De Havilland DHC-7 Twin Otter: Piper 30, PA-31-350 Navaho Chieftain, PA-44 Seminole, and PA-18 Super Cub: Cessna 340, 337 Skymaster, 206 Super Skywagon, 182P Skyland, 172 Skyhawk, 152/150, and 188A Ag Wagon; Air Tractor AT-402; and Ayres Thrush S2R 550. She is a member of Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association (AOPA), the National Agricultural Aviation Association (NAAA), and has a Kansas Pesticide Applicators License.
Provenance:
Achter, Sylvia., Gift, 2003
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests
Topic:
Aeronautics  Search this
Aerial spraying and dusting in agriculture  Search this
Cessna 340  Search this
Ayres Corp Turbo-Thrush S2R  Search this
Cessna 188A AgWagon B  Search this
Lockheed C-141Starlifter  Search this
Beech Super King Air 200  Search this
Cessna 172 Skyhawk  Search this
de Havilland (Canada) DHC-6 Twin Otter Series 300l  Search this
Airbus A310  Search this
Genre/Form:
Digital images
Citation:
Sylvia Achter Photography Collection, 2004-0024, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.2004.0024
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-2004-0024

Borys Malkin slides, negatives and other material

Creator:
Malkin, Borys, 1917-2009  Search this
Extent:
28 negatives (photographic) (black and white)
1 Photographic Print (black and white)
117 slides (photographs) (color)
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
negatives (photographic)
Photographic Prints
slides (photographs)
Photographic prints
Photographs
Color slides
Black-and-white negatives
Place:
Brazil
Date:
circa 1960-1962
Summary:
Images of Brazilian Indians, including Karaja, Tapirape, Awetí (Aueto), Wayana (Oyana) and Ka'apor. Images include outdoor/ indoor portraits and daily and ceremonial activities.
Arrangement note:
Negatives: organized in envelopes; arranged by negative number

Slides: organized in binders; arranged by slide number

Prints: organized in folders; arranged by print number
Biographical/Historical note:
Boris Malkin was a naturalist and ethnographer born in Vitebsk, Belarus. Malking spent his childhood in Warsaw, Poland, where he showed an early interest in the natural world and exploration. In 1938, he emigrated to the United States, where he developed a relationship with the American Museum of Natual History through his interest in entomology. In 1941, Malkin received a scholarship to attend the University of Oregon in Eugene, but academics were put on hold when he was drafted into the Army, where he fought with Air Force units in the Pacific theater. After the war, Malkin continued his education at University College, London. In 1948, with funding from the California Academy of Science, he undertook a trip to Africa with the aim of collecting insects for the Academy. Malkin returned to the United States, spending time at the University of Washington and the University of Minnesota, where he was a lecturer in anthropology. Very soon after, Malkin resigned his position at the university to pursue intensive field work, devoting his time to collecting natural specimens as well as items documenting the material culture of the Indians of South and Central America.
Restrictions:
Access is by appointment only, Monday - Friday, 9:30 am - 4:30 pm. Please contact the archives to make an appointment.
Rights:
Copyright: National Museum of the American Indian
Topic:
Indians of South America -- Brazil  Search this
Wayana Indians  Search this
Tapirapé Indians  Search this
Urubu Kaapor Indians  Search this
Caraja Indians  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographic prints
Photographs
Color slides
Black-and-white negatives
Citation:
Borys Malkin slides, negatives and other material, circa 1960-1962, National Museum of the American Indian Archives, Smithsonian Institution (negative, slide and catalog number).
Identifier:
NMAI.AC.040
Archival Repository:
National Museum of the American Indian
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmai-ac-040

Fred Mitchell papers

Creator:
Mitchell, Fred, 1923-  Search this
Names:
Mississippi Art Colony  Search this
Gonzales, Justo  Search this
Kline, Franz, 1910-1962  Search this
McQuade, James M.  Search this
Ochman, Jim  Search this
Pajerski, Elizabeth  Search this
Reed, Harry Hope  Search this
Rooney, Peter  Search this
Rucker, Patrick  Search this
Stevens, Dick, 1928-  Search this
Sultz, Phil  Search this
Extent:
14.3 Linear feet
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Diaries
Photographs
Sketches
Scrapbooks
Watercolors
Drawings
Date:
1938-2007
Summary:
The papers of Fred Mitchell, 1938-2007, measure 14.3 linear feet. Correspondence, writings, 29 diaries, and subject files, document his personal life and career as a painter and educator in New York City. The papers also include biographical materials, artwork, sketchbooks, printed material, and photographs.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of Fred Mitchell, 1938-2007, measure 14.3 liner feet. Correspondence, writings, 29 diaries, and subject files document his personal life and career as a painter and educator in New York City. The papers also include biographical materials, artwork, sketchbooks, printed material, and photographs.

