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Quantum Leap: Does "Indian Blood" Still Matter?

Creator:
Smithsonian Institution  Search this
Type:
Youtube videos
Uploaded:
2011-09-29T17:47:36.000Z
Youtube Category:
Education  Search this
See more by:
SmithsonianVideos
YouTube Channel:
SmithsonianVideos
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:yt_JgJJzTFwdfA

Anthony Leeds Papers

Creator:
Leeds, Anthony, 1925-  Search this
Extent:
18.37 Linear feet (32 document boxes, 2 card file boxes, one photo album, one oversize box, 2 map folders, and one document box of restricted materials.)
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Place:
Bahia (Brazil : State)
Date:
1946-1989
Summary:
This collection is comprised of the professional papers of Anthony Leeds, anthropologist and university professor. Leeds' reasearch was primarily concerned with urban development, though the fieldwork included in this collection is from rural areas. Included are correspondence, field notes, published and unpublished papers, photographs, newspaper and periodical clippings, conference papers, lecture notes, syllabi, critiques of colleague and student work, and several personal documents.
Scope and Contents:
This collection is comprised of the professional papers of Anthony Leeds, anthropologist and university professor. Included are correspondence, field notes, published and unpublished papers, photographs, newspaper and periodical clippings, conference papers, lecture notes, syllabi, critiques of colleague and student work, and personal documents such as calendars, biographical materials, and personal poems.

The materials in this collection reflect Leeds' field work in South America and Portugal, his role as a university professor, and his extensive involvement in various professional organizations. The majority of his anthropological endeavors focused on urban culture, the growth of technology and agriculture in society, and the philosophy behind anthropology and the social sciences. The fieldwork included in this collection is from early in his career, focusing on the study of Cacao agriculture in Brazil and the Yaruro people in Venezuela. The items in this collection document Leeds' various interests and activities.
Arrangement:
This collection is arranged in 7 series: (1) Correspondence, 1950-1989; (2) Research, 1949-1989; (3) Field Work, 1950-1973; (4) University, 1947-1989; (5) Professional Activities, 1951-1988; (6) Personal, 1946-1989; (7) Photo Album, circa 1952
Biographical Note:
Anthony Leeds was born January 26, 1925 on the Lower East Side of Manhattan. Because of his parents' strong ties to Europe (both were of Jewish descent, with kin in Germany and England), Leeds spent a fair amount of his childhood in Vienna and Switzerland, where he became fluent in French and German. His father, a businessman and lawyer, died when Leeds was only three years old. Though his family returned to the United States in 1933 due to political unrest in Europe, Leeds continued to be exposed to world cultures and politics through his family. For instance, Leeds' mother was an actor, translator, and psychoanalyst who once studied at Freud's Psychoanalytic Institute in Vienna. His stepfather was not only a sculptor and musician, but also a political activist. This rich familial environment fostered an interest in the social sciences and the arts from a young age.

Leeds also got a taste for rural life when his mother moved to a working farm in Clinton Corners, New York in 1935. For the next nine years Leeds intermittently helped his mother with the farm work and attended a small high school in the area. Of his time spent at Clinton Corners, Leeds felt a strong sense of community which would make a profound influence in his understanding of rural settings as an anthropologist.

Leeds eventually attended Columbia University in New York City and received a B. A. in Anthropology in 1949. He then went directly into the graduate program at Columbia, where his fellow anthropology colleagues included Marvin Harris and Andrew P. Vayda. Some of his favorite professors and later influences were Alfred L. Kroeber, William Duncan Strong, and Karl Polyani. His dissertation was a study of the politics behind cocoa production in the Bahia region of Brazil. Conducted in 1951-1952, Leeds' investigation was one of four in Bahia supervised by Charles Wagley and Brazilian anthropologist Thales de Azevedo. This study led to his dissertation, "Economic Cycles in Brazil: The Persistence of a Total-Cultural Pattern: Cacao and Other Cases," in which Leeds analyzed the topic from a Marxist viewpoint.

After receiving his Ph.D. in Anthropology from Columbia University in 1957, Leeds embarked on his primary career as a university professor. For the next 32 years, Leeds taught at a variety of institutions--first at Hofstra University and City College in New York City, then the University of Texas, and later at Boston University. In between, Leeds found the time to spend two years (1961-63) as the chief of the Program of Urban Development at the Pan-American Union (PAU) in Washington, D.C. He also spent a year (1972-73) at the Latin American centers in England associated with Oxford University and the University of London.

It was during his university years that Leeds focused on urban studies and urban analysis. Though he did conduct a brief study of the Yaruro peoples of Venezuela in 1958, the majority of his field work thereafter concerned urban development and its effects on society as a whole. Leeds made several field trips to Brazil and other areas of South America while working at the University of Texas; he specifically traveled to Rio de Janeiro, Sao Paulo, Bogota, Lima, and Santiago de Chile to study the cultural and political cultures of squatter settlements. From 1965 to 1966, Leeds received funding from the Social Science Research Council and the Ford Foundation to conduct a study of twelve specific favelas (squatter settlements) in Rio de Janeiro. For this fieldwork, Leeds organized Peace Corps volunteers, local community workers, academics (both foreign and Brazilian), and favela residents to help collect and analyze the data. It was during this trip that Leeds met Elizabeth Plotkin, a Peace Corps community action worker, who would later become Leeds' second wife and one of his most important collaborators. Together they wrote a book in Portuguese titled A Sociologia do Brasil Urbano (1978), based on their favela research.

In the 1970's Leeds and Plotkin made seven different trips to Portugal to follow different lines of research regarding the area. Leeds specifically researched the labor migration movements from the rural areas to the cities. He later wrote a book on his studies titled Minha Terra, Portugal: Lamentations and Celebrations (The Growth of an Ethnography and a Commitment), though it would go unpublished.

In his later years, Leeds not only took a more active role in various anthropological organizations (specifically those concerning the study of urban development), but he also became an active mentor to many students at Boston University. Leeds supported a variety of graduate student research in anthropology at Boston, as well as student research from other neighboring New England universities. In addition, Leeds began a "Thursday Night Group" that regularly met at his home in Dedham, Massachusetts to discuss a variety of anthropological subjects.

On February 20th, 1989, Leeds died of a heart attack in his Randolph, Vermont farmhouse.

Sources Consulted

Sieber, Timothy R. "The Life of Anthony Leeds: Unity in Diversity." In Cities, Classes, and Social Order, by Anthony Leeds, edited Roger Sanjek, 3-26. Ithaca, New York: Cornell University Press, 1994.

