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"Proposal for an experiment to track animals from artificial satellites," by Helmut K. Buechner and James C. Maxwell, 1968

Collection Creator::
Buechner, Helmut K. (Helmut Karl)  Search this
Container:
Box 22 of 35
Type:
Archival materials
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 7279, Helmut Karl Buechner Papers
See more items in:
Helmut Karl Buechner Papers
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-sia-faru7279-refidd1e7076

Tracking and Data Relay Satellites System (TDRSS) Documentation

Creator:
Contel Federal Systems, Fairfax, VA  Search this
Names:
United States. National Aeronautics and Space Administration  Search this
Extent:
0.9 Cubic feet ((2 letter document boxes, 1 slim letter document box))
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Lists
Specifications
Reports
Diagrams
Date:
1976-1979
Scope and Contents:
This collection contains TDRSS documentation from the years 1976 through 1979. Materials include: a Pricing Manual, a Program Acronym List, Program Space Segment Specifications, a Baseline Report, Project Plans, a Proposal Kickoff Package, the Proposal Preparation, a Test Plan, the Review Boards Notebook, a Shuttle User Draft, Contracts, a System Design Report, Performance Specifications, a Statement of Work, and Flow Diagrams.
Biographical / Historical:
Tracking and Data Relay Satellites (TDRS) are the largest, most advanced privately developed communications satellites. TDRS provide global coverage of Earth-orbiting spacecraft. In the past, spacecraft could communicate with Earth only when they were in sight of a ground tracking station, typically less than one fifth of the time. The TDRS system enables spacecraft to communicate with Earth for about 85 to 100 percent of the orbit by having a system of orbiting telecommunication satellites operated from a single ground terminal link. The first TDRS was launched from Kennedy Space Center on April 4, 1983. TDRS is owned and operated by the Technical Services Division of Contel Federal Systems, Fairfax, VA. However, its services are being leased to NASA for a ten-year period.
Provenance:
Daniel K. Elliot, Gift, 2002
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests
Topic:
Tracking and Data Relay Satellites System (TDRSS)  Search this
Artificial satellites  Search this
Astronautics  Search this
Space vehicles  Search this
Communications equipment  Search this
Genre/Form:
Lists
Specifications
Reports
Diagrams
Citation:
Tracking and Data Relay Satellites System (TDRSS) Documentation, Accession 2002-0046, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.2002.0046
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-2002-0046

Operation Moonwatch in Philippines

Creator:
Unknown  Search this
Subject:
Boy Scouts of America  Search this
Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory  Search this
Smithsonian Institution Office of Public Affairs  Search this
Physical description:
Gelatin silver prints; 8 x 10;
Type:
Black-and-white photographs
Place:
Philippines
Date:
1958
Topic:
Artificial satellites  Search this
Astronomy  Search this
International Geophysical Year, 1957-1958  Search this
Local number:
SIA RU000371 [96-1369]
Restrictions & Rights:
No restrictions.. All requests for duplication and use must be submitted in writing and approved by the Smithsonian Institution Archives. Contact SIA Reference Staff for further information (email photos@si.edu)
Unknown
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_arc_396202

Sound Recording, "Sputnik Dance," performed by the Equadors

Maker:
RCA Victor  Search this
Physical Description:
vinyl (overall material)
Measurements:
overall: 7 in; 17.78 cm
Object Name:
sound recording
Place Made:
United States: New Jersey, Camden
Date made:
1958
Subject:
Music  Search this
Credit Line:
GIft of Steven C. Turner
ID Number:
2007.0048.01
Accession number:
2007.0048
Catalog number:
2007.0048.01
Maker number:
EPA 4286
See more items in:
Cultural and Community Life: Entertainment
Music & Musical Instruments
Sputnik
Data Source:
National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmah_1321736

Sound Recording, "Sputnik Rock and Roll," performed by Rock-Krister

Recording artist:
Rock - Krister  Search this
Manufacturer:
Jan  Search this
Physical Description:
vinyl (overall material)
Measurements:
overall: 7 in; x 17.78 cm
Object Name:
sound recording
Subject:
Music  Search this
ID Number:
1996.0153.19337
Catalog number:
1996.0153.19337
Label number:
45-080
Accession number:
1996.0153
See more items in:
Cultural and Community Life: Entertainment
Music & Musical Instruments
Sputnik
Data Source:
National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nmah_1243819
Additional Online Media:

