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History of Tropical Biology Oral History Interviews

Extent:
1 audiotape (reference copy).
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Interviews
Audiotapes
Oral history
Date:
1997
Introduction:
The Smithsonian Institution Archives began its Oral History Program in 1973. The purpose of the program is to supplement the written documentation of the Archives' record and manuscript collections with an Oral History Collection, focusing on the history of the Institution, research by its scholars, and contributions of its staff. Program staff conduct interviews with current and retired Smithsonian staff and others who have made significant contributions to the Institution. There are also reminiscences and interviews recorded by researchers or students on topics related to the history of the Smithsonian or the holdings of the Smithsonian Institution Archives.

The History of Tropical Biology Oral History Interviews were compiled by Smithsonian fellow Catherine A. Christen as part of her research on the history of tropical biology at the Smithsonian.
Descriptive Entry:
These interviews of Robert L. Dressler and William Louis Stern, conducted by Catherine A. Christen, cover their involvement with the Association for Tropical Biology and the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute during the 1960s.

The collection consists of two interview sessions, totaling approximately 1.5 hours of recordings, and transcripts. There are two generations of tape for each session: original audiotape cassettes and reference audiotape cassettes. In total, this collection is comprised of 2 original audio cassette tapes, 2 reference copy audio cassette tapes, and 57 pages of transcripts. The original tapes are reserved in preservation storage.
Historical Note:
As part of her research for her Smithsonian postdoctoral fellowship project, in 1997 Catherine A. Christen conducted oral history interviews with two orchid specialists who had conducted research in the neotropics. On 1 July 1997, she interviewed Robert L. Dressler (1927- ), curator and co-ordinator for the Orchidaceae Section of the Flora MesoAmericana at the Missouri Botanical Garden. Dressler received the B.A. from the University of Southern California in 1951 and the Ph.D. from Harvard University in 1957. He was on the staff of the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute from 1963 to 1987, when he was named a research associate. On 2 July 1997, Christen interviewed William Louis Stern (1926- ), professor of botany, University of Florida. Stern received the B.S. from Rutgers University in 1950, the M.S. in 1951 and the Ph.D. in 1954 from the University of Illinois. He was curator and then chair of the Department of Botany, National Museum of Natural History, from 1960 to 1967. In 1967, he was appointed professor at the University of Maryland. From 1978 to 1979, he was program chairman for systematic biology at the National Science Foundation. In 1979, he was named chairman of the Department of Botany at the University of Florida. In 1985 he returned to teaching there as professor of botany. In Florida, he changed his research focus to studies on the vegetative anatomy and systematics of the orchid family.
Restrictions:
The recordings of the interview of Cameron and North is open for research use, however, the transcript has not been deeded to the Archives. Researchers may submit a written request to the interviewees, heirs or assigns, for written permission to use the transcript.
Topic:
World War, 1939-1945  Search this
Endangered species  Search this
Biological stations  Search this
Biology -- Fieldwork  Search this
Facility management  Search this
Zoos  Search this
Employees  Search this
Genre/Form:
Interviews
Audiotapes
Oral history
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 9606, History of Tropical Biology Oral History Interviews
Identifier:
Record Unit 9606
See more items in:
History of Tropical Biology Oral History Interviews
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-faru9606

Near Eastern Skeletal Biology Program

Collection Creator:
Ortner, Donald J.  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1977-2010, undated
Scope and Contents:
This series consists of fieldwork materials, data analysis, and publications related to Ortner's work with specimens from Jordan, Egypt, Yemen, and Bahrain, dated 1977 to 2010 and undated. The bulk of this series relates to Ortner's participation in fieldwork at a cemetery complex in Bab edh-Dhra, Jordan, a part of the Expedition to the Dead Sea Plain with Walter Rast and R. Thomas Schaub.

Subseries 3.1, Publications, dated 1977 to 2008 and undated, includes drafts, data, data analysis, research materials, notes, correspondence, photographs, a blueprint, and a map related to Ortner's publications on his work in Bab edh-Dhra. The computer disks in this series are digital copies of the paper manuscripts they are included with. Several folders in this subseries contain planning material related to the series of books: Reports of the Expedition to the Dead Sea Plain. Bruno Frohlich and Ortner's 2008 book The Early Bronze Age I Tombs and Burials of Bab edh-Dhra, Jordan, also represented in this series, was volume 3 of the Reports.

Subseries 3.2, Bab edh-Dhra field seasons 1977 and 1979, dated 1977 to 2005, includes travel and finance documents, data analyses, correspondence, photographs, negatives, and maps. Of note are the sound recordings and transcripts of Ortner's audio journals in 1977 and 1979; as well as an interview, interpreted by Muhammed Darwish, conducted by between Ortner and Mahmoud Mustafa about burial practices of people living in El Mazra. Recordings are on 9 sound cassettes.

Subseries 3.3, Bab edh-Dhra field season 1981, dated 1980 to 1990, includes mostly financial and planning materials because Ortner did not travel to the site for this field season.

Subseries 3.4 Other projects and events, 1980 to 1983 and undated, includes files from other projects Ortner was involved with in Jordan, Egypt, Yemen, and Bahrain unrelated to the Expedition to the Dead Sea Plain. This includes a proposal for a Near Eastern Skeletal Biology Program with Smithsonian archaeologist Bruno Frohlich in collaboration with Yarmouk University in Bahrain. There is not much information on the Early Islamic Project in Egypt, the Yemen mummy project, or the Abydos study.

The series maintains Ortner's original arrangement with some changes for clarity.