Chronology

1925 -- Born January 26 in New York, New York

1949 -- Earns B.A. in Anthropology from Columbia University

1951-52 -- Conducts disseration field work in the Cacao region of Bahia, Brazil, where he studies the political economy of cocoa production

1956-61 -- Teaches at Hofstra University and later City College, both in New York City

1957 -- Completes dissertation, titled "Economic Cycles in Brazil: The Persistence of a Total-Cultural Pattern: Cacao and Other Cases"

1958 -- Conducts brief field work studying the Yaruro people in Venezuela

1961-63 -- Head of the Program of Urban Development at the Pan-American Union (PAU) in Washington, D.C.

1963-72 -- Professor at the University of Texas-Austin

1965-66 -- Organizes Peace Corps volunteers, Brazilian and foreign academics, and local residents to conduct an intense study of twelve favelas (Brazilian squatter settlements) in Rio de Janeiro

1972-73 -- Spends a transitional year teaching at the Latin American centers at Oxford University and the University of London

1973-89 -- Professor at Boston University

1976-80 -- Takes several field trips to Portugal with his second wife, Elizabeth Plotkin Leeds; there he studies Portuguese labor migrations

1978 -- Sociologia do Brasil Urbano, co-written with Elizabeth Plotkin Leeds, is published

1989 -- Leeds dies of a heart attack on February 20 in Randolph, Vermont at the age of 64

Selected Bibliography

1964 -- Leeds, Anthony. "Brazilian Careers and Social Structure: An Evolutionary Model and Case History." American Anthropologist 66 (1964): 1321-47.

1965 -- Leeds, Anthony and Andrew P. Vayda. Man, Culture, and Animals: The Role of Animals in Human Ecological Adjustment. Washington, DC: American Association for the Advancement of Science, 1965.

1968 -- Leeds, Anthony. "The Anthropology of Cities: Some Methodological Issues." In Urban Anthropology, Research Perspectives and Strategies, edited by M. Fried, M. Harris, and R. Murphy, 31-47. Athens, Georgia: University of Georgia Press, 1968.

1971 -- Leeds, Anthony. "The Culture of Poverty Concept- Conceptual, Logical, and Empirical Problems, with Perspectives from Brazil and Peru." In The Culture of Poverty, A Critique, edited by E. Leacock, 226-284. New York: Simon and Schuster, 1971.

1976 -- Leeds, Anthony and Elizabeth Leeds. "Accounting for Behavioral Differences: Three Political Systems and the Responses of Squatters to them in Brazil, Peru, and Chile." In The City in Comparative Perspective: Cross-National Research and New Directions in Theory, edited by J. Walton and L. H. Masotti, 193-248. Beverly Hills: Sage, 1976.

1978 -- Leeds, Anthony and Elizabeth Leeds. A Sociologia do Brasil Urbano. Rio de Janeiro: Zahar Editora, 1978.

1979 -- Leeds, Anthony. "Forms of Urban Integration: "Social Urbanization" in Comparative Perspective." Urban Anthropology 8, no. 3/4 (1979): 227-27.

1981 -- Leeds, Anthony. "Low Income Urban Settlement Types, Processes, Structures, Policies." In The Residential Circumstances of the Urban Poor in Developing Countries, edited by United Nations Centre for Human Settlements, 21-61. New York: Praeger, 1981.

1984 -- Leeds, Anthony. "Cities and Countryside in Anthropology." In Cities of the Mind, edited by Lloyd Rodwin and Robert M. Hollister, 291-311. New York: Plenum, 1984.
Related Materials:
Anthony Leeds' correspondence and writings can also be found in the Marvin Harris papers at the National Anthropological Archives.
Provenance:
These papers were donated to the National Anthropological Archives by Columbia University's Department of Anthropology.
Restrictions:
Graded materials of Anthony Leeds' students and grant applications that he reviewed are restricted. His photo album is also restricted due to preservation concerns.
Rights:
Contact the respository for terms of use.
Topic:
Urban anthropology  Search this
Cacao  Search this
Yaruro Indians  Search this
Anthropology  Search this
Citation:
Anthony Leeds papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.1994-35
See more items in:
Anthony Leeds Papers
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-1994-35

Marvin Harris papers

Creator:
Harris, Marvin, 1927-2001  Search this
Names:
Columbia University  Search this
University of Florida. Department of Anthropology  Search this
Extent:
42.27 Linear feet (85.5 document boxes, 1 oversize box, 4 record storage boxes, 90 computer disks, 19 cassette tapes, 1 7" sound reel, 3 vinyl records, and 1 map folder)
Note:
Boxes 88-91 (formerly designated off-site boxes 1-4) are stored off-site. Advanced notice must be given to view these materials.
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Place:
New York (N.Y.)
Mozambique
Rio de Contas (Brazil)
Arembepe (Brazil)
Chimborazo (Ecuador)
Date:
1945-2001
Summary:
This collection contains the professional papers of anthropologist Marvin Harris. Harris was a prominent anthropologist, best known for developing the controversial paradigm of cultural materialism. He authored several important books in the field of anthropology and taught at Columbia University and The University of Florida. The papers include correspondence, research materials, his publications, unpublished manuscripts, conference papers, lectures, subject files, teaching files, computer files, and photographs.
Scope and Contents:
This collection contains the professional papers of anthropologist Marvin Harris. The papers include correspondence, research materials, his publications, unpublished manuscripts, conference papers, lectures, subject files, teaching files, computer files, and photographs.

His research files document his ethnographic field work in Rio de Contas, Brazil, both for his dissertation and his racial categorization project; his research on forced labor in Mozambique; his videotape study in New York City households; and his India sacred cattle research. The collection also contains his research on food preferences and aversions, his files as a research consultant for the McKinsey Global Institute, and photos from his field work in Chimborazo, Ecuador and Arembepe, Brazil.

Over the course of his career, Harris also participated in several conferences and invited lectures. The collection contains some of the papers he presented as well as audio recordings of his lecture "Levi-Strauss and the Clam: An Open and Shut Case" and a recording of a radio interview. Also present in the collection are materials relating to conference sessions and symposiums that he organized, including the 1967 AAA session on Anthropology and War and his 1983 Wenner-Gren symposium on Food Preferences and Aversions.

Additional materials that may be of interest are materials documenting Harris' activism in the 1960s at Columbia University, which include his anti-Vietnam War activities, as well as his involvement in the student protests of 1968 at Columbia University. The collection also contains Harris' CIA, FBI, and Department of State records that he obtained through Freedom of Information Act requests, photographs from Harris' service in the army in the 1940s, and photos taken in Brazil by Pierre Verger.