Lunar Probe, Ranger, Block III

Title:
Lunar Probe, Ranger, Block III
Manufacturer:
Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology  Search this
Materials:
Metal, plastic, assorted composites.
Dimensions:
Overall: 10 ft. 3 in. tall x 15 ft. wide, 784.2 lb. (312.42 x 457.2cm, 355.7kg)
Type:
SPACECRAFT-Unmanned
Country of Origin:
United States of America
Credit Line:
Transferred from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration
Inventory Number:
A19770993000
Restrictions & Rights:
Do not reproduce without permission from the Smithsonian Institution, National Air and Space Museum
See more items in:
National Air and Space Museum Collection
Data Source:
National Air and Space Museum
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nasm_A19770993000
Additional Online Media:

Keneth A. Simons Papers

Creator::
Simons, Keneth A.  Search this
Extent:
0.58 cu. ft. (1 tall document box)
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Manuscripts
Audiotapes
Clippings
Place:
Bryn Athyn (Pa.)
Date:
circa 1957-1958
Descriptive Entry:
This accession consists of records created and maintained by Simons documenting his participation on the Moonwatch Team and the local publicity he received. Materials include a report on the Team's work, clippings, instructions for tracking satellites, tracking data, and audio recordings of satellites.
Historical Note:
Keneth A. Simons (March 10, 1913-June 14, 2004), ham radio operator and cable television and radio engineer worked for Bell Telephone Laboratories and later was a founding employee of Jerrold Electronics Corporation. In 1957, he became involved in the Bryn Athyn Moonwatch Team as a radio engineer. Moonwatch teams were established around the world by the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, Moonwatch Division, 1956-1975, to track and photograph artificial satellites. The Bryn Athyn Moonwatch Team was relatively unique in that it combined the use of radios and telescopes to track satellites. Simons was primarily involved in Doppler tracking the Sputnik satellites.
Topic:
Amateur radio stations  Search this
Radio engineers  Search this
Cable television  Search this
Artificial satellites -- Tracking  Search this
Artificial satellites -- Doppler tracking  Search this
Sputnik satellites  Search this
Genre/Form:
Manuscripts
Audiotapes
Clippings
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Accession 10-004, Keneth A. Simons Papers
Identifier:
Accession 10-004
See more items in:
Keneth A. Simons Papers
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-fa10-004

OPTICAL TRACKING OF ARTIFICIAL SATELLITES (Proceedings American Philosophical Society; and Science - 1958)

Collection Creator:
Whipple, Fred Lawrence,  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Accession 04-183, Whipple, Fred Lawrence, , Fred Lawrence Whipple Papers
See more items in:
Fred Lawrence Whipple Papers
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-sia-fa04-183-refd1e3953

F.L. Whipple, J.A. Hynek Optical and Visual Tracking of Artificial Satellites

Collection Creator:
Whipple, Fred Lawrence,  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Collection Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Accession 04-183, Whipple, Fred Lawrence, , Fred Lawrence Whipple Papers
See more items in:
Fred Lawrence Whipple Papers
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-sia-fa04-183-refd1e3989

Vioalle Hefferan Papers

Creator:
Hefferan, Vioalle  Search this
Extent:
0.5 cu. ft. (1 document box)
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Clippings
Manuscripts
Black-and-white photographs
Date:
1943-1974
Descriptive Entry:
This accession consists of the contents of scrapbooks created by Vioalle Hefferan. Hefferan was a teacher and astronomy club advisor at Albuquerque High School as well as the leader of Moonwatch Team #041. The team, based in Albuquerque, New Mexico, was one of the few teams led by a female and most of its members were high school students. Moonwatch teams were established around the world by the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, Moonwatch Division, 1956-1975, to track and photograph artificial satellites. Materials include letters and cards from students, parents, former students, friends, and family. Materials also include clippings, photographs, certificates, and related materials.
Topic:
Artificial satellites -- Tracking  Search this
Astronomy  Search this
Satellites  Search this
Science -- Study and teaching  Search this
High school students -- United States  Search this
Genre/Form:
Clippings
Manuscripts
Black-and-white photographs
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Accession 08-048, Hefferan, Vioalle, Vioalle Hefferan Papers
Identifier:
Accession 08-048
See more items in:
Vioalle Hefferan Papers
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-fa08-048