This series is arranged in 4 subseries: 3.1 Publications, 1977-2008; 3.2 Bab edh-Dhra field seasons 1977 and 1979, 1977-2005; 3.3 Bab edh-Dhra field season 1981, 1980-1990; 3.4 Other projects and events, 1980-1983, undated
Restrictions:
The CD-Roms and floppy disks are unavailable for research due to preservation concerns.
Collection Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Collection Citation:
Donald J. Ortner Papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NAA.2014-07, Series 3
See more items in:
Donald J. Ortner Papers
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-naa-2014-07-ref400

Survey Records

Creator::
National Museum of Natural History. Palearctic Migratory Bird Survey  Search this
Extent:
6.5 cu. ft. (6 record storage boxes) (1 document box)
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Field notes
Electronic records
Place:
Mediterranean Region
Egypt
Israel
Cyprus
Uganda
Date:
1966-1973
Descriptive Entry:
The Palearctic Migratory Bird Survey (PMS) was a survey of migratory birds, their ectoparasites, and the viruses they carry that was conducted mainly in the eastern Mediterranean region. This accession includes specimen and banding information from surveys conducted in Egypt, Israel, Cyprus, and Uganda. Materials include field notes and a small amount of punch cards.
Topic:
Ornithology  Search this
Migratory birds  Search this
Research  Search this
Fieldwork  Search this
Scientific surveys  Search this
Biology -- Fieldwork  Search this
Parasites  Search this
Genre/Form:
Field notes
Electronic records
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Accession 16-361, National Museum of Natural History. Palearctic Migratory Bird Survey, Survey Records
Identifier:
Accession 16-361
See more items in:
Survey Records
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-fa16-361

A. Stanley Rand Papers

Creator::
Rand, A. Stanley (Austin Stanley), 1932-2005  Search this
Extent:
5 cu. ft. (5 record storage boxes)
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Motion pictures (visual works)
Videotapes
Audiotapes
Place:
Caribbean Area
Islands of the Pacific
Date:
1961-1985
Descriptive Entry:
This accession consists of film footage taken by A. Stanley Rand, a biologist specializing in the ecology and behavior of tropical reptiles and amphibians. After receiving his Ph.D. in biology from Harvard University in 1961, Rand served as a zoologist at the Departamento de Zoologia, Sao Paulo, Brazil. In 1964, he was hired as a biologist at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute (STRI). From 1974 to 1979, he served as Assistant Director at STRI and, in 1979, was named Senior Biologist. The majority of the footage in this accession documents the behavior of anoles throughout the Caribbean region and on several Eastern Pacific islands. Materials also include a small number of videotapes and a reel-to-reel audiotape.
Topic:
Tropical biology  Search this
Reptiles  Search this
Amphibians  Search this
Anoles  Search this
Zoology  Search this
Ecology  Search this
Animal behavior  Search this
Zoologists  Search this
Ecologists  Search this
Biologists  Search this
Research  Search this
Fieldwork  Search this
Genre/Form:
Motion pictures (visual works)
Videotapes
Audiotapes
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Accession 17-092, A. Stanley Rand Papers
Identifier:
Accession 17-092
See more items in:
A. Stanley Rand Papers
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-fa17-092

Practical statistics for field biology / Jim Fowler, Lou Cohen, and Phil Jarvis

Author:
Fowler, Jim 1943-  Search this
Cohen, Louis 1928-  Search this
Jarvis, Phil  Search this
Physical description:
ix, 259 p. : ill. ; 25 cm
Type:
Books
Date:
1998
C1998
Topic:
Biology--Fieldwork--Statistical methods  Search this
Ecology--Statistical methods  Search this
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_556656

Field Research Records

Creator::
National Ecology Research Center (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service)  Search this
Extent:
2 cu. ft. (2 record storage boxes)
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Manuscripts
Field notes
Place:
Virginia
Islands of the Pacific
Florida
Date:
1963-1975, 1988-1989
Descriptive Entry:
This accession consists of field notes, research, and catalogue records created or maintained by Roger B. Clapp. Clapp worked in the Biological Survey Unit, Patuxent Wildlife Research Center, United States Geological Survey from 1970 until his retirement in December of 2011. (In 1989, the Biological Survey Unit was called the Biological Survey Group, National Ecology Research Center, United States Fish and Wildlife Service.) His research interests included hole-nesting birds, birds of Virginia, and birds of the Pacific Ocean.

The majority of these records relate to his earlier work with the Pacific Ocean Biological Survey Program (POBSP). These records consist of field notebooks created by Clapp and others conducting a biological survey of islands in the Pacific Ocean (see Record Unit 245). A small portion of this collection consists of catalogue records, manuscripts, and field notes of birds in Virginia and Florida. Materials include field notebooks and manuscripts.
Topic:
Birds  Search this
Pacific Ocean Biological Survey Program  Search this
Scientific surveys  Search this
Biology -- Fieldwork  Search this
Genre/Form:
Manuscripts
Field notes
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Accession 13-027, National Ecology Research Center (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service), Field Research Records
Identifier:
Accession 13-027
See more items in:
Field Research Records
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-fa13-027

Field Research Records

Creator::
National Museum of Natural History. Pacific Ocean Biological Survey Program  Search this
Extent:
0.5 cu. ft. (1 document box)
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Color transparencies
Place:
Pacific Ocean
Islands of the Pacific
Date:
1965-1966
Descriptive Entry:
The Pacific Ocean Biological Survey Program (POBSP) consisted of biological surveys of an area of the Pacific Ocean that was dotted with clusters of islands and atolls. The major goals of the program were to learn what plants and animals occurred on the islands, the seasonal variations in their numbers and reproductive activities, and the distribution and population of the pelagic birds in that area. These records consist of several hundred color slides taken mostly by Jeffrey P. Tordoff, who worked on the project June 1965-July 1966 and December 1967-February 1968. Image subjects include animals (particularly birds), plants, landscapes, and survey staff members. Most images are identified.
Topic:
Ornithology  Search this
Scientific surveys  Search this
Biology -- Fieldwork  Search this
Birds  Search this
Landscapes  Search this
Scientists  Search this
Plants  Search this
Animals  Search this
Genre/Form:
Color transparencies
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Accession 14-011, National Museum of Natural History. Pacific Ocean Biological Survey Program, Field Research Records
Identifier:
Accession 14-011
See more items in:
Field Research Records
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-fa14-011

