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Oral history interview with Dana Chandler, 1993 March 11-May 5

Interviewee:
Chandler, Dana, 1941-  Search this
Interviewer:
Brown, Robert F.  Search this
Subject:
Andrews, Benny  Search this
Tovish, Harold  Search this
Catlett, Elizabeth  Search this
Bearden, Romare  Search this
Mazur, Michael  Search this
Massachusetts College of Art  Search this
Museum of Fine Arts, Boston  Search this
African-American Master Artists in Residence Program  Search this
Northeastern University (Boston, Mass.)  Search this
Simmons College.Art and Music Dept  Search this
Type:
Interviews
Sound recordings
Topic:
Art teachers  Search this
African American artists  Search this
Printmakers  Search this
Painters  Search this
Art  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)11499
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)215773
AAA_collcode_chandl93
Theme:
African American
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_oh_215773

Calvin Burnett papers, 1920-1979, bulk 1960s-1970s

Creator:
Burnett, Calvin W., 1921-2007  Search this
Type:
Drawings
Interviews
Transcripts
Sketchbooks
Scrapbooks
Photographs
Topic:
Art  Search this
Illustrators  Search this
African American artists  Search this
Graphic artists  Search this
Educators  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)8493
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)210669
AAA_collcode_burncalv
Theme:
Sketches & Sketchbooks
Diaries
African American
Lives of American Artists
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_coll_210669
Additional Online Media:

Oral history interview with Calvin Burnett, 1980 June 13-1981 January 6

Interviewee:
Burnett, Calvin W., 1921-2007  Search this
Interviewer:
Brown, Robert F.  Search this
Type:
Interviews
Sound recordings
Topic:
Illustrators  Search this
African American artists  Search this
Printmakers  Search this
Designers  Search this
Art teachers  Search this
Painters  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)11452
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)212245
AAA_collcode_burnet80
Theme:
African American
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_oh_212245
Additional Online Media:

Oral history interview with Allan Rohan Crite, 1979 January 16-1980 October 22

Interviewee:
Crite, Allan Rohan, 1910-2007  Search this
Interviewer:
Brown, Robert F.  Search this
Subject:
Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. School  Search this
Society of Independent Artists (New York, N.Y.)  Search this
Rambusch (Firm)  Search this
Rambusch Glass and Decorating Company  Search this
Type:
Interviews
Sound recordings
Topic:
Christian art and symbolism  Search this
Art  Search this
Painters  Search this
Illustrators  Search this
Art, American  Search this
African American artists  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)11458
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)212600
AAA_collcode_crite79
Theme:
African American
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_oh_212600
Additional Online Media:

Oral history interview with Adrian Piper, 1990 Sept. 20

Interviewee:
Piper, Adrian, 1948-  Search this
Interviewer:
Withers, Josephine  Search this
Type:
Interviews
Sound recordings
Topic:
Women artists  Search this
African American artists  Search this
Educators  Search this
Conceptual artists  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)11478
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)213696
AAA_collcode_piper90
Theme:
African American
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_oh_213696

Oral history interview with John Wilson, 1993 March 11-1994 August 16

Interviewee:
Wilson, John Woodrow, 1922-  Search this
Interviewer:
Brown, Robert F.  Search this
Subject:
Hurwitz, Sidney  Search this
Siqueiros, David Alfaro  Search this
Rivera, Diego  Search this
Lewis, Elma  Search this
LÔeger, Fernand  Search this
Gaither, Edmund B.  Search this
Bengtz, Ture  Search this
Zerbe, Karl  Search this
Kramer, Jack N.  Search this
Aronson, David  Search this
Kay, Reed  Search this
Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. School  Search this
Boston University.School of Fine and Applied Arts  Search this
Type:
Interviews
Sound recordings
Topic:
African American artists as teachers  Search this
Printmakers  Search this
Art  Search this
Art teachers  Search this
Painters  Search this
Sculptors  Search this
African American artists  Search this
Record number:
(DSI-AAA_CollID)11501
(DSI-AAA_SIRISBib)216507
AAA_collcode_wilson93
Theme:
African American
Data Source:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:AAADCD_oh_216507

Gordon Parks : the new tide, early work, 1940-1950 / Philip Brookman ; with essays by Maurice Berger, Sarah Lewis, Richard J. Powell, Deborah Willis ; series editor, Peter W. Kunhardt, Jr

Title:
New tide, early work, 1940-1950
Editor:
Brookman, Philip  Search this
Photographer:
Parks, Gordon 1912-2006 Works Selections  Search this
Contributor:
Lebowitz, Anjuli  Search this
Doorly, Elizabeth  Search this
Author:
Powell, Richard J. 1953-  Search this
Willis, Deborah 1948-  Search this
Berger, Maurice 1956-  Search this
Host institution:
National Gallery of Art (U.S.)  Search this
Cleveland Museum of Art  Search this
Amon Carter Museum of American Art  Search this
Addison Gallery of American Art  Search this
Organizer:
Gordon Parks Foundation  Search this
Printer:
Steidl Verlag  Search this
Subject:
Parks, Gordon 1912-2006  Search this
Parks, Gordon 1912-2006 Criticism and interpretation  Search this
Parks, Gordon 1912-2006 Themes, motives  Search this
Physical description:
349 pages : illustrations (some color), portraits ; 30 x 26 cm
Type:
Exhibitions
In art
Exhibition catalogs
Essays
Portraits
Photobooks
Place:
United States
Kansas
Date:
2018
20th century
Topic:
Photography, Artistic  Search this
Portrait photography  Search this
Documentary photography  Search this
Black-and-white photography  Search this
Art, American  Search this
African American artists  Search this
African Americans in art  Search this
Art and society  Search this
Social conditions  Search this
Call number:
TR647 .P385 2018
TR647.P25 B76n 2018
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_1100835

Bob Thompson papers

Creator:
Thompson, Bob, 1937-1966  Search this
Names:
Billiard Place  Search this
David Anerson Gallery  Search this
Donald Morris Gallery  Search this
Sluggs Jazz Club  Search this
The Billard Palace  Search this
Whitney Museum of American Art  Search this
Baraka, Amiri, 1934-2014  Search this
Beskind, Dorothy Levitt  Search this
Bridwell, Margaret  Search this
Covi, Dario A.  Search this
Crodel, Charles, 1894-1973  Search this
Cruz, Emilio, 1938-  Search this
Ginsberg, Allen, 1926-  Search this
Martin, Mary, 1913-  Search this
May, Mary Spencer  Search this
Ratcliff, Carter  Search this
Schapiro, Meyer, 1904-  Search this
Spellman, A. B., 1935-  Search this
Thompson, Bessie  Search this
Thompson, Carol  Search this
Wilke, Ulfert, 1907-1987  Search this
Wilson, Judith, 1952-  Search this
Young, Kenneth, 1933-  Search this
Extent:
2 Linear feet
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Video recordings
Photographs
Date:
1949-2005
Summary:
The papers of New York African American figurative painter Bob Thompson measure 2 linear feet and date from 1949 to 2005. The collection includes biographical material, videocassettes, correspondence, writings by Bob Thompson and others, exhibition files, scattered personal business records, printed material, photographs, and photograph albums. The correspondence is mostly between Carol Thompson, the artist's wife, and others concerning Bob Thompson's artwork.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of New York African American figurative painter Bob Thompson measure 2 linear feet and date from 1949 to 2005. The collection includes biographical material, videocassettes, correspondence, writings by Bob Thompson and others, exhibition files, scattered personal business records, printed material, photographs, and photograph albums. The correspondence is mostly between Carol Thompson, the artist's wife, and others concerning Bob Thompson's artwork.

Biographical material includes certificates, school memorabilia, biographical chronologies, a memorial program and obituaries, and a transcript of "Bob Thompson: His Life and Friendships" panel discussion with several notable artists commenting on Thompson. There is also a video recording copy of a 1965 film by Dorothy Levitt Beskind titled Bob Thompson Happening which was made to accompany a 1999 exhibition at the Whitney Museum of Art.

Carol Thompson's correspondence is with various galleries, dealers, and friends primarily concerning Bob Thompson's artwork and posthumous exhibitions. There is correspondence with art historian Judith Wilson, the artist's mother Bessie Thompson, David Anderson Gallery, and Donald Morris Gallery.

Writings by Bob Thompson include church speeches, a letter to the editor of Louisville Courier Journal, a poem, and an artist statement. There are also writings about Thompson by others, including his mother Bessie Thompson, wife Carol Thompson, and artists and friends, including Margaret Bridwell, Dario Covi, Carl Crodel, Emilio Cruz, Allen Ginsberg, LeRoi Jones, Mary H. Martin, Mary Spencer May, Carter Ratcliff, Meyer Schapiro, A. B. Spellman, Ulfert Wilke, and Ken Young. The writings by friends are mostly in the form of recollections by friends that were gathered as a memorial tribute to Thompson.