Fred Lawrence Whipple Interviews

Creator:
Whipple, Fred Lawrence,  Search this
Extent:
4 audiotapes (reference copies).
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Interviews
Audiotapes
Oral history
Date:
1976
Introduction:
The Smithsonian Institution Archives began its Oral History Program in 1973. The purpose of the program is to supplement the written documentation of the Archives' record and manuscript collections with an Oral History Collection, focusing on the history of the Institution, research by its scholars, and contributions of its staff. Program staff conducts interviews with current and retired Smithsonian staff and others who have made significant contributions to the Institution. There are also interviews conducted by researchers or students on topics related to the history of the Smithsonian or the holdings of the Smithsonian Institution Archives.

Whipple was interviewed for the Oral History Collection because of his central role in the modernization of the SAO and his outstanding contributions to science. For additional information, see the following related collections in Smithsonian Archives: the records of the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory; the Fred Lawrence Whipple Papers; and Record Unit 9542, Multiple Mirror Telescope videohistory interviews.
Descriptive Entry:
Whipple was interviewed on 24 and 25 June 1976 by Pamela M. Henson. The interviews cover his education; radar countermeasure work during World War II; role in the development of national programs for astrophysics and space exploration; research program on comets, meteors, and interplanetary material; administration of SAO; development of Mt. Hopkins, MMT, and optical tracking programs; and reminiscences of colleagues such as Imre G. Izsak, Craig M. Merrihue, and Carlton W. Tillinghast.
Historical Note:
Fred Lawrence Whipple (1906-2004), received the B.A. in mathematics with a minor in physics and astronomy from the University of California at Los Angeles in 1927 and the Ph.D. in astronomy from the University of California at Berkeley in 1931. His early training focused on comet orbits. After teaching for a year at Stanford University, he joined the staff of the Harvard College Observatory in 1931 and remained in Cambridge throughout his career. During the 1930s his work focused on double station meteor research. From 1943 to 1945, he developed radar countermeasures for the U. S. Army Radiation Laboratory of the Office of Scientific Research and Development. After World War II he worked on development of the Super-Schmidt cameras to photograph meteors and continued research on the influx of material from comets into the interplanetary medium. His comet research culminated in publication of the Icy Comet Model in 1950. During the forties he also conducted studies of meteor hazards to spacecraft, inventing the meteor bumper, and served on the Rocket and Satellite Research Panel. In the early fifties, with Wernher von Braun and Cornelius J. Ryan, he coauthored a series of popular articles on the conquest of the space frontier.

His teaching career at Harvard University progressed from Instructor, 1932-1938; Lecturer, 1938-1945; Associate Professor, 1945-1950; Professor, 1950-1970; Chairman of the Department of Astronomy, 1949-1956; to Phillips Professor of Astronomy, 1970-1977. Thus when Whipple was appointed Director of the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO) in July 1955, he moved its headquarters to the Cambridge campus and continued as Professor and member of the Harvard College Observatory staff. He reorganized the Smithsonian's observatory and reoriented its research program. Under his directorship, the staff grew from a handful to more than five hundred, including over sixty scientists.

At the request of the National Science Foundation and the National Academy of Sciences, Whipple began development of Baker-Nunn cameras to track artificial satellites during the International Geophysical Year (1957-1958). With the help of Armand N. Spitz, he also developed the Moonwatch optical tracking program, which utilized teams of volunteers observing satellites with hand-held telescopes. When Sputnik was launched in October of 1957, the Moonwatch teams were the only U. S. mechanism available to track the Russian satellite. The SAO subsequently received large contracts from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration to operate the Satellite Tracking Program (STP), an optical tracking system with Baker-Nunn camera stations located all over the globe. Whipple's satellite tracking work earned him the 1963 Distinguished Civilian Service Award from President John F. Kennedy.

