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New York State Education Department

Collection Creator:
Cancel, Luis R.  Search this
Container:
Box 7, Folder 6
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1990-1991
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C., Research Center. Use of archival audiovisual recordings and born-digital records with no duplicate copies requires advance notice.
Collection Citation:
Luis Cancel papers, circa 1900-1998, bulk 1970-1996. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
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Luis Cancel papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-cancluis-ref152

New York State Association of Museums

Collection Creator:
Cancel, Luis R.  Search this
Container:
Box 8, Folder 12
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1991
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C., Research Center. Use of archival audiovisual recordings and born-digital records with no duplicate copies requires advance notice.
Collection Citation:
Luis Cancel papers, circa 1900-1998, bulk 1970-1996. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
See more items in:
Luis Cancel papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-cancluis-ref191

Luis Cancel papers

Creator:
Cancel, Luis R.  Search this
Names:
Bronx Museum of the Arts  Search this
New York (N.Y.). Department of Cultural Affairs  Search this
Extent:
10.1 Linear feet
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Sound recordings
Video recordings
Date:
circa 1900-1998
bulk 1970-1996
Summary:
The papers of arts administrator and artist Luis Cancel measure 10.1 linear feet and date from circa 1900 to 1998 with the bulk of the material dating from 1970 to 1996. The collection is comprised of biographical material, professional files, arts administration records documenting his directorship at the Bronx Museum of the Arts and as Commissioner for the Department of Cultural Affairs in New York, subject and artist's files, files for the exhibition Legacy / Legado, printed materials, photographs, and unidentified sound recordings.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of arts administrator and artist Luis Cancel measure 10.1 linear feet and date from circa 1900 to 1998 with the bulk of the material dating from 1970 to 1996. The collection is comprised of biographical material, professional files, arts administration records documenting his directorship at the Bronx Museum of the Arts and as Commissioner for the Department of Cultural Affairs in New York, subject and artist's files, files for the exhibition Legacy / Legado, printed materials, photographs, and unidentified sound recordings.

Biographical material contains two appointment books, awards, certificates, diplomas, a pin, real estate documents, resumes, a watercolor, and Cancel's writings. Files for committees, councils, consulting work, academic work, exhibitions, and various projects as well as digital disks and a video recording are among Cancel's professional files. Arts administration records consist of files for the Bronx Museum of the Arts and the Department of Cultural Affairs. Subject files include printed material, two video recordings, and a small amount of other material on topics of interest to Cancel. Files on artists contain printed material, photographs, resumes, cross reference notes, and other material.

The Legacy / Legado exhibition files include digital disks, artist's files, administrative records, and photographic materials. Printed material consists of business cards, booklets, brochures, flyers, invitations, newsletters, magazines, and clippings. Photographic materials are of Cancel with colleagues, family, travel, and works of art. Two unidentified sound recordings are in the last series.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as nine series.

Series 1: Biographical Material, 1970-1994 (0.3 linear feet; Box 1, OV 12)

Series 2: Professional Files, 1973-1998 (3.4 linear feet; Boxes 1-5)

Series 3: Arts Administration Records, 1972-1997 (4.1 linear feet; Boxes 5-8, OV 12, 14)

Series 4: Subject Files, 1973-1996 (0.4 linear feet; Boxes 8-9)

Series 5: Artist Files, 1952-1991 (0.5 linear feet; Box 9, 11, OV 12)

Series 6: -- Legacy / Legado -- Exhibition Files, 1985-1996 (0.8 linear feet; Box 9-11)

Series 7: Printed Material, 1976-1992 (0.2 linear feet; Box 10, OV 13)

Series 8: Photographic Material, circa 1900-circa 1990 (0.3 linear feet; Box 10-11)

Series 9: Unidentified Sound Recordings, circa 1980s (1 folder; Box 11)
Biographical / Historical:
Luis Cancel (1952-) is an arts administrator and artist from New York City, N.Y.

Cancel attended Fiorello H. La Guardia High School for Music and Art before earning his bachelor of arts degree in painting and printmaking from Pratt Institute. During his last year at Pratt, he studied in Puerto Rico at the University of Puerto Rico. Cancel continued his research on Puerto Rico through a fellowship with the American Friends Service Committee Reciprocal Youth Project in Puerto Rico. Cancel's research resulted in a multifaceted presentation titled Puerto Rico: Its People and Its Artists. He continued his education receiving master of arts degrees from New York University in arts administration and from Harvard University's John F. Kennedy School of Government in public administration. Cancel also attended classes on educational software design and CD-ROM production at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

After finishing his studies, Cancel became gallery director at the Cayman Gallery in New York from 1975 to 1977. In 1978, he became the executive director of the Bronx Museum of the Arts. In his 13 years at the Bronx Museum, Cancel organized numerous exhibitions including The Latin American Spirit: Art and Artists in the United States 1920-1970, Devastation/Resurrection: The South Bronx, and Krishna Reddy: A Retrospective. He was also granted a fellowship from the National Endowment for the Arts to travel throughout Latin America to research art and build relationships with significant museums and galleries. Cancel left the Bronx Museum in 1991 to begin his tenure as Commissioner of New York City's Department of Cultural Affairs where he worked with Mayor David Dinkins to enhance support for the city's arts.

In the 2000s, Cancel was also the executive director of the Clemente Soto Vélez Cultural Center, the Director of Cultural Affairs in San Francisco, was appointed by United States Representative Nancy Pelosi to the National Museum of the American Latino Commission, and established a cultural consulting company. He is currently the CEO at the Hispanic Heritage Baseball Museum Hall of Fame.
Provenance:
The papers were donated by Luis Cancel in 2000.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C., Research Center. Use of archival audiovisual recordings and born-digital records with no duplicate copies requires advance notice.
Occupation:
Art museum directors -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Topic:
Arts administrators -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Artists -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Hispanic American artists  Search this
Art, Latin American  Search this
Hispanic American art  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Video recordings
Citation:
Luis Cancel papers, circa 1900-1998, bulk 1970-1996. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.cancluis
See more items in:
Luis Cancel papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-cancluis

Regina Stewart papers

Creator:
Stewart, Regina Serniak, 1942-  Search this
Names:
New York Artists Equity Association  Search this
Blackburn, Robert Hamilton, 1920-  Search this
Candell, Victor, 1903-1977  Search this
Facci, Domenico, 1916-1994  Search this
Kennedy, Edward Moore, 1932-  Search this
Kuniyoshi, Sara Mazo  Search this
McMurtry, Larry  Search this
Stewart, Jack, 1926-2005  Search this
Extent:
0.8 Linear Feet
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Photographs
Scrapbooks
Sketches
Date:
1959-2010
Summary:
Three scrapbooks, 1959-2010, assembled by Regina Serniak Stewart document her career as a costume designer, painter, board member and Executive Director of the New York Artists Equity Association.
Scope and Content Note:
Three scrapbooks, 1959-2010, assembled by Regina Serniak Stewart (b. 1942) document her career as a costume designer, painter, board member and Executive Director of the New York Artists Equity Association.

The scrapbooks contain: letters from Robert Blackburn, Victor Candell, Domenico Facci, Edward M. Kennedy, Sara M. Kuniyoshi, Larry McMurtry, Jack Stewart, and letters from various museums and galleries; costume sketches, 1963-1974, for the Paterson, New Jersey Lyric Opera Theatre; curriculum vitae, awards and profiles of the artist; photographs of Stewart, her work, and events; and printed material including clippings, articles, programs, brochures, flyers, and exhibition catalogs. The collection also includes some loose printed materials consisting of collectors' guides to kitchen utensils and stoneware co-written by Stewart and an article and exhibition catalog about her painting.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as 2 series:

Series 1: Scrapbooks, 1959-2010 (Boxes 1-2; 0.7 linear ft.)

Series 2: Printed Materials, circa 1977, 2003-2008 (Box 2; 0.1 linear ft.)
Biographical Note:
Regina Serniak Stewart (b. 1942), a painter, administrator, and writer in New York City is the Executive Director of the New York Artists Equity Association.

Stewart is a graduate of the Cooper Union School of Art and Achitecture whose paintings have been exhibited in New York and throughout the United States. In addition to painting, Ms. Stewart was a set and costume designer for the Paterson Lyric Opera Theatre, a jewelry designer, an art consultant, and an art instructor. She was elected to the board of the New York Artists Equity Association in 1989 and is now Executive Director.
Provenance:
Donated by Regina Stewart, July 27, 2010.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment.
Rights:
The Regina Stewart papers are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Women artists -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Arts administrators -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Collagists -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Costume designers  Search this
Painters -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Scrapbooks
Sketches
Citation:
The Regina Stewart papers. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.stewregi
See more items in:
Regina Stewart papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-stewregi

Roy Moyer papers

Creator:
Moyer, Roy, 1921-2007  Search this
Names:
American Federation of Arts  Search this
UNICEF  Search this
Lunde, Karl  Search this
Extent:
2.8 Linear feet
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Drawings
Photographs
Date:
1923-2013
bulk 1950-2000
Summary:
The papers of artist and arts administrator Roy Moyer measure 2.8 linear feet and date from 1923 to 2013, with the bulk of the materials dating from 1950 to 2000. The materials also concern to a limited degree Moyer's life partner, artist and art historian, Karl Lunde. Moyer's career is documented by writings, photographs of his artwork and exhibiton installations, as well as printed materials concerning exhibitions and his participation in cutural and community activities. There is limited correspondence or material of a personal nature.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of artist and arts administrator Roy Moyer measure 2.8 linear feet and date from 1923 to 2013, with the bulk of the materials dating from 1950 to 2000. The materials also conern to a limited degree Moyer's life partner, artist and art historian, Karl Lunde. Moyer's career is documented by writings, photographs of his artwork and exhibiton installations, as well as printed materials concerning exhibitions and his participation in cultural and community activities. There is limited correspondence or material of a personal nature.

Biographical materials consist of biographical sketches of Moyer, hand written lists of sold paintings and purchasers, Moyer's diploma from Columbia University (M.A.,1947), and a 1977 award from the National Academy of Design in New York. Scattered letters concern Moyer's exhibited paintings and his participation at art related conferences.

Subject files include multiple exhibitions at galleries, materials concerning Karl Lunde, Moyer's employment at the American Federation of Arts and UNICEF, and his contributions to book projects. Writings include an essay, short articles, and student papers.

Printed materials document Moyer's exhibition history and his participation as speaker or panelist at cultural events in the capacity of art critic or art historian. Some items mention Moyer as director of the American Federation of Arts in an endorsement capacity.

Original artwork by Moyer includes pencil drawings and a small sketchbook, including figures and still lifes in color. There are two drawings of unknown origin, one of Moyer and one which appears to be Moyer and Lunde together.

Photographs are of Moyer, Moyer with Lunde, their apartment, and Moyer with colleagues. Also found are photographs of Moyer's artwork and exhibition installations.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged in 7 series.

Series 1: Biographical Material, 1947-2008 (Box 1; 1 folder)

Series 2: Letters, circa 1960s-1998 (Box 1; 1 folder)

Series 3: Writings, 1950-2007 (Box 1; 0.4 linear feet)

Series 4: Subject Files, 1950-2013 (Boxes 1-2; OV 5; 1.2 linear feet)

Series 5: Printed Material, 1959-2010 (Box 2; OV 5; 0.3 linear feet)

Series 6: Artwork, 1950s-1970s (Box 2; 0.1 linear feet)

Series 7: Photographs, 1923-2000 (Boxes 2-4; OV 5; 0.7 linear feet)
Biographical / Historical:
Artist and arts administrator Roy Moyer (1921-2007) and his life partner, artist and art historian Karl Lunde (1931-2009), lived and worked in the New York City area.

Moyer worked as the director of the American Federation of Arts for nine years, curating traveling art exhibitions, including the noted 50th anniversary re-creation of the 1913 New York Armory Show. During this period he also worked with art theorist Rudolph Arnheim on films relating to visual perception. Moyer then served as chief of art and design at UNICEF until 1986. He later devoted his time to painting and continued to exhibit until his death in 2007 following a hear attack.
Related Materials:
Also found in the Archives of American Art is an oral history interview with Roy Moyer conducted by Paul Cummings in 1975.
Provenance:
The papers were donated to the Archives of American Art in 2011 by Karl Lunde.
Restrictions:
Use of original material requires an appointment. Use of archival audiovisual recordings with no duplicate access copy requires advance notice.
Rights:
The Roy Moyer papers are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Art critics -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Arts administrators -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Art historians -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Genre/Form:
Drawings
Photographs
Citation:
Roy Moyer papers, 1923-2013. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.moyeroy
See more items in:
Roy Moyer papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-moyeroy

Artist Tenants Association records

Creator:
Artist Tenants Association (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Extent:
1 Linear Feet
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Scrapbooks
Date:
1959-1978
Summary:
The records of the Artist Tenants Association measure 1.0 linear feet and date from 1959 to 1978. They document the Association's efforts to alter New York City building codes to permit artists to live in lofts, initiating the development of SoHo as an art center. Records include business correspondence, founding documents, memoranda and press releases, member lists, financial records, clippings, and a scrapbook of clippings pertaining to the organization.
Scope and Content Note:
The records of the Artist Tenants Association measure 1.0 linear feet and date from 1959 to 1978. They document the Association's efforts to alter New York City building codes to permit artists to live in lofts, initiating the development of SoHo as an art center. Records include business correspondence, founding documents, memoranda and press releases, member lists, financial records, clippings, and a scrapbook of clippings pertaining to the organization.