Among the biographical materials are biographical notes, military records, passports, and resumes. Correspondence includes both professional and personal letters. Correspondents include friends, former students, colleagues, and individuals of romantic interest.

Writings by Mitchell include notebooks containing names and addresses, appointments, lists and a variety of notes. Diaries record Mitchell's personal and professional activities, plans, aspirations, and memories; also, many volumes contain loose items such as printed material, drawings, notes and letters. Other authors represented are Harry Hope Reed, Peter Rooney, and Patrick Rucker.

Subject files maintained by Mitchell concern friends, teaching activities, exhibitions; also, interests in art, dance, poetry, and music. Files on the Mitchell family concern four generations and include Elizabeth Pajerski, his artist sister with whom he sometimes exhibited. There are files on Coenties Slip artists and related exhibitions. Other subjects of note are a Franz Kline traveling exhibition curated by Mitchell, and Mississippi Art Colony. Individuals for whom threre are substantial subject files include Justo Gonzales, James M. McQuade, Jim Ochman, Peter Rooney, John W. ("Dicky") Stevens, and Phil Sultz.

Most artwork is by Mitchell and consists mainly of drawings and sketches. Artwork by others includes drawings and watercolors by Peter Rooney, students, and unidentified artists. Mitchell's sketchbooks (16 volumes) contain sketches, drawings, and a few finished watercolors.

Printed material is about or mentions Mitchell. Included are a variety of items such as exhibition catalogs and announcements, brochures, clippings, press releases, and concert programs. Photographs are of Mitchell with family and friends; artwork by Mitchell and other artists; exhibition installations and openings; and places including the Wall-South neighborhood just before the destruction of his studio and travel pictures.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged in 9 series:

Series 1: Biographical Materials,1942-circa 2005 (Box 1; 0.4 linear feet)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1947-2004 (Boxes 1-2; 1.9 linear feet)

Series 3: Writings, circa 1940s-2004 (Boxes 2-3; 1.4 linear feet)

Series 4: Diaries, 1949-2002 (Boxes 4-6; 2.5 linear feet)

Series 5: Subject Files, 1943-2002 (Boxes 6-12; 6 linear feet)

Series 6: Artwork, circa 1940s-2002 (Boxes 12-13; 0.5 linear feet)

Series 7: Sketchbooks, 1955-1993 (Boxes 13, 15; 0.6 linear feet)

Series 8: Printed Material, 1938-2004 (Boxes 13-14; 0.5 linear feet)

Series 9: Photographs, 1940s-2002 (Box 14; 0.5 linear feet)
Biographical / Historical:
Fred Mitchell (1923-2013), a painter and educator who worked in New York City, was among the first artists to open a studio in Coenties Slip on the East River in downtown Manhattan.

A native of Meridian, Mississippi, Madison Fred Mitchell (always called Fred), won a Scholastic Magazine award and his work was shown in its "15th Annual National High School Art Exhibit" held at the museum of the Carnegie Institute in 1942. Mitchell studied at the Carnegie Institute of Technology for a year before entering the U. S. Army. After World War II ended, he resumed his education at Cranbrook Academy of Art (BFA 1946 and MFA 1956). He moved to New York in 1951 and became a member of the "Downtown Group." In 1952 he was among the organizers of Tanager Gallery and in 1954 founded the Coenties Slip School of Art.

Mitchell enjoyed a long career as a highly regarded teacher of drawing, painting, and art history. He taught at Finch College, the Positano Art Workshop in Italy, and Cranbrook Academy in the 1950s. During the 1960s, he was affiliated with Downtown Art Center at Seamens Church Institute in Coenties Slip, New York University, Cornell University, and Ithaca College. In the early 1970s Mitchell taught at Queens College, and from the mid-1980s-early 2000s served on the faculties of Parsons School of Design, Art Students League of New York, and City University of New York's Kingsborough Community College in Brooklyn.

He exhibited widely in group shows and solo exhibitions in the New York area and throughout the United States. Among these venues were: Howard Wise Gallery, Meridian Museum, Munson-Williams-Proctor Art Institute, State University of New York Binghamton, University of Oregon, and Whitney Museum of American Art.