The Prairie Network, an optical tracking system designed to photograph meteorites and fireballs in order to calculate their orbits, created by Whipple and Richard E. McCrosky, began observations in 1964. Coordination of STP camera observations with Jodrell Bank Observatory radio data on flare stars led to the first identification of radio noise from any star besides the sun.

SAO relied on early computers such as the Mark IV, IBM 7090, and CDC 6400 for rapid processing of massive quantities of data. Baker-Nunn and Super-Schmidt camera data were directly processed by automated means, which made possible the 1966 SAO Star Catalog, coordinated by Katherine L. Haramundanis. Whipple required direct publication from computer tapes, a first for the U. S. Government Printing Office. Observations from the STP were progressively refined during the sixties through new laser tracking techniques and advances in automated data processing, to provide improved geodetic and geophysical data. In the early sixties, stellar atmosphere models were developed with the aid of an IBM 7090 and after 1966 a CDC 6400, in anticipation of far ultraviolet light data from orbiting observatories. Based on this experience in upper atmosphere research, Whipple was appointed project director for the orbiting astronomical observatories from 1958 to 1972.

The telegraph service of the International Astronomical Union came to the SAO in 1965 under the coordination of Owen J. Gingerich and later Brian G. Marsden. It utilized SAO's sophisticated communications network and led eventually to the creation of the Center for Short-Lived Phenomena by Robert A. Citron.

Development of an observatory site at Mt. Hopkins, Arizona, began in 1966. Chosen by Whipple for its altitude and seeing conditions, the site was dedicated in 1981 as the Fred Lawrence Whipple Observatory. On this site, in conjunction with the U. S. Air Force and University of Arizona, he developed the technically innovative Multiple Mirror Telescope (MMT), which commenced observations in May of 1979.

In addition to his own research program on comets, meteors, and interplanetary materials, Whipple coordinated the SAO research programs in celestial mechanics, geodesy, meteoritics, radio astronomy, neutrino searches, stellar atmosphere models, and the atomic clock project to test the theory of relativity. He encouraged NASA's lunar program and development of the space telescope.

Whipple was distinguished both for his theoretical work in astrophysics and his technical innovations in such areas as tracking cameras, multiple mirror telescopes, and meteor bumpers. A member of the National Academy of Sciences, Whipple received the Academy's J. Lawrence Smith Medal in 1949 for his meteor research. He was awarded the Kepler Medal by the American Association for the Advancement of Science in 1971 and the Joseph Henry Medal of the Smithsonian Institution in 1973. Through his work on numerous federal and private boards, panels, and commissions, Whipple was influential in the development of national programs for research in astrophysics and creation of a space exploration program.

Whipple retired from administration of SAO in 1973 but continued active research as a Senior Scientist from 1973 to 1977. Upon his retirement in 1977, he was appointed Emeritus Phillips Professor of Astronomy at Harvard.
Topic:
Astronomy  Search this
Astrophysics.  Search this
Meteorites.  Search this
World War, 1939-1945  Search this
Genre/Form:
Interviews
Audiotapes
Oral history
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Record Unit 9520, Whipple, Fred Lawrence, , Fred Lawrence Whipple Interviews
Identifier:
Record Unit 9520
See more items in:
Fred Lawrence Whipple Interviews
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-faru9520

Richard H. Emmons Papers

Creator::
Emmons, Richard H., 1919-2005  Search this
Extent:
0.5 cu. ft. (1 document box)
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Books
Clippings
Manuscripts
Newsletters
Black-and-white photographs
Date:
circa 1935-1976, 1990-1991, 1995-1996, 2005
Descriptive Entry:
Richard H. Emmons (1919-2005), astronomer, engineer, and proponent of astronomy education, taught astronomy and physics at Kent State University and later worked as an engineer for Goodyear Aerospace Corporation. He was well-known for the planetariums he established, over 23 in all. Emmons was also the team leader for the North Canton Moonwatch Team. Moonwatch teams were established around the world by the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, Moonwatch Division, 1956-1975, to track and photograph artificial satellites. This accession consists of records created and maintained by Emmons documenting his work as an astronomer and an engineer, his participation in Moonwatch, and his research interests. This accession also documents the creation and dissolution of both the Moonwatch program as well as the North Canton Moonwatch Team. Materials include correspondence, reports, clippings, articles, fact sheets, photographs, lecture notes, announcements, newsletters, calculations, notes, and related materials as well as an autobiography of H. H. Emmons with a postscript written by his son, Richard H. Emmons.
Topic:
Astronomers  Search this
Astrophysicists  Search this
Astronomy  Search this
Astrophysics  Search this
Aerospace engineers  Search this
Aerospace engineering  Search this
Astronomy -- Study and teaching  Search this
Planetariums  Search this
Satellites  Search this
Artificial satellites -- Tracking  Search this
Genre/Form:
Books
Clippings
Manuscripts
Newsletters
Black-and-white photographs
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Accession 08-112, Richard H. Emmons Papers
Identifier:
Accession 08-112
See more items in:
Richard H. Emmons Papers
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-fa08-112