Harris corresponded with several prominent anthropologists, many of whom were Latin American specialists. Some of his noteworthy correspondents include Napoleon Chagnon, Derek Freeman, Morton Fried, Conrad Kottak, Sidney Mintz, Anthony Leeds, Claude Levi-Strauss, Darcy Ribeiro, Anisio Teixeira, Charles Wagley, and Karl Wittfogel. Also of special interest is his correspondence with leading figures in the Mozambique and Portuguese liberation movements, including Antonio Figuereido, Eduardo Mondlane, and General Humberto Delgado.
Arrangement:
This collection is arranged in 10 series: (1) Correspondence, 1952-2001; (2) Research, 1949-1997; (3) Writings, 1955-2001; (4) Professional Activities, 1960-1999; (5) Name Subject Files, 1951-2001; (6) University, 1947-1999; (7) Biographical Files, 1954-1999; (8) Writings by Other People, 1961-2000; (9) Photographs, 1945-1996; (10) Computer Files, 1980-2000
Biographical Note:
Marvin Harris was a prominent anthropologist, best known for developing the controversial paradigm of cultural materialism. He authored several important books in the field of anthropology, most notably The Rise of Anthropological Theory (1968) and Cultural Materialism (1979) as well as books that reached a wider audience, such as Cows, Pigs, Wars and Witches (1974) and Cannibals and Kings (1977).

Harris was born in Brooklyn, New York on August 18, 1927. After serving in the U.S. Army Transportation Corps (1945-47), he received his B.A. (1948) and Ph.D. (1953) from Columbia University. His first anthropology course was taught by Charles Wagley, who was influential in Harris' decision to become an anthropologist. Harris joined the faculty at Columbia University after earning his doctorate and served as chair of the Department of Anthropology from 1963 to 1966. In 1980, he left Columbia for a position as Graduate Research Professor at University of Florida, where he stayed until his retirement in 2000.

It was in The Rise of Anthropological Theory that Harris coined the phrase "cultural materialism," a subject he further elaborated on in Cultural Materialism. Cultural materialism, Harris explains, is a scientific research strategy "based on the simple premise that human social life is a response to the practical problems of earthly existence" (1979, xv). Harris applied the paradigm to explain various cultural patterns, such as food preferences and taboos, changes in U.S. family structure, and the collapse of Soviet and East European state socialism. One of his most controversial theories was that the Hindu prohibition of slaughtering and consuming cows in India arose because it was more economically beneficial to use cattle as draft animals than as meat. He challenged Napoleon Chagnon's views that Yanomami men were inherently more aggressive and violent by explaining that it was the pursuit of animal protein that was the cause of Yanomami warfare. Harris similarly argued that protein deficiency was the reason why the Aztecs practiced cannibalism.

Harris presented his theories beyond academic circles to a general audience by contributing a monthly column to Natural History Magazine. He also authored several popular books. In addition to Cows, Pigs, Wars and Witches and Cannibals and Kings, Harris also wrote America Now (1981), Good to Eat (1985), and Our Kind (1989). Harris also authored and edited several editions of two college-level introductory textbooks: Culture, People, Nature (first published as Culture, Man, and Nature in 1971) and Cultural Anthropology (first published in 1983, later editions coauthored with Orna Johnson). According to Harris, the 1975 edition of Culture, People, Nature "was the first anthropology textbook to be written cover to cover in a gender-neutral mode of discourse" (12/3/93 letter from Harris to Deborah S. Rubin, "Furlow - [The Teaching of Anthropology]", Series 3. Writings, Marvin Harris Papers).

Although Harris is primarily known for his work as a theoretician, he also conducted ethnographic fieldwork throughout his career. Harris traveled to Rio de Contas, Brazil in 1950-51 to conduct research for his dissertation, "Minas Velhas: A Study of Urbanism in the Mountains of Eastern Brazil." This research was also the subject of his book Town and Country in Brazil (1958) and his chapter, "Race Relations in Minas Velhas, a Community in the Mountain Region of Central Brazil" in Race and Class in Rural Brazil (Charles Wagley, 1952). He continued his research in Brazil in 1953-54 while serving as a research advisor for the Ministry of Education in Rio de Janeiro. As field leader of the Columbia-Cornell-Harvard-Illinois Summer Field Studies Program, Harris returned to Brazil in 1962 to study fishing villages in Arembepe. Prior to that, he also served as field leader for the program in Chimborazo, Ecuador in 1960.

In 1956-57, Harris conducted field research in Mozambique, at the time under Portuguese rule. He initially intended to study the influence of Portuguese rule on race relations, comparing the race relations in Brazil and Mozambique. He soon became aware, however, of the political brutalities that the Portuguese government was imposing on the people of Mozambique. Consequently, Harris decided to focus his research on labor exploitation in the colony. Antonio de Figueiredo, who later became an important figure in the Mozambique liberation movement, served as an informal assistant to Harris. Harris was also friends with Eduardo Mondlane, president of FRELIMO, the Mozambican Liberation Front. Because Harris was openly critical of the Portuguese government, he was forced to leave Mozambique before he completed his research. When he returned to the United States, Harris published Portugal's African "Wards" (1958), a critical evaluation of Portugal's colonialism. His publication was influential in eradicating the forced labor system in Mozambique a few years later.

Harris' activism extended to the social and political unrest at home during the 1960s. He was vice-chairman of Vietnam Facts, an organization of professors in the United States who were against the Vietnam War, and was one of the organizers of the Ad Hoc Teaching Committee on Vietnam. In 1967, he brought an academic focus to war by organizing a symposium on the subject with Morton Fried and Robert Murphy at the American Anthropological Association's (AAA) annual meeting. Together, they edited War: The Anthropology of Armed Conflict and Aggression (1968), a compilation of the papers presented at the conference. During the 1968 student uprising at Columbia University, Harris was one of the few faculty members that openly sided with the students. Harris criticized the actions of the university administrators in his article, "Big Busts on Morningside Heights" (1968).

Due to his experiences in Mozambique, Harris also began to think about the distinctions between emic and etic perspectives, which he discusses in his book, The Nature of Cultural Things (1964). During the 1960s-70s, Harris experimented with the use of video recordings as an etic approach to collecting ethnographic data. He collaborated with the Bronx State Hospital to videotape domestic life in two Puerto Rican and two African American families. He also videotaped and coded behavioral streams of two Caucasian and two African-American families in New York City for his NSF funded project, "Patterns of Authority and Subordination in Low-Income Urban Domiciles." In 1965 and 1992, Harris returned to Brazil to study racial categorizations and identifications, specifically the emic and etic differences in the perception of race. He published several papers on the subject, including "The Structural Significance of Brazilian Racial Categories" (1963), "Referential Ambiguity in the Calculus of Brazilian Racial Identity" (1970), and "Who are the Whites?" (1993).