Curatorial Records

Creator::
United States National Museum. Division of Plants  Search this
Extent:
1 cu. ft. (1 record storage box)
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Manuscripts
Clippings
Maps
Scientific illustrations
Black-and-white photographs
Place:
South America
Date:
1906-1925 and undated
Descriptive Entry:
This accession consists of materials documenting the curatorial activities of Joseph Nelson Rose, a curator in the Division of Plants, 1896-1911 and 1917-1928. Rose specialized in the study of cacti. Some materials document Rose's leave of absence from the United States National Museum for field work in South America. Materials include correspondence, manuscripts, notes, newspaper clippings, maps, photographs, and illustrations.
Topic:
Botany  Search this
Cactus  Search this
Biology -- Fieldwork  Search this
Genre/Form:
Manuscripts
Clippings
Maps
Scientific illustrations
Black-and-white photographs
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Accession 15-172, United States National Museum. Division of Plants, Curatorial Records
Identifier:
Accession 15-172
See more items in:
Curatorial Records
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-fa15-172

Field Research Records

Creator::
National Museum of Natural History. Pacific Ocean Biological Survey Program  Search this
Extent:
2 cu. ft. (2 record storage boxes)
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Field notes
Place:
Pacific Ocean
Islands of the Pacific
Date:
1963-1967
Descriptive Entry:
The Pacific Ocean Biological Survey Program (POBSP) consisted of biological surveys of an area of the Pacific Ocean that was dotted with clusters of islands and atolls. The major goals of the program were to learn what plants and animals occurred on the islands, the seasonal variations in their numbers and reproductive activities, and the distribution and population of the pelagic birds in that area. These field notes consist primarily of ectoparasite information collected on this survey. Materials include catalogues and data sheets.
Topic:
Ornithology  Search this
Research  Search this
Scientific surveys  Search this
Biology -- Fieldwork  Search this
Birds  Search this
Parasites  Search this
Genre/Form:
Field notes
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Accession 16-362, National Museum of Natural History. Pacific Ocean Biological Survey Program, Field Research Records
Identifier:
Accession 16-362
See more items in:
Field Research Records
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-fa16-362

Curatorial Records

Creator::
United States National Museum. Division of Plants  Search this
Extent:
1 cu. ft. (1 record storage box)
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Manuscripts
Clippings
Picture postcards
Maps
Black-and-white photographs
Black-and-white negatives
Artifacts
Place:
South America
Date:
1907-1925 and undated
Descriptive Entry:
This accession consists of materials documenting the curatorial activities of J. N. (Joseph Nelson) Rose, a curator in the Division of Plants, 1896-1911 and 1917-1928. Rose specialized in the study of cacti. Some materials document Rose's leave of absence from the United States National Museum for field work in South America. Materials include correspondence, postcards, manuscripts, notes, clippings, photographs, a negative, a few small specimens, and a map.
Topic:
Botany  Search this
Cactus  Search this
Botanists  Search this
Biology -- Fieldwork  Search this
Genre/Form:
Manuscripts
Clippings
Picture postcards
Maps
Black-and-white photographs
Black-and-white negatives
Artifacts
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Accession 18-056, United States National Museum. Division of Plants, Curatorial Records
Identifier:
Accession 18-056
See more items in:
Curatorial Records
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-fa18-056

Walter Shropshire Interviews

Creator:
Shropshire, Walter. interviewee  Search this
Extent:
18 audiotapes (reference copies).
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Interviews
Audiotapes
Oral history
Introduction:
The Smithsonian Institution Archives began its Oral History Program in 1973. The purpose of the program is to supplement the written documentation of the Archives' record and manuscript collections with an Oral History Collection, focusing on the history of the Institution, research by its scholars, and contributions of its staff. Program staff conduct interviews with current and retired Smithsonian staff and others who have made significant contributions to the Institution. There are also reminiscences and interviews recorded by researchers or students on topics related to the history of the Smithsonian or the holdings of the Smithsonian Institution Archives.

The Walter A. Shropshire, Jr., Oral History Interviews were recorded to document the history of the Smithsonian Institution's Division of Radiation and Organisms (DRO) of the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO), which then became the Radiation Biology Laboratory (RBL) and later the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center (SERC).
Descriptive Entry:
Pamela M. Henson, Historian, from the Smithsonian Institution Archives, conducted these interviews as a part of the Smithsonian Institution Archives' Oral History Collection. These interviews cover the history of the Smithsonian's Radiation Biology Laboratory; the research conducted by its staff; the challenges faced by administrators; changes in the scientific field of biophysics; and Shropshire's personal life and pastoral career. Interviews of Shropshire include audiotape sessions and photographs.

The Walter A. Shropshire, Jr., Oral History Interviews consist of 16 interview sessions, totaling approximately 15 hours of audiotape recordings and 684 pages of transcript. There are two generations of recordings: original tapes and reference tapes. In total this collection is comprised of 30 original 7" reel-to-reel tapes and 17 reference copy cassette tapes. The reel-to-reel audiotapes have been transferred to digital .wav files. The original tapes and digital files are reserved in preservation storage.
Historical Note:
Scientific research has always been essential to the Smithsonian Institution's mission. These interviews focus on the history of the Smithsonian's Division of Radiation and Organisms, which became the Radiation Biology Laboratory and later the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center, focusing on the effects of sunlight on living organisms. The interviewee, Walter A. Shropshire, a research scientist with RBL, worked at the Institution for thirty-two years. His reminiscences span from his early childhood in Washington, D.C., to his second career as a pastor. The topics covered include background information about his education and personal life; studies at The George Washington University; early work in the basement laboratories of the Smithsonian Institution Castle; scientific research for RBL; participation in Smithsonian symposia; collaboration with other scientists of his era; conducting research abroad; his administrative duties at RBL; working as a Methodist pastor; and an in-depth conversation about photographs from the early years of the Smithsonian's Division of Radiation and Organisms and RBL.
Rights:
Restricted.
Topic:
Biology -- Fieldwork  Search this
Botany  Search this
Religion and science  Search this
Photobiology  Search this
Methodist Church -- Clergy  Search this
Genre/Form:
Interviews
Audiotapes
Oral history
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 9597, Shropshire, Walter. interviewee, Walter Shropshire Interviews
Identifier:
Record Unit 9597
See more items in:
Walter Shropshire Interviews
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-faru9597

Conservation and Research Center History Interview

Extent:
1 audiotape (reference copy).
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Interviews
Audiotapes
Oral history
Date:
2000
Introduction:
The Oral History Program is part of the Smithsonian Institution Archives. The purpose of the program is to conduct interviews with current and retired members of the Smithsonian staff who have made significant contributions, administrative and scholarly, to the Institution. The project's goal is to supplement the published record and manuscript collections in the Archives, focusing on the history of the Institution and contributions to the increase and diffusion of knowledge made by its scholars.

The Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute (SCBI), National Zoological Park, Interview was conducted as part of the Smithsonian Institution Archives Oral History Program to document the history of the SCBI site prior to being transferred to the Smithsonian and changes since then.
Descriptive Entry:
The Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute, National Zoological Park, Interview was conducted in 2000 by Smithsonian Archives Historian Pamela M. Henson. This collection consists of one interview session, totaling approximately 1 hour of recordings. There are two generations of tape for each session: originals tapes and reference tapes. In total, this collection is comprised of 2 original 7 reel-to-reel audiotapes and 1 reference copy audiotape cassette, and 60 pages of transcript, and occupies 0.5 cubic feet of shelf space. There are two generations of recordings for the interview: original audiotapes and a reference audiotape cassette. The original tapes are reserved in preservation storage. Box 1 contains a transcript of the interview and a cassette copy of the original recording.

Additional documentation pertaining to the SCBI can be found in the Theodore H. Reed Interviews (RU 9568) and the History of CRC Interviews (RU 9596) in Smithsonian Institution Archives.
Historical Note:
The Conservation and Research Center (CRC) of the National Zoological Park, now known as the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute, located in Front Royal, Virginia, was established in 1975 to encourage development of all aspects of animal sciences. It trains wildlife biologists from developing countries, and breeds, houses, and conducts research on a range of endangered species. Prior to being transferred to the Smithsonian, the property served as a United States Army Cavalry Remount Station, a facility for prisoners of war during World War II, a guard dog training site, and a United States Department of Agriculture cattle station. In May of 2000, as part of the 25th anniversary of the Conservation and Research Center, two long-time staff members, Maxon Cameron and George "Junior" North, were interviewed about the history of the CRC. Both interviewees, who served on the facilities staff, provided historical background on the CRC property before it was transferred to the Smithsonian and in the years since.
Restrictions:
The recordings of the interview of Cameron and North is open for research use, however, the transcript has not been deeded to the Archives. Researchers may submit a written request to the interviewees, heirs or assigns, for written permission to use the transcript.
Topic:
World War, 1939-1945  Search this
Endangered species  Search this
Biological stations  Search this
Biology -- Fieldwork  Search this
Facility management  Search this
Zoos  Search this
Employees  Search this
Genre/Form:
Interviews
Audiotapes
Oral history
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 9605, Conservation and Research Center History Interview
Identifier:
Record Unit 9605
See more items in:
Conservation and Research Center History Interview
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-faru9605

Neal Griffith Smith Papers

Creator::
Smith, Neal Griffith, 1937-  Search this
Extent:
3 cu. ft. (3 record storage boxes)
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Field notes
Manuscripts
Black-and-white negatives
Black-and-white photographs
Black-and-white transparencies
Color transparencies
Color photographs
Color negatives
Audiotapes
Videotapes
Place:
Southampton Island (Nunavut)
White Island (Nunavut)
Baffin Island (Nunavut)
Barro Colorado Island (Panama)
Panama
Barro Colorado Nature Monument (Panama)
Date:
circa 1925-1995
Descriptive Entry:
This accession consists of the research materials of Neal Griffith Smith (1937-2012), an ornithologist and tropical biologist who received his Ph.D. from Cornell University in 1963 and then spent his entire career working for the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute (STRI). Particularly well documented is Smith's graduate research on Arctic birds on White, Southampton, and Baffin Islands in the Northwest Territories (now known as Nunavut). Other research topics include urania (Uraniidae) hawks, vultures, and peripatus (Onychophora). Much of his research was performed on Barro Colorado Island and other areas of Panama. This accession also includes research materials and other documents that had originally been maintained by James Zetek, an entomologist and the first resident director of the Canal Zone Biological Area (also known as the Barro Colorado Nature Monument), and later maintained by Smith. Materials include field notes, journals, photographs, audiovisual materials, observation sheets, species lists, notes, correspondence, reference materials, and related materials.
Topic:
Ornithology  Search this
Entomology  Search this
Biology -- Tropics  Search this
Ornithologists  Search this
Entomologists  Search this
Biologists  Search this
Research  Search this
Birds -- Arctic regions  Search this
Uraniidae  Search this
Hawks  Search this
Vultures  Search this
Onychophora  Search this
Fieldwork  Search this
Genre/Form:
Field notes
Manuscripts
Black-and-white negatives
Black-and-white photographs
Black-and-white transparencies
Color transparencies
Color photographs
Color negatives
Audiotapes
Videotapes
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Accession 17-057, Neal Griffith Smith Papers
Identifier:
Accession 17-057
See more items in:
Neal Griffith Smith Papers
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-fa17-057

A. Myra Keen Interview

Creator::
Keen, A. Myra (Angeline Myra), 1905-1986 interviewee  Search this
Extent:
1 audiotape (Reference copy).
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Interviews
Audiotapes
Oral history
Date:
1983
Introduction:
The Smithsonian Institution Archives began its Oral History Program in 1973. The purpose of the program is to supplement the written documentation of the Archives' record and manuscript collections with an Oral History Collection, focusing on the history of the Institution, research by its scholars, and contributions of its staff. Program staff conduct interviews with current and retired Smithsonian staff and others who have made significant contributions to the Institution. There are also interviews conducted by researchers or student on topics related to the history of the Smithsonian or the holdings of the Smithsonian Institution Archives.