Exhibition files consist of material related to posthumous group and solo exhibitions of Bob Thompson's work.

The majority of the personal business records are posthumous and include inventories, loan and consignment forms, sales and appraisal records, and scattered correspondence.

Printed material includes exhibition catalogs, magazine and newspaper clippings about Bob Thompson, blank postcards of artwork, posters, and press releases.

There are photographs of Bob Thompson, family, and friends, including many artists, shot in various locations in New York City and Provincetown, as well as in Spain, France, and Italy. There are images of Thompson's Rivington Street studio, the Billiard Palace and the Slugs Jazz Club in New York City, exhibitions, events, street scenes, and artwork. There are four photographs albums, one of the Thompson's wedding, two of exhibitions (one is disbound), and one personal album with many photographs of friends and family, including the artist's mother Bessie Thompson and wife Carol Thompson.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as 7 series.

Series 1: Biographical Material, 1953-2003 (0.2 linear feet; Box 1)

Series 2: Carol Thompson's Correspondence, 1971-2000 (0.1 linear feet; Box 1)

Series 3: Writings, 1949-1998 (0.1 linear feet; Box 1)

Series 4: Exhibition Files, 1978-2001 (0.1 linear feet; Box 1)

Series 5: Personal Business Records, 1965-2001 (0.1 linear feet; Box 1)

Series 6: Printed Material, 1960-2005 (0.7 linear feet; Boxes 1-2, 4, OV 5)

Series 7: Photographs, 1951-2000 (0.7 linear feet; Boxes 2-4)
Biographical / Historical:
Bob Thompson (1937-1966) was an African American figurative painter who worked primarily in New York City.

Thompson was born in Louisville, Kentucky in 1937. He attended Boston University as a pre-med student, but quit the program and returned to Kentucky to attend the University of Louisville and study painting under German expressionist artist Ulfert Wilke. As a student, he spent a summer in Provincetown, Massachusetts and immersed himself in the art communities there. In 1958, Thompson moved to New York City and reunited with several artists he had met in Provincetown and participated in some of the earliest "happenings," somewhat informal art events or gatherings usually involving performance art and music, in 1960. He became a regular at the jazz clubs The Five Spot and Slugs and became friends with several jazz musicians. Many of Thompson's paintings reflect his interest in jazz. He also formed friendships with writers Allen Ginsberg and LeRoi Jones. In 1960, he had his first solo exhibition at the Delancy Street Museum.

The same year as his first solo exhibition, Thompson married Carol Plenda and the couple lived in Paris from 1961-1962 after he received a Whitney Foundation fellowship. They lived in Ibiza, Spain the following year. Thompson painted prolifically while abroad, and when he returned to New York City in 1963, he brought many paintings with him. He quickly found representation by Martha Jackson Gallery and the gallery featured Thompson's work in solo exhibitions in 1963-1965. His reputation grew and more exhibitions across the country followed.

In late 1965, Thompson and his wife traveled to Rome, Italy, where he continued to study art and paint. Thompson died in Rome in 1966 at the age of 28 from a drug overdose not long after receiving gall bladder surgery.
Provenance:
The collection was donated by Elaine Plenda, the artist's sister-in-law, in 2006, 2010, 2011, and 2012.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center. Use of video recording requires advance notice. Contact Reference Services for more information.
Rights:
The Bob Thompson papers are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws. The "Bob Thompson Happening" videocassettes are available for on-site research only and permission for reproduction must be made to Joanna Elkin, the daughter of the filmmaker.
Topic:
African American artists  Search this
Artists' studios -- Photographs  Search this
Painters -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Genre/Form:
Video recordings
Photographs
Citation:
Bob Thompson papers, 1949-2005. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.thombob
See more items in:
Bob Thompson papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-thombob
Additional Online Media:

William H. Johnson papers

Creator:
Johnson, William H., 1901-1970  Search this
Names:
Alma Reed Galleries  Search this
Barnett-Aden Gallery  Search this
Harmon Foundation  Search this
Aden, Alonzo J., 1906-1963  Search this
Halpert, Edith Gregor, 1900-1970  Search this
Hawthorne, Charles Webster, 1872-1930  Search this
Hughes, Langston, 1902-1967  Search this
Johnson, Holcha Krake, 1885-1943  Search this
Nierendorf, Karl  Search this
Extent:
1.5 Linear feet
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Photographs
Scrapbooks
Date:
1922-1972
bulk 1926-1956
Summary:
The papers of African American painter William H. Johnson date from 1922 to 1971, with the bulk of the material dating from 1926 to 1956, and measure 1.5 linear feet. The collection documents Johnson's career as an artist in New York and in Europe and his marriage to textile artist Holcha Krake through scattered biographical material, including eight letters regarding the sale and exhibition of his work - one from Langston Hughes and two are from Alonzo Aden of the Barnett Aden Gallery. Also found are exhibition catalogs, news clippings, other printed material, and photographs of Johnson, Krake, and their artwork. One scrapbook contains news clippings, letters, and additional photographs. Another scrapbook contains travel postcards. Also found are a few scattered records and research notes compiled by the Harmon Foundation regarding William H. Johnson.
Scope and Content Note:
The papers of African American painter William H. Johnson date from 1922 to 1971, with the bulk of the material dating from 1926 to 1956, and measure 1.5 linear feet. The collection documents Johnson's career as an artist in New York and in Europe and his marriage to textile artist Holcha Krake through scattered biographical material, including eight letters regarding the sale and exhibition of his work. Also found are exhibition catalogs, news clippings, other printed material, and photographs of Johnson, Krake, and their artwork. One scrapbook contains news clippings, letters, and additional photographs. Another scrapbook contains travel postcards. Also found are a few scattered records and research notes compiled by the Harmon Foundation regarding William H. Johnson.

Scattered biographical material includes biographical sketches, a marriage certificate, award certificates from the National Academy of Design, lists of artwork, and the guestbook from Johnson's 1941 exhibition at the Alma Reed Gallery. Also found are eight letters regarding the sale and exhibition of his work, including a letter from Langston Hughes and two letters from Alonzo Aden of the Barnett Aden Gallery.

Printed material consists of exhibition catalogs, U.S. and foreign news clippings, and other materials, primarily published by the Harmon Foundation regarding African American art. Photographs are of Johnson, Johnson with Krake in their studio, Johnson with friends in Provincetown, Massachusetts, and of Johnson's artwork.

The collection includes two scrapbooks, one containing news clippings, exhibition materials, letters from Charles Hawthorne, Edith Halpert, Karl Nierendorf, and others, and photographs of Johnson and his artwork. Additional items from the scrapbook may have became detached at an earlier date and included among the material in other series. The second scrapbook contains Johnson's postcard collection from his travels in Europe.

Also found are scattered records and research material of the Harmon Foundation regarding William H. Johnson consisting of exhibition panels displaying original photographs of Johnson and his artwork, as well as translations and notes concerning the foreign news clippings found in the William H. Johnson papers.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged into 5 series:

Series 1: Biographical Material, 1922-1967 (Box 1, 3; 0.2 linear feet)

Series 2: Printed Material, 1928-1971 (Box 1-3; 0.3 linear feet)

Series 3: Photographs, circa 1923-1940s (Box 2-3; 0.2 linear feet)

Series 4: Scrapbooks, 1920s-1947 (Box 2-4; 0.4 linear feet)

Series 5: Harmon Foundation Research Materials Regarding William H. Johnson, 1950s (Box 2, OV 5; 0.2 linear feet)
Biographical Note:
William Henry Johnson (1901-1970) was born in Florence, South Carolina, in 1901. He moved to New York City in 1918, and from 1921 to 1926 he attended the National Academy of Design, studying with Charles Hawthorne, and attending Hawthorne's summer school in Provincetown, Massachusetts. As a student he won many awards for his paintings but failed to win a traveling scholarship to Europe. Hawthorne and others believed there may have been some prejudice in this decision and raised money for Johnson to study abroad. From 1926 to 1929 he lived in Paris and southern France. While in Paris he lived and worked in Whistler's old studio and met African American expatriate painter, Henry Ossawa Tanner. He lived briefly in Harlem, New York, in 1930 and exhibited in the Harmon Foundation's exhibition of work by African American artists in which he won the Gold Award for "Distinguished Achievement among Negroes".

In late 1930 Johnson moved to Kerteminde, Denmark, where he married textile artist Holcha Krake whom he had met in Paris. In 1933 they traveled to Germany, France, and Tunisia, which had a great impact on his work. From 1935 to 1938 they lived in various parts of Norway, and Johnson met artist Edvard Munch.