During the 1980s, Harris was troubled by the rising popularity of postmodernist theory within anthropology. He believed that anthropology was a science and was concerned about the harmful consequences of postmodernist theory to the field. He organized a AAA session on postmodernism called "Anti-anti Science" in 1989 and participated in multiple conference sessions on the subject, including a 1993 session on "The Objectivity Crisis: Rethinking the Role of Science" at the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) meeting. "Anthropology and Postmodernism," a revised version of his AAAS paper was published as a chapter in Science, Materialism, and the Study of Culture (Martin F. Murphey and Maxine L. Margolis, 1995). Harris also criticized postmodernist theory in his final book, Theories of Culture in Postmodern Times (1999).

While Harris thought that postmodernism was moving anthropology further away from science, behavior scientists began to see the relevancy of cultural materialism in their own research. In 1986, Harris was invited to give an address at the annual conference of the Association for Behavioral Analysis (ABA). His paper was titled, "Cultural Materialism and Behavior Analysis: Common Problems and Radical Solutions." He also participated in a symposium on "The Integration of Cultural Materialism and Behavior Analysis" at the 1991 ABA annual meeting.

From 1988-90, Harris served as president of the General Anthropology Division of AAA. In 1991, he was given the honor of presenting the Distinguished Lecture at the AAA annual meeting. His talk was titled, "Anthropology and the Theoretical and Paradigmatic Significance of the Collapse of Soviet and East European Communism." That same year, The Rise of Anthropological Theory was designated a Social Science Citation Classic.

Harris died at the age of 74 on October 25, 2001.

Sources Consulted

Margoline, Maxine L. and Conrad Phillip Kottak. "Marvin Harris (1927-2001)." American Anthropologist. 105(3) (2003): 685-688.

Curriculum Vitae. Series 7. Biographical Files. Marvin Harris papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

Harris, Marvin. "Cultural Materialism is Alive and Well and Won't Go Away Until Something Better Comes Along." In Assessing Anthropology,edited by Robert Borofsky, 62-76. New York: McGraw Hill, 1994.

Chronology

1927 -- Born August 18 in Brooklyn, New York

1945-1947 -- Served in U.S. Army Transportation Corps

1948 -- B.A. from Columbia College

1950-1951 -- Field research in Brazil

1953 -- Ph.D. in Anthropology from Columbia University Field research in Brazil

1953-1954 -- Research Advisor, National Institute of Pedagogical Studies, Rio de Janeiro. Brazilian Ministry of Education

1953-1959 -- Assistant Professor, Department of Anthropology, Columbia University

1956-1957 -- Field research in Mozambique

1959-1963 -- Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology, Columbia University

1960 -- Field leader of Columbia-Cornell-Harvard-Illinois Summer Field Studies Program in Chimborazo, Ecuador

1962 -- Field leader of Columbia-Cornell-Harvard-Illinois Summer Field Studies Program in Arembepe, Bahia, Brazil. NSF

1963-1980 -- Professor, Department of Anthropology, Columbia University

1963-1966 -- Chair, Department of Anthropology, Columbia University

1965 -- Field Research in Brazil

1965-1972 -- Video Tape Methodology and Etic Ethnography

1969-1974 -- Principle Investigator, Videotape Studies of Urban Domiciles

1968-1969 -- Visiting Distinguished Professor, Central Washington State College

1976 -- Field Research in India

1980-2000 -- Graduate Research Professor, Department of Anthropology, University of Florida

1983-1984 -- Consultant, United Nations Fund for Population Activities

1984 -- McMurrin Professor, University of Utah, Fall

1991-1992 -- Consultant, McKinsey and Company Global Institute

1991 -- Presented AAA Distinguished Lecture, "Anthropology and the Theoretical and Paradigmatic Significance of the Collapse of Soviet and East European Communism" The Rise of Anthropological Theory designated Social Science Citation Classic

1992 -- Field Research in Brazil

2001 -- Died October 25

Selected Bibliography

1952 -- Harris, Marvin. "Race Relations in Minas Velhas." In Race and Class in Rural Brazil, edited by Charles Wagley, 51-55. Paris: UNESCO, 1952.

1956 -- Harris, Marvin. Town and Country in Brazil. New York: Columbia University Press, 1956.

1958 -- Harris, Marvin, and Charles Wagley. Minorities in the New World. New York: Columbia University, 1958. Harris, Marvin. Portugal's African "Wards". New York: The American Committee on Africa, 1958.

1959 -- Harris, Marvin. "The Economy Has No Surplus?" American Anthropologist 51 (1959): 189-199. Harris, Marvin. "Labor Emigration Among the Mozambique Thonga: Cultural and Political Factors." Africa 29 (1959): 50-56.

1963 -- Harris, Marvin, and Conrad Kottack. "The Structural Significance of Brazilian Racial Categories." Sociologia 25 (1963): 203-209.

1964 -- Harris, Marvin. "Racial Identity in Brazil." Luso-Brazilian Review 1 (1964): 21-28. Harris, Marvin. The Nature of Cultural Things. New York: Random House, 1964. Harris, Marvin. Patterns of Race in the Americas. New York: Walker and Company, 1964.

1965 -- Harris, Marvin. "The Myth of the Sacred Cow." In Man, Culture and Animals, edited by A. Vayda and A. Leeds, 217-228. Washington: American Association for the Advancement of Science, 1965.

1966 -- Harris, Marvin. "The Cultural Ecology of India's Sacred Cattle." Current Anthropology 7 (1966): 51-66. Harris, Marvin, and George Morren. "The Limitations of the Principle of Limited Possibilities." American Anthropologist 58 (1966): 122-127.

1967 -- Harris, Marvin, Morton Fried, and Robert Murphy, eds. "The Anthropology of War and Aggression." Special Supplement, Natural History (December 1967): 30-70.

1968 -- Harris, Marvin. "Big Bust on Morningside Heights." The Nation 206 (1968): 757-763. Harris, Marvin. The Rise of Anthropological Theory. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell, 1968. Harris, Marvin, Morton Fried, and Robert Murphy, eds. War: The Anthropology of Armed Conflict and Aggression. New York: Natural History Press, 1968.

1970 -- Harris, Marvin. "Referential Ambiguity in the Calculus of Brazilian Racial Identity." Southwestern Journal of Anthropology 26 (1970): 1-14.

1971 -- Harris, Marvin. Culture, Man and Nature: An Introduction to General Anthropology. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell, 1971.

1974 -- Harris, Marvin. Cows, Pigs, Wars and Witches: The Riddles of Culture. New York: Random House, 1974.

1976 -- Harris, Marvin, and William Divale. "Population, Warfare, and the Male Supremacist Complex." American Anthropologist 78 (1976): 521-538.

1977 -- Harris, Marvin. Cannibals and Kings: The Origins of Cultures. New York: Random House, 1977.