The correspondence in the collection includes a handful of letters from artists regarding the availability of lofts, letters from the New York City Housing and Development Administration, and information from other co-housing projects in the city. In addition, there is a report, "Arts Administrator Need and Potential in New York State," drafted by George Alan Smith for the New York State Council on the Arts.

Administrative records include a legal resolution of unincorporation, meeting announcements, press releases and memoranda, member lists, and phone messages. Finanical records include checking and savings account books, canceled checks and check memos, bank statements, and receipts related to Association activities. The clippings in the collection relate to coverage of Association activities and topics relevant to their objectives.

The scrapbook of clippings chronicle housing needs of New York City artists, press coverage related to the Association, and supplementary articles tracing the development of the SoHo neighborhood as an integrated artists' live and work community.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as 5 series:

Series 1: Correspondence, 1967-1969 (Box 1; 12 folders)

Series 2: Administrative Records, 1961-1969 (Box 1; 10 folders)

Series 3: Financial Records, 1961-1969 (Boxes 1-2; 0.2 linear feet)

Series 4: Printed Material, 1967-1978 (Box 2; 4 folders)

Series 5: Scrapbook, 1959-1976 (BV 1; 0.2 linear feet)
Historical Note:
The Artist Tenants Association was loosely formed in the early 1960s to petition the office of Robert Wagner, then mayor of New York, for permission to live in manufacturing districts not officially zoned for residence. The city eventually agreed to an Artist in Residence (A.I.R.) program, which led to a more formal movement to legalize artists' occupation of studio spaces in the neighborhood "South of Houston," shorted to SoHo.

On March 31, 1965, the Association acquired a formal certificate of unincorporation, although they had been operating in an unofficial capacity since the fall of 1961. In addition to negotiating with the city, the Artist Tenants Association served as a centralized information resource by disseminating information to artists, proposing boycotts and other actions early in the negotiation process, and raising funds to support artists and building projects. Between 1964 and 1968, the Association was central to the negotiation of the A.I.R. Agreement, which received approval in 1964 and officially passed as an amendment concerning Artists' Centers and Studios in March 1968.

Influential artists who supported the Association's first artist boycott in protest of the city's 1961 studio-loft evictions include Helen Frankenthaler, Willem de Kooning, Robert Motherwell, Ad Reinhardt, and Richard Stankiewicz.
Related Material:
Also found in the Archives of American Art are the SoHo Artists Association Records, 1968-1978.
Provenance:
The records were donated to the Archives of American Art by Ruth Fortel, the financial secretary of the Association, in 1978 and 1979.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment.
Rights:
The Artist Tenants Association records are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Artists -- Housing -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Artists' studios -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Art -- Societies, etc. -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Genre/Form:
Scrapbooks
Citation:
Artist Tenants Association records, 1959-1978. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.artitena
See more items in:
Artist Tenants Association records
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-artitena
Additional Online Media:

John Weichsel papers concerning the People's Art Guild

Creator:
Weichsel, John, 1870-1946  Search this
Names:
People's Art Guild  Search this
Beal, Gifford, 1879-1956  Search this
Bellows, George, 1882-1925  Search this
Bluemner, Oscar, 1867-1938  Search this
Davis, Stuart, 1892-1964  Search this
Delaunay, Robert, 1885-1941  Search this
Kroll, Leon, 1884-1974  Search this
Macdonald-Wright, Stanton, 1890-1973  Search this
Pascin, Jules, 1885-1930  Search this
Sloan, John, 1871-1951  Search this
Van Dine, S. S.  Search this
Weichsel, John, 1938?-  Search this
Zorach, Marguerite, 1887-1968  Search this
Zorach, William, 1887-1966  Search this
Extent:
0.6 Linear feet
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Sketches
Date:
1905-1965, bulk 1905-1929
bulk 1905-1929
Summary:
The John Weichsel papers concerning the People's Art Guild measure 0.6 linear feet and date from 1905-1965 with the bulk of the material dating from 1905-1929. The papers consist almost entirely of the records of the People's Art Guild, founded by Weichsel, and include administrative records, correspondence, writings and notes, business and financial records, printed material, and artwork.
Scope and Contents:
The John Weichsel papers concerning the People's Art Guild measure 0.6 linear feet and date from 1905-1965 with the bulk of the material dating from 1905-1929. The papers consist almost entirely of the records of the People's Art Guild, founded by Weichsel, and include administrative records, correspondence, writings and notes, business and financial records, printed material, and artwork.

People's Art Guild records include the constitution, membership lists, and correspondence with Gifford Beal, George Bellows, Oscar Bluemner, Stuart Davis, Robert Delaunay, Leon Kroll, Standon Macdonald-Wright, Jules Pascin, John Sloan, Willard Wright and Marguerite and William Zorach, among others. Writings about the Peoples Art Guild are by Weichsel and his grandson John Weichsel. There are also lists of artists and works of art. Also found are very scattered business and financial records, printed materials, and artwork in the form of sketches for exhibition announcements.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as 6 series.

Series 1: Administrative Records, 1915-1917 (2 folders; Box 1)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1905-1922 (0.3 linear feet; Box 1)

Series 3: Writings and Notes, 1915-circa 1919, 1965 (4 folders; Box 1)

Series 4: Business and Financial Records, 1915-1917 (0.1 linear feet; Box 1-2)

Series 5: Printed Material, 1915-circa 1948 (0.2 linear feet; Box 2)

Series 6: Artwork, 1915-1916 (1 folder; Box 2)
Biographical / Historical:
John Weichsel (1870-1946) was an arts administrator and founded the artists' cooperative People's Art Guild of New York City in 1915.

John Weichsel was born in Poland and ultimately settled in New York City. The People's Art Guild was founded by Weichsel as an artist's cooperative focused on improving and expanding knowledge of art and the art world among the general public, believing this would increase art appreciation and patronage.
Provenance:
The collection was donated in 1960 and 1963 by Dr. H. S. Weichsel and John Weichsel, the son and grandson of Dr. John Weichsel. At an unknown later date, grandson John Weichsel donated his 1965 thesis on the Peoples Art Guild.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment.
Rights:
The John Weichsel papers concerning the People's Art Guild are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Arts administrators -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Art -- Societies, etc. -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sketches
Citation:
John Weichsel papers concerning the People's Art Guild, 1905-1965, bulk 1905-1929. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.weicjohn
See more items in:
John Weichsel papers concerning the People's Art Guild
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-weicjohn

Gustave Harrow legal records relating to the Estate of Mark Rothko

Creator:
Harrow, Gustave  Search this
Names:
Mark Rothko Foundation  Search this
Metropolitan Museum of Art (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
New York (State). Attorney General's Office  Search this
Annenberg, Walter H., 1908-  Search this
Rothko, Mark, 1903-1970  Search this
Extent:
34.6 Linear feet
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Date:
1957-1986
Summary:
The Gustave Harrow legal records relating to the Estate of Mark Rothko measure 34.6 linear feet and date from 1957-1986. The records document the case brought by the New York State Attorney General's Office as cross-petitioner to the case brought by Rothko's daughter Kate, against the executors of Rothko's estate, Frank Lloyd and the Marlborough Gallery, for mismanagement and self-dealing. There are also records related to Harrow's writings about the case. Lastly, included in the collection are materials relating to art law issues in connection with the Metropolitan Museum of Art.
Scope and Contents:
New York State Attorney General Gustave Harrow's records relating to the Estate of Mark Rothko consist of legal and other documentation of the state's case in connection with the Mark Rothko Estate and Foundation, from Surrogate Court through appeals, as well as from Harrow's writings about the case, both during and after the trial. Various trial documents include affidavits, briefs, EBTs (examination before trial) trial transcripts, motions, depositions, notes and clippings, and miscellaneous records related to the case and post-trial activities. Also found are reference materials, Harrow's writings in connection with the case.

Unrelated to the Rothko case are Harrow's research materials for possible legal actions by the state in connection with Walter Annenberg's proposed donation of a Communication Center to the Metropolitan Museum of Art, and with other issues including donations, object authenticity and the Packard Collection.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged in 7 series.

Series 1: General Files, 1957-1981, undated

Series 2: Motions, 1971-1979, undated

Series 3: Decisions, 1970-1979, undated

Series 4: Appeals Documents, 1972-1979, undated

Series 5: Miscellaneous Case and Post-Trial files, 1972-1984, undated

Series 6: Reference Materials, Notes and Writings, 1970-1986

Series 7: Metropolitan Museum of Art / Walter Annenberg Etc., 1971-1981, undated
Biographical / Historical:
Gustave Harrow was a New York State Assistant Attorney General, and an adjunct professor in the Graduate Program in Arts Administration at NYU. Abstract Expressionist Artist Mark Rothko died on February 25, 1970 leaving the bulk of his estate, including 798 paintings (the greater part of his life's work) to the Mark Rothko Foundation which he had created shortly before his death. His daughter Kate [Rothko Prizel] brought suit against the estate executors and Marlborough Gallery for self-dealing, fraud, and conspiring with Marlborough owner, Frank Lloyd to waste the assets of the estate. The state of New York Attorney General's Office, represented by Harrow, joined the case as a cross-petitioner on behalf of the people of New York's interest as beneficiaries of the charitable Foundation. The case resulted in the return of most of the paintings, the removal of the executors (accountant Bernard Reis, artist Theodoros Stamos, and anthropology professor Morton Levine), and a $9.2 million judgment against them and Frank Lloyd. The case had a lasting effect on laws dealing with artists' estates, and Harrow was instrumental in framing a bill that aimed at reducing fraud in the fine arts market. Harrow wrote about the Rothko Estate case in several articles and in the 1979 book Art, the Artist, and the Consequences of Rothko: Lasting Legal Impressions from the Estate of Great Artist.
Related Materials:
Among the holdings of the Archives of American Art are the Mark Rothko Foundation records, 1976-1987; Legal records relating to Richard Serra v. United States General Services Administration et al., 1985-1987.

The Archives of American Art interviewed multiple artists as part of the Mark Rothko and His Times Oral History Project. Many of the interviews reference Rothko and his work, and relationships with the artist.

The Legal records relating to Richard Serra v. United States General Services Administration et al., 1985-1987 contains documentation of another lawsuit handled by Gustave Harrow.
Separated Materials:
Another small collection (11 items) of Mark Rothko papers were loaned to the Archives for microfilming on reel 3135. The papers were in the possession of George Carson, husband of Rothko's ex-wife Edith Carson. Carson gave the papers to the Mark Rothko Foundation and gave the Archives of American Art permission to microfilm them. The microfilm is available at Archives of American Art offices and through interlibrary loan but are not described in the container listing of this finding aid.
Provenance:
The Gustave Harrow legal records relating to the Estate of Mark Rothko were donated to the Archives of American Art by Marilynn Karp March 23, 1996. Mr. Harrow had deposited the papers with Ms. Karp, a colleague of Harrow's at New York University where he was an adjunct professor.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center. Use of archival audiovisual recording with no duplicate access copy requires advance notice. Contact Reference services for more information.
Rights:
The Gustave Harrow legal records relating to the Estate of Mark Rothko are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Artists -- Legal status, laws, etc. -- United States  Search this
Transcripts  Search this
Decedents' estates -- New York (State)  Search this
Law and art -- United States  Search this
Citation:
Gustave Harrow legal records relating to the Estate of Mark Rothko, 1957-1986, undated. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.harrgust2
See more items in:
Gustave Harrow legal records relating to the Estate of Mark Rothko
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-harrgust2

Agnes Rindge Claflin papers concerning Alexander Calder

Creator:
Claflin, Agnes Rindge, 1900-1977  Search this
Names:
Vassar College. Art Gallery  Search this
Calder, Alexander, 1898-1976  Search this
Extent:
0.2 Linear feet
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Potcards
Manuscripts
Photographs
Illustrated letters
Date:
1936-circa 1970s
Summary:
The papers of arts administrator, collector, and educator Agnes Rindge Claflin concerning Alexander Calder measure 0.2 linear feet and date from 1936-circa 1970s. Included are five letters, two of which are illustrated, and one postcard from Alexander Calder to Claflin; two handwritten manuscripts by Calder, one untitled and "A Propos of Measuring a Mobile," 1943; an invitation to a Calder exhibition at Galerie Maeght, Paris, 1952; and 14 photographs of Calder, of Calder and Claflin in Calder's studio, of Calder's art work, and of a Calder exhibition installation at Vassar Art Gallery, 1942. Transcriptions of three of the letters and both manuscripts are also included.
Scope and Content Note:
The papers of arts administrator, collector, and educator Agnes Rindge Claflin concerning Alexander Calder measure 0.2 linear feet and date from 1936-circa 1970s. Included are five letters and one postcard from Alexander Calder to Claflin, two of which are illustrated; two handwritten manuscripts by Calder, one untitled and "A Propos of Measuring a Mobile," 1943; an invitation to a Calder exhibition at Galerie Maeght, Paris, 1952; and 14 photographs of Calder, of Calder and Claflin in Calder's studio, of Calder's art work, and of a Calder exhibition installation at Vassar Art Gallery, 1942. One photograph depicting an event is possibly the opening of the Calder exhibition at Vassar Art Gallery, 1942. Also included are two polaroid photographs most likely from the 1970s. Transcriptions of three of the letters and both manuscripts are also included.
Arrangement:
Due to the small size of the collection, items are organized into one series of 23 folders:

Series 1: Agnes Rindge Claflin Papers Concerning Alexander Calder, 1936-circa 1970s (Box 1; 23 folders)
Biographical Note:
Agnes Rindge Claflin (1900-1977) was an arts administrator, collector, and educator who spent the majority of her career at Vassar College as a professor and serving as director of its art gallery for 28 years.