In 1938 Johnson and his wife moved back to New York City. The next year he briefly joined the WPA Federal Art Project as a painting teacher at the Harlem Community Art Center. Johnson had his first solo exhibition in New York at the Alma Reed Gallery in 1941. After Holcha Krake's death in 1944, Johnson began showing signs of mental illness. He lived briefly in Florence, South Carolina, and in 1946 returned to Denmark. He was hospitalized in Norway in 1947 and was then transferred to the Central Islip State Hospital in New York where he spent the next 23 years, until his death in 1970.

In 1956 the Harmon Foundation acquired over a thousand of Johnson's works that were still among his estate. The foundation ceased operations in 1967.
Provenance:
The William H. Johnson papers were originally donated to the National Museum of American Art (Smithsonian American Art Museum) by the Harmon Foundation in 1982. The National Museum of American Art subsequently transferred them to the Archives of American Art in 1982 and 1986.
Restrictions:
The bulk of the collection is digitized. Use of material not digitized requires an appointment.
Rights:
The William H. Johnson papers are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Painters -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
African American artists -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Scrapbooks
Citation:
William H. Johnson papers, 1922-1971, bulk 1926-1956. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.johnwill
See more items in:
William H. Johnson papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-johnwill
Additional Online Media:

Calvin Burnett papers

Creator:
Burnett, Calvin, 1921-2007  Search this
Extent:
6.1 Linear feet
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Drawings
Interviews
Photographs
Scrapbooks
Sketchbooks
Transcripts
Date:
1920-1979
bulk 1960s-1970s
Summary:
The papers of graphic artist and arts educator Calvin Burnett measure 6.1 linear feet and date from 1920 to 1979, with the bulk of the collection dating from the 1960s to the 1970s. The papers contain biographical material, correspondence, writings, material related to his education and professional activities, personal business records, printed material, a scrapbook, and a small amount of photographs and artwork.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of graphic artist and arts educator Calvin Burnett measure 6.1 linear feet and date from 1920 to 1979, with the bulk of the collection dating from the 1960s to the 1970s. The papers contain biographical material, correspondence, writings, material related to his education and professional activities, personal business records, printed material, a scrapbook, and a small amount of photographs and artwork.

Biographical material consists of resumes, biographical notes/drafts, certificates from volunteer organizations, an interview transcript, and personal calendars.

Correspondence consists of letters and drafts of letters to and from Burnett. Some partial fragments of letters are housed with the undated correspondence.

Writings consist of two subseries and includes both materials related to Burnett's book, Objective Drawing, as well as notes, notecards, poetry, and some class assignments.

Education and professional activities also includes two subseries. Teaching and education files consist of materials related to Burnett's time as both a student and an instructor. These include class notes, assignments, course materials, correspondence, etc. Black Artists Union, committee work, and related materials include materials related to the Black Artists Union (BAU), the Committee on Urban Education (CUE), and the Committee on Minority Affairs, and their work. These items include memos, printed materials, reports, and other documentation.

Personal business records consist of correspondence, financial documents, printed material, and notes related to commercial art jobs, consultations, sales, loans, and exhibitions.

Photographs are of Burnett, other individuals, and works of art. Not all of the works of art appear to be by Burnett.

Artwork includes drawings and three small sketchbooks.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as nine series.

Series 1: Biographical Material, 1947-1979 (Box 1; 0.2 linear feet)

Series 2: Correspondence, circa 1941-1979 (Box 1; 0.4 linear feet)

Series 3: Writings, 1950s-1970s (Boxes 1-2; 0.9 linear feet, OV 7)

Series 4: Education and Professional Activities, 1920-1970s (Boxes 2-5; 2.5 linear feet)

Series 5: Personal Business Records, 1947-1979 (Box 5; 0.3 linear feet)

Series 6: Printed Material, 1938-1979 (Boxes 5-6; 0.5 linear feet, OV 7)

Series 7: Scrapbook, 1937-1951 (Box 6; 0.2 linear feet)

Series 8: Photographs, 1946-1972 (Box 6; 1 folder)

Series 9: Artwork, 1941-1942 (Box 6; 2 folders)
Biographical / Historical:
Calvin Burnett (1921-2007) was a graphic artist, illustrator, and arts educator. He graduated from the Massachusetts School of Art (also known as MassArt; now the Massachusetts College of Art and Design) in 1942, and earned his MFA from Boston University in 1960. He later received another degree in arts education. Burnett taught at a number of institutions in the Northeast, including the DeCordova Museum and the Massachusetts School of Art, where he was the first African American to be appointed to the faculty, and where he taught for 33 years.

While on the faculty at the Massachusetts School of Art, Burnett was involved with the Black Artists Union, the Committee on Urban Education, and the Committee on Minority Affairs. Among their many functions, these groups advocated for more diverse representation in faculty and more funding for minority and disadvantaged students.

In 1966, Burnett published the book, Objective Drawing, about perspective. His interest in the subject and the idea for the book grew out of his teaching the perspective course at the Massachusetts School of Art (Oral history interview with Calvin Burnett, 1980 June 13-1981 January 6. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Transcript p.41).
Related Materials:
Also found in the Archives of American Art is an oral history interview with Calvin Burnett conducted by Robert Brown, June 13, 1980-January 6, 1981.
Provenance:
The papers were donated to the Archives of American Art by Calvin Burnett in 1990.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C., Research Center.
Topic:
African American artists--Massachusetts  Search this
Art -- Study and teaching  Search this
Educators -- Massachusetts  Search this
Graphic artists--Massachusetts  Search this
Illustrators -- Massachusetts  Search this
Genre/Form:
Drawings
Interviews
Photographs
Scrapbooks
Sketchbooks
Transcripts
Citation:
Calvin Burnett papers, 1920-1979, bulk 1960s-1970s. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.burncalv
See more items in:
Calvin Burnett papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-burncalv

Through Their Eyes: The Art of Lou and Di Stovall Self Guided Audio Tour

Creator:
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Jones, Brian  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Corcoran Gallery of Art  Search this
Corcoran School of Art (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
Howard University  Search this
Stovall Workshop Inc.  Search this
Gilliam, Sam, 1933-  Search this
McNeill, Lloyd  Search this
Porter, James A. (James Amos), 1905-1970  Search this
Stovall, Di Bagley  Search this
Stovall, Lou  Search this
Collection Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
2 sound recordings (open reel, 1/4 inch)
5 sound recordings (audio cassette)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Sound recordings
Narration
Place:
Washington (D.C.)
Georgia
Springfield (Mass.)
United States
Date:
1983
Scope and Contents:
Brian Jones provides the narration for the self guided audio tour for the exhibition, Through Their Eyes: The Art of Lou and Di Stovall. The life history of Lou and Di Stovall and their work with the Stovall Workshop Inc., Lou's relationship with Sam Gilliam and Lloyd McNeill, Lou's work with the Corcoran Gallery, Di's education at the Corcoran School of Art, the meaning of the poster, and Lou's passion for drawing are briefly discussed. Individual works - posters, prints, and fine art - by Lou and Di, including a collaboration piece by Gilliam and Lou, are described.
Audio tour script - unedited audio narration. Part of Through Their Eyes: The Art of Lou and Di Stovall Audiovisual Records. AV003296-3: sound distorted. Dated 19831026, 19831027. AV001367 and AV001377: dated 198310. AV001368 and AV001369: dated 19831020. AV001365: undated.
Biographical / Historical:
Through Their Eyes: The Art of Lou and Di Stovall Self Guided Audio Tour was created for an exhibition featuring the works of Washington, D.C. artists, Lou and Di Stovall, organized by the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum and held there from September 18, 1983 - March 4, 1984. The exhibition, Through Their Eyes: The Art of Lou and Di Stovall, showcased 84 works - silkscreen prints, drawings, and arcylic paintings - illustrating the artists' progression form posterists to master printmaker and miniaturist, respectively. The art was complemented by audiovisual presentations on the technique of silkscreen printing and a biographical essay on the artists.;Lou Stovall was born Luther McKinley Stovall in Athens, Georgia in 1937. When Stovall was four years old, his family moved north to Springfield, Massachusetts to find work. At age of fifteen, he was an apprentice to Al LaPierre in his silkscreen sign shop at the Growers Outlet Super Market. In 1956, Stovall received a grant and scholarship to attend Rhode Island School of Design. After the first semester, his father became ill so Stovall returned home to support his family for about five or six years. When he returned to school, Stovall attended Howard University, where he received a B.F.A. in 1965. James Lesesne Wells introduced to Stovall to silkscreen as a fine art rather than a commercial medium. Stovall also learned about collaboration in printmaking (artist and printer combining ideas and skills to create a work of art) from Wells. In 1968, Stovall received a grant to buy printmaking equipment. However, he made most of the tools and tables himself creating a full scale printmaking, wood making, and metal workshop in Washington, D.C. Under his direction, Workshop Inc. has grown from a small but active studio primarily concerned with community posters into a professional printmaking outfit. Stovall creates his own original silkscreen prints and is the printmaker of choice for other master artists including Elizabeth Catlett, David C. Driskell, and Sam Gilliam. For each work of art, he finds new and unique ways to replicate as closely as possible a painting supplied by the artist. He has the ability to make the medium do just about anything he and the artist(s) want it to do. Stovall's innovative techniques and distinctive style is credited by artists and critics with helping to transform the concept of silkscreen printmaking from a commercial craft to a true art form. In 1971, Stovall married Di Bagley, a painter who specializes in acrylic on paper and incorporates miniature images into many of her works.;Di Stovall, also known as Di Bagley Stovall and Di Bagley, was born in Columbus, Georgia in 1947. As a child, she loved collecting small things, animate and inanimate. Stovall studied with Barbara Pound, a painter known for landscapes, oil, and watercolor, throughout her childhood and teenage years. In the late 1960s, Stovall was educated at Columbus College and Bradley Museum, both in Georgia, before moving to Washington, D.C. to attend Corcoran School of Art. Stovall is a noted master of the miniature, creating representational and abstract images painted in absorbing detail. Although she creates drawings, prints, and watercolors, she prefers to work with acrylic on paper to capture the minute detail she seeks. Stovall's work also includes acrylic paint on glass, hand-crafted jewelry, and wooden cabinetry. Overall, Stovall's work is colorful, whimsical, and sophisticated. Color is extremely important to her. In 1971, she married Lou Stovall, a printmaker.
Local Numbers:
ACMA AV003296-1