1979 -- Harris, Marvin. Cultural Materialism: The Struggle for a Science of Culture. New York: Random House, 1979.

1981 -- Harris, Marvin. America Now: The Anthropology of a Changing Culture. New York: Simon and Schuster, 1981.

1982 -- Harris, Marvin, A. Vaidynathan, and K.N. Nair. "Bovine Sex and Species Ratios in India." Current Anthropology 23 (1982): 365-383.

1983 -- Harris, Marvin. Cultural Anthropology. New York: Harper and Row, 1983.

1984 -- Harris, Marvin. "Animal Capture and Yanomamo Warfare: Retrospect and New Evidence." Journal of Anthropological Research 40 (1984): 183-201.

1985 -- Harris, Marvin. Good to Eat: Riddles of Food and Culture. New York: Simon and Schuster, 1985.

1987 -- Harris, Marvin. "Cultural Materialism: Alarums and Excursions." In Waymarks: The Notre Dame Inaugural Lectures in Anthropology, edited by Kenneth Morre, 107-126. Notre Dame: Notre Dame Press, 1987. Harris, Marvin, and Eric Ross, eds. Food and Evolution: Toward a Theory of Human Food Habits. Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 1987. Harris, Marvin, and Eric Ross. Death, Sex and Fertility: Population Regulation in Preindustrial and Developing Societies. New York: Columbia University Press, 1987.

1988 -- Harris, Marvin. Why Nothing Works: The Anthropology of Daily Life. New York: Touchstone, 1988.

1989 -- Harris, Marvin. Our Kind: Who We Are, Where We Came From, and Where We're Going. New York: Harper and Row, 1989.

1991 -- Harris, Marvin. "Anthropology: Ships that Crash in the Night." In Perspectives on Social Science: The Colorado Lectures, edited by Richard Jessor, 70-114. Boulder, CO.: Westview, 1991. Harris, Marvin, Thomas Headland, and Kenneth Pike, eds. Emics and Etics: The Insider/Outsider Debate. Newbury Park, CA: Sage, 1991. Harris, Marvin. "The Evolution of Human Gender Hierarchies: A Trial Formulation." In Sex and Gender Hierarchies, edited by Barbara Miller, 57-79. New York: Cambridge University Press, 1991.

1992 -- Harris, Marvin. "Distinguished Lecture: Anthropology and the Theoretical and Paradigmatic Significance of the collapse of Soviet and East European Communism." American Anthropologist 94 (1992): 295-305.

1993 -- Harris, Marvin, Josildeth Gomes Consorte, Joseph Lang, and Bryan Byrne. "Who are the White? Imposed Census Categories and the Racial Demography of Brazil." Social Forces 72 (1993): 451-462.

1994 -- Harris, Marvin. "Cultural Materialism is Alive and Well and Won't Go Away Until Something Better Comes Along." In Assessing Anthropology, edited by Robert Borofsky, 62-76. New York: McGraw Hill, 1994.

1995 -- Harris, Marvin. "Anthropology and Postmodernism." In Science, Materialism, and the Study of Culture, edited by Martin Murphy and Maxine Margolis, 62-77. Gainsville, FL: University Press of Florida, 1995.

1999 -- Harris, Marvin. Theories of Culture in Postmodern Times. Walnut Creek, CA: AltaMira Press, 1999.
Related Materials:
More of Marvin Harris' correspondence can be found in the papers of William Duncan Strong. Researchers may also want to consult the Human Studies Film Archives, which holds video oral histories of Charles Wagley (HSFA 89.10.5) and Lambros Comitas (HSFA 89.10.20), both of whom discuss Harris in their interviews.
Separated Materials:
An open reel video from the collection was transferred to the Human Studies Film Archives (HSFA 2011.10.1). The video relates to Series 2: Research; Sub-series 2.6: Videotape Research--"[Macy's Santa Claus study]"
Provenance:
The papers of Marvin Harris were donated to the National Anthropological Archives by his daughter, Susan Harris.
Restrictions:
Access to student records (consisting of graded materials and student recommendation letters), grant proposals sent to Harris for review by grant agencies, and part of his faculty recruitment files are restricted until 2081. Series 10. Computer Files are also restricted due to preservation concerns.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Food habits  Search this
Race  Search this
Anthropology  Search this
Cattle -- India  Search this
Citation:
Marvin Harris papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NAA.2009-27
See more items in:
Marvin Harris papers
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-2009-27

Division of Physical Anthropology collection of photographs of physical anthropologists

Collector:
National Museum of Natural History (U.S.). Division of Physical Anthropology  Search this
Photographer:
Armed Forces Institute of Pathology (U.S.)  Search this
Gibson Art Galleries  Search this
Harris & Ewing  Search this
Underwood & Underwood  Search this
Farrar, Richard  Search this
Prokopec, Miroslav  Search this
Rau, William Herman, 1855-1920  Search this
Names:
Harper & Brothers, printers  Search this
Allen, Harrison, 1841-1897  Search this
Angel, J. Lawrence (John Lawrence)  Search this
Baer, Karl Ernst von, 1792-1876  Search this
Barbour, Erwin Hinckley, 1856-1947 (possible photographer)  Search this
Bertillon, Alphonse, 1853-1914  Search this
Brinton, Daniel G. (Daniel Garrison), 1837-1899  Search this
Broca, Paul, 1824-1880  Search this
Cobb, W. Montague (William Montague), 1904-1990  Search this
Corrêa, A. A. Mendes (Antonio Augusto Mendes), 1888-1960  Search this
Dubois, Eugène, 1858-1940  Search this
Eliot, Charles William, 1834-1926  Search this
Farabee, William Curtis, 1865-1925  Search this
Ford, James Alfred, 1911-1968  Search this
Giuffrida-Ruggeri, V. (Vincenzo), 1872-1922  Search this
Goldstein, Marcus S. (Marcus Solomon), 1906-  Search this
Gorjanović-Kramberger, Dragutin, 1856-1936  Search this
Haddon, Alfred C. (Alfred Cort), 1855-1940  Search this
Harvey, William, 1578-1657  Search this
Hooton, Earnest Albert, 1887-1954  Search this
Hough, Walter, 1859-1935  Search this
Hrdlička, Aleš, 1869-1943  Search this
Leakey, L. S. B. (Louis Seymour Bazett), 1903-1972  Search this
León, Nicolás, 1859-1929  Search this
Lillie, Frank Rattray, 1870-1947  Search this
Manouvrier, L. (Léonce), 1850-1927  Search this
Meigs, James Aitken, 1829-1879  Search this
Morton, Samuel George, 1799-1851  Search this
Newman, Marshall T. (Marshall Thornton), 1911-1994  Search this
Ortner, Donald J.  Search this
Osborn, Henry Fairfield, 1857-1935  Search this
Purkyně, Jan Evangelista, 1787-1869  Search this
Retzius, A. (Anders), 1796-1860  Search this
Retzius, Gustaf, 1842-1919  Search this
Schultz, Adolph H. (Adolph Hans), 1891-  Search this
Schwalbe, Gustav Albert, 1844-1916  Search this
Sergi, Giuseppe, 1841-1936  Search this
Sims, J. Marion (James Marion), 1813-1883  Search this
St. Hoyme, Lucile Eleanor  Search this
Stewart, T. D. (Thomas Dale), 1901-1997  Search this
Todd, T. Wingate (Thomas Wingate), 1885-1938  Search this
Virchow, Rudolf, 1821-1902  Search this
Wyman, Jeffries, 1814-1874  Search this
Extent:
1 Print (engraving)
2 Prints (chalk manner lithograph)
3 Prints (etching)
23 photomechanical prints (halftone, photogravure, and collotype)
152 Photographic prints (silver gelatin and albumen)
8 copy prints
6 copy negatives
1 Print (offset lithography)
1 Print (probably chromolithograph)
11 Negatives (acetate)
3 Drawings
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Prints
Photomechanical prints
Photographic prints
Copy prints
Copy negatives
Negatives
Drawings
Photographs
Date:
undated
Scope and Contents note:
Photographs relating to physical anthropologists from around the 19th and 20th centuries in Europe and the United States. Many of the photographs depict Smithsonian staff, particularly Ales Hrdlicka and T. Dale Stewart, as well as people and artifacts relating to physical anthropology throughout history. Some of the portraits are signed and the collection also includes pamphlets from professional societies, prints mounted for publication, a copy of the Baltimore Sunday Sun relating to Adolph Schultz, and some correspondence.
Local Call Number(s):
NAA Photo Lot 4822
Location of Other Archival Materials:
The National Anthropological Archives holds the Ales Hrdlicka papers, Thomas Dale Stewart papers, and John Lawrence Angel papers.
Additional photographs collected by the Division of Physical Anthropology held in National Anthropological Archives Photo Lot 8 and Photo Lot 83-41.
Contained in:
Numbered manuscripts 1850s-1980s (some earlier)
See others in:
Division of Physical Anthropology collection of photographs of physical anthropologists, undated
Restrictions:
The collection is open for research.