Claflin was born Agnes Millicent Rindge in Grand Rapids, Michigan on May 19, 1900. She graduated from the Madeira School in 1917, attended Mount Holyoke College for two years, and graduated magna cum laude from Radcliffe College. Afterwards, Claflin briefly taught at Vassar College before returning to Radcliffe and earning her M.A. and Ph.D. She rejoined the Vassar College faculty in 1928 and served as the director of the Vassar Art Gallery from 1934-1962. Claflin published Sculpture in 1929 and in the 1930s she began writing articles for several different publications. At the request of Alfred Barr, she joined the Advisory Committee for the Museum of Modern Art in 1941 and became the Assistant Executive Vice President from 1943-1944. Claflin held a number of other positions in art organizations such as the Commission on Arts of the American Association of Colleges (1939), Art in America (1940-1943), Art Division of the Coordinator of Inter-American Affairs (1941-1942), American Federation of Arts (1944-1945), and Committee on Fellowships of the College Art Association (1945-1948). She married Philip W. Claflin, a captain in the U.S. Army, in 1945. Throughout her career, Claflin lectured at organizations and universities across the United States, including the Chicago Art Institute, Columbia University, New York University, Yale University, and many others. Agnes Claflin died on June 12, 1977.

Claflin and Calder were colleagues and friends. In 1942, the Vassar Art Gallery hosted a Calder exhibition installation. The following year, Claflin wrote and narrated a short film, "Alexander Calder: Sculpture and Constructions," which was presented with the Museum of Modern Art's Calder exhibition of the same year.
Related Material:
The Archives of American Art holds several collections related to the Agnes Rindge Claflin papers concerning Alexander Calder, including the Alexander Calder papers which have been fully digitized; Alexander Calder letters and photographs microfilmed on reel 4781; Alexander Calder letter microfilmed on reel 2787, frames 963-970; and an oral history interview with Alexander Calder, October 26, 1971, available as a transcript online.
Provenance:
The collection was donated in 1981 by Philip W. Claflin, widower of Agnes Rindge Claflin.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment.
Rights:
The Agnes Rindge Claflin papers concerning Alexander Calder are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Art -- Collectors and collecting  Search this
Arts administrators -- New York (State)  Search this
Genre/Form:
Potcards
Manuscripts
Photographs
Illustrated letters
Citation:
Agnes Rindge Claflin papers concerning Alexander Calder, 1936-circa 1970s. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.clafagne
See more items in:
Agnes Rindge Claflin papers concerning Alexander Calder
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-clafagne
Additional Online Media:

Jack Stewart papers

Creator:
Stewart, Jack, 1926-2005  Search this
Names:
New York City Transit Authority  Search this
World Trade Center (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Yale University -- Students  Search this
Baxter, Violet  Search this
Egan, Charles, 1911-  Search this
Gold, Nancy  Search this
Goulet, Lorrie, 1925-  Search this
Kahn, Wolf, 1927-  Search this
Romano, Clare  Search this
Thomas, Steffen, 1906-  Search this
Toney, Anthony  Search this
Townsend, Rodman  Search this
Walker, Herbert Brooks, 1927-  Search this
Weiner, Sam  Search this
Extent:
9.9 Linear feet
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Sketches
Drawings
Sound recordings
Paintings
Photographs
Sketchbooks
Illustrated letters
Interviews
Transcripts
Color slides
Video recordings
Greeting cards
Designs
Date:
1926-2010
Summary:
The Jack Stewart papers are dated 1926-2010 and measure 9.9 linear feet. A significant portion of the collection concerns Stewart's dissertation, "Subway Graffiti: An Aesthetic Study of Graffiti on the Subway" (New York University, 1989), related research, writings, and exhibitions on the subject. Biographical materials, correspondence, writings, printed material, artwork, sketchbooks, and photographic materials document his career as a painter, muralist, designer, educator and administrator.
Scope and Content Note:
The Jack Stewart papers are dated 1926-2010 and measure 9.9 linear feet. A significant portion of the collection concerns Stewart's dissertation, "Subway Graffiti: An Aesthetic Study of Graffiti on the Subway" (New York University, 1989), related research, writings, and exhibitions on the subject. Biographical materials, correspondence, writings, printed material, artwork, sketchbooks, and photographic materials document his career as a painter, muralist, designer, educator and administrator.

Biographical materials include a "Video Archive" (DVD) consisting mainly of Jack Stewart being interviewed on several occasions by Nancy Gold for her television show, "What It Takes." In addition to discussions about Stewart's career, the shows include examples of his paintings and murals along with views of him at work.

Correspondence mostly documents Stewart's artistic career and work as an educator and administrator; there is some personal correspondence, as well. Of particular note are letters to Rodman Townsend who commissioned a mural about the human brain; they discuss the details of the project and its evolution, brain research, and subsequent exhibitions of related paintings. Illustrated letters and greeting cards with original artwork are from Violet Baxter, Lorrie Goulet, Wolf Kahn, Clare Romano, Anthony Toney, and Sam Weiner. Herbert Brooks Walker sent several pieces of mail art and, while in Italy, collected graffiti information for Stewart. Letters Stewart wrote to his mother span decades; the best represented periods are the years he served in the U.S. Army and studied at Yale University.

Writings and notes consist of Stewart's dissertation ("Subway Graffiti: An Aesthetic Study of Graffiti on the Subway"), miscellaneous writings and notes, and art and architecture notebooks. Dissertation documentation includes the manuscript, drafts, and related records. Among the miscellaneous writings and notes - published and unpublished - are shorter pieces, articles, student papers, and teaching notes. Of particular interest are notes/instructions for a performance piece titled "Endless Subway," "Memories of Steffan Thomas" and "My Recollection of Charles Egan." Also found are minutes of Cooper Union adjunct faculty meetings (1965-1966), and reports written when provost of the Rhode Island School of Design. Art and architecture notebooks (5 volumes) were compiled while at Yale University.

Research files on graffiti contain many sound recordings and some transcripts of interviews with graffiti writers, voluminous lists of graffiti writers' names/tags, correspondence, notes, photographs, and a wide variety of printed material. Stewart began collecting these materials as his interest in graffiti developed. They were used for his dissertation and material continued to be added after the dissertation was completed.

Printed material mentioning Stewart or containing reproductions of his work includes exhibition catalogs, posters, and newsletters.

Artwork by Jack Stewart consists of drawings, paintings, and one etching; also found are designs and plans for tables, murals, and other projects. Drawings include figure studies, heads, and landscapes; most are in pencil and some in ink. The small number of paintings are oil on canvas (removed from stretchers), and gouache on paper and board. Sketchbooks (44 volumes) contain mostly pencil drawings and sketches, and a few studies for paintings and murals. Two volumes include writings about travels and events; of particular interest are "Notes on Kline's funeral May 1962," "Visit to Roman Bronze Art Foundry," and "Notes on My Development."

Photographic materials consist mainly photographs, but also include digital images and 35-mm color slides. Images of Stewart include views of him with paintings and working in his studio. Identified individuals with whom he appears are: Regina Stewart (wife), Brandon Stewart (son), Lil Stewart (mother), Ninalee Craig, Irving Sandler, and students in Urbino, Italy. Photographs of artwork document murals such as Raw Material (composed of shirt labels), and Versailles Hotel in Miami Beach; among the paintings documented are State of the Union, Icons of Western Art and Revelation XVI-16 (both with keys to individuals portrayed). Exhibition openings and installations are shown in photographs, color slides, and video recordings. Also found are photographs of the World Trade Center site taken by Stewart in December 2001.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as 9 series:

Series 1: Biographical Materials, 1926-circa 2009 (Boxes 1,11; 0.6 linear foot)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1944-2009 (Boxes 1-2; 0.7 linear foot)

Series 3: Writings and Notes, circa 1947-2003 (Boxes 2-5; 3.1 linear foot)

Series 4: Research Files on Graffiti, 1972-2010 (Boxes 5-7,11; 2.8 linear foot)

Series 5: Printed Material, circa 1945-2002 (Boxes 8, 11, OV 13; 0.7 linear foot)

Series 6: Scrapbooks, circa 1990-2003 (Box 8; 0.2 linear foot)

Series 7: Artwork, 1946-2000 (Boxes 8, 11, OV 12; 0.3 linear foot)

Series 8: Sketchbooks, 1951-2004 (Boxes 8-9; 1.3 linear foot)

Series 9: Photographic Materials, circa 1950s-2010 (Boxes 10-11; 0.4 linear foot)
Biographical Note:
Jack Stewart (1926-2005) was a painter, muralist, designer, educator and administrator in New York City. After developing an interest in graffiti in the 1970s, Stewart eventually wrote a dissertation on the subject, "Subway Graffiti: An Aesthetic Study of Graffiti on the Subway" (New York University, 1989) and was recognized as an expert on mass transit art.

Jack Stewart began studying art at the High Museum School in his hometown of Atlanta when he was 10 years old. At age 14, he began a 4 year apprenticeship with painter and sculptor Steffen Thomas. After serving in World War II, he enrolled at Yale University (B.F.A. 1951) as a sculpture student, but soon switched to the painting department where he studied with Josef Albers and Willem de Kooning. After graduation, Stewart began receiving mural commissions and enrolled in classes at Columbia University School of Architecture (1951-1953). His interest in architecture was tied to understanding how to work effectively with architects on mural projects. Later, Stewart developed an interest in graffiti which he pursued through graduate study at New York University (M.A., 1975 and Ph.D., 1989).

Stewart created murals in ceramic tile, mixed media and stained glass. In addition to mosaic murals, he designed tables with mosaic tops. As an outgrowth of his mosaic work, Stewart developed a technique for laminating stained glass onto plate glass that, by eliminating the need for lead, opened new design possibilities. Mural commissions included work for Hamilton Hotel in Chicago, Versailles Hotel in Miami Beach, Public School 28 in New York City, and several ocean liners. The most unusual mural, Raw Material commissioned by Cluett Peabody and Company, was composed of shirt labels embedded in acrylic.

Beginning in 1950 Stewart participated regularly in group shows and enjoyed solo exhibitions mainly in the New York City area. He also showed in Philadelphia, Georgia, Rhode Island, Mexico and Italy, and was included in exhibitions circulated by the American Federation of Arts.

Stewart taught at the college level for nearly thirty years, including: The New School (art and architecture, 1953-1958); Pratt Institute (interior architectural design, 1955-1960); The Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art (painting, drawing, human anatomy, art history, 1960-1976; Art Department Chairman, 1971-1976); International Center of Mythymna, American Division, Lesbos, Greece (summer school, 1962-1965); Columbia University (M.F.A. program instructor, 1966-1976); and New York University (drawing, 1967-1975). In 1976 he was appointed Vice President and Provost of the Rhode Island School of Design.

Stewart was active in several professional organizations. He served as New York Artists Equity Association Secretary (1986-1987) and President (1987-1989); President of the National Society of Mural Painters (1996-2000); member of the advisory board of the Steffen Thomas Museum and Archives, Buckhead, GA (1997- 2000s); and President of the Fine Arts Federation of New York (2003-2004). The National Academy of Design elected Jack Stewart an Academician in 1995.

Jack Stewart and Margot Schwarzhaupt, an artist, were married in 1947; they had one son, Brandon. Painter and arts administrator, Regina Serniak, became Jack Stewart's wife in 1976.

Jack Stewart died in New York City in 2005.
Provenance:
Donated in 2010 by Regina Stewart, widow of Jack Stewart.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment. Use of archival audiovisual recordings with no duplicate access copy requires advance notice. This collection is copyright restricted.
Rights:
The Jack Stewart papers are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Street art  Search this
Muralists -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Mail art  Search this
Art -- Study and teaching  Search this
Painters -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Graffiti  Search this
Graffiti artists  Search this
Arts administrators -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Designers -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sketches
Drawings
Sound recordings
Paintings
Photographs
Sketchbooks
Illustrated letters
Interviews
Transcripts
Color slides
Video recordings
Greeting cards
Designs
Citation:
Jack Stewart papers, 1926-2010. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.stewjack
See more items in:
Jack Stewart papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-stewjack

Mildred Baker papers

Creator:
Baker, Mildred, 1905-  Search this
Names:
Federal Art Project  Search this
Index of American Design  Search this
New York (N.Y.). Municipal Art Committee  Search this
Newark Museum  Search this
Salons of America, Inc  Search this
Technical Services Laboratory (National Space Technology Laboratories)  Search this
United Federal Workers of America  Search this
Baker, Jacob  Search this
McMahon, Audrey, 1900?-1981  Search this
Weiss, Adolph, 1891-1971  Search this
Extent:
2.7 Linear feet
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Photographs
Interviews
Transcripts
Date:
1882
1923-1997
Summary:
The papers of arts administrator Mildred Baker measure 2.7 linear feet and date from 1882 to 1997, with the bulk of the material dating from 1923 to 1997. Found within the papers are biographical materials; personal and professional correspondence; writings; files related to her work on the WPA Federal Art Project and other institutional art projects; printed material; photographs of Baker; and photographs and papers related to the work of her husband, Jacob Baker, who also administered programs for the WPA.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of arts administrator Mildred Baker measure 2.7 linear feet and date from 1882 to 1997, with the bulk of the material dating from 1923 to 1997. Found within the papers are biographical materials; personal and professional correspondence; writings; files related to her work on the WPA Federal Art Project and other institutional art projects; printed material; photographs of Baker; and photographs and papers related to the work of her husband, Jacob Baker, who also administered programs for the WPA.