The Keen interview was donated to the Oral History Collection because of her long career and many contributions to the field of American malacology.
Descriptive Entry:
Keen was interviewed by Eugene V. Coan, malacologist and former student of Keen's, because of her long career and many contributions to the field of American malacology. The interview includes her reminiscences about her education, research interests, fieldwork, colleagues, and students. The interview complements the A. Myra Keen papers, also located in the Smithsonian Institution Archives.
Historical Note:
Angeline Myra Keen (1905-1986), an invertebrate paleontologist and malacologist, was an international expert on the systematics of marine mollusks. She influenced her profession as a researcher and fieldworker, teacher and advisor, curator and exhibitor, author and public speaker. Her work was of interest both to academic scholars and to shell collectors.

Raised in Colorado, Keen became an amateur naturalist and photographer in her teens, and pursued her research interests in birds and insects at Colorado College, graduating with an A.B. in 1930. She earned an M.A. in psychology from Stanford University the following year, and then a doctorate in psychology from the University of California at Berkeley. Finding herself with no employment prospects, graduating in the depression year of 1934, she volunteered to help identify shells in the Stanford geology department's collection. This was the beginning of Keen's serious study of shells and her thirty-eight year association with Stanford. She had some coursework in biology, geology, and statistics, but was self-taught in malacology.

In 1936 Keen was appointed Curator of paleontology in the department of geology, and began teaching there during the Second World War. She was appointed Assistant Professor of paleontology in 1954 and Curator of malacology in 1957. Despite her stature, Keen waited until 1960 for appointment as a tenured Associate Professor and until 1965 for a full professorship, becoming one of three women professors in the sciences at Stanford. Upon her retirement in 1970, she was made Professor of Paleontology Emeritus and Curator of Malacology Emeritus, and taught two more years.

Keen's research focused on molluscan systematics, but ranged widely within the field to include recent marine mollusk fauna of the Panamic Province and marine molluscan Cenozoic paleontology, neontology, and zoogeography of western North America. Keen was particularly interested in bivalve systematics and nomenclature. She spent many years adding to, cataloging, and systematically arranging the Cenozoic mollusk collection at Stanford. She also wrote fourteen books and sixty-four papers in the field of malacology.

Keen was the primary teacher of students in malacology at Stanford, advising advanced degree candidates in geology and biology. She also taught courses in advanced paleontology, biological oceanography, and curatorial methods.

Keen's professional honors included Phi Beta Kappa, a 1964 Guggenheim Fellowship, and appointment as Fellow of the Geological Society of America and as fellow of the Paleontological Society. She received the Fellows Medal from the California Academy of Sciences in 1979, becoming the first woman to do so. She served as President of both the American Malacological Union and the Western Society for Malacology, and chaired the Committee on Nomenclature of the Society of Systematic Zoology.
Topic:
Invertebrate zoology  Search this
Paleontology  Search this
Mollusks  Search this
Genre/Form:
Interviews
Audiotapes
Oral history
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 9527, Keen, A. Myra (Angeline Myra), 1905-1986 interviewee, A. Myra Keen Interview
Identifier:
Record Unit 9527
See more items in:
A. Myra Keen Interview
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-faru9527

James B. Watson papers

Creator:
Watson, Virginia  Search this
Watson, James B. (James Bennett), 1918-2009  Search this
Extent:
52.5 Linear feet (123 boxes)
47 sound recordings
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Sound recordings
Sound recordings
Correspondence
Books
Programs
Field notes
Maps
Punched cards
Journals (periodicals)
Grant Proposals
Photographs
Articles
Lecture notes
Place:
Papua New Guinea
Brazil
Mato Grosso (Brazil : State)
Papua New Guinea -- Social life and customs
Date:
1904-1998
bulk 1933-1987
Summary:
This collection contains the professional papers of cultural anthropologist James B. Watson, and documents his fieldwork in Papua New Guinea, Brazil, and Del Norte, Co., as well as his teaching career at the University of Washington. Included are field notes, lecture notes, correspondence, maps, photographs, books, articles, journals, grant proposals, surveys, data punch cards, conference materials, and sound recordings.
Scope and Contents:
This collection is comprised of the professional papers of James B. Watson, the bulk of which relate to his research and academic work on the Eastern Highlands of Papua New Guinea. The series are Research, Writings, Correspondence, Professional Activities, University Files, Biographical Files, Maps, Photographs, and Sound Recordings.

The Research series contains Watson's research on Hopi food classification systems in Arizona, Cayua acculturation in Brazil, social stratification between English-speaking and Spanish-speaking residents of Del Norte, Co., numerous research projects in Papua New Guinea, and gift exchange theories.

The Arizona, Hopi Food Classification Systems subseries consists of his research among the Hopi in Arizona, primarily on their food classication systems. Included are field notes and reports.

The Mato Grosso, Brazil and Cayua Acculturation subseries consists of research materials conducted while Watson was working as an assistant professor in Sao Paulo. Included are field notes, bibliographies, a journal, and a language notebook primarily regarding his research on culture change among the Cayua.

The Del Norte, Colorado Surveys subseries contains material related to research conducted in the summers of 1949 and 1950 as part of a study on social stratification between English-speaking and Spanish-speaking residents of Del Norte. Included are datasets from several community surveys on education, occupations, business, and cultural attitudes, along with research notes and background materials.

The Papua New Guinea subseries consists of research materials on the Eastern Highlands of Papua New Guinea. Included are field notes, language materials, bibliographies, grant documents and research proposals, genealogy data, long reports and patrol reports, data punch cards, and TAT (thematic apperception test) protocols. There is material from several research projects including the Committee on New Guinea Studies (CONGS), the Kainantu Blood Group Study, and the New Guinea Religions Project. Watson's wife, Virginia Drew Watson, also has research material in this series. Language documentation include lexicons and notes about Agarabi, Auyana, Awa, Tairora, Gadsup, and Tok Pisin.

The subsubseries Micro-evolution Studies Project (MES) consists of related Papua New Guinea research as part of this multi-year project. Material included is correspondence, financial documents, memorandums and planning documents, grant proposals, language files, and work papers.