Access to the collection requires an appointment.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Physical anthropologists  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Citation:
Photo Lot 4822, Division of Physical Anthropology collection of photographs of physical anthropologists, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NAA.PhotoLot.4822
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-photolot-4822

Lawrence Oschinsky papers

Creator:
Oschinsky, Lawrence, 1921-1965  Search this
Extent:
18 Linear feet
Type:
Collection descriptions
Archival materials
Manuscripts
Photographs
Date:
circa 1900-1965
Summary:
The papers of Lawrence Oschinsky primarily document his research and professional activities from 1940s-1965 as an American physical anthropologist, but include some personal materials as well. The collection contains his published works, dissertations, field notes, correspondence, teaching materials, and many photographs depicting both his personal travels and his research subjects in the Canadian Arctic, Africa, Asia, and other regions.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of Lawrence Oschinsky primarily document his professional life and research on the racial affinities and evolutionary characteristics of various peoples. The collection contains his published works, dissertations, field notes, correspondence, teaching materials, and many photographs depicting both his personal travels and his research subjects in the Canadian Arctic, Africa, Asia, and other regions.
Arrangement:
The Lawrence Oschinsky papers are organized into 9 series:

Series 1: Personal Information and Effects

Series 2: Correspondence

Series 3: Education

Series 4: Research and Notes

Series 5: Published Works

Series 6: Writings

Series 7: Teaching Materials

Series 8: Photographs

Series 9: Motion picture film
Biographical / Historical:
Lawrence Oschinsky was born on April 19, 1921, to Lea Pollak Oschinsky and John Oschinsky in New York City. He received his B.A. degree from Brooklyn College in 1943, where he was first drawn to anthropology. In 1947 he received his master's degree in Anthropology from the University of Chicago, with the thesis entitled "Islam in Chicago: Being a Study of the Acculturation of a Muslim Palestinian Community in That City." He attended the University of Zurich from 1947-1950 pursuing graduate coursework in anthropology.

From 1950-1951 he was instructor of anatomy at Makerere College Medical School, in Kampala Uganda, studying the racial affinities of various African tribes. From 1951-1952 he was a Research Student at the University of Cambridge, England. He returned to the University of Zurich in 1952 and received his PhD in Anthropology. His doctoral dissertation, published in 1953, was entitled "The Racial Affinities of the Baganda and Other Bantu Tribes of British East Africa." In October 1953, Oschinsky returned to the United States and began his teaching and research career as an Instructor in Physical Anthropology at the Graduate School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania. He also acted as research assistant to Dr. Wilton M. Krogman, Professor of Physical Anthropology, and took anthropometric measurements of school children for Krogman's child growth research program.

Concurrently, Oschinsky cooperated with police and other agencies in the forensic identification of unknown human remains and cases of disputed paternity. Toward the end of 1953, he obtained a position as a Research Scholar in Physical Anthropology at the United States Educational Foundation in Burma. He spent a year studying the peoples of Burma in relation to those of Thailand, Indonesia, Malaya, and the Philippines. From 1956-1957, he was an Instructor in Anatomy at Howard University Medical School in Washington, DC. During 1957-1958, he was Visiting Lecturer in Physical Anthropology at the University of Arizona, Tucson. In 1958, Oschinsky was offered the position of Curator of Physical Anthropology at the National Museum of Canada, in Ottawa, where he devoted himself to an intensive study of the museum's osteological collections. In 1962 he became a part-time instructor in Physical Anthropology at St. Patrick's College, University of Ottawa. In July 1963, Oschinsky became Assistant Professor, and later Associate Professor of Physical Anthropology, University of Toronto, where he taught until his death on December 19, 1965.

Oschinsky wrote several scientific papers during these years, culminating in 1964 with the monograph The Most Ancient Eskimos: The Eskimo Affinities of Dorset Culture Skeletal Remains.. In this book, Oschinsky explored Eskimo prehistory via skeletal specimens.

Chronology

1921 April 19 -- Born in New York City, NY

1939-1943 -- Bachelor of Arts, Brooklyn College

1943-1947 -- Masters in Anthropology, University of Chicago

1947-1950 -- Graduate Coursework in Anthropology, University of Zurich

1950-1951 -- Anatomy instructor; studied racial affinities of African tribes, Makerere College Medical School, Uganda

1951-1952 -- Research student, University of Cambridge, England

1952-53 -- PhD in Physical Anthropology, University of Zurich

1953 -- Worked with police and other agencies in the forensic identification of unknown human remains and cases of disputed paternity

1953-1954 -- Instructor, Physical Anthropology, Graduate School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania Research assistant to Dr. Wilton M. Krogman; took anthropometric measurements of schoolchildren for Krogman's child growth research program.