Biographical materials include birth and award certificates, curriculum vitae, divorce documents, an oral history transcript, and genealogical research and information on Baker's family, including her brother, the composer and bassoonist Adolph Weiss.

Correspondence is primarily with Baker's friends, business associates, researchers, and art institutions discussing personal relationships, research inquiries into the administration of the Federal Art Project, and loans and gifts of artwork to various institutions. The series includes Baker's responses to researcher requests regarding FAP exhibitions, programs, artists, and recollections of her fellow administrators.

Writings by Baker consist of reminiscences, 8 travel diaries, 3 essays, an exhibition catalog introduction, 4 lectures, and miscellaneous notes. Writings by others consist of 4 essays on contemporary art and art administration.

Federal Art Project files include correspondence; artist and exhibition lists; memoranda and general information; reports; speeches; information and photographs related to regional art centers and black artists; printed material; and miscellaneous material related to the Index of American Design, Southern California Art Project, and the Technical Services Laboratory.

General project files include information for 4 exhibitions, including the 1934 First Municipal Art and Salon of America Exhibitions; reports and speeches for the Newark Museum; information on the commissioning of the New Jersey Council on the Arts; and member information from the Woman Pays Club.

Printed material includes clippings, exhibition announcements and catalogs, newsletters, press releases, and a commercial recording of Alice Tully Hall.

Photographs are of Mildred Baker, including photos during her tenure at the Federal Art Project and Newark Museum. There is also a photograph of fellow FAP administrator Audrey McMahon.

Materials related to Jacob Baker include interview recordings and transcripts; personal correspondence with friends and business associates; writings and speeches; information related to Baker's work for the United Federal Workers of America; printed materials; and photographs of Baker.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as 8 series.

Series 1: Biographical Materials, 1882, 1934-1990 (7 folders; Box 1)

Series 2: Correspondence, circa 1937-1997 (0.4 linear feet, Box 1)

Series 3: Writings, circa 1940-1985 (17 folders; Box 1)

Series 4: Federal Art Project, WPA, circa 1934-1953 (0.8 linear feet, Box 1-2)

Series 5: Project Files, 1934-1991 (0.4 linear feet, Box 2)

Series 6: General Printed Material, 1923-1996 (11 folders; Box 2-4)

Series 7: Photographs, circa 1934-1992 (2 folders; Box 3)

Series 8: Jacob Baker, 1930-1975 (0.3 linear feet; Box 3-4)
Biographical / Historical:
Mildred Baker (1905-1998) was an arts administrator who worked in New York City, New York; Newark, New Jersey; and Washington, D.C.

Baker was born in Brooklyn, New York to composer and musician George Weiss and his wife Sophia Soennichsen, whose family were also musicians and writers. In 1925, while enrolled at the University of Rochester, she married the artist Ernest Holzhauer and together they moved to Europe for study and travel. In 1927, they returned to New York where Baker began working in administrative positions for the Van Diemen Galleries and the College Art Association. In 1934, she was hired by Holger Cahill to assist him in organizing Rockefeller Center's Salons of America Exhibition and First Municipal Art Exhibition. After the success of these shows, in 1935, Baker was hired as Cahill's assistant after he was selected to run the Federal Art Project for the Work Projects Administration in Washington, D.C.

While working for the Federal Art Project, Baker was appointed director of exhibitions and surveyed the work of over 100 art centers, organized over 500 traveling exhibitions, and managed the final allocation of artworks created for the FAP. In 1940, Baker divorced Mr. Holzhauer and married Jacob Baker, an economist and WPA administrator, union organizer, and a founder of the left-wing Vanguard Press, in 1947. After overseeing the closing of the Federal Art Project offices in Washington, Baker and her husband moved back to New York and became longtime residents of the Chelsea Hotel. Baker joined the staff of the Newark Museum in 1944, was promoted to assistant director in 1949, and to associate director in charge of exhibitions and programs from 1953 until her retirement in 1971.

In 1963, Baker was appointed by Governor Richard Hughes to the Commission to Study the Arts in New Jersey, and while serving as vice chairman, she oversaw the establishment of the New Jersey State Council on the Arts. She was a member of the Cosmopolitan Club, Women's City Club, Woman Pays Club, and American Association of Museums. Baker died on December 9, 1998.
Related Materials:
The Archives of American Art holds several collections related to Mildred Baker and the WPA Federal Art Project. There are two oral histories with Mildred Baker, one conducted by Harlan Phillips, September 21, 1963 and another by William Agee, July 22, 1965. There is also an oral history with Jacob Baker conducted by Harlan Phillips, September 25, 1963. Transcripts of the interviews conducted by Harlan Phillips are found within the collection. Collections related to the Federal Art Project include the Federal Art Project of the Work Projects Administration records and the Holger Cahill papers.
Separated Materials:
The Archives of American Art also holds microfilm of material lent for microfilming on reel D110 including exhibition catalogs and clippings. Loaned materials were returned to the lender and are not described in the collection container inventory.
Provenance:
Mildred Baker donated her papers in several increments between 1971 and 1993. In 1999, the bulk of her papers were donated to the archives by Baker's estate executor, Patricia Haskell, some of which included materials that had been loaned for microfilming in 1963.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment. Use of archival audiovisual recordings with no duplicate access copy requires advance notice.
Rights:
The Mildred Baker papers are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Federal aid to the arts  Search this
Art -- Exhibitions -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Arts administrators  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Interviews
Transcripts
Citation:
Mildred Baker papers, 1882, 1923-1997. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.bakemild
See more items in:
Mildred Baker papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-bakemild

Porter A. McCray papers

Creator:
McCray, Porter A., 1908-2000  Search this
Names:
Asia Society  Search this
Byrd Hoffman Foundation  Search this
Cathedral of St. John the Divine (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Cunningham Dance Foundation  Search this
International Council of the Museum of Modern Art (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Japan Society (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Museum of Modern Art (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Society of Architectural Historians  Search this
UNESCO  Search this
United States. Foreign Service  Search this
Cutting, Brock  Search this
Humphrey, Hubert H. (Hubert Horatio), 1911-1978  Search this
Kazuko Oshima  Search this
Morley, Grace, 1900-1985  Search this
Paik, Nam June, 1932-2006  Search this
Richie, Donald, 1924-2013  Search this
Rockefeller, John D., 1906-  Search this
Sherfield, Roger Mellor Makins, Baron, 1904-1996  Search this
Thetong, Tenzin  Search this
Extent:
12.3 Linear feet
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Photographs
Lectures
Interviews
Paintings
Transcripts
Date:
1936-1989
Summary:
The papers of New York City arts administrator Porter A. McCray measure 12.3 linear feet and date from 1936 to 1989. The papers include scattered biographical materials, correspondence, and writings and notes. The bulk of the collection consists of professional files documenting his advisory and consulting work for museums, institutions, organizations, and foundations. Also found within the collection are printed materials and photographs of McCray and artwork.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of New York City arts administrator Porter A. McCray measure 12.3 linear feet and date from 1936 to 1989. The papers include scattered biographical materials, correspondence, and writings and notes. The bulk of the collection consists of professional files documenting his advisory and consulting work for museums, institutions, organizations, and foundations. Also found within the collection are printed materials and photographs of McCray and artwork.

Scattered biographical materials include appointment books, curricula vitae, a transcript of an interview conducted by McCray with Dr. Grace Morley, and an unsigned painting.

Found within the general correspondence are letters that relate to his work as an arts advisor and consultant, but which appear to be more personal in nature. The bulk of correspondence related to specific projects is found within the professional files. Correspondents include Hubert Humphrey, Mrs. John Lockwood, Grace Morely, Kazuko Oshima, Donald Richie, John D. Rockefeller III, and Tenzin Thetong among others.

Writings and notes include lectures by McCray and writings by others including Brock Cutting, Lord Sherfield, and Nam June Paik. Also found are travel notes for McCray's travels throughout Asia, Europe, and the Middle East.

Professional files document McCray's work as an arts advisor and consultant for numerous museums, foundations, organizations, foundations, and special committees, as well as his membership in various arts committees and boards. Files document McCray's work for and/or membership in the Asia Society, Asian Cultural Program of Cultural Exchange, Byrd Hoffman Foundation, Cathedral Church of St. John the Divine, Cunningham Dance Foundation, Indo-United States committees, International Council of Museums, Japan Society, John D. Rockefeller 3rd Fund, Museum of Modern Art, Society of Architectural Historians, UNESCO, and the United States Foreign Service.

Printed materials include clippings and articles, a Drawing and Architecture exhibition catalog, and a book by Robert Wilson. Photographs include personal photographs and oversized photographs of sculptures by an unknown artist.
Arrangement:
This collection is arranged as 6 series.

Series 1: Biographical Materials, 1959-1982 (0.5 linear feet; Box 1)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1959-1986 (0.5 linear feet; Box 1)

Series 3: Writings and Notes, 1960-1983 (1.5 linear feet; Box 2-3)

Series 4: Professional Files, 1936-1987 (8.2 linear feet; Box 3-11, OVS 12-13)

Series 5: Printed Materials, 1965-1989 (0.5 linear feet; Box 11, OV 14)

Series 6: Photographs, 1945-1980s (0.2 linear feet; Box 11, OV 15)
Biographical / Historical:
Porter A. McCray (1908-2000) was an arts administrator working in New York City, New York.

Born in Clarksburg, West Virginia in 1908, McCray recieved a degree in English literature from the Virginia Military Institute in 1930, and a degree in architecture from Yale University in 1941. McCray traveled extensively throughout Europe, Asia, and the Middle East, developing relationships with individuals and organizations across the world.

In 1941, McCray worked as an exhibition specialist in the Office of the Coordinator of Inter-American Affairs and collaborated with the Museum of Modern Art on an American exhibition at the Guatemala National Fair. After serving as an ambulance driver in World War II, he was employed by the architectural firm of Harrison and Abramovitz where he worked on some preliminary designs of the present site of the United Nations.

While working for Harrison, McCray met Nelson Rockefeller, who was chairman of the board of the Museum of Modern Art (MOMA). In 1947, Rockefeller asked McCray to serve as the director of circulating exhibitions at MOMA and be responsible for the Museum's national and international traveling exhibition program. McCray accepted and remained at MOMA until 1961. The following year, he orchestrated the preparation of a MOMA exhibition of Mark Rothko's work in Paris in 1962. In 1963, McCray became the executive director of the JDR 3rd Fund, a non-profit started by John D. Rockefeller III to promote artistic and cultural exchanges between the United States and Asia. McCray also worked as a consultant for the Japan Society's visual arts programs, the Asian Cultural Council, for the dean of the Cathedral Church of St. John the Divine's visual and performing arts program, and for MOMA's International Program after retiring.

McCray died in 2000 in Hightstown, New Jersey.
Related Materials:
Also found at the Archives of American Art is an oral history interview of Porter A. McCray conducted by Paul Cummings from September 17 to October 4, 1977.
Provenance:
The collection was donated in 1994 by Porter McCray.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Washington, D.C. Research Center.
Rights:
The Porter A. McCray papers are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Arts boards  Search this
Cultural relations  Search this
Arts administrators -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Lectures
Interviews
Paintings
Transcripts
Citation:
Porter A. McCray Papers, 1936-1989. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.mccrport
See more items in:
Porter A. McCray papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-mccrport
Additional Online Media:

National Association of Women Artists records

Creator:
National Association of Women Artists (U.S.)  Search this
Names:
Butler Institute of American Art  Search this
Museum of New Mexico  Search this
National Association of Women Painters and Sculptors (U.S.)  Search this
Newark Museum  Search this
Texas Fine Arts Association  Search this
Baker, Mildred, 1905-  Search this
Bobbitt, Vernon L., 1911-1992  Search this
Jerry, Sylvester, 1904-1990  Search this
Morley, Grace, 1900-1985  Search this
Extent:
1.6 Linear feet
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Scrapbooks
Photographs
Date:
1926-1971
Summary:
The records of the National Association of Women Artists measure 1.6 linear feet and date from 1926 to 1971. Found are administrative and membership records from the 1960s, exhibition records, printed material, and three scrapbooks. The bulk of the collection consists of catalogs and correspondence regarding the Association's annual exhibition from 1926 to 1971.
Scope and Contents:
The records of the National Association of Women Artists measure 1.6 linear feet and date from 1926 to 1971. Found are administrative and membership records from the 1960s, exhibition records, printed material, and three scrapbooks. The bulk of the collection consists of catalogs and correspondence regarding the Association's annual exhibition from 1926 to 1971.

NAWA's administrative and membership records includes general writings and notes, board meeting notes, constitution and by-laws, mailing lists, and membership forms from 1963 to 1964.