ACMA AV003296-2

ACMA AV003296-3

ACMA AV001367

ACMA AV001377

ACMA AV001368

ACMA AV001369

ACMA AV001365
Series Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American printmakers  Search this
Printmakers  Search this
African American artists  Search this
Artists  Search this
Art  Search this
Prints  Search this
Screen prints  Search this
Posters  Search this
Landscapes  Search this
Drawing  Search this
Prints -- Technique  Search this
Serigraphy  Search this
Museum exhibits  Search this
Exhibitions  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Narration
Series Citation:
Through Their Eyes: The Art of Lou and Di Stovall audiovisual records, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
ACMA.03-001, Item ACMA AV003450
See more items in:
Through their eyes: the art of Lou and Di Stovall exhibition records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-001-ref505

Stovall Workshop Inc. Slide Show

Creator:
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Corcoran Gallery of Art  Search this
Corcoran Gallery--Dupont Center  Search this
Stovall Workshop Inc.  Search this
Bronson, David  Search this
Fralin, Frances  Search this
McNeill, Lloyd  Search this
Stovall, Di Bagley  Search this
Stovall, Lou  Search this
Collection Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
2 sound recordings (open reel, 1/4 inch)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Sound recordings
Narration
Place:
Washington (D.C.)
Atlanta (Ga.)
United States
Date:
1983
Scope and Contents:
Stovall Workshop Inc. Slide Show focuses on the formation of Workshop by Lou Stovall and Lloyd McNeill from its origins at the Corcoran Gallery of Art to its current location in northwest Washington, D.C. Stovall's and McNeill's poster work, the development of Stovall's silkscreen process, landscape designs, and use of color are also described. In interview clips, Francis Fralin and David Bronson provide memories about Stovall, McNeill, and Workshop. M. Murray provides the narration.
Music, narration, and interview clips edited for slide show. Part of Through Their Eyes: The Art of Lou and Di Stovall Audiovisual Records. AV003444-1 and AV003509-2: music, narration, and interview clips. AV003444-2: narration and interview clips only. AV003509-1: constant beeps over music, narration, and interview clips. AV003444 labeled final mix. Dated 19830902 [AV003444]. Undated [AV003509].
Biographical / Historical:
Stovall Workshop Inc. Slide Show is related to an exhibition featuring the works of Washington, D.C. artists, Lou and Di Stovall, organized by the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum and held there from September 18, 1983 - March 4, 1984. The exhibition, Through Their Eyes: The Art of Lou and Di Stovall, showcased 84 works - silkscreen prints, drawings, and arcylic paintings - illustrating the artists' progression form posterists to master printmaker and miniaturist, respectively. The art was complemented by audiovisual presentations on the technique of silkscreen printing and a biographical essay on the artists.;Lou Stovall was born Luther McKinley Stovall in Athens, Georgia in 1937. When Stovall was four years old, his family moved north to Springfield, Massachusetts to find work. At age of fifteen, he was an apprentice to Al LaPierre in his silkscreen sign shop at the Growers Outlet Super Market. In 1956, Stovall received a grant and scholarship to attend Rhode Island School of Design. After the first semester, his father became ill so Stovall returned home to support his family for about five or six years. When he returned to school, Stovall attended Howard University, where he received a B.F.A. in 1965. James Lesesne Wells introduced to Stovall to silkscreen as a fine art rather than a commercial medium. Stovall also learned about collaboration in printmaking (artist and printer combining ideas and skills to create a work of art) from Wells. In 1968, Stovall received a grant to buy printmaking equipment. However, he made most of the tools and tables himself creating a full scale printmaking, wood making, and metal workshop in Washington, D.C. Under his direction, Workshop Inc. has grown from a small but active studio primarily concerned with community posters into a professional printmaking outfit. Stovall creates his own original silkscreen prints and is the printmaker of choice for other master artists including Elizabeth Catlett, David C. Driskell, and Sam Gilliam. For each work of art, he finds new and unique ways to replicate as closely as possible a painting supplied by the artist. He has the ability to make the medium do just about anything he and the artist(s) want it to do. Stovall's innovative techniques and distinctive style is credited by artists and critics with helping to transform the concept of silkscreen printmaking from a commercial craft to a true art form. In 1971, Stovall married Di Bagley, a painter who specializes in acrylic on paper and incorporates miniature images into many of her works.;Stovall Workshop Inc. was formed as a result of a poster collaboration between printmaker Lou Stovall and designer Lloyd McNeill in 1966. Printmaking, sculpture, photography, and furniture making were directed by Stovall in Workshop, first located at the Concoran Gallery of Art [Corcoran Gallery Dupont Circle]. By 1973, Stovall moved Workshop to northwest DC.
Local Numbers:
ACMA AV003444-2

ACMA AV003509-1

ACMA AV003509-2
Series Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American printmakers  Search this
Printmakers  Search this
African American artists  Search this
Artists  Search this
Art  Search this
Prints  Search this
Screen prints  Search this
Posters  Search this
Landscapes  Search this
Prints -- Technique  Search this
Serigraphy  Search this
Color in art  Search this
Museum exhibits  Search this
Exhibitions  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Narration
Citation:
Stovall Workshop Inc. Slide Show, Exhibition Records AV03-001, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.03-001, Item ACMA AV003444-1
See more items in:
Through their eyes: the art of Lou and Di Stovall exhibition records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-001-ref506