1954-1955 -- Research scholar in Physical Anthropology, United States Educational Foundation, Burma (currently Myanmar)

1956-1957 -- Instructor in Anatomy, Howard University Medical School, Washington, D.C.

1957-1958 -- Visiting Lecturer in Physical Anthropology, University of Arizona, Tucson

1958-1963 -- Curator of Physical Anthropology, National Museum of Canada, Ottawa

1962 -- Part-time instructor in Physical Anthropology, St. Patrick's College, University of Ottawa

1963-1965 -- Assistant Professor of Physical Anthropology, University of Toronto

1964 -- Published monograph, The Most Ancient Eskimos: The Eskimo Affinities of Dorset Culture Skeletal Remains

1965 December 19 -- Died in Toronto, Ontario
Related Materials:
The National Anthropological archives holds the records of the Wilton M. Krogman Center for Research in Child Growth and Development.
Separated Materials:
Oschinsky's measuring instruments and a number of dental casts were transferred to the biological anthropology collections of the National Museum of Natural History.
Provenance:
The papers were donated to the National Anthropological Archives by Lawrence Oschinsky's nephew, Scott Fuller, in 2016.
Restrictions:
The collection is open for research. Access to the Lawrence Oschinsky papers requires an appointment.
Rights:
Contact the repository for terms of use.
Topic:
Physical anthropology  Search this
anthropometry  Search this
Physical anthropology -- skeletal remains  Search this
Physical anthropology -- Eskimo  Search this
Physical anthropology -- Early man  Search this
Genre/Form:
Manuscripts
Photographs
Citation:
Lawrence Oschinsky papers, National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NAA.2016-26
See more items in:
Lawrence Oschinsky papers
Archival Repository:
National Anthropological Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-naa-2016-26

William Henry Holmes artists' files, 1879-1955

Creator:
Holmes, William Henry, 1846-1933  Search this
Subject:
Sharp, Joseph Henry  Search this
Moser, James Henry  Search this
Closson, William Baxter Palmer  Search this
Wiles, Irving Ramsay  Search this
Weyl, Max  Search this
La Farge, John  Search this
Ream, Vinnie  Search this
Brooke, Richard Norris  Search this
Nichols, John Hobart  Search this
Johnston, Reuben Le Grand  Search this
Messer, Edmund Clarence  Search this
Pennell, Joseph  Search this
Fraser, James Earle  Search this
Walcott, Mary Vaux  Search this
Oakley, Violet  Search this
Weller, Carl F.  Search this
Moran, Thomas  Search this
Zolnay, George Julian  Search this
Melchers, Gari  Search this
Smithsonian American Art Museum  Search this
Washington Water Color Club (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Type:
Sketches
Photographs
Topic:
Art, American  Search this
Curators  Search this
Museum directors  Search this
Artists  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)7791
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)209957
AAA_collcode_holmwill
Theme:
Communities, Organizations, Museums
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_coll_209957
Additional Online Media:

Site of Kwakiutl Settlement at Fort Rupert

Creator:
Hastings, Oregon Columbus  Search this
Subject:
Boas, Franz 1858-1942  Search this
United States National Museum  Search this
Physical description:
8 x 10;
Type:
Glass negatives
Place:
Vancouver Island (B.C.)
Date:
1894
Topic:
Kwakiutl Indians  Search this
Indians of North America  Search this
Ethnology  Search this
Ethnological expeditions  Search this
Local number:
SIA Acc. 11-007 [MNH-4811]
Restrictions & Rights:
No access restrictions Many of SIA's holdings are located off-site, and advance notice is recommended to consult a collection. Please email the SIA Reference Team at osiaref@si.edu
No Known Copyright
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_arc_392014

Portrait in Profile of Kwakiutl Man

Creator:
Hastings, Oregon Columbus  Search this
Subject:
United States National Museum  Search this
Boas, Franz 1858-1942  Search this
Physical description:
7 x 5;
Type:
Vancouver Island (B.C.)
Glass negatives
Date:
1894
Topic:
Kwakiutl Indians  Search this
Indians of North America  Search this
Ethnology  Search this
Ethnological expeditions  Search this
Local number:
SIA Acc. 11-007 [MNH-4771]
Restrictions & Rights:
No access restrictions Many of SIA's holdings are located off-site, and advance notice is recommended to consult a collection. Please email the SIA Reference Team at osiaref@si.edu
No Known Copyright
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_arc_392015

Portrait of Kwakiutl Man

Creator:
Hastings, Oregon Columbus  Search this
Subject:
United States National Museum  Search this
Boas, Franz 1858-1942  Search this
Physical description:
7 x 5;
Type:
Vancouver Island (B.C.)
Glass negatives
Date:
1894
Topic:
Kwakiutl Indians  Search this
Indians of North America  Search this
Ethnology  Search this
Ethnological expeditions  Search this
Local number:
SIA Acc. 11-007 [MNH-4772]
Restrictions & Rights:
No access restrictions Many of SIA's holdings are located off-site, and advance notice is recommended to consult a collection. Please email the SIA Reference Team at osiaref@si.edu
No Known Copyright
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_arc_392016

Kwakiutl Tsetsaeqa (Winter Ceremonial)

Creator:
Hastings, Oregon Columbus  Search this
Subject:
United States National Museum  Search this
Boas, Franz 1858-1942  Search this
Physical description:
5 x 7;
Type:
Vancouver Island (B.C.)
Glass negatives
Date:
1894
Topic:
Kwakiutl Indians  Search this
Indians of North America  Search this
Ethnology  Search this
Ethnological expeditions  Search this
Local number:
SIA Acc. 11-007 [MNH-4773]
Restrictions & Rights:
No access restrictions Many of SIA's holdings are located off-site, and advance notice is recommended to consult a collection. Please email the SIA Reference Team at osiaref@si.edu
No Known Copyright
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_arc_392017

Site of Kwakiutl Settlement at Fort Rupert

Creator:
Hastings, Oregon Columbus  Search this
Subject:
United States National Museum  Search this
Boas, Franz 1858-1942  Search this
Physical description:
5 x 7;
Type:
Vancouver Island (B.C.)
Glass negatives
Date:
1894
Topic:
Kwakiutl Indians  Search this
Indians of North America  Search this
Ethnology  Search this
Ethnological expeditions  Search this
Local number:
SIA Acc. 11-007 [MNH-4775]
Restrictions & Rights:
No access restrictions Many of SIA's holdings are located off-site, and advance notice is recommended to consult a collection. Please email the SIA Reference Team at osiaref@si.edu
No Known Copyright
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_arc_392018