Richard H. Emmons Papers

Creator::
Emmons, Richard H., 1919-2005  Search this
Extent:
4 cu. ft. (4 record storage boxes)
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Clippings
Manuscripts
Newsletters
Black-and-white photographs
Color photographs
Date:
circa 1954-1998
Descriptive Entry:
Richard H. Emmons (1919-2005), astronomer, engineer, and proponent of astronomy education, taught astronomy and physics at Kent State University and later worked as an engineer for Goodyear Aerospace Corporation. He was well-known for the planetariums he established, over 23 in all. Emmons was also the team leader for the North Canton Moonwatch Team. Moonwatch teams were established around the world by the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, Moonwatch Division, 1956-1975, to track and photograph artificial satellites. This accession consists of records created and maintained by Emmons documenting his work as an astronomer and an engineer, his participation in Moonwatch, and his research interests. Materials include correspondence and memoranda; theories, calculations, charts, graphs, and notes; images of astronomers, equipment, facilities, and the sky; articles written and co-written by Emmons; newspaper clippings; professional society and astronomy club newsletters; and research and reference materials such as journal articles, manuscripts, predictions, and technical documents. Some research and reference materials pre-date the date span of this accession, but would have been collected during this time period.
Topic:
Astronomers  Search this
Astrophysicists  Search this
Astronomy  Search this
Astrophysics  Search this
Aerospace engineers  Search this
Aerospace engineering  Search this
Astronomy -- Study and teaching  Search this
Planetariums  Search this
Satellites  Search this
Artificial satellites -- Tracking  Search this
Genre/Form:
Clippings
Manuscripts
Newsletters
Black-and-white photographs
Color photographs
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Accession 07-154, Richard H. Emmons Papers
Identifier:
Accession 07-154
See more items in:
Richard H. Emmons Papers
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-fa07-154

Publication Files

Topic:
SAO News (Serial)
Centerline (Serial)
Creator::
Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory. Publications and Information  Search this
Extent:
4.43 cu. ft. (4 record storage boxes) (1 12x17 box)
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Clippings
Manuscripts
Black-and-white negatives
Black-and-white photographs
Black-and-white transparencies
Color photographs
Color transparencies
Date:
1932, 1946, 1957-1989
Descriptive Entry:
This accession consists of records created and maintained by James C. Cornell, Jr., a public information specialist and publications manager for the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO) for nearly 40 years. SAO jointly administers the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (CfA) with the Harvard College Observatory. Materials primarily consist of photographs used in the production of newsletters (such as "SAO News" and CfA's "Centerline") and other publications as well as those documenting the construction of Satellite Tracking Program stations around the world. In addition, materials include handbooks, news clippings, station notes, and publications chronicling the history of both SAO and the Harvard College Observatory.
Topic:
Astrophysics  Search this
Astronomy  Search this
Astrophysical observatories  Search this
Museums -- Public relations  Search this
Museum publications  Search this
Artificial satellites -- Tracking  Search this
Baker-Nunn camera  Search this
Genre/Form:
Clippings
Manuscripts
Black-and-white negatives
Black-and-white photographs
Black-and-white transparencies
Color photographs
Color transparencies
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Accession 16-109, Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory. Publications and Information, Publication Files
Identifier:
Accession 16-109
See more items in:
Publication Files
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-fa16-109