Stovall Workshop Inc. Slide Show Interviews

Creator:
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Corcoran Gallery of Art  Search this
Corcoran Gallery--Dupont Center  Search this
Stovall Workshop Inc.  Search this
Bronson, David  Search this
Cook, Dana  Search this
Davis, Gene, 1920-1985  Search this
Fralin, Frances  Search this
Gilliam, Sam, 1933-  Search this
Hopps, Walter  Search this
McGowin, Ed, 1938-  Search this
McNeill, Lloyd  Search this
Stovall, Di Bagley  Search this
Stovall, Lou  Search this
Collection Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
2 sound recordings (open reel, 1/4 inch)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Sound recordings
Interviews
Place:
Washington (D.C.)
Atlanta (Ga.)
United States
Date:
1983
Scope and Contents:
Interviews with Dana Cook, Francis Fralin, and David Bronson for Stovall Workshop Inc. Slide Show, which focused on the formation of Workshop by Lou Stovall and Lloyd McNeill from its origins at the Corcoran Gallery of Art to its current location in northwest Washington, D.C. Cook, an illustrator and printmaker, discusses her experience working with and learning from Stovall at Workshop. Fralin speaks of Walter Hopps' outreach program idea leading to a relationship between Stovall and the Corcoran Gallery of Art, development of the Workshop at the Corcoran Gallery Dupont Circle, Stovall's and McNeill's poster collaboration, Stovall's silkscreening and drawing, Di Stovall's art and imagination, and other Workshop and Corcoran artists, including Sam Gilliam, David Bronson and Gene Davis. Bronson, a technician and craftsman, discusses his role at Workshop: helping to set up Workshop at Corcoran, learning silk screen process, working in woodshop, and creating prints for artists, including Ed McGowin for Name Change exhibition at Baltimore Museum of Art. All speak of Stovall's personality as a person, teacher and leader, particularly his perfectionist nature and high standards.
Interviews for slide show about Stovall Workshop Inc. Part of Through Their Eyes: The Art of Lou and Di Stovall Audiovisual Records. Dana Cook interview dated 19830801: AV003309-1. Frances Fralin interview dated 19830809: AV003309-1 and AV003309-2. David Bronson interview dated 19830810: AV003314. All recordings have some distortions or skips in sound recording.
Biographical / Historical:
Stovall Workshop Inc. Slide Show is related to an exhibition featuring the works of Washington, D.C. artists, Lou and Di Stovall, organized by the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum and held there from September 18, 1983 - March 4, 1984. The exhibition, Through Their Eyes: The Art of Lou and Di Stovall, showcased 84 works - silkscreen prints, drawings, and arcylic paintings - illustrating the artists' progression from posterists to master printmaker and miniaturist, respectively. The art was complemented by audiovisual presentations on the technique of silkscreen printing and a biographical essay on the artists.;Lou Stovall was born Luther McKinley Stovall in Athens, Georgia in 1937. When Stovall was four years old, his family moved north to Springfield, Massachusetts to find work. At age of fifteen, he was an apprentice to Al LaPierre in his silkscreen sign shop at the Growers Outlet Super Market. In 1956, Stovall received a grant and scholarship to attend Rhode Island School of Design. After the first semester, his father became ill so Stovall returned home to support his family for about five or six years. When he returned to school, Stovall attended Howard University, where he received a B.F.A. in 1965. James Lesesne Wells introduced to Stovall to silkscreen as a fine art rather than a commercial medium. Stovall also learned about collaboration in printmaking (artist and printer combining ideas and skills to create a work of art) from Wells. In 1968, Stovall received a grant to buy printmaking equipment. However, he made most of the tools and tables himself creating a full scale printmaking, wood making, and metal workshop in Washington, D.C. Under his direction, Workshop Inc. has grown from a small but active studio primarily concerned with community posters into a professional printmaking outfit. Stovall creates his own original silkscreen prints and is the printmaker of choice for other master artists including Elizabeth Catlett, David C. Driskell, and Sam Gilliam. For each work of art, he finds new and unique ways to replicate as closely as possible a painting supplied by the artist. He has the ability to make the medium do just about anything he and the artist(s) want it to do. Stovall's innovative techniques and distinctive style is credited by artists and critics with helping to transform the concept of silkscreen printmaking from a commercial craft to a true art form. In 1971, Stovall married Di Bagley, a painter who specializes in acrylic on paper and incorporates miniature images into many of her works.;Stovall Workshop Inc. was formed as a result of a poster collaboration between printmaker Lou Stovall and designer Lloyd McNeill in 1966. Printmaking, sculpture, photography, and furniture making were directed by Stovall in Workshop, first located at the Concoran Gallery of Art [Corcoran Gallery Dupont Circle]. By 1973, Stovall moved Workshop to northwest DC.
Local Numbers:
ACMA AV003309-2

ACMA AV003314
Series Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American printmakers  Search this
Printmakers  Search this
African American artists  Search this
Artists  Search this
Art  Search this
Prints  Search this
Screen prints  Search this
Posters  Search this
Landscapes  Search this
Prints -- Technique  Search this
Serigraphy  Search this
Color in art  Search this
Museum exhibits  Search this
Exhibitions  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Interviews
Citation:
Stovall Workshop Inc. Slide Show Interviews, Exhibition Records AV03-001, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.03-001, Item ACMA AV003309-1
See more items in:
Through their eyes: the art of Lou and Di Stovall exhibition records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-001-ref507

Lou Stovall Sound Rolls and Narration

Creator:
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Reinckens, Sharon A.  Search this
Capilongo, Christopher  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Stovall Workshop Inc.  Search this
Stovall, Lou  Search this
Collection Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
10 sound recordings (open reel, 1/4 inch)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Sound recordings
Documentary films
Interviews
Outtakes
Ambient sounds
Sound effects recordings
Place:
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
1983
Scope and Contents:
Sound rolls for short documentary titled Lou Stovall in which Stovall demonstrates and speaks about his silk screen printing process and use of color in detail. Interviews, narration, ambient sounds, foley sound effects, and demonstration of screen printing process contained on sound rolls. During the interview segments, Stovall discusses his ability and passion for drawing, working with stencils and proofing strips, details of the reductive printing process, mixing and integrating of color in his work, and silk screen printing as a technical medium. Some of the footage, particularly AV003285, AV003287 and AV003288, consists of almost exclusively demonstration [sounds of the screen printing process].
Sound rolls and narration for short documentary titled Lou Stovall. Part of Through Their Eyes: The Art of Lou and Di Stovall Audiovisual Records. Audio only. Most likely there is film which syncs with sound rolls, except AV003276 [no camera/image according to statement at beginning of sound roll]. AV003506: Sound Roll 1. AV003288: Sound Roll 2. AV003285: Sound Roll 3. AV003276: Sound Roll 4. AV003313: Sound Roll 5. AV003498: Sound Roll 6. AV003287: Sound Roll 7. AV003303: Sound Roll 8. AV003289: Sound Roll 9. AV003447: Lou Stovall Narration [distortion at beginning of recording]. Dated 19830803 [AV003506], 19830804 [AV003276, AV003285, AV003288, AV003498], 19830805 [AV003287, AV003303], 19830824 [AV003289]. Undated [AV003313, AV003447].
Biographical / Historical:
Lou Stovall Sound Rolls and Narration is related to an exhibition featuring the works of Washington, D.C. artists, Lou and Di Stovall, organized by the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum and held there from September 18, 1983 - March 4, 1984. The exhibition, Through Their Eyes: The Art of Lou and Di Stovall, showcased 84 works - silkscreen prints, drawings, and arcylic paintings - illustrating the artists' progression form posterists to master printmaker and miniaturist, respectively. The art was complemented by audiovisual presentations on the technique of silkscreen printing and a biographical essay on the artists.;Lou Stovall was born Luther McKinley Stovall in Athens, Georgia in 1937. When Stovall was four years old, his family moved north to Springfield, Massachusetts to find work. At age of fifteen, he was an apprentice to Al LaPierre in his silkscreen sign shop at the Growers Outlet Super Market. In 1956, Stovall received a grant and scholarship to attend Rhode Island School of Design. After the first semester, his father became ill so Stovall returned home to support his family for about five or six years. When he returned to school, Stovall attended Howard University, where he received a B.F.A. in 1965. James Lesesne Wells introduced to Stovall to silkscreen as a fine art rather than a commercial medium. Stovall also learned about collaboration in printmaking (artist and printer combining ideas and skills to create a work of art) from Wells. In 1968, Stovall received a grant to buy printmaking equipment. However, he made most of the tools and tables himself creating a full scale printmaking, wood making, and metal workshop in Washington, D.C. Under his direction, Workshop Inc. has grown from a small but active studio primarily concerned with community posters into a professional printmaking outfit. Stovall creates his own original silkscreen prints and is the printmaker of choice for other master artists including Elizabeth Catlett, David C. Driskell, and Sam Gilliam. For each work of art, he finds new and unique ways to replicate as closely as possible a painting supplied by the artist. He has the ability to make the medium do just about anything he and the artist(s) want it to do. Stovall's innovative techniques and distinctive style is credited by artists and critics with helping to transform the concept of silkscreen printmaking from a commercial craft to a true art form. In 1971, Stovall married Di Bagley, a painter who specializes in acrylic on paper and incorporates miniature images into many of her works.
Local Numbers:
ACMA AV003285

ACMA AV003287

ACMA AV003288

ACMA AV003289

ACMA AV003303

ACMA AV003313

ACMA AV003447

ACMA AV003498

ACMA AV003506
Series Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American printmakers  Search this
Printmakers  Search this
African American artists  Search this
Artists  Search this
Art  Search this
Prints  Search this
Screen prints  Search this
Landscapes  Search this
Drawing  Search this
Prints -- Technique  Search this
Serigraphy  Search this
Color in art  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Documentary films
Interviews
Outtakes
Ambient sounds
Sound effects recordings
Citation:
Lou Stovall Sound Rolls and Narration, Exhibition Records AV03-001, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.03-001, Item ACMA AV003276
See more items in:
Through their eyes: the art of Lou and Di Stovall exhibition records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-001-ref510