Portrait of Two Kwakiutl Men

Creator:
Hastings, Oregon Columbus  Search this
Subject:
United States National Museum  Search this
Boas, Franz 1858-1942  Search this
Physical description:
7 x 5;
Type:
Vancouver Island (B.C.)
Glass negatives
Date:
1894
Topic:
Kwakiutl Indians  Search this
Indians of North America  Search this
Ethnology  Search this
Ethnological expeditions  Search this
Local number:
SIA Acc. 11-007 [MNH-4793]
Restrictions & Rights:
No access restrictions Many of SIA's holdings are located off-site, and advance notice is recommended to consult a collection. Please email the SIA Reference Team at osiaref@si.edu
No Known Copyright
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_arc_392019

Portrait of Kwakiutl Man

Creator:
Hastings, Oregon Columbus  Search this
Subject:
United States National Museum  Search this
Boas, Franz 1858-1942  Search this
Physical description:
7 x 5;
Type:
Vancouver Island (B.C.)
Glass negatives
Date:
1894
Topic:
Kwakiutl Indians  Search this
Indians of North America  Search this
Ethnology  Search this
Ethnological expeditions  Search this
Local number:
SIA Acc. 11-007 [MNH-4794]
Restrictions & Rights:
No access restrictions Many of SIA's holdings are located off-site, and advance notice is recommended to consult a collection. Please email the SIA Reference Team at osiaref@si.edu
No Known Copyright
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_arc_392020

Totem Pole Carved by Kwakiutl Indians

Creator:
Hastings, Oregon Columbus  Search this
Subject:
United States National Museum  Search this
Boas, Franz 1858-1942  Search this
Physical description:
7 x 5;
Type:
Vancouver Island (B.C.)
Glass negatives
Date:
1894
Topic:
Kwakiutl Indians  Search this
Indians of North America  Search this
Ethnology  Search this
Ethnological expeditions  Search this
Local number:
SIA Acc. 11-007 [MNH-4797]
Restrictions & Rights:
No access restrictions Many of SIA's holdings are located off-site, and advance notice is recommended to consult a collection. Please email the SIA Reference Team at osiaref@si.edu
No Known Copyright
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_arc_392021

Totem Pole Carved by Kwakiutl Indians

Creator:
Hastings, Oregon Columbus  Search this
Subject:
United States National Museum  Search this
Boas, Franz 1858-1942  Search this
Physical description:
7 x 5;
Type:
Vancouver Island (B.C.)
Glass negatives
Date:
1894
Topic:
Kwakiutl Indians  Search this
Indians of North America  Search this
Ethnology  Search this
Ethnological expeditions  Search this
Local number:
SIA Acc. 11-007 [MNH-4798]
Restrictions & Rights:
No access restrictions Many of SIA's holdings are located off-site, and advance notice is recommended to consult a collection. Please email the SIA Reference Team at osiaref@si.edu
No Known Copyright
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_arc_392022

Totem Pole Carved by Kwakiutl Indians

Creator:
Hastings, Oregon Columbus  Search this
Subject:
United States National Museum  Search this
Boas, Franz 1858-1942  Search this
Physical description:
7 x 5;
Type:
Vancouver Island (B.C.)
Glass negatives
Date:
1894
Topic:
Kwakiutl Indians  Search this
Indians of North America  Search this
Ethnology  Search this
Ethnological expeditions  Search this
Local number:
SIA Acc. 11-007 [MNH-4799]
Restrictions & Rights:
No access restrictions Many of SIA's holdings are located off-site, and advance notice is recommended to consult a collection. Please email the SIA Reference Team at osiaref@si.edu
No Known Copyright
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_arc_392023

Totem Pole Carved by Kwakiutl Indians

Creator:
Hastings, Oregon Columbus  Search this
Subject:
United States National Museum  Search this
Boas, Franz 1858-1942  Search this
Physical description:
5 x 7;
Type:
Vancouver Island (B.C.)
Glass negatives
Date:
1894
Topic:
Kwakiutl Indians  Search this
Indians of North America  Search this
Ethnology  Search this
Ethnological expeditions  Search this
Local number:
SIA Acc. 11-007 [MNH-4800]
Restrictions & Rights:
No access restrictions Many of SIA's holdings are located off-site, and advance notice is recommended to consult a collection. Please email the SIA Reference Team at osiaref@si.edu
No Known Copyright
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_arc_392024

Totem Pole Carved by Kwakiutl Indians

Creator:
Hastings, Oregon Columbus  Search this
Subject:
United States National Museum  Search this
Boas, Franz 1858-1942  Search this
Physical description:
7 x 5;
Type:
Vancouver Island (B.C.)
Glass negatives
Date:
1894
Topic:
Kwakiutl Indians  Search this
Indians of North America  Search this
Ethnology  Search this
Ethnological expeditions  Search this
Local number:
SIA Acc. 11-007 [MNH-4801]
Restrictions & Rights:
No access restrictions Many of SIA's holdings are located off-site, and advance notice is recommended to consult a collection. Please email the SIA Reference Team at osiaref@si.edu
No Known Copyright
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_arc_392025

Raven Mask and Dress of Red and White Cedar Bark

Creator:
Hastings, Oregon Columbus  Search this
Subject:
United States National Museum  Search this
Boas, Franz 1858-1942  Search this
Physical description:
5 x 7;
Type:
Vancouver Island (B.C.)
Glass negatives
Date:
1894
Topic:
Kwakiutl Indians  Search this
Indians of North America  Search this
Ethnology  Search this
Ethnological expeditions  Search this
Local number:
SIA Acc. 11-007 [MNH-4802]
Restrictions & Rights:
No access restrictions Many of SIA's holdings are located off-site, and advance notice is recommended to consult a collection. Please email the SIA Reference Team at osiaref@si.edu
No Known Copyright
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_arc_392026

Raven Mask and Dress of Red and White Cedar Bark

Creator:
Hastings, Oregon Columbus  Search this
Subject:
United States National Museum  Search this
Boas, Franz 1858-1942  Search this
Physical description:
5 x 7;
Type:
Vancouver Island (B.C.)
Glass negatives
Date:
1894
Topic:
Kwakiutl Indians  Search this
Indians of North America  Search this
Ethnology  Search this
Ethnological expeditions  Search this
Local number:
SIA Acc. 11-007 [MNH-4803]
Restrictions & Rights:
No access restrictions Many of SIA's holdings are located off-site, and advance notice is recommended to consult a collection. Please email the SIA Reference Team at osiaref@si.edu
No Known Copyright
Data Source:
Smithsonian Institution Archives
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_arc_392027

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