Publication Files

Topic:
SAO News (Serial)
Centerline (Serial)
Creator::
Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory. Publications and Information  Search this
Extent:
9.5 cu. ft. (9 record storage boxes) (1 document box)
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Manuscripts
Clippings
Color photographs
Black-and-white photographs
Color transparencies
Black-and-white transparencies
Color negatives
Black-and-white negatives
Date:
1910, 1921, 1938, 1954-2000
Descriptive Entry:
This accession consists of records created and maintained by James C. Cornell, Jr., a public information specialist and publications manager for the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO). SAO jointly administers the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (CfA) with the Harvard College Observatory. Materials primarily consist of photographs used in the production of SAO newsletters (such as "SAO News" and CfA's "Centerline") and other publications in regard to SAO staff, Satellite Tracking Program stations, installation and use of telescopes and cameras, and special events. Also includes correspondence, memoranda, and notes as well as newspaper clippings, news releases, reports, press kits, research papers, biographical information, and other supporting documentation.
Topic:
Artificial satellites -- Tracking  Search this
Astrophysical observatories  Search this
Museums -- Public relations  Search this
Science publishing  Search this
Special events  Search this
Telescopes  Search this
Astrophysicists  Search this
Astronomers  Search this
Astrophysics  Search this
Astronomy  Search this
Scientists  Search this
Genre/Form:
Manuscripts
Clippings
Color photographs
Black-and-white photographs
Color transparencies
Black-and-white transparencies
Color negatives
Black-and-white negatives
Citation:
Smithsonian Institution Archives, Accession 16-263, Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory. Publications and Information, Publication Files
Identifier:
Accession 16-263
See more items in:
Publication Files
Archival Repository:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-sia-fa16-263

Baker-Nunn Satellite Tracking Collection

Creator:
Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory  Search this
Extent:
9.46 Cubic Feet ((8 boxes))
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Drawings
Correspondence
Manuals
Photographic prints
Date:
bulk 1965-1983
Scope and Contents:
This collection consists of 8 cubic feet of documentation on the Baker-Nunn camera, including the following types of material: drawings, photographs, manuals and reports, and memorandums and correspondence
Biographical / Historical:
The Baker-Nunn Camera, designed by James Baker and Joseph Nunn, was created to observe both natural and man-made satellites orbiting at a great altitude. This high-precision telescopic tracking camera was used by the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO) to track artificial satellites from the 1950s to mid-1970s. The SAO set up a highly successful optical tracking system using a network of Baker-Nunn cameras at twelve tracking stations located in Argentina, Australia, Curacao, India, Iran, Japan, Peru, South Africa, Spain, and at three sites in the United States.
Provenance:
Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO) via Space History Division, NASM, Gift, 2012
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests
Topic:
Baker-Nunn camera  Search this
Artificial satellites -- Optical observations  Search this
Artificial satellites -- Tracking  Search this
Astronautics  Search this
Genre/Form:
Drawings
Correspondence
Manuals
Photographic prints
Citation:
Baker-Nunn Satellite Tracking Collection, Accession 2012-0014, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.2012.0014
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-2012-0014

International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) Satellite Notebooks

Creator:
Harner, Dick  Search this
Extent:
0.36 Cubic Feet ((1 box))
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Notebooks
Date:
bulk 1973-1976
Scope and Contents:
This collection consists of two 8 by 10 inch green notebooks, which chart the construction of the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) Satellite. Book one records from October 1, 1973 until September 16, 1974. Book two records from September 17, 1974 until January 9, 1976. The books contain black and white photographs with related notations.
Biographical / Historical:
The International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) was the first experiment to explore the full range of ultraviolet radiation from the universe. The IUE was a satellite sponsored and operated jointly by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the United Kingdom's Science and Engineering Research Council (SERC) and the European Space Agency (ESA), and dedicated to gathering astronomical data in the ultraviolet range of the spectrum. The IUE was launched by a Thor-Delta rocket on January 26, 1978 and placed into a geosynchronous orbit around the Earth. It carried a 45-centimeter Cassegrain reflecting telescope with two spectrographs, collected spectral data in real time and was capable of being operated by a visiting astronomer at one of two ground stations: in Madrid, Spain, and at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center. The observer could perform preliminary evaluation and analysis during the observing session, operating the system much like a modern ground-based telescope. In its18 years of operation the IUE provided data for thousands of scientific papers. IUE real time operations terminated on September 27, 1996.
Provenance:
Dick Harner, Gift, 2012
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests
Topic:
Astronautics  Search this
Artificial satellites  Search this
Artificial satellites -- Tracking  Search this
Ultraviolet spectrometry  Search this
International Ultraviolet Explorer  Search this
Genre/Form:
Notebooks
Citation:
International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) Satellite Notebooks, Accession 2012-0022, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.2012.0022
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-2012-0022