After several years of declining health, Fred Mitchell died in New York City in 2013.
Provenance:
Fred Mitchell donated a small amount of printed material and photographs in 1972. The majority of the papers were donated in 2013 by Fred Pajerski, Fred Mitchell's nephew.
Restrictions:
Use of original material requires an appointment. Use of archival audiovisual recordings with no duplicate access copy requires advance notice.
Rights:
The Fred Mitchell papers are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Art -- Study and teaching  Search this
Painters -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Genre/Form:
Diaries
Photographs
Sketches
Scrapbooks
Watercolors
Drawings
Citation:
Fred Mitchell papers, 1938-2007. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.mitcfred
See more items in:
Fred Mitchell papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-mitcfred
Additional Online Media:

History of the Conservation and Research Center, National Zoological Park, Oral History Interviews

Extent:
13 audiotapes (reference copies).
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Audiotapes
Interviews
Oral history
Date:
1992-1999, 2005
Introduction:
The Smithsonian Institution Archives began its Oral History Program in 1973. The purpose of the program is to supplement the written documentation of the Archives' record and manuscript collections with an Oral History Collection, focusing on the history of the Institution, research by its scholars, and contributions of its staff. Program staff conduct interviews with current and retired Smithsonian staff and others who have made significant contributions to the Institution. There are also interviews conducted by researchers or students on topics related to the history of the Smithsonian or the holdings of the Smithsonian Institution Archives.

Wemmer, director of the Conservation and Research Center (CRC), National Zoological Park (NZP), conducted a series of oral history interviews with individuals central to the history of the CRC from 1992 to 1999. He transferred the interviews to the Oral History Collection, Institutional History Division, Smithsonian Institution Archives in 2001 in order to document the early history of this endangered species facility now known as the Conservation Biology Institute (CBI) of the NZP. Wemmer interviewed John F. Eisenberg (1935-2003), former NZP mammalogist, on 13 March 1992. Wemmer and Larry R. Collins, CRC mammalogist, interviewed Eugene Maliniak (1926-1996), former NZP mammalogist, on 9 April 1992. Wemmer interviewed Theodore H. Reed (1922-2013), director of the NZP when CRC was founded, on 18 October 1993. Wemmer interviewed Kenneth E. Stager (1915-2009), ornithologist, on 7 December 1999. Wemmer's remarks and reminiscences at his retirement ceremony on 23 July 2004 were recorded for the collection, and historian of science Catherine A. Christen also conducted interviews with Wemmer in 2005.
Descriptive Entry:
Eisenberg was interviewed in 1992 by Wemmer and discussed his education and career. Maliniak was interviewed by Collins and Wemmer in 1992 and discussed his career before and during his years at the NZP, especially the many animal species he worked with. Reed was interviewed by Wemmer in 1993 and discussed his career at the NZP and reminiscenced about animals and colleagues. Stager was interviewed by Wemmer in 1999 and discussed his field work in Southeast Asia, especially Burma. Wemmer's remarks at his retirement in 2004 were recorded; Christen conducted two interviews of him in 2005, covering his education, field work, research and career as an administrator. The collection consists of 16.5 hours of audiotape recording; and occupies 0.5 linear meters of shelf space. The interviews are not transcribed. There are three generations of recordings for each session: original tapes, preservation recordings and reference recordings. In total, this collection is comprised of 13 original audiocassette tapes; 13 reference copy audiotape cassettes, 37 7" and 7" low torque reel to reel preservation audiotapes and 24 digital preservation .wav files. Box 1 contains cassette copies of the original cassettes and DVDs with 24 .mp3 files. The original cassettes, preservation reel to reel recordings and digital files are in security storage.