Through Their Eyes: The Art of Lou and Di Stovall Walk Thru Tour with Lou and Di

Creator:
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Stovall Workshop Inc.  Search this
Stovall, Di Bagley  Search this
Stovall, Lou  Search this
Collection Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
2 sound recordings (audio cassette)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Sound recordings
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
1983
Scope and Contents:
Lou and Di Stovall walk through the exhibition 'Through Their Eyes: The Art of Lou and Di Stovall' with Zora Martin-Felton. The Stovalls talk about various pieces of their artwork displayed throughout the exhibition. They also speak of their artistic process and style.
Exhibiton tour. Sound only. Part of Through Their Eyes: The Art of Lou and Di Stovall Audiovisual Records. AV001364: dated 19830923. AV001346: dated 19830925.
Biographical / Historical:
Through Their Eyes: The Art of Lou and Di Stovall Self Guided Audio Tour was created for an exhibition featuring the works of Washington, D.C. artists, Lou and Di Stovall, organized by the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum and held there from September 18, 1983 - March 4, 1984. The exhibition, Through Their Eyes: The Art of Lou and Di Stovall, showcased 84 works - silkscreen prints, drawings, and arcylic paintings - illustrating the artists' progression form posterists to master printmaker and miniaturist, respectively. The art was complemented by audiovisual presentations on the technique of silkscreen printing and a biographical essay on the artists.;Lou Stovall was born Luther McKinley Stovall in Athens, Georgia in 1937. When Stovall was four years old, his family moved north to Springfield, Massachusetts to find work. At age of fifteen, he was an apprentice to Al LaPierre in his silkscreen sign shop at the Growers Outlet Super Market. In 1956, Stovall received a grant and scholarship to attend Rhode Island School of Design. After the first semester, his father became ill so Stovall returned home to support his family for about five or six years. When he returned to school, Stovall attended Howard University, where he received a B.F.A. in 1965. James Lesesne Wells introduced to Stovall to silkscreen as a fine art rather than a commercial medium. Stovall also learned about collaboration in printmaking (artist and printer combining ideas and skills to create a work of art) from Wells. In 1968, Stovall received a grant to buy printmaking equipment. However, he made most of the tools and tables himself creating a full scale printmaking, wood making, and metal workshop in Washington, D.C. Under his direction, Workshop Inc. has grown from a small but active studio primarily concerned with community posters into a professional printmaking outfit. Stovall creates his own original silkscreen prints and is the printmaker of choice for other master artists including Elizabeth Catlett, David C. Driskell, and Sam Gilliam. For each work of art, he finds new and unique ways to replicate as closely as possible a painting supplied by the artist. He has the ability to make the medium do just about anything he and the artist(s) want it to do. Stovall's innovative techniques and distinctive style is credited by artists and critics with helping to transform the concept of silkscreen printmaking from a commercial craft to a true art form. In 1971, Stovall married Di Bagley, a painter who specializes in acrylic on paper and incorporates miniature images into many of her works.;Di Stovall, also known as Di Bagley Stovall and Di Bagley, was born in Columbus, Georgia in 1947. As a child, she loved collecting small things, animate and inanimate. Stovall studied with Barbara Pound, a painter known for landscapes, oil, and watercolor, throughout her childhood and teenage years. In the late 1960s, Stovall was educated at Columbus College and Bradley Museum, both in Georgia, before moving to Washington, D.C. to attend Corcoran School of Art. Stovall is a noted master of the miniature, creating representational and abstract images painted in absorbing detail. Although she creates drawings, prints, and watercolors, she prefers to work with acrylic on paper to capture the minute detail she seeks. Stovall's work also includes acrylic paint on glass, hand-crafted jewelry, and wooden cabinetry. Overall, Stovall's work is colorful, whimsical, and sophisticated. Color is extremely important to her. In 1971, she married Lou Stovall, a printmaker.
Local Numbers:
ACMA AV001364_B

ACMA AV001346_A

ACMA AV001346_B
Series Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American printmakers  Search this
Printmakers  Search this
African American artists  Search this
Artists  Search this
Prints  Search this
Screen prints  Search this
Prints -- Technique  Search this
Serigraphy  Search this
Museum exhibits  Search this
Exhibitions  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Series Citation:
Through Their Eyes: The Art of Lou and Di Stovall audiovisual records, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
ACMA.03-001, Item ACMA AV001364_A
See more items in:
Through their eyes: the art of Lou and Di Stovall exhibition records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-001-ref511

Through Their Eyes: The Art of Lou and Di Stovall Exhibition Tour for Students led by Brian Jones

Creator:
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Stovall Workshop Inc.  Search this
Stovall, Di Bagley  Search this
Stovall, Lou  Search this
Collection Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
1 sound recording (audio cassette)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Sound recordings
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
1984
Scope and Contents:
Brian Jones led an interactive tour of the exhibition 'Through Their Eyes: The Art of Lou and Di Stovall' for JHS students during February 1984.
Exhibiton tour - educational program. Sound only. Part of Through Their Eyes: The Art of Lou and Di Stovall Audiovisual Records. Dated 198402.
Biographical / Historical:
Through Their Eyes: The Art of Lou and Di Stovall Self Guided Audio Tour was created for an exhibition featuring the works of Washington, D.C. artists, Lou and Di Stovall, organized by the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum and held there from September 18, 1983 - March 4, 1984. The exhibition, Through Their Eyes: The Art of Lou and Di Stovall, showcased 84 works - silkscreen prints, drawings, and arcylic paintings - illustrating the artists' progression form posterists to master printmaker and miniaturist, respectively. The art was complemented by audiovisual presentations on the technique of silkscreen printing and a biographical essay on the artists.;Lou Stovall was born Luther McKinley Stovall in Athens, Georgia in 1937. When Stovall was four years old, his family moved north to Springfield, Massachusetts to find work. At age of fifteen, he was an apprentice to Al LaPierre in his silkscreen sign shop at the Growers Outlet Super Market. In 1956, Stovall received a grant and scholarship to attend Rhode Island School of Design. After the first semester, his father became ill so Stovall returned home to support his family for about five or six years. When he returned to school, Stovall attended Howard University, where he received a B.F.A. in 1965. James Lesesne Wells introduced to Stovall to silkscreen as a fine art rather than a commercial medium. Stovall also learned about collaboration in printmaking (artist and printer combining ideas and skills to create a work of art) from Wells. In 1968, Stovall received a grant to buy printmaking equipment. However, he made most of the tools and tables himself creating a full scale printmaking, wood making, and metal workshop in Washington, D.C. Under his direction, Workshop Inc. has grown from a small but active studio primarily concerned with community posters into a professional printmaking outfit. Stovall creates his own original silkscreen prints and is the printmaker of choice for other master artists including Elizabeth Catlett, David C. Driskell, and Sam Gilliam. For each work of art, he finds new and unique ways to replicate as closely as possible a painting supplied by the artist. He has the ability to make the medium do just about anything he and the artist(s) want it to do. Stovall's innovative techniques and distinctive style is credited by artists and critics with helping to transform the concept of silkscreen printmaking from a commercial craft to a true art form. In 1971, Stovall married Di Bagley, a painter who specializes in acrylic on paper and incorporates miniature images into many of her works.;Di Stovall, also known as Di Bagley Stovall and Di Bagley, was born in Columbus, Georgia in 1947. As a child, she loved collecting small things, animate and inanimate. Stovall studied with Barbara Pound, a painter known for landscapes, oil, and watercolor, throughout her childhood and teenage years. In the late 1960s, Stovall was educated at Columbus College and Bradley Museum, both in Georgia, before moving to Washington, D.C. to attend Corcoran School of Art. Stovall is a noted master of the miniature, creating representational and abstract images painted in absorbing detail. Although she creates drawings, prints, and watercolors, she prefers to work with acrylic on paper to capture the minute detail she seeks. Stovall's work also includes acrylic paint on glass, hand-crafted jewelry, and wooden cabinetry. Overall, Stovall's work is colorful, whimsical, and sophisticated. Color is extremely important to her. In 1971, she married Lou Stovall, a printmaker.
Local Numbers:
ACMA AV001363_B
Series Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American printmakers  Search this
Printmakers  Search this
African American artists  Search this
Artists  Search this
Prints  Search this
Screen prints  Search this
Prints -- Technique  Search this
Serigraphy  Search this
Museum exhibits  Search this
Museums and community  Search this
Students  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Series Citation:
Through Their Eyes: The Art of Lou and Di Stovall audiovisual records, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
ACMA.03-001, Item ACMA AV001363_A
See more items in:
Through their eyes: the art of Lou and Di Stovall exhibition records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-001-ref512

Through Their Eyes: The Art of Lou and Di Stovall Exhibition Tour led by Brian Jones