Exhibition records date from 1926 to 1971 and are not complete. Files may include artist and price lists, catalogs and printed material, correspondence, itineraries, and photographs. Notable correspondents and institutions included are Mildred Baker, Vernon Bobbitt, the Butler Institute of American Art, Sylvester Jerry, Grace Morley, the Museum of New Mexico, the Newark Museum, and the Texas Fine Arts Association.

Additional printed materials include a certificate of community service, press clippings, press releases, and printed material from other art-related sources, such as newsletters and exhibition catalogs.

Three mixed media scrapbooks date from 1951 to 1963. Scrapbooks include photographs, clippings, and exhibition catalogs.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as 4 series.

Series 1: Administrative and Membership Records, 1947-1970 (Box 1; 0.2 linear feet)

Series 2: Exhibition Records, 1926-1971 (Box 1; 0.7 linear feet)

Series 3: Printed Material, 1957-1967 (Box 1; 0.1 linear feet)

Series 4: Scrapbooks, 1951-1963 (BVs 2-4; 0.3 linear feet)
Biographical / Historical:
The National Association of Women Artists (NAWA) was founded in 1889 and remains the oldest women's fine arts organization in the country.

Founded under the name the Woman's Art Club of New York, the National Association of Women Artists established a space for women to exhibit, create work, and learn about art. Artists Anita Ashley, Adele Frances Bedell, Elizabeth S. Cheever, Grace Fitz-Randolph, and Edith Mitchill Preilwitz established the organization in 1889. Also known as the National Association of Women Painters and Sculptors from 1913, NAWA adopted its current name in 1941.

NAWA's annual exhibition of member artworks gained recognition for the association. The organization also promoted membership by sending out traveling exhibitions across the world. The National Association of Women Artist currently has hundreds of members from all across the United States.
Separated Materials:
Additional records on the National Association of Women Artists can be found at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, Metropolitan Museum of Art, Whitney Museum of American Art, Zimmerli Art Museum, Museum of Modern Art, Ryerson & Burnham Libraries, Frick Art Reference Library, New York Public Library, Film and Fine Art Library, and Library of Congress.
Provenance:
Printed material, 1926-1971, donated by Jane Gray, historian for the NAWA, 1971. Scrapbooks donated by the NAWA, 1981, and the traveling exhibition records donated by NAWA, 1980.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Wasington, D.C. Research Center. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Rights:
The National Associaton of Women Artists records are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Occupation:
Women artists -- United States  Search this
Topic:
Traveling exhibitions  Search this
Art -- Societies, etc.  Search this
Arts administrators -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Genre/Form:
Scrapbooks
Photographs
Citation:
National Association of Women Artists records, 1926-1971. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.natiasso
See more items in:
National Association of Women Artists records
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-natiasso

Leon Kroll papers

Creator:
Kroll, Leon, 1884-1974  Search this
Names:
Beal, Gifford, 1879-1956  Search this
Biddle, George, 1885-1973  Search this
Bishop, Isabel, 1902-1988  Search this
Bruce, Edward, 1879-1943  Search this
Faulkner, Barry, 1881-1966  Search this
Glackens, William J., 1870-1938  Search this
Henri, Robert, 1865-1929  Search this
Langsam, Julie  Search this
Manship, Paul, 1885-1966  Search this
Nichols, Hobart, 1869-1962  Search this
Speicher, Eugene Edward, 1883-1962  Search this
Sterne, Maurice, 1878-1957  Search this
Williams, Esther, 1907-1969  Search this
Extent:
7.9 Linear feet
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Sketchbooks
Writings
Photographs
Sketches
Date:
1905-1974
Summary:
The papers of realist painter, muralist, and art instructor Leon Kroll date from 1905 to 1974 and measure 7.9 linear feet. The collection documents Kroll's painting career, teaching, and active participation in numerous art organizations. Over one-half of the collection is correspondence with artists, schools, galleries, museums, patrons, arts organizations, and others. Also found are scattered biographical material, writings and notes, legal and financial records, exhibition catalogs, clippings, other printed material, photographs of Kroll and colleagues, loose drawings and nine sketchbooks.
Scope and Content Note:
The papers of realist painter, muralist, and art instructor Leon Kroll date from 1905 to 1974 and measure 7.9 linear feet. The collection documents Kroll's painting career, teaching, and active participation in numerous art organizations. Over one-half of the collection is correspondence with artists, schools, galleries, museums, patrons, arts organizations, and others. Also found are scattered biographical material, writings and notes, legal and financial records, exhibition catalogs, clippings, other printed material, photographs of Kroll and colleagues, loose drawings, and nine sketchbooks.

Biographical material contains chronologies, biographical essays, awards, price lists, interview transcripts, and a file about the Committee on Government and Art. More than one-half of the collection consists of Kroll's personal and professional correspondence with artists such as Gifford Beal, George Biddle, Isabel Bishop, Barry Faulkner, William Glackens, Robert Henri, Paul Manship, Hobart Nichols, Eugene Speicher, Maurice Stern, Esther Williams, and many others. Additional correspondence is with art critics, curators, dealers, students, patrons, schools, museums, and numerous arts organizations. There is also extensive correspondence with arts administrators regarding government art projects, especially his friend and fellow artist Edward Bruce, Director of the U. S. Treasury Department's Section for Fine Arts.

Writings and notes by Leon Kroll including autobiographical essays, drafts of lectures and speeches, lists, and other scattered notes. Also found is a small amount of writings by others, including an essay by Julia Langsam describing her experience as an artist's model for Kroll. Legal and financial records include contracts, loan agreement, art sales receipts, and several ledgers recording consignments and monthly receipts and expenditures. One ledger specifically documents financial transactions for his mural commissions for the Justice Department and the Worcester War Memorial.

Printed material contains numerous news clippings about Kroll and his work and includes several articles written by Kroll. Also found are exhibition announcements and catalogs for Kroll's solo exhibitions, material about the Worcester War memorial, and miscellaneous printed items.

Photographs include one of Kroll with his family, Kroll in his studio and working on murals, and several of him with other artists as jurors for art exhibitions. Artists depicted include Isabel Bishop, Reginal Marsh, John Sloan, Raphael Soyer, Eugene Speicher, and others. Also found are photographs of Edward Bruce, as well as photographs of exhibitions, artwork by Leon Kroll, and artwork by others. All of the original artwork in this collection is by Leon Kroll and includes loose drawings and nine sketchbooks containing drawings of landscapes, figures, portraits, and animals.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged into 7 series:

Series 1: Biographical Material, 1906-1969 (Box 1; 0.2 linear feet)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1905-1973 (Box 1-4; 3.6 linear feet)

Series 3: Writings and Notes, 1932-1972 (Box 4-5; 0.5 linear feet)

Series 4: Legal and Financial Records, 1921-1974 (Box 5; 0.6 linear feet)

Series 5: Printed Material, 1924-1972 (Box 5-6; 0.4 linear feet)

Series 6: Photographs, circa 1900s-1960s (Box 6; 0.4 linear feet)

Series 7: Artwork, 1911-circa 1950s (Box 6; 0.3 linear feet)
Biographical Note:
Leon Kroll (1884-1974) of New York, N.Y., was a painter.

Leon Kroll was born in New York City in 1884. As a teenager he attended classes at the Art Students League and studied painting with John Henry Twachtman. In the early 1900s he began taking classes at the National Academy of Design, where he won student prizes, and had his first major exhibition in 1906. In 1908 he won a scholarship to study art in Paris and attended the Académie Julian, studying at the atelier of Jean-Paul Laurens. Through he practiced realism, Kroll was also influenced by French impressionist painters, specifically Paul Cézanne. While in Paris he also met Genevieve (Viette) Domec. They married later in 1923 and had one daughter, Marie-Claude.

Upon his return to New York in 1910, Kroll had a one man show of his Paris work at the National Academy where he received critical acclaim. The next year he began teaching at the National Academy of Design. During his career, he also taught at the Maryland Institute, Art Institute of Chicago, the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts, and was a guest instructor and lecturer at several other schools.

Kroll was part of a circle of New York artists that included several members of "The Eight", and he was especially close with Robert Henri, William Glackens, George Bellows, and Eugene Speicher. During his time in Europe he also became friends with Marc Chagall and Robert and Sonia Delaunay. He exhibited at the Armory Show in 1913 and during the next few decades won numerous major national and international prizes in painting, including first prize at the 1936 Carnegie International Exhibition. He had his first retrospective exhibition at the Worcester Art Museum in 1937. Kroll was especially known for his paintings of female nudes, but also painted New York City street scenes, New England landscapes, and portraits. Beginning in the late 1930s he was commissioned to paint murals at public buildings including, among others, the U. S. Department of Justice Building, the war memorial in Worcester, Massachusetts, and the auditorium at Johns Hopkins University.

Throughout his career Kroll was a very active member of professional arts organizations. He was an Associate and later a Academician at the National Academy of Design, and his memberships included the New Society of Artists; American Society of Painters, Sculptors, and Gravers; Artists Equity Association; Four Arts Aid Association; and the National Institute of Arts and Letters among others. He also served as a board officer for many of these organizations. Kroll was active in the federal arts programs from the 1930s to the 1950s and close friends with Edward Bruce, director of the U.S. Treasury Department's Section for Fine Arts.

Kroll maintained a studio in New York City and spent summers at his home and studio at Folly Cove, Gloucester, Massachusetts. Leon Kroll died in 1974 at the age of 89.
Provenance:
Leon Kroll donated a portion of his papers in 1968. His widow, Genevieve Kroll, donated the rest of the papers in 1976.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment.
Rights:
The Leon Kroll papers are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Art patronage  Search this
Art -- Economic aspects  Search this
Art teachers -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Artists' studios -- Photographs  Search this
Painting, American  Search this
Muralists -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Painters -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Art and state  Search this
Artists' models  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sketchbooks
Writings
Photographs
Sketches
Citation:
Leon Kroll papers, 1905-1974. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.krolleon
See more items in:
Leon Kroll papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-krolleon
Additional Online Media:

Richard Haas papers

Creator:
Haas, Richard, 1936-  Search this
Extent:
6 Linear feet
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Watercolors
Sketchbooks
Travel diaries
Drawings
Sketches
Photographs
Date:
1937-2012
Summary:
The Richard Haas papers measure 6 linear feet and are dated 1937 to 2012, bulk 1970-2012. His work and career as a muralist, printmaker, and educator are documented by correspondence, writings, printed material, sketchbooks, and photographs.
Scope and Content Note:
The Richard Haas papers measure 6 linear feet and are dated 1937 to 2012, bulk 1970-2012. His work and career as a muralist, printmaker, and educator are documented by correspondence, writings, printed material, sketchbooks, and photographs.

Haas's correspondence relates to commissions, exhibitions, lectures, publications, teaching, and other professional activities. Correspondents include clients, galleries, professional organizations, critics, artists, architects and others. Also found is small amount of personal correspondence. Writings and notes by Haas include artist's statements, notes, lectures, a travel diary, papers and class notes from his undergraduate and graduate student days. Writings about him are a New Museum exhibition catalog text and a student paper. Subject files relate to Haas's professional activities and interests. They document exhibitions and projects, relationships with galleries, membership and participation in various organizations, and routine business matters. Sketchbooks (17 volumes) contain drawings, sketches, and a few watercolors, along with scattered writings and notes.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as 8 series:

Series 1: Biographical Materials, 1990, 2009 (Box 1; 0.1 linear feet)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1964-2008 (Box 1; 1 linear feet)

Series 3: Writings and Notes, circa 1954-2012 (Box 2; 0.8 linear feet)

Series 4: Subject Files, 1970-2011 (Boxes 2-4; 2.2 linear feet)

Series 5: Printed Material, 1956-2012 (Boxes 5-6; 1.2 linear feet)

Series 6: Artwork, 1954-2005 (Box 6; 0.1 linear feet)

Series 7: Sketchbooks, 1976-2009 (Box 6; 0.5 linear feet)

Series 8: Photographs, 1937-2006 (Box 6; 0.1 linear feet)
Biographical Note:
Richard Haas (b. 1936) is a mural painter of "architecture of illusion," his term describing the trompe l'oeil architectural subjects for which he is best known. His work as a printmaker also focuses on architecture, with iconic buildings of New York and other cities serving as subject matter. Hass is also an educator who has taught painting and printmaking at University of Minnesota, Michigan State University, Bennington College in Vermont, and School of Visual Arts in New York City.

During World War II, the Haas family moved from Spring Green, Wisconsin to Milwaukee. As a teenager, Richard spent two summers working with his great uncle, a master stone mason employed by Frank Lloyd Wright at Taliesin. He proved to be less interested in stonework than in exploring Wright's library and watching the young architects draw. He considered becoming an architect, but eventually concluded the artistic side of architecture was more attractive than the day to day work of an architect.

After graduating from the University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee (B.S., 1959), Hass worked as an art teacher in a Milwaukee high school. He attended graduate classes at University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee where visiting artist Jack Tworkov was his teacher. At the University of Minnesota (M.F.A., 1964), Haas studied with Peter Busa and Malcolm Myers. As an assistant professor at Michigan State University from 1964 to 1968, Haas's colleagues included Angelo Ippolito and Charles Pollock, and he met a number of important artists and critics who visited the campus. Haas moved to New York City in 1968 and soon accepted a part-time position teaching printmaking at Bennington College. He commuted weekly between New York and Vermont for the next decade.