The Eisenberg, Maliniak, and Stager interviews cannot be used without the permission of the interviewees or their heirs or assigns.
Historical Note:
The National Zoological Park's Conservation and Research Center, now called the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute, was established in 1975 on 3,100 acres at a former US Army Cavalry Remount Station in Front Royal, Virginia, to encourage development of all aspects of animal sciences. Renamed the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute in 2010, the institute's mission is the conservation of biodiversity through scientific research, professional training, and environmental education. Dr. Theodore H. Reed, then director of the National Zoo, had been searching over a decade for a captive breeding facility where animals could be studied and bred without the stress of public viewing, when he heard of the possibility of obtaining the old Remount Station property. Other locations were examined, including La Plata, Maryland; Virginia's Great Dismal Swamp; and a nine hundred acre portion of Camp A. P. Hill in Virginia; but none could compare with the potential and existing on-site facilities offered by the old remount depot. The property was occupied by the Smithsonian in 1974, and title to the land was received in 1975. The facility was named the Conservation and Research Center, and was staffed with a dozen employees from various National Zoo departments, as well as a handful of former Cavalry Remount Station and Beef Cattle Research Station employees. In 2010, the center was renamed the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute. Institute research has always covered a broad array of subjects including ethology, conservation biology, ecology and biodiversity monitoring, reproductive biology and animal health, genetic diversity and systematics, and nutrition and geographic information systems. CRC researchers are involved in groundbreaking research pertaining to the conservation of endangered species and ecosystems locally, nationally, and around the world. The institute breeds and houses a wide range of endangered species. Institute staff have focused on such endangered species as the last living family of black-footed ferrets, the Guam rail, cranes, clouded leopards, Przewalski's wild horses, and Matschie's tree kangaroos. The institute also trains wildlife biologists from developing countries and conducts international research projects, such as the elephants of Southeast Asia led by Christian Wemmer. The goal of their research programs is to develop long-term, collaborative conservation initiatives that utilize a diverse array of scientific, cultural, and political tools to understand and protect species and their ecosystems.

John F. Eisenberg (1935-2003) received his bachelor's degree from Washington State University and his master's and Ph.D. from the University of California at Berkeley in 1961. He joined the staff of the National Zoological Park as a mammalogist in 1965. In 1982 he joined the faculty of the University of Florida until his retirement in 2000. He was best known for his 1981 volume, The Mammalian Radiations: An Analysis of Trends in Evolution, Adaptation, and Behavior.

Eugene Maliniak (1926-1996), a World War II veteran, was hired as a keeper at the National Zoological Park in 1951. In his early years at the Zoo, he worked with birds, reptiles, carnivores, and bears before moving to the Small Mammal House from 1957 to 1965. In 1965, he transferred to the Department of Scientific Research where he assisted Zoo curators with research on animal behavior and nutrition, until his retirement in 1985.

Theodore H. Reed (1922-2013), veterinarian and zoo administrator, received the D.V.M. in 1945 from the School of Veterinary Medicine, Kansas State College. From 1946 to 1955, he practiced as a veterinarian in Oregon and Idaho. He gained experience with exotic animals while serving as a veterinarian to the Portland Zoological Park from 1951 to 1955. In 1955, Reed was appointed Veterinarian at the National Zoological Park (NZP). In 1956, he was named Acting Director after the retirement of William M. Mann, and in 1958, he advanced to Director. During his tenure, Reed oversaw a capital renovation of the NZP; development of the Conservation and Research Center (CRC) in Front Royal, Virginia, in 1974; a transition from display of exotic specimens to breeding of endangered species; and many advances in exotic animal care and medicine. Reed retired from administration in 1983 and from the NZP in 1984.

Kenneth E. Stager (1915-2009) received a bachelor's degree in 1940 from the University of California at Los Angeles, a master's degree in zoology in 1953 and a doctorate in 1962 from the University of Southern California. He began working at the Los Angeles County Museum of Natural History as a student in the 1930s. He was appointed assistant curator in 1941 and curator of ornithology and mammalogy in 1946, remaining at the L.A. County Museum until his retirement in 1976. He was interviewed because of his field research in Southeast Asia and work with NZP staff.

Christen M. Wemmer (1943- ) directed the Conservation and Research Center (CRC), National Zoological Park (NZP) from 1974 to 2004. Wemmer received a B.S. and M.S. from San Francisco State College and the Ph.D. from University of Maryland in 1972, and began his career at the Brookfield Zoo in Chicago. He was the founding director of the Conservation and Research Center of the National Zoological Park since its creation in 1974.
Restrictions:
(1) Restricted; (2) see finding aid for details on restrictions; (3) use of this record unit requires prior arrangement with the Archives staff.
Topic:
Biological stations  Search this
Endangered species  Search this
Zoos.  Search this
Conservation biology  Search this
Biology -- Field work  Search this
Employees  Search this
Genre/Form:
Audiotapes
Interviews
Oral history
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 9596, History of the Conservation and Research Center, National Zoological Park, Oral History Interviews
Identifier:
Record Unit 9596
See more items in:
History of the Conservation and Research Center, National Zoological Park, Oral History Interviews
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-faru9596

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