Creator:
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Stovall Workshop Inc.  Search this
Stovall, Di Bagley  Search this
Stovall, Lou  Search this
Collection Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
1 sound recording (audio cassette)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Sound recordings
Place:
Anacostia (Washington, D.C.)
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
circa 1984
Scope and Contents:
Brian Jones led an interactive tour, possibly for students, of the exhibition 'Through Their Eyes: The Art of Lou and Di Stovall.'
Exhibiton tour - educational program. Sound only. Part of Through Their Eyes: The Art of Lou and Di Stovall Audiovisual Records. Undated.
Biographical / Historical:
Through Their Eyes: The Art of Lou and Di Stovall Self Guided Audio Tour was created for an exhibition featuring the works of Washington, D.C. artists, Lou and Di Stovall, organized by the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum and held there from September 18, 1983 - March 4, 1984. The exhibition, Through Their Eyes: The Art of Lou and Di Stovall, showcased 84 works - silkscreen prints, drawings, and arcylic paintings - illustrating the artists' progression form posterists to master printmaker and miniaturist, respectively. The art was complemented by audiovisual presentations on the technique of silkscreen printing and a biographical essay on the artists.;Lou Stovall was born Luther McKinley Stovall in Athens, Georgia in 1937. When Stovall was four years old, his family moved north to Springfield, Massachusetts to find work. At age of fifteen, he was an apprentice to Al LaPierre in his silkscreen sign shop at the Growers Outlet Super Market. In 1956, Stovall received a grant and scholarship to attend Rhode Island School of Design. After the first semester, his father became ill so Stovall returned home to support his family for about five or six years. When he returned to school, Stovall attended Howard University, where he received a B.F.A. in 1965. James Lesesne Wells introduced to Stovall to silkscreen as a fine art rather than a commercial medium. Stovall also learned about collaboration in printmaking (artist and printer combining ideas and skills to create a work of art) from Wells. In 1968, Stovall received a grant to buy printmaking equipment. However, he made most of the tools and tables himself creating a full scale printmaking, wood making, and metal workshop in Washington, D.C. Under his direction, Workshop Inc. has grown from a small but active studio primarily concerned with community posters into a professional printmaking outfit. Stovall creates his own original silkscreen prints and is the printmaker of choice for other master artists including Elizabeth Catlett, David C. Driskell, and Sam Gilliam. For each work of art, he finds new and unique ways to replicate as closely as possible a painting supplied by the artist. He has the ability to make the medium do just about anything he and the artist(s) want it to do. Stovall's innovative techniques and distinctive style is credited by artists and critics with helping to transform the concept of silkscreen printmaking from a commercial craft to a true art form. In 1971, Stovall married Di Bagley, a painter who specializes in acrylic on paper and incorporates miniature images into many of her works.;Di Stovall, also known as Di Bagley Stovall and Di Bagley, was born in Columbus, Georgia in 1947. As a child, she loved collecting small things, animate and inanimate. Stovall studied with Barbara Pound, a painter known for landscapes, oil, and watercolor, throughout her childhood and teenage years. In the late 1960s, Stovall was educated at Columbus College and Bradley Museum, both in Georgia, before moving to Washington, D.C. to attend Corcoran School of Art. Stovall is a noted master of the miniature, creating representational and abstract images painted in absorbing detail. Although she creates drawings, prints, and watercolors, she prefers to work with acrylic on paper to capture the minute detail she seeks. Stovall's work also includes acrylic paint on glass, hand-crafted jewelry, and wooden cabinetry. Overall, Stovall's work is colorful, whimsical, and sophisticated. Color is extremely important to her. In 1971, she married Lou Stovall, a printmaker.
Local Numbers:
ACMA AV001366_B
Series Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American printmakers  Search this
Printmakers  Search this
African American artists  Search this
Artists  Search this
Prints  Search this
Screen prints  Search this
Prints -- Technique  Search this
Serigraphy  Search this
Museum exhibits  Search this
Museums and community  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Series Citation:
Through Their Eyes: The Art of Lou and Di Stovall audiovisual records, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
ACMA.03-001, Item ACMA AV001366_A
See more items in:
Through their eyes: the art of Lou and Di Stovall exhibition records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-001-ref513

Patricia Hills papers

Creator:
Hills, Patricia  Search this
Names:
Women's Caucus for Art  Search this
Lawrence, Jacob, 1917-2000  Search this
Neel, Alice, 1900-1984  Search this
Sargent, John Singer, 1856-1925  Search this
Stevens, May  Search this
Extent:
23.1 Linear feet
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Date:
circa 1900-2015
bulk 1968-2009
Summary:
The papers of art historian, curator, and educator Patricia Hills measure 23.1 linear feet and date from circa 1900-2015, bulk 1968-2009. Central to this collection are project files documenting professional work that resulted in lectures, publications, exhibitions, art history courses on numerous artists including Alice Neel, Jacob Lawrence, May Stevens, Rudolf Baranik, and John Singer Sargent. These files and files documenting Hills's tenure at the Whitney Museum of American Art include planning documents, research files, correspondence, manuscripts and accompanying publications, as well as other printed materials. The collection also contains correspondence with art historians, artists, curators, and others, notably Lawrence Alloway, Lowery Stokes Sims, Lucy R. Lippard, T.J. Clark, Leon Golub, and Donald Kuspit; professional files documenting grants and residencies awarded and consulting work; artist and subject files; other writings; and printed material. Membership and affiliation records document Hills' service to the profession, including Women's Caucus for Art and the Visual Culture/Art History Caucus of the American Studies Association.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of art historian, curator, and educator Patricia Hills measure 23.1 linear feet and date from circa 1900-2015, bulk 1968-2009. Central to this collection are project files documenting professional work that resulted in lectures, publications, exhibitions, art history courses on numerous artists including Alice Neel, Jacob Lawrence, May Stevens, Rudolf Baranik, and John Singer Sargent. These files and files documenting Hills's tenure at the Whitney Museum of American Art include planning documents, research files, correspondence, manuscripts and accompanying publications, as well as other printed materials. The collection also contains correspondence with art historians, artists, curators, and others, notably Lawrence Alloway, Lowery Stokes Sims, Lucy R. Lippard, T.J. Clark, Leon Golub, and Donald Kuspit; professional files documenting grants and residencies awarded and consulting work; artist and subject files; other writings; and printed material. Membership and affiliation records document Hills' service to the profession, including Women's Caucus for Art and the Visual Culture/Art History Caucus of the American Studies Association.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as 9 series.

Series 1: Correspondence, circa 1968-2015 (2 Linear Feet; Boxes 1-2)

Series 2: Project Files, circa 1900-2011 (10.5 Linear Feet; Boxes 3-13, OV24)

Series 3: Whitney Museum Files, circa 1900-2015, bulk 1973-1987 (3.6 Linear Feet; Boxes 13-16)

Series 4: Professional Files, circa 1962-2012 (1.9 Linear Feet; Boxes 17-18)

Series 5: Membership and Affiliation Records, circa 1970-2013 (1.8 Linear Feet; Boxes 18-20)

Series 6: Writings, circa 1966-2011 (0.4 Linear Feet; Boxes 20-21)

Series 7: Artist Files, circa 1958-2014 (0.9 Linear Feet; Box 21)

Series 8: Subject Files, circa 1961-2007 (1 Linear Feet; Box 22)

Series 9: Printed Material, circa 1970-2010 (1 Linear Feet; Box 23)
Biographical / Historical:
Patricia Hills (1936-) is an art historian, curator, and Professor Emerita of American Art and African American Art at Boston University. Hills obtained a B.A. from Stanford University in Modern European Literature, an M.A. from Hunter College in 1968, where she was advised by Leo Steinberg, and her PhD. from New York University's Institute of Fine Arts. Hills worked as Associate and later Adjunct Curator of 18th and 19th Century American Art at the Whitney Museum of American Art from 1972 until 1987. During that time she organized exhibitions including John Singer Sargent (1986) while progressively becoming more invested as an educator, with teaching positions at Hunter College and the Institute of Fine Arts. In February 2011 she received the Distinguished Teaching of Art History award from the College Art Association.

Hills served as the Director of the Boston University Art Gallery from 1980-1989, and began her tenure in the art history department as Associate Professor in 1978. She was co-founder of the Boston Chapter of the Women's Caucus for Art and was highly active in the College Art Association and American Studies Association. She has held fellowships at numerous institutions including the W.E.B. DuBois Institute for African and African American Research at Harvard University, the Smithsonian American Art Museum, the Georgia O'Keeffe Museum Research Center, and the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History.