During the 1960s Haas was a Color-field painter. He also continued making etchings and lithographs, and by 1970 several galleries were selling his architectural prints. His first outdoor mural, painted in the So Ho section of New York City in 1975, attracted attention and commissions followed. Mural commissions include: Boston Architectural Center (1977); Edison Bothers Store, Inc., St. Louis (1984); Home Savings of America, multiple locations in Florida and California (1990-1991); City of Huntsville, Texas (1991); Federal Building and Courthouse, Kansas City, Kansas (1994); and Yorkville Mural, New York City (2004.)

Haas, who began exhibiting while still a student, has participated in a large number of group shows and enjoyed many solo exhibitions. He was elected a National Academician, National Academy of Design, was granted a Guggenheim Fellowship, and has been a MacDowell Fellow. Among other honors, Haas has received the American Institute of Architects Medal of Honor, New York City Municipal Art Society Award, Doris C. Freedman Award for Public Art, and the Jimmy Ernst Award of the American Academy of Arts and Letters.

Mr. Haas, who works in New York City, is represented by David Findlay, Jr. Gallery. His wife, Katherine Sokolnikoff, is a sculptor and arts administrator; they live in Yonkers, New York.
Related Material:
An interview of Richard Haas conducted January 13 and March 16, 2009, by Avis Berman, for the Archives of American Art's U.S. General Services Administration, Design Excellence and the Arts oral history project, at Haas' studio, in New York, N.Y.
Provenance:
Donated by Richard Haas in 2012.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment.
Rights:
The Richard Haas papers are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Educators -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Printmakers -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Muralists -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Art -- Study and teaching  Search this
Genre/Form:
Watercolors
Sketchbooks
Travel diaries
Drawings
Sketches
Photographs
Citation:
Richard Haas papers, 1937-2012, bulk 1970-2012. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.haasrich
See more items in:
Richard Haas papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-haasrich

Andrew Carnduff Ritchie papers

Creator:
Ritchie, Andrew Carnduff  Search this
Names:
Allied Forces. Supreme Headquarters. Monuments, Fine Arts and Archives Section  Search this
College Art Association of America  Search this
Museum of Modern Art (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Yale University. Art Gallery  Search this
Afro, 1912-1976  Search this
Calder, Alexander, 1898-1976  Search this
Hadzi, Dimitri, 1921-2006  Search this
Lynes, Russell, 1910-1991  Search this
Namuth, Hans  Search this
Paolozzi, Eduardo, 1924-2005  Search this
Ritchie, Jane  Search this
Roszak, Theodore, 1907-1981  Search this
Extent:
10.3 Linear feet
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Photographs
Date:
1907-1983
Summary:
The papers of museum director, professor, writer, and post-World War II Monuments Men Andrew Carnduff Ritchie measure 10.3 linear feet and date from 1907 to 1983. Found within the papers are biographical material, including materials and photographs concerning his military service in the Monuments, Fine Arts, and Archives Section of the U.S. Army; correspondence, including letters from numerous artists; writings; committee and organization files; exhibition and project files, teaching files; printed material; and photographs, including portrait images of Ritchie taken by Hans Namuth.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of museum director, professor, writer, and post-World War II Monuments Men Andrew Carnduff Ritchie measure 10.3 linear feet and date from 1907 to 1983. Found within the papers are biographical material, including materials and photographs concerning his military service in the Monuments, Fine Arts, and Archives Section of the U.S. Army; correspondence, including letters from numerous artists; writings; committee and organization files; exhibition and project files, teaching files; printed material; and photographs, including portrait images of Ritchie taken by Hans Namuth.

Biographical materials include birth certificates, passports, academic records, biographical profiles, and awards. There are files documenting Andrew Carnduff Ritchie's post-World War II military service in 1945-1946 as a "Monuments Men" in the Monuments, Fine Arts, and Archives (MFAA) section of the U.S. Army, including correspondence, forms, reports, photographs (including 7 of paintings looted from Holland), and awards. There is also a file on the Fogg conference on the emergency protection of artwork dated 1939-1942 and one file regarding the Frick Collection's orders for protecting art. There is also a folder of material on his wife Jane Ritchie.

Alphabetical and chronological correspondence is with artists, museums, galleries, universities, and colleagues. The bulk of the alphabetical correspondence consists of letters from artists such as Afro, Alexander Calder, Dimitri Hadzi, Russell Lynes, Eduardo Paolozzi, Theodore Roszak, and others. There are also condolence letters addressed to Jane Ritchie. Chronological correspondence includes Ritchie's correspondence on the subject of travels, lectures, projects, and exhibitions.

Writings include one disbound notebook, papers from college and graduate studies, lecture drafts, outlines, and notes. There are a few writings by others.

Committee and organization files document Ritchie's work on advisory panels, trustee boards, councils, board of directors, and committees. There are meeting minutes, bulletins, reports, studies, and correspondence. Some of the more voluminous files include the College Art Association's study on "The Visual Arts in Higher Education" as well as the Museum of Modern Art's committee on museum collections.

Exhibition and project files include correspondence, printed material, photographs, catalogs, and assorted documents. Among the projects and exhibitions in this series are Ritchie's work on the Alfred E. Burr Memorial in Connecticut and the Middelheim Sculpture exhibition.

Teaching files contain correspondence, program outlines, course materials, recommendations, and a few student papers from universities and programs where Ritchie taught, including Yale University Art Gallery.

Printed material consists of news clippings, some of which are arranged by subject, along with articles by Andrew Ritchie, press releases, magazines, bulletins, and a few exhibition catalogs.

Photographs are of Andrew Ritchie, and of friends and artists at various art openings and events. There is one small album of photographs of a birthday party for Jane Ritchie. Also included are photographs of artwork.
Arrangement:
This collection is arranged as 8 series.

Series 1: Biographical Material, 1907-1978 (0.5 linear feet; Box 1, OV 11)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1928-1983 (2.2 linear feet; Boxes 1-3)

Series 3: Writings, 1927-1978 (2.9 linear feet; Boxes 3-6, OV 11)

Series 4: Committee and Organization Files, 1948-1971 (1.2 linear feet; Boxes 6-7)

Series 5: Exhibition and Project Files, 1949-1978 (1.6 linear feet; Boxes 7-9, OV 12)

Series 6: Teaching Files, 1957-1974 (0.5 linear feet; Box 9)

Series 7: Printed Material, 1928-1978 (0.5 linear feet; Boxes 9-10)

Series 8: Photographs, 1935-1982 (O.9 linear feet; Box 10, OV 13)
Biographical / Historical:
Andrew Carnduff Ritchie (1907-1978) was a museum director, professor, and art historian based in New York and Connecticut. He served as director of the Albright Knox Gallery in Buffalo, N.Y., director of Painting and Sculpture at the Museum of Modern Art, and director of the Yale University Art Gallery.

Andrew Carnduff Ritchie was born in Bellshill, Scotland, in 1907 to Andrew and Jeanie Gilchrist Ritchie. The family immigrated to the United States when he was 15 and settled in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. He attended the University of Pittsburgh and received a bachelor's and master of arts degrees in medieval art, and his doctoral degree from the University of London in 1935. That same year, he married Jane Thompson.

From 1935 to 1942, Ritchie was a researcher and lecturer at the Frick Collection in New York City and faculty member at New York University, as well as a visiting lecturer at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland.

In 1942, Ritchie was appointed director of the Albright Knox Gallery in Buffalo, New York where he stayed until 1949 when he became the director of Painting and Sculpture at the Museum of Modern Art.

In 1945-1946, directly following World War II, Ritchie served with the U.S. Army's Monuments, Fine Arts, and Archives section in Austria and helped with the restitution of art looted by the Nazis, returning paintings and cultural artifacts back to their country of origin. He was later honored by France and the Netherlands for this work.

In 1957, Ritchie accepted the postion of director of the Yale University Art Gallery where he stayed until 1971. While there, he acquired notable works of art for the Gallery's collections by David Smith, Noguchi, and Maillol. Thanks to Ritchie's efforts and guidance, art collector and patron Paul Mellon donated his collection of British art and established the Yale Center for British Studies. In 1971, Ritchie also became the Clark Professor at Williams College, Massachusetts, and, in 1972, he was a visiting professor at the University of Sydney, Australia. Ritchie retired from Yale in 1973.

Ritchie was also awarded honorary doctorates from the University of Pittsburgh and the Royal College of Art in London. He wrote several books over the course of his career and passed away in Canaan, Connecticut, in 1978.
Related Materials:
Among the holding at the Archives of American Art is an interview of Andrew Carnduff Ritchie conducted in 1977 June 16-17 by Paul Cummings.

The Albright-Knox Gallery Archives in Buffalo, New York has a collection of Andrew Carnduff Ritchie papers, which include administrative records and correspondence.
Provenance:
This collection was donated in multiple installments in 1979 and 1981 by Andrew Ritchie's widow, Jane T. Ritchie, and by her estate in 1986. Five letters from Alfred Hamilton Barr to Andrew and Jane Ritchie were donated in 1974 by Andrew Ritchie through Russell Lynes.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. research facility.
Rights:
The Andrew Carnduff Ritchie papers are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Occupation:
Arts administrators -- Connecticut -- Canaan  Search this
Educators -- Connecticut -- Canaan  Search this
Topic:
World War, 1939-1945 -- Destruction and pillage -- Europe  Search this
World War, 1939-1945 -- Confiscations and contributions -- Germany  Search this
Art treasures in war -- Netherlands -- History -- 20th century  Search this
Art thefts -- Germany -- History -- 20th century  Search this
World War, 1939-1945 -- Art and the war  Search this
Cultural property -- Protection -- Europe -- History -- 20th century  Search this
Art -- Study and teaching  Search this
Museum directors -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Authors -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Citation:
Andrew Carnduff Ritchie papers, 1907-1983. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.ritcandr2
See more items in:
Andrew Carnduff Ritchie papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-ritcandr2

Fine Arts Federation of New York records

Creator:
Fine Arts Federation of New York  Search this
Extent:
15.2 Linear feet
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Scrapbooks
Photographs
Date:
1895-2005
Summary:
The records of the Fine Arts Federation of New York, a consortium of New York City arts and architecture organizations, measure 15.2 linear feet and date from 1895-2005, bulk 1935-2002. The Federation's activities on behalf of the interests of the constituent organizations and the greater community are documented through officers' files, correspondence, administrative records, scattered printed materials, and scrapbooks.
Scope and Content Note:
The records of the Fine Arts Federation of New York, a consortium of New York City arts and architecture organizations, measure 15.2 linear feet and date from 1895-2005, bulk 1935-2002. The Federation's activities on behalf of the interests of the constituent organizations and the greater community are documented through officers' files, correspondence, administrative records, scattered printed materials, and scrapbooks.

The records do not span the entire history of the F.A.F.; records prior to 1935 are few and scattered. Generally, the records document the activities of those officers' who served terms from the mid-20th century to the end of the century, and who maintained and donated their files to the Archives of American Art.

Presidents' Files contain scattered correspondence of F.A.F. presidents from 1935-early 1950s, and the files maintained or collated during presidental tenures from the 1970s and the 1990s-2000s. Secretaries' Files contain scattered records of various F.A.F. secretaries from the 1930s-early 1950s, and the files maintained or collated during particular secretaries' tenures from 1952-late 1970s and the early 2000s. Records in both series contain a variety of materials including administrative records, correspondence, meetings records, and subject files. Treasurers' Files include correspondence, two financial ledgers, lists of membership dues, and tax-related materials from 1915-1967.

The bulk of the Correspondence Series ranges from the 1930s-1960s and contains correspondence from constituent societies, special committees, and standing committees, as well as some miscellaneous chronological correspondence. Administrative Records include records related to the F.A.F. constitution and by-laws; meeting minutes and ancillary records; and project files from the late 1980s. Printed Materials include scattered announcements, catalogs, clippings, and pamphlets from the late 20th century to 2000s. Folders containing various types of records with little discernable order, a mélange of correspondence, drafts, meeting minutes, mimeographs, notes, reports, scattered clippings, transcriptions, and other documents, the bulk from the mid-1930s-1950s, comprise the Miscellaneous Series. There are also two photo scrapbooks documenting two separate events held in 1995.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as 8 series:

Series 1: Presidents' Files, 1935-2002 (Boxes 1-3; 2.9 linear feet)

Series 2: Secretaries' Files, 1900-2002 (Boxes 3-9; 5.1 linear feet)

Series 3: Treasurers' Files, 1915-1967 (Box 9; 0.75 linear feet)

Series 4: Correspondence, circa 1914-2004, bulk 1930s-1967 (Boxes 9-12; 2.75 linear feet)

Series 5: Administrative Records, 1895, 1897, 1935-2005 (Boxes 12-14; 1.9 linear feet)

Series 6: Printed Materials, 1971-2005 (Box 14; 6 folders)

Series 7: Miscellaneous, 1914-1966, bulk mid-1930s-1950s (Boxes 14-15; 1.6 linear feet)

Series 8: Scrapbooks, 1995 (Box 16; 2 folders)
Historical Note:
The Fine Arts Federation of New York was established in 1895 "to ensure united action by the Art Societies of New York in all matters affecting their common interests; and to foster and protect the artistic interests of the community."

A consortium of New York City arts and architecture organizations, the F.A.F. has been responsible for saving historic buildings, promoting the arts, and providing a vision of the city's architectural future. The F.A.F. also provided delegate nominations to the New York City mayor for the Art Commission, a panel of architects and artists who reviewed proposed development to public property.