The Gift Exchange Theories subseries consists of Watson's research on gift exchange theories, primarily as they relate to small autonomous peoples. The material consists of research notes, paper ideas, bibliographies, and grant applications.

The Other Research subseries consists of papers and research that are not easily catagorized. Included are subject files on perception, notes and critiques of Marshal Sahlins's Stone Age Economics, and a research project by Watson studying innovation in high school social studies curriculum.

The Writings series primarily consists of journal articles produced over the duration of his career. Included are research notes, drafts, and some correspondence. A print copy is included where possible. There is significant material related to his book Tairora Culture, including chapter drafts, outlines, and reader comments. The writings by others are primarily annotated copies of articles, rare and small print-run items, or manuscripts by others sent to Watson for comment.

The Correspondence series contains professional and personal correspondence with Watson's colleagues and contemporaries in the field, including J. David Cole, Terence Hays, Paula Brown-Glick, Richard Lieban, Howard P. McKaughan, Harold Nelson, Kerry Pataki-Schweizer, Kenneth E. Read, Sterling Robbins, and Roy Wagner. Topics include his academic career, student dissertations, research grants and fellowships, and research related to Papua New Guinea, and in particular the Micro-evolution Studies project.

The Professional Activities series primarily consists of conference notes, papers, presentations, and symposium documents. Included are materials for the American Anthropological Association, the Association for Social Anthropology in Oceania, the Pacific Sciences Conference, as well as symposiums held at the East-West Center in Honolulu, Hawaii. Some of the files are related to specific symposiums Watson attended or helped to organize, the bulk of which are related to Papua New Guinea. Also included are Watson's lecture notes, and materials related to the United Nations West Irian Development Plan

The University Files series contains material related to Watson's academic career. The bulk of the files are course materials from the classes he taught at the Univesity of Washington, which include lecture notes, syllabi, exams, and student papers. Other materials includes student dissertation files and some of Watson's course work from the University of Chicago.

The Biographical Files series includes numerous editions of his curriculum vitae and bibliographies.

The Maps series contains maps used in Watson's research, which includes Brazil; Del Norte, Co.; and Papua New Guinea. The bulk are maps of Papua New Guinea, and include published maps, annotated maps, hand-drawn maps, patrol reports, and linguistic maps.

The Photographs series contains photographs of Watson's fieldwork and professional career. The bulk of his fieldwork photographs are from Del Norte, Co. and Papua New Guinea. The Del Norte photographs include aerial images along with photographs of residents, houses, and cultural activities. The photographs from Papua New Guinea include images of a taro garden, a woman before and at her marriage ceremony, and images of tools found at an excavation site near the Wahgi Valley.

The sound recordings contain seven identified recordings made in the Papua New Guinea Eastern Highlands, Kainantu District during James and Virginia Watson's first trip, 1954-1955. Also included are 31 recordings of lectures and classes by James Watson and others, two recordings of popular music, and six reels recorded at the Pacific Science Congress in Tokyo in 1966. The remaining 23 uncataloged recordings are unidentified or partially identified.

Please see individual series descriptions in the finding aid for additional information.
Arrangement note:
This collection is arranged in 9 series:

Series1: Research, 1933-1993

Series 2: Writings, 1904-1995

Series 3: Correspondence, 1933-1994

Series 4: Professional Activities, 1944-1998

Series 5: University Files, 1939-1991

Series 6: Biographical Files, 1941-1991

Series 7: Maps, circa 1920s-1970

Series 8: Photographs, circa 1942-1977

Series 9: Sound Recordings, 1954-1984
Biographical/Historical note:
James B. Watson (1918-2009) was a cultural anthropologist and university professor. He is primarily known for his ethnographic studies of the Eastern Highlands of Papua New Guinea, with a concentration on acculturation. He taught at the University of Washington, was the prinicipal investigator for the Micro-evolution Studies project (MES), and the author of numerous journal articles and books.

Watson was born in Chicago, Ill., and raised in Bangor, Maine. He studied anthropology at the University of Chicago, earning his B.A. in 1941; his M.A. in 1945; and his Ph.D. in 1948. Fred Eggan acted as his advisor while he was pursuing his doctorate. He began his teaching career as an assistant professor at the Escala Livre de Sociologia e Politica, Sao Paulo (1944-1945); Beloit College (1945-1946); University of Oklahoma (1946-1947); and as an associate professor at Washington University in St. Louis (1947-1955). He then became a full professor of anthropology at the University of Washington (1955-1987), where he spent the majority of his career.

His ethnographic research began with his fieldwork among the Hopi in Arizona in 1942. He researched Hopi food classification systems, which would become the subject of his master's thesis. Watson would next study the effects of acculturation among the Cayua people in Mato Grosso, Brazil in 1943-1945. This research would become the basis of his dissertation, later to be published as Cayua Culture Change: A Study in Acculturation and Methodology. His wife, anthropologist Virginia Drew Watson, accompanied him and conducted her own research. While at Washington University, he directed fieldwork in the summers of 1949 and 1950 in Del Norte, Co., conducting several community surveys on education, occupations, business, and cultural attitudes. These surveys were part of a larger study on social stratification between English-speaking and Spanish-speaking residents of Del Norte.

Watson is most noted for his work in the Papua New Guinea Highlands, where he was one of the first generation of Highland ethnographers. Along with Virginia Drew Watson, he studied the Kainantu peoples of the Eastern Highlands including the Tairora, the Gadsup, the Auyana, and the Awa. He was involved in several research projects, including the Committee on New Guinea Studies (CONGS), The Kainantu Blood Group Study, and the New Guinea Religions Project.

He was also the principal investigator for the Micro-evolution Studies project (1959-1968) where he directed a team of researchers examining the interconnections of the Kainantu peoples from the perspectives of ethnography, linguistics, archaeology, and physical anthropology. Other MES researchers include Kenneth E. Read, Robert A. Littlewood, Howard McKaughan, Kerry J. Pataki-Schweizer, and Sterling Robbins. This research on Papua New Guinea is best described in his book Tairora Culture: Contingency and Pragmatism (1983).