Geostar Corporation Records

Creator:
Geostar Corporation  Search this
Extent:
5.26 Cubic Feet ((5 boxes))
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Correspondence
Technical manuals -- 20th century
Press releases
Financial records
Date:
bulk 1983-1991
Scope and Contents:
This collection consists of Geostar's business records. Included here is information on RDSS as well as Geostar's agreements and relationships with various organizations including NASA, CAST, AMSC, QUALCOMM, and LOCSTAR. The types of materials present here include correspondence, articles, press releases, presentations, FCC filings, reports, programs, agreements, and financial data
Biographical / Historical:
Geostar Corporation began in 1983, intent on providing tracking services with Radio Determination Satellite Service (RDSS) technology. Similar to GPS, RDSS uses satellites to provide locating information. Initially a small entrepreneurial company, Geostar had large goals and high hopes for the future. From the beginning, however, Geostar faced many conflicts and problems which eventually proved to be fatal for this fledgling company. In 1985, the founder of Geostar, Dr. Gerard K. O'Neill, was diagnosed with leukemia. Following his recovery, a disagreement over proxies arose between O'Neill and his company, and a lawsuit ensued. Despite managerial and other internal conflicts, Geostar persisted. After two failed attempts to launch a satellite, Geostar faced severe financial concerns and eventually filed for bankruptcy in 1991. Geostar was a pioneer in using satellites to provide accurate tracking and locating services, and made significant contributions to the further development of this field.
Provenance:
Scott Sacknoff, Gift, 2005
Restrictions:
No restrictions on access.
Rights:
Material is subject to Smithsonian Terms of Use. Should you wish to use NASM material in any medium, please submit an Application for Permission to Reproduce NASM Material, available at Permissions Requests
Topic:
Artificial satellites  Search this
Radio Determination Satellite Service (RDSS) technology  Search this
Astronautics  Search this
Space industrialization  Search this
Periodicals  Search this
Genre/Form:
Correspondence
Technical manuals -- 20th century
Press releases
Financial records
Citation:
Geostar Corporation Records, Accession number 2006-0049, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NASM.2006.0049
Archival Repository:
National Air and Space Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nasm-2006-0049

Cover, Satellite, Faux Display

Manufacturer:
Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology  Search this
Materials:
Mylar, Mat Board
Dimensions:
3-D: 14 × 44.4 × 0.2cm (5 1/2 in. × 1 ft. 5 1/2 in. × 1/16 in.)
Type:
SPACECRAFT-Unmanned
Country of Origin:
United States of America
Credit Line:
Transferred from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration
Inventory Number:
A19770993013
Restrictions & Rights:
Do not reproduce without permission from the Smithsonian Institution, National Air and Space Museum
See more items in:
National Air and Space Museum Collection
Data Source:
National Air and Space Museum
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nasm_A19770993013
Additional Online Media:

Cover, Satellite, Faux Display

Manufacturer:
Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology  Search this
Materials:
Mylar, Mat Board
Dimensions:
3-D: 14 × 42.5 × 0.2cm (5 1/2 in. × 1 ft. 4 3/4 in. × 1/16 in.)
Type:
SPACECRAFT-Unmanned
Country of Origin:
United States of America
Credit Line:
Transferred from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration
Inventory Number:
A19770993010
Restrictions & Rights:
Do not reproduce without permission from the Smithsonian Institution, National Air and Space Museum
See more items in:
National Air and Space Museum Collection
Data Source:
National Air and Space Museum
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:nasm_A19770993010
Additional Online Media:

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