Presidents and other officers of the F.A.F. included Joseph H. Freedlander (1935-1937), A. F. Brinckerhoff (1937-1939), James C. Mackenzie (1940-1941), Wheeler William (1943, 1946-1948), Howard Greenley (Vice President, 1943-1944), Charles Downing Lay (Acting President, 1945), Richard Bach (1948-1950), Harvey Stevenson (1950-1951?), Giorgio Cavaglieri (1971-1974; 2001-2002), Margot Gayle (1974-1977), Nanne Wollmann (1992?-1994?), Roy Gussow (1996?-1997), and Lorrie Goulet (1997-2001), among others.

For many years in the mid-20th century, the Fine Arts Federation was located in the Architectural League of New York building on East 40th Street.
Related Material:
Additional records related to the Fine Arts Federation of New York are found in the Architectural League of New York records, 1880s-1974.
Separated Material:
The Fine Arts Federation loaned materials to the Archives of American Art for microfilming in 1970 which are available on microfilm reel N70/16 and by interlibrary loan. These materials were not included in later donations and are not described in the container listing of this finding aid. They include correspondence with or related to the Municipal Art Society, mostly about the nomination of delegates to the F.A.F. and appointments to the New York City Art Commission and the mayor's Panel of Architects, 1961-1967; annual and semi-annual meeting reports for 1961-1965, and 1967; and an address by J. Roy Carroll, president of the American Institute of Architects, to the officers and board of the F.A.F., November 1963, concerning the artists-architect's role in society.
Provenance:
The Fine Arts Federation loaned materials for microfilming in 1968 and 1970; these same records were later donated, along with multiple accretions from 1978-2007 by former officers of the F.A.F., including Minor Bishop, Giorgio Cavaglieri, Margot Gayle, Lorrie Goulet, Katherine Thayer Hobson, Henriette Nathan, and Nanne Wollmann.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment. Use of archival audiovisual recordings and electronic records with no duplicate access copy requires advance notice.
Rights:
The Fine Arts Federation of New York records are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Art, American  Search this
Arts administrators  Search this
Art -- Societies, etc. -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Genre/Form:
Scrapbooks
Photographs
Citation:
Fine Arts Federation of New York, 1895-2005, bulk 1935-2002. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.fineafny
See more items in:
Fine Arts Federation of New York records
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-fineafny

Charles M. Kurtz papers

Creator:
Kurtz, Charles M. (Charles McMeen), 1855-1909  Search this
Names:
Albright Art Gallery (Buffalo, N.Y.)  Search this
American Art Association  Search this
Buffalo Fine Arts Academy  Search this
Exposition universelle internationale de 1900 (Paris, France)  Search this
Louisiana Purchase Exposition (1904: Saint Louis, Mo.)  Search this
National Academy of Design (U.S.)  Search this
Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts  Search this
Saint Louis Exposition and Music Hall Association (1883-1902 : Saint Louis, Mo.)  Search this
Southern Exposition (1885 : Louisville, Ky.)  Search this
World's Columbian Exposition, Chicago, 1893  Search this
Starkweather family  Search this
Abbey, Edwin Austin, 1852-1911  Search this
Avery, Samuel Putnam, 1822-1904  Search this
Cesnola, Luigi Palma di, 1832-1904  Search this
Clarke, Thomas B. (Thomas Benedict), 1848-1931  Search this
Hallowell, Sara  Search this
Hambidge, Jay, 1867-1924  Search this
Hasbrouck, Du Bois Fenelon, b.1860  Search this
Irwin, Benoni, 1840-1896  Search this
Ives, Halsey Cooley, 1847-1911  Search this
Kurtz, Davis Brook Kurtz, 1826-1906  Search this
Kurtz, Julia Stephenson  Search this
Reid, Alexander  Search this
Rhodes, Charles Ward, d. 1905  Search this
Richardson, Mary Curtis, 1848-1931  Search this
Sedelmeyer, Charles  Search this
Thum, Patty P., 1853-1926  Search this
Wanamaker, John, 1838-1922  Search this
Wickenden, Robert J.  Search this
Photographer:
Pluschow, Guglielmo  Search this
Extent:
27.74 Linear feet
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Menus
Photographs
Lithographs
Etchings
Address books
Engravings
Visiting cards
Diaries
Photogravures
Tempera paintings
Oil paintings
Sketches
Date:
1843-1990
bulk 1884-1909
Summary:
The papers of arts administrator, museum director, collector, dealer, and editor Charles M. Kurtz (1855-1909), measure 27.74 linear feet and date from 1843-1990 (bulk dates 1884-1909). The bulk of the collection consists of detailed chronological correspondence between Kurtz and his wife and family, friends, colleagues, and business associates that documents many notable exhibitions, galleries, museums, private collections, as well as cities, people, and events of the period. Also found in the collection are Kurtz's diaries, scrapbooks, printed materials, and photographs.
Scope and Content Note:
The Charles M. Kurtz papers measure 27.74 linear feet and date from 1843 to 1990 with the bulk of the material dating from 1884 to 1909. The bulk of the collection consists of chronological correspondence between Kurtz and his family, most notably his wife, friends, colleagues, and business associates. Kurtz's letters are amazingly detailed and document many notable exhibitions, galleries, museums, private collections, as well as cities, people, and events of the period. The letters between Kurtz and his wife are most interesting for their descriptive commentary on late 19th century life and offer a complete picture of Kurtz's activities. Many of Kurtz's letters to Halsey C. Ives can be found in the Halsey C. Ives Papers. Some of the letters in the collection are illustrated. Also found in the collection are Kurtz's diaries, scrapbooks, printed materials, and photographs.
Arrangement:
The collection is organized into twelve series.

Series 1: Biographical Information, 1885-1931, undated

Series 2: Correspondence, 1843-1940, undated

Series 3: Circulars/Requests for Submissions of Works of Art, 1886-1905

Series 4: Legal Records, 1881-1928

Series 5: Financial Records, 1870-1989, undated

Series 6: Diaries, 1894-1901

Series 7: Notes and Writings, 1872-1980, undated

Series 8: Scrapbooks, 1878-1909

Series 9: Printed Material, 1873-1990, undated

Series 10: Photographs, 1898-1990

Series 11: Photographs of Works of Art, undated

Series 12: Miscellany, undated
Biographical Note:
Charles M. Kurtz's name is known to many scholars and students of American art history. To some he is important for his critical writings, others are interested in his management of exhibitions for the Art Union and the American Art Association. Many are aware of him because of his publication of National Academy Notes, which continued for nine years. Still others are familiar with Kurtz in his role as an art administrator for late 19th century art exhibitions like those at the 1893 Columbian Exposition in Chicago and the St. Louis Fair, or for his accomplishments as the first director of the Albright Gallery in Buffalo, New York. Sometimes researchers have become familiar with his name through the sale catalogue for his considerable collection, which was sold at auction after his death in 1909. His career, which encompassed the last quarter of the nineteenth century and the first decade of the twentieth century, touched on virtually every aspect of art in America during that period.

Born in 1853 to Davis Brook Kurtz (1826-1906), an attorney, and Julia Wilder, Charles Kurtz enjoyed a genteel upbringing. The Kurtz family originated in Darmstadt, Germany, and migrated to America in the eighteenth century. D.B. Kurtz, a leading member of the Lawrence County bar, was also a vice-president of the National Bank of Lawrence County, Pennsylvania. As a local representative of many important railroad and business interests, he accumulated assets estimated at one million dollars by the time of his death, just three years before that of his son, Charles, the eldest of his five children. Unlike his brothers Louis, who also became an attorney, and Edward, a professor at Columbia University, Charles eschewed a professional career to enter the art world, as did his sisters Emily, an artist, and Catherine, a musician.

After his graduation from Washington and Jefferson College in Washington, Pennsylvania, Kurtz visited the Centennial Exposition, held in 1876 in Philadelphia, before coming to New York to study art at the National Academy of Design. These two activities foreshadowed the direction that his career would eventually take. As the chronology indicates, his early efforts revolve around writing for a variety of publications, most notably, his own National Academy Notes. In 1881 he took what was to be the first of many trips abroad to survey the art scene in Europe. Later in his career, his fascination with foreign art and his own entrepeneurial interests led him to become an outspoken opponent of tariffs on imported art.

Kurtz's personal life changed significantly in 1884 when he met Julia Stephenson, a physician's daughter and fledging art student from Harrodsburg, Kentucky. Throughout their courtship and after their marriage the couple was frequently separated. Consequently, they wrote lengthy letters which document not only their personal relationship but also Kurtz's aspirations and activities in the art world.

With his appointment as one of Halsey C. Ives's (1847-1911) chief assistants of the Fine Arts Department of the World's Columbian Exposition in 1891, Charles Kurtz's career achieved international stature. Among the most notable European artists he introduced into this country through circulating exhibitions were the Glasgow School, the Danish School, the Hungarian artist, Mihaly Munkacsy, and the subject of his final exhibition, the Spanish artist, Sorolla.

Throughout his life, Kurtz was plagued by health problems and, in 1899, illness forced him to resign as Assistant Director of Fine Arts for the United States for the Paris Exposition of 1900. Throughout the following decade, his work was increasingly interrupted by ill health. His death in 1909 at the age of 54, while sudden, was not entirely unexpected. However it most certainly cut short a cosmopolitan career that encompassed virtually every aspect of the art world and the pertinent issues of the day.

Kurtz is remembered for his editorial work with the National Academy of Design; as Art Director for the Southern Exposition, 1883-1886, and the St. Louis Exposition, 1894-1899 (where he introduced the Glasgow School of Painting); and as Assistant Chief/Director for the World's Columbian Exposition, the 1900 Paris Exposition, and the 1904 Louisiana Purchase Exposition. He was also director of the Buffalo Fine Arts Academy.

1855 -- Charles McMeen Kurtz born

1876 -- receives B.S. degree from Washington and Jefferson College, Washington, Pennsylvania

1876-78 -- studies at the National Academy of Design, N.Y. with Lemuel Wilmarth and William Morgan; writes a column, "New York Letters," for The Courant published in New Castle, Pennsylvania

1878 -- edits a small daily paper published during a "National Camp Meeting for the promotion of Holiness" held that summer in New Castle, Pa.; its critical stance resulted in his public denouncement and earned him a reputation as a journalist in western Pennsylvania; receives M.A. from Washington and Jefferson College

1878-79 -- becomes the local editor of The Guardian of New Castle

1879 -- publishes The Daily Reporter, a financial success

1881 -- publishes the first issue of National Academy Notes; travels in Europe, spending time in England, Holland, Belgium, Germany, Switzerland, Italy and France (Paris)

1881-82 -- prepares Illustrated Notes for Metropolitan Museum of Art exhibition

1882 -- writes "Art Notes" in The New York Tribune and resigns Dec. 23rd

1882-83 -- accepts position to write for Music and Drama, a new daily paper

1883 -- becomes the general manager of the American Art Union; exhibits a large collection of Art Union paintings in Buffalo, N.Y. and Louisville, Ky., where they became part of the Southern Exposition's first great art display

1883-86 -- accepts offer to become Director of the Art Department, Southern Exposition, Louisville, Kentucky

1884 -- edits Art Union magazine until December; applies for position to head the Art Department of the New Orleans World's Fair in September

1884-86 -- accepts a position offered by the American Art Association; terminates uncongenial relationship in March, 1886

1885 -- writes catalogues for the sale of the George Seney Collection and for the Watts exhibition at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; October 1, marries Julia Stephenson (1861-1931), daughter of Dr. A. T. Stephenson of Harrodsburg, Kentucky; they had two daughters who survived them: Julia Wilder Kurtz (1889-1977), and Isabella Starkweather Kurtz (1901-1991); another daughter, Elizabeth Stephenson Kurtz (1886-1897), predeceased them

1886 -- terminates employment with the Art Association; daughter, Elizabeth Stephenson Kurtz, born

1886-87 -- manages the circulation of Mihaly Munkacsy's Christ Before Pilot for Charles Sedelmeyer to American venues: New York, Boston, St. Louis, Cincinnati, Kansas City, Minneapolis, Saint Paul, Nashville, Phildelphia, Indianapolis; tour generates $90,000 in ticket receipts

1889-91 -- February 24, appointed art critic ("Art Notes") and book reviewer for New York Daily Star; later literary and art editor of the Sunday Star

1890 -- writes for the Sunday edition The Press, a New York paper

1891 -- writes for The World; art editor for The New York Recorder; contributes to the New York Truth

1891-93 -- contributes to Chicago Evening Post ; writes artist biographies for The Chicago Graphic, a regional magazine; appointed Assistant Chief of the Department of Fine Arts of the World's Columbian Exposition

1894 -- contributes column, "Art at the Exposition" to St. Louis Life

1895 -- tours Denmark, Scotland, and France during the summer on behalf of the St. Louis Exposition

1894-99 -- appointed Director of the Art Department of the St. Louis Annual Exposition

1896 -- elected member of The Japan Society, London

1897 -- daughter, Elizabeth (Daisy), dies

1898 -- receives a diploma and medal "in recognition of valuable services in connection with the Fine Arts Exhibit" from the directors of the Trans-Mississippi International Exposition, Omaha

1899 -- appointed Assistant Director of Fine Arts for the United States Commission to the Paris Exposition of 1900; resigned in July due to ill health

1901-04 -- appointed Assistant Chief of the Department of Art of the Louisiana Purchase Exposition, August

1901 -- daughter, Isabella Starkweather Kurtz, born

1902 -- receives honorary Ph.D from Washington and Jefferson College "in recognition of distinguished ability and services as an art critic and writer"

1905 -- receives the cross of the Order of Merit from Prince Ferdinand of Bulgaria; appointed Director, Buffalo Fine Arts Academy and Albright Art Gallery, Buffalo, New York, in January; exhibits Glasgow paintings at Albright Art Gallery from November until the following April

1906 -- writes Academy Notes, a bulletin pubished by the Buffalo Fine Arts Academy and the Albright Art Gallery; father, D.B. Kurtz, dies in Newcastle, Pennsylvania

1907 -- accused of importing German pictures free of duty for exhibition purposes and then selling some for profit

1908 -- Honorary Doctor of Philosophy degree conferred by Washington and Jefferson College

1909 -- Charles M. Kurtz dies in Buffalo, New York on March 21

1910 -- Sale of the private collection of Charles M. Kurtz at auction, Fifth Avenue Art Galleries, February 24-25

1931 -- Widow, Julia Stephenson Kurtz dies October 30

1977 -- Daughter, Julia Wilder Kurtz, dies

1991 -- Daughter, Isabel Starkweather Kurtz, dies in Buffalo, N.Y.; remaining Charles M. Kurtz Papers bequeathed to the Archives of American Art and the National Academy of Design, New York
Related Material:
The St. Louis Exposition/Halsey C. Ives papers in the Archives of American Art contain material relating to Charles M. Kurtz.