He was professionally active, attending and organizing sessions at annual meetings for the American Anthropological Association (AAA) and the Association for Social Anthropology in Oceania (ASAO). He also organized symposiums at the East-West Center in Honolulu, Hawaii. Additionally, he served as a consultant to the United Nations on their West Irian Development Plan in 1967. Watson retired from teaching in 1987, but continued to publish and remain involved in AAA and ASAO. He died in 2009.

Sources Consulted: 1999 Westermark, George. ASAO Honorary Fellow: James B. Watson. Association for Social Anthropology in Oceania Newsletter 104: 21

Chronology

1918 -- Born on August 10 in Chicago, Illinois

1941 -- B.A. in anthropology, University of Chicago Lecturer, University of Chicago

1941-1942 -- Fieldwork: Hopi

1943 -- Married Virgina Drew Fieldwork: Mato Grosso, Brazil

1943-1945 -- Fieldwork: Brazil

1944-1945 -- Assistant Professor, Escala Livre de Sociologia e Politica, Sao Paulo, Brazil

1945 -- M.A. in anthropology, University of Chicago

1945-1946 -- Assistant Professor, Beloit College

1946-1947 -- Assistant Professor, University of Oklahoma

1947-1955 -- Associate Professor, Washington University in St. Louis

1948 -- Ph.D. in anthropology, University of Chicago

1949-1950 -- Director, Washington University summer field project

1949-1950 -- Fieldwork: Del Norte, Colorado

1953-1955 -- Fieldwork: Eastern Highlands, Papua New Guinea

1955-1987 -- Professor of Anthropology, University of Washington

1959 -- Fieldwork: Papua New Guinea and Netherlands New Guinea

1959-1968 -- Principal Investigator, New Guinea Micro-evolution Studies Project

1963-1964 -- Fieldwork: Eastern Highlands, Papua New Guinea

1966-1967 -- Senior Specialist, Institute of Advanced Projects, East-West Center

1967 -- Consultant for United Nations Development Programme, West Irian

1967 -- Fieldwork: West Irian (Indonesia)

1987 -- Retired from teaching at University of Washington

2009 -- Died on November 12
Related Materials:
The National Anthropological Archives also holds the papers of Virginia D. Watson.

Mandeville Special Collections Library, UCSD holds the Micro-evolution Project Papers, MSS 436.
Provenance:
These papers were donated to the National Anthropological Archives by James Watson's daughter, Anne Watson, in 2003.
Restrictions:
Some research proposals not authored by Watson are restricted until 2083.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Language and languages -- Documentation  Search this
Ethnology -- Brazil  Search this
Ethnology -- Papua New Guinea  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Correspondence
Books
Programs
Field notes
Maps
Punched cards
Journals (periodicals)
Grant Proposals
Photographs
Articles
Lecture notes
Citation:
James B. Watson papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NAA.2003-15
See more items in:
James B. Watson papers
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-2003-15
Additional Online Media:

The USDA Arboretum on the Mall, 1867-1942: Rob Griesbach-USDA -- Field Adventures in Mite Biology: Ron Ochoa-USDA

Collection Creator:
Smithsonian Institution. Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage  Search this
Extent:
1 sound recording (compact audio cassette)
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Date:
2012 July 5
Collection Restrictions:
Access by appointment only. Where a listening copy or viewing copy has been created, this is indicated in the respective inventory; additional materials may be accessible with sufficient advance notice and, in some cases, payment of a processing fee. Older papers are housed at a remote location and may require a minimum of three weeks' advance notice and payment of a retrieval fee. Certain formats such as multi-track audio recordings and EIAJ-1 videoreels (1/2 inch) may not be accessible. Contact the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at 202-633-7322 or rinzlerarchives@si.edu for additional information.
Collection Rights:
Copyright and other restrictions may apply. Generally, materials created during a Festival are covered by a release signed by each participant permitting their use for personal and educational purposes; materials created as part of the fieldwork leading to a Festival may be more restricted. We permit and encourage such personal and educational use of those materials provided digitally here, without special permissions. Use of any materials for publication, commercial use, or distribution requires a license from the Archives. Licensing fees may apply in addition to any processing fees.
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2012 Smithsonian Folklife Festival, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.SFF.2012, Item FP-2012-CT-0145
See more items in:
Smithsonian Folklife Festival records: 2012 Smithsonian Folklife Festival
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-cfch-sff-2012-ref617

Eric H. Davidson audio recordings

Collector:
Davidson, Eric H., 1937-  Search this
Musician:
Galyean, Cullen  Search this
Harrison, Bobby  Search this
Jarrell, Tommy, 1901-1985  Search this
Joines, Polly  Search this
Neaves, Glen  Search this
Smith, Glen (Banjo player)  Search this
Spencer, Ed  Search this
Ward, Wade  Search this
Extent:
73 sound tape reels
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Sound tape reels
Audiotapes
Date:
1958-1984
Summary:
This collection contains 73 open reel tapes, made by Eric H. Davidson between 1958-1984, featuring the traditional music of Southern Appalachia.
Scope and Contents:
The Eric H. Davidson audio recordings consists of 73 open reel tapes dating from 1958-1984, featuring field recordings made by Davidson and his colleagues (including Caleb Ellicott Finch, Paul Newman, Lyn Davidson, and Jane Rigg) featuring the traditional music of Southern Appalachia. The recordings were collected primarily in Grayson and Carroll counties in Southwestern Virginia, and adjacent counties in North Carolina.
Arrangement:
The Eric H. Davidson audio recordings are arranged in chronological order. Each open reel tape was assigned a unique number by Eric Davidson.
Biographical / Historical:
Eric H. Davidson was born in 1937, in New York City. He was primarily known as a pioneering developmental biologist, who revolutionized the research of and theoretical framework behind "the gene regulatory networks that perform complex biological processes, such as the transformation of a single-celled egg into a complex organism. His work helped to reveal how the DNA sequences inherited in the genome are used to initiate and drive forward the sequence of steps that result in development." (1)

Davidson's work in biology began at the age of 16, when he began conducting research with cell physiologist L. V. Heilbrunn, a family friend, at the Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL) in Woods Hole, Massachusetts. He began as a dish washer at the MBL, but was informed by Heilbrunn that he was also expected to have a research project. This project resulted in a published abstract in the Biological Bulletin on clotting in sand dollars.