Additional Charles Kurtz papers, 1870-1910, including 340 letters which discuss exhibitions, sales of art, patronage, atelier visits, and submissions to publications, and letters to his parents in which he discsses the art market and art world new; as well as manuscripts, notebooks, a diary, and printed ephemera relating to exhibitions and publications, are available at the Getty Research Institute, Research Library, Los Angeles, California.
Separated Materials:
The Archives of American Art also holds material lent for microfilming (reel 4912) including Charles Kurtz's Glasgow painting diary. The loaned diary was returned to the lender and can now be found at the Yale Center for British Art in New Haven, Connecticut. This material is not described in the collection container inventory.
Provenance:
For many years, the Kurtz Papers were thought to have been destroyed in a fire. Isabel Kurtz, a school teacher who lived with her older sister in Buffalo, New York, was vague when initially approached about her father's papers by Archives Regional Director, Robert Brown in the mid-1980s. However upon her death in 1991, her will revealed that the papers were indeed in her house in Buffalo and the bulk of them were bequeathed to the Archives of American Art. Paintings and a diary relating to the Glasgow School were given to the Yale Center for British Art. That diary has subsequently been duplicated on microfilm and is now also available in the Archives. Scorch marks on some of the papers and also on the paintings given to Yale suggest that there was indeed a fire. The material that was not bequeathed to the Archives included duplicates of printed documents along with books from the Kurtz library and a coin collection, all of which were dispersed in an estate auction that was held in Buffalo in 1991.
Restrictions:
The collection is open for research. Patrons must use microfilm copy.
Rights:
With the exception of material filmed on Reel 4912 the Charles M. Kurtz papers are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws. Permission from Yale University is required to quote, publish or reproduce from papers filmed on Reel 4912.
Topic:
Works of art  Search this
Editors -- United States  Search this
Glasgow school of painting  Search this
Exhibitions -- United States  Search this
Art, Scottish  Search this
Art -- Private collections  Search this
Art criticism  Search this
Art museums -- Buffalo (N.Y.)  Search this
Art -- Collectors and collecting  Search this
Art critics -- United States  Search this
Museum directors -- New York (State) -- Buffalo  Search this
Arts administrators -- United States  Search this
Genre/Form:
Menus
Photographs
Lithographs
Etchings
Address books
Engravings
Visiting cards
Diaries
Photogravures
Tempera paintings
Oil paintings
Sketches
Citation:
Charles M. Kurtz papers, 1843-1990 (bulk 1884-1909). Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.kurtchar
See more items in:
Charles M. Kurtz papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-kurtchar
Additional Online Media:

Correspondence

Collection Creator:
Artist Tenants Association (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Extent:
12 folders (Box 1)
Type:
Archival materials
Date:
1967-1969
Scope and Contents note:
The correspondence in the collection includes a handful of letters from artists regarding the availability of lofts, letters from the New York City Housing and Development Administration, and information from other co-housing projects in the city. In addition, there is a report, "Arts Administrator Need and Potential in New York State," drafted by George Alan Smith for the New York State Council on the Arts.
Arrangement note:
Letters are alphabetically arranged by business name or last name of correspondent. The series has been scanned in its entirety.
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment.
Collection Rights:
The Artist Tenants Association records are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Collection Citation:
Artist Tenants Association records, 1959-1978. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.artitena, Series 1
See more items in:
Artist Tenants Association records
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-aaa-artitena-ref14

Ruth Bowman papers

Creator:
Bowman, Ruth, 1923-  Search this
Names:
American Association of Museums  Search this
American Federation of Arts  Search this
Brooklyn Museum  Search this
Canadian Museums Association  Search this
Craft and Folk Art Museum  Search this
KUSC (Radio station : Los Angeles, Calif.)  Search this
Long Beach Museum of Art  Search this
Los Angeles County Museum of Art  Search this
Massachusetts Institute of Technology  Search this
Metropolitan Museum of Art (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Museum of Modern Art (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
New York University  Search this
Newark Museum  Search this
WNYC (Radio station : New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Albers, Josef  Search this
Anshutz, Thomas Pollock, 1851-1912  Search this
Bengelsdorf, Rosalind, 1916-1979  Search this
Bolotowsky, Ilya, 1907-1981  Search this
Burkhardt, Hans Gustav, 1904-1994  Search this
Cézanne, Paul, 1839-1906  Search this
Diller, Burgoyne, 1906-1965  Search this
Eakins, Thomas, 1844-1916  Search this
Ferren, John, 1905-1970  Search this
Holty, Carl, 1900-1973  Search this
Holtzman, Harry  Search this
Lassaw, Ibram, 1913-2003  Search this
Levine, Les, 1935-  Search this
Lipchitz, Jacques, 1891-1973  Search this
MacDonald, Duncan (Broadcaster)  Search this
Mason, Alice Trumbull, 1904-1971  Search this
McNeil, George, 1908-1995  Search this
Morris, George L. K., 1905-1975  Search this
Noguchi, Isamu, 1904-1988  Search this
Picasso, Pablo, 1881-1973  Search this
Reinhardt, Ad, 1913-1967  Search this
Sloan, Helen Farr, 1911-  Search this
Wilfred, Thomas, 1889-1968  Search this
Extent:
26.7 Linear feet
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Photographs
Interviews
Sound recordings
Scripts (documents)
Date:
1936-2006
bulk 1963-1999
Summary:
The papers of art historian and museum educator Ruth Bowman are dated 1936-2006, bulk 1963-1999, and measure 26.7 linear feet. Professional correspondence and subject files document Bowman's relationships with colleagues and reflect her interests, activities including curatorial work, and accomplishments as a museum educator. Writings and related research materials include her thesis,"Thomas Pollock Anshutz, 1851-1912" (M.A., Institute of Fine Arts, New York University, 1971), and unfinished projects. Also found are interviews conducted by Bowman with a wide range of individuals for a variety of purposes.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of art historian and museum educator Ruth Bowman are dated 1936-2006, bulk 1963-1999, and measure 26.7 linear feet. Professional correspondence and subject files document Bowman's relationships with colleagues and reflect her interests, activities including curatorial work, and accomplishments as a museum educator. Writing and related research materials include her thesis, "Thomas Pollock Anshutz, 1851-1912" (M.A., Institute of Fine Arts, New York University, 1971), and unfinished projects. Also found are interviews conducted by Bowman with a wide range of individuals for a variety of purposes.

Biographical materials consist of certificates, resumes, and a few photographs of Ruth Bowman. Correspondence concerns Bowman's professional activities and interests. Among the most frequent correspondents are: American Association of Museums, Craft and Folk Art Museum (Los Angeles), Massachusetts Institute of Technology, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, and The Museum of Modern Art.

Writings by Ruth Bowman, published and unpublished, include a thesis and articles about Thomas Pollock Anshutz, catalogs for American Federation of Arts and The Newark Museum exhibitions, lectures, as well as articles about museum education and visual arts programs. Research relates to her writings about Anshutz, and to unrealized projects concerning Anshutz, Cézanne, Eakins, Picasso, and other subjects. Also found are two brief writings about Bowman.

Subject files--general subjects, artists' files, Ruth Bowman activities, and "Sunrise Semester"--contain the majority of Bowman's professional correspondence along with printed material, writings, photographs, and sound recordings. Among the most thoroughly documented general subjects are: The Brooklyn Museum's Trustees Retreat, Canadian Museums Association, a 1981 Craft Symposium, International Network for the Arts, Long Beach Museum of Art, Los Angeles County Museum of Art, "Museum Directors' Forum", New York University Art Collection, and Massachusetts Institute of Technology Council for the Arts. Artists' files are comprised mainly of printed material with a small amount of correspondence and some photographs. The Les Levine file consists of the first issue of Art-Rite featuring a brief article about Levine on its cover; Thomas Wilfred's file includes information about Lumia. Ruth Bowman activities include lectures, radio and television appearances, and participation in professional events. "Sunrise Semester," a collaboration between CBS television and New York University, offered early morning courses for college credit. Ruth Bowman was the instructor for "20th Century American Art," which is documented by general information, scripts, and sound recordings of all 46 classes.

Interviews conducted by Bowman are with English museum administrators and educators; people knowledgeable about a controversial proposal for an Annenberg Fine Arts Center at The Metropolitan Museum of Art; guests on KUSC radio shows "Sounds of Seeing" and "Live from Trump's"; and guests on the WNYC radio program "Views on Art." Interviews with miscellaneous individuals include Josef Albers, Hans Burkhardt, Carl Holty, Isamu Noguchi, and Helen Farr Sloan. Bowman interviewed a dozen American abstract artists, including Ilya Bolotowsky, Rosalind Bengelsdorf Browne, Burgoyne Diller, John Ferren, Carl Holty, Harry Holtzman, Ibram Lassaw, Jacques Lipchitz, Alice Mason, George McNeil, George L. K. Morris, and Ad Reinhardt for a thesis on the subject, but eventually wrote on a different topic. Two interviews with Bowman were conducted by Duncan MacDonald and an unidentified interviewer.
Arrangement:
This collection is arranged as 5 series:

Series 1: Biographical Materials, 1964-1984 (Box 1; 0.1 linear feet)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1963-1996 (Box 1; 0.7 linear feet)

Series 3: Writings and Related Research, 1942-1999 (Boxes 1-3; 1.5 linear feet)

Series 4: Subject Files, 1936-2006 (Boxes 3-12, 26; 9.6 linear feet)

Series 5: Interviews, 1963-1989 (Boxes 12-25; 9.2 linear feet)
Biographical / Historical:
Ruth Bowman (b. 1923) is an art historian and museum educator who worked in New York City and Los Angeles. She is known for her interest in using new communications technology for museum education, discovering Arshile Gorky's long forgotten murals at Newark Airport, and expertise in the work of Thomas Anshutz.

A graduate of Bryn Mawr College (B.A. 1944), where she had studied art history and classical archaeology, Ruth Bowman began a museum career in New York as an assistant curator at the Jewish Museum in the early 1960s. From 1963-1974 Ruth Bowman served as curator of the York University Art Collection and was involved in its transition to the Grey Art Gallery and Study Center. Bowman wrote her master's thesis on Philadelphia artist Thomas Pollock Anshutz and received a degree from the Institute of Fine Arts, New York University in 1971. During this same period, she was a staff lecturer at The Museum of Modern Art and taught art history in divisions of New York University. She was the instructor for a "Sunrise Semester" 20th century American art course broadcast nationally on CBS.

In 1974 Bowman and her family moved to California and she began an association with the Los Angeles County Museum of Art as Director of Education. She attended summer courses in arts administration at Harvard University (1975) and similar training provided by the British Arts Council (1976). She taught at University of California Santa Barbara, as well as at California State University at Fullerton and Long Beach. Bowman was active in the Council of the American Association of Museums (vice president), the Craft and Folk Art Museum in Los Angeles (vice president), and has served as a consultant to several museums and a corporate collection.

Ruth Bowman with her friend Harry Kahn (1916-1999) developed a collection of self-portraits by 20th century American artists, which she donated to the National Portrait Gallery in 2002. Mrs. Bowman is the widow of R. Wallace Bowman and currently resides in New York City.
Provenance:
Donated by Ruth Bowman in 2004.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment. Use of archival audiovisual recordings with no duplicate access copy requires advance notice.
Rights:
The Ruth Bowman papers are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. They may be used for research, study, and scholarship. Authorization to quote, publish or reproduce her unpublished writings and related research materials requires written permission from Ruth Bowman, 200 East 66th Street, Apt. B-2101, New York, New York 10021.
Topic:
Art -- Study and teaching  Search this
Art historians -- California -- Los Angeles  Search this
Art, American -- 20th century  Search this
Art historians -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Interviews
Sound recordings
Scripts (documents)
Citation:
Ruth Bowman papers, 1936-2006, bulk 1963-1999. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.bowmruth2
See more items in:
Ruth Bowman papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-bowmruth2
Additional Online Media:

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