Davidson earned his bachelor of arts degree from the University of Pennsylvania in 1958 and his doctorate from Rockefeller University in 1963. After working as a postdoctoral researcher and faculty member at Rockefeller, he moved to Caltech, where he would spend the rest of his career, beginning as a visiting assistant professor. He was named Norman Chandler Professor of Cell Biology in 1982 and remained there until his death.

His interest in old time music arose at nearly the same time as his interest in biology. His father, a well-known abstract painter, and mother were connected to several people who were hired to do research for the Works Progress Administration (WPA) of the late 1930's and 40's. At 14, he began to play the 5-string banjo after being introduced to the instrument through his exposure to recordings of Southern Appalachian music recorded as a part of the WPA, held at the Library of Congress.

In college, he played music in cafes. He also got a hold of the log of WPA recordings that were so influential to him. He began to stick pins in maps wherever the recordings were made, and began to notice that most of the pins were clustered in two counties in Southwestern Virginia--Grayson and Carroll counties--and adjacent counties in North Carolina.

In 1956, he began to take trips down to these areas during breaks from school to record musicians that had learned songs and skills through oral tradition, as opposed to the radio or records. He continued to go every year for many years, until the last person he knew had learned by oral tradition passed away. He formed close relationships with many notable musicians during these trips, including Wade Ward (from whom he learned the clawhammer banjo playing technique), Tommy Jarrell, Paul Joines, Glen Neaves, Vester Jones, Ed Spencer, Glen Smith, Cullen Galyean, and Bobby Harrison. He often recorded with his longtime collaborators Caleb Ellicott Finch, Paul Newman, Lyn Davidson, and Jane Rigg. Many of these recordings were released by Moses Asch as Folkways Records albums, produced by Davidson and his collaborators between 1962-1986.

Davidson was interested in the personal, musical, structural, traditional, and historical aspects of Southern Appalachian music. His fieldwork style was to continue to record a musician until they got tired or he'd run out of tape. Then he'd come back the next day, and the next year, and the year after that, until he had recorded everything that musician knew. This gave his work the characteristic of what he described as, borrowing from his scientific background, a longitudinal study. He was able to observe changes in the musical tradition of the region: the transition of traditional ballad singing from a cappella to string band accompaniment, the incorporation of the guitar into the string band ensemble, and the shift from clawhammer to three-finger banjo picking. In an oral history interview with Davidson conducted by the Ralph Rinzler Folklife and Collections in 2015, Davidson said that in his research, he could see how "ballads combine and recombine like genetic organisms in biology."

Davidson was also an accomplished banjo musician in his own right. He formed the Iron Mountain String Band together with Caleb Finch (fiddle), and Peggy Haine (guitar), releasing an album (FA 2473) on Folkways Records in 1973 consisting of songs and tunes learned from his many recording trips into Grayson and Carroll counties.

Eric Davidson died on September 1, 2015 at the age of 78.

1. "Developmental Biologist Eric H. Davidson Passes Away," Caltech News, September 4, 2015, accessed January 5, 2016, http://www.caltech.edu/news/developmental-biologist-eric-h-davidson-passes-away-47772.
Disclaimer:
Please note that some language in this collection is culturally insensitive or offensive to viewers. It is presented as it exists in the original material for the benefit of research and the historical record. The material reflects the culture and context in which it was created and not the views of the Smithsonian Institution.
Related Materials:
An oral history with Eric H. Davidson was conducted by the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections on April 26, 2015. Both the video and transcript is available for researchers. Contact archives staff for information.
Provenance:
Donated by Eric H. Davidson.
Restrictions:
Access by appointment only. Contact the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections at rinzlerarchives@si.edu or (202) 633-7322 for additional information.
Rights:
Copyright restrictions apply. Contact archives staff for information.
Topic:
Fiddle tunes -- Appalachian Region, Southern  Search this
Folk music -- Appalachian Region, Southern  Search this
Banjo music -- Appalachian Region, Southern  Search this
Music -- Appalachian Region, Southern  Search this
Old-time music -- Appalachian Region, Southern  Search this
Genre/Form:
Audiotapes
Citation:
Eric H. Davidson audio recordings, Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Eric H. Davidson audio recordings, 1958-1985. Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
CFCH.DAVID
See more items in:
Eric H. Davidson audio recordings
Archival Repository:
Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-cfch-david

Preparing a Chilean "Hulte" (marine algae) Salad

Creator:
Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute  Search this
Type:
Youtube videos
Uploaded:
2011-05-04T13:29:26.000Z
Topic:
Tropics;Biology  Search this
Youtube Category:
Science & Technology  Search this
See more by:
collinlabpanama
YouTube Channel:
collinlabpanama
Data Source:
Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_fN2DiOswmOA

Bat community species richness and composition in a restinga protected area in Southeastern Brazil

Author:
Oprea, Monik  Search this
Esberard, C. E. L.  Search this
Ditchfield, A. D.  Search this
Brito, D.  Search this
Pimenta, V. T.  Search this
Mendes, P.  Search this
Weira, T. B.  Search this
Object Type:
Smithsonian staff publication
Electronic document
Year:
2009
Topic:
Natural History  Search this
Vertebrates  Search this
Animals  Search this
Zoology  Search this
See others in:
Vertebrate Zoology
Data source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:SILSRO_80912

Huesser Horizon: a Lake and a Marine Incursion in Northwestern South America during the Early Miocene

Author:
Mora, Andres  Search this
Gomez, Andres A.  Search this
Parra, Mauricio  Search this
Jaramillo, Carlos A.  Search this
Object Type:
Smithsonian staff publication
Electronic document
Year:
2009
Topic:
Tropics  Search this
Biology  Search this
Data source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:SILSRO_78030

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