As a principal author she is responsible for organizing a number of monograph and exhibition catalog publishing efforts including Painting Harlem Modern: The Art of Jacob Lawrence (2010), May Stevens (2005), Eastman Johnson: Painting America (co-authored, 1999), John Singer Sargent (1986), Alice Neel (1983), Social Concern and Urban Realism: American Painting of the 1930s (1983), Turn-of-the-Century America: Paintings, Graphics, Photographs, 1890-1910 (1977), The Painters' America: Rural and Urban Life, 1810-1910 (1974), and The American Frontier: Images and Myths (1973). In addition, Patricia Hills has authored numerous articles for art publications, served as reviewer for College Art Association's CAA Reviews, and has contributed greatly as a peer reviewer and editor. From 1990 to 1999, she served as series editor for six books in the Cambridge Studies in American Visual Culture series, published by Cambridge University Press.
Provenance:
Donated in 2018 by Patricia Hills.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center. Use of archival audiovisual recordings and born-digital records with no duplicate copy requires advance notice.
Rights:
The Patricia Hills papers are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Occupation:
Museum curators -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Educators -- Massachusetts  Search this
Art historians -- Massachusetts -- Boston  Search this
Topic:
Women artists  Search this
Art -- Political aspects  Search this
Art, American -- 19th century  Search this
African American artists  Search this
Citation:
Patricia Hills Papers, circa 1950s-2015, bulk 1968-2009. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.hillspat
See more items in:
Patricia Hills papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-hillspat

Lou Stovall

Creator:
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Reinckens, Sharon A.  Search this
Capilongo, Christopher  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Stovall Workshop Inc.  Search this
Stovall, Lou  Search this
Collection Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
1 sound recording (open reel, 1/4 inch)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Sound recordings
Documentary films
Place:
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
1983
Scope and Contents:
Artist Lou Stovall demonstrates and speaks about his silk screen printing process and use of color in detail. He also discusses his ability and passion for drawing.
Short documentary. Audio only [most likely there is related 16mm film which has not been digitized yet]. Part of Through Their Eyes: The Art of Lou and Di Stovall Audiovisual Records. Dated 19940329.
Biographical / Historical:
Lou Stovall is related to an exhibition featuring the works of Washington, D.C. artists, Lou and Di Stovall, organized by the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum and held there from September 18, 1983 - March 4, 1984. The exhibition, Through Their Eyes: The Art of Lou and Di Stovall, showcased 84 works - silkscreen prints, drawings, and arcylic paintings - illustrating the artists' progression form posterists to master printmaker and miniaturist, respectively. The art was complemented by audiovisual presentations on the technique of silkscreen printing and a biographical essay on the artists.;Lou Stovall was born Luther McKinley Stovall in Athens, Georgia in 1937. When Stovall was four years old, his family moved north to Springfield, Massachusetts to find work. At age of fifteen, he was an apprentice to Al LaPierre in his silkscreen sign shop at the Growers Outlet Super Market. In 1956, Stovall received a grant and scholarship to attend Rhode Island School of Design. After the first semester, his father became ill so Stovall returned home to support his family for about five or six years. When he returned to school, Stovall attended Howard University, where he received a B.F.A. in 1965. James Lesesne Wells introduced to Stovall to silkscreen as a fine art rather than a commercial medium. Stovall also learned about collaboration in printmaking (artist and printer combining ideas and skills to create a work of art) from Wells. In 1968, Stovall received a grant to buy printmaking equipment. However, he made most of the tools and tables himself creating a full scale printmaking, wood making, and metal workshop in Washington, D.C. Under his direction, Workshop Inc. has grown from a small but active studio primarily concerned with community posters into a professional printmaking outfit. Stovall creates his own original silkscreen prints and is the printmaker of choice for other master artists including Elizabeth Catlett, David C. Driskell, and Sam Gilliam. For each work of art, he finds new and unique ways to replicate as closely as possible a painting supplied by the artist. He has the ability to make the medium do just about anything he and the artist(s) want it to do. Stovall's innovative techniques and distinctive style is credited by artists and critics with helping to transform the concept of silkscreen printmaking from a commercial craft to a true art form. In 1971, Stovall married Di Bagley, a painter who specializes in acrylic on paper and incorporates miniature images into many of her works.
General:
Title transcribed from physical asset.
Series Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American printmakers  Search this
Printmakers  Search this
African American artists  Search this
Artists  Search this
Art  Search this
Prints  Search this
Screen prints  Search this
Landscapes  Search this
Drawing  Search this
Prints -- Technique  Search this
Serigraphy  Search this
Color in art  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Documentary films
Citation:
Lou Stovall, Exhibition Records AV03-001, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.03-001, Item ACMA AV000957
See more items in:
Through their eyes: the art of Lou and Di Stovall exhibition records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-001-ref508

Lou Stovall Interview - Silk Screen Process

Creator:
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Reinckens, Sharon A.  Search this
Capilongo, Christopher  Search this
Names:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum  Search this
Stovall Workshop Inc.  Search this
Gilliam, Sam, 1933-  Search this
Stovall, Di Bagley  Search this
Stovall, Lou  Search this
Collection Creator:
Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Smithsonian Institution. Anacostia Community Museum  Search this
Extent:
2 sound recordings (open reel, 1/4 inch)
Culture:
African American  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Sound recordings
Sound recordings
Documentary films
Interviews
Place:
Washington (D.C.)
United States
Date:
1983
Scope and Contents:
Interview with Lou Stovall for documentary in which Stovall demonstrates and speaks about his silk screen printing process and use of color in detail. During the interview, Stovall discusses his ability and passion for drawing, hiding the human figure in landscape compositions, working with stencils and proofing strips, details of the reductive printing process, integration of color in his work, silk screen printing as a technical medium, art intelligence, aesthetics in his work and other artists, where he gets his inspiration, and Sam Gilliam's work and abstract art.
Interview for short documentary titled Lou Stovall. Audio only. Part of Through Their Eyes: The Art of Lou and Di Stovall Audiovisual Records. AV003305: audio skips and minimal distortions. Dated 19830627.
Biographical / Historical:
Lou Stovall Interview - Silk Screen Process is related to an exhibition featuring the works of Washington, D.C. artists, Lou and Di Stovall, organized by the Anacostia Neighborhood Museum and held there from September 18, 1983 - March 4, 1984. The exhibition, Through Their Eyes: The Art of Lou and Di Stovall, showcased 84 works - silkscreen prints, drawings, and arcylic paintings - illustrating the artists' progression form posterists to master printmaker and miniaturist, respectively. The art was complemented by audiovisual presentations on the technique of silkscreen printing and a biographical essay on the artists.;Lou Stovall was born Luther McKinley Stovall in Athens, Georgia in 1937. When Stovall was four years old, his family moved north to Springfield, Massachusetts to find work. At age of fifteen, he was an apprentice to Al LaPierre in his silkscreen sign shop at the Growers Outlet Super Market. In 1956, Stovall received a grant and scholarship to attend Rhode Island School of Design. After the first semester, his father became ill so Stovall returned home to support his family for about five or six years. When he returned to school, Stovall attended Howard University, where he received a B.F.A. in 1965. James Lesesne Wells introduced to Stovall to silkscreen as a fine art rather than a commercial medium. Stovall also learned about collaboration in printmaking (artist and printer combining ideas and skills to create a work of art) from Wells. In 1968, Stovall received a grant to buy printmaking equipment. However, he made most of the tools and tables himself creating a full scale printmaking, wood making, and metal workshop in Washington, D.C. Under his direction, Workshop Inc. has grown from a small but active studio primarily concerned with community posters into a professional printmaking outfit. Stovall creates his own original silkscreen prints and is the printmaker of choice for other master artists including Elizabeth Catlett, David C. Driskell, and Sam Gilliam. For each work of art, he finds new and unique ways to replicate as closely as possible a painting supplied by the artist. He has the ability to make the medium do just about anything he and the artist(s) want it to do. Stovall's innovative techniques and distinctive style is credited by artists and critics with helping to transform the concept of silkscreen printmaking from a commercial craft to a true art form. In 1971, Stovall married Di Bagley, a painter who specializes in acrylic on paper and incorporates miniature images into many of her works.
Local Numbers:
ACMA AV003305-2

ACMA AV003281
General:
Title transcribed from physical asset.
Series Restrictions:
Use of the materials requires an appointment. Some items are not accessible due to obsolete format and playback machinery restrictions. Please contact the archivist at acmarchives@si.edu.
Topic:
African Americans  Search this
African American printmakers  Search this
Printmakers  Search this
African American artists  Search this
Artists  Search this
Art  Search this
Prints  Search this
Screen prints  Search this
Landscapes  Search this
Drawing  Search this
Prints -- Technique  Search this
Serigraphy  Search this
Color in art  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sound recordings
Documentary films
Interviews
Citation:
Lou Stovall Interview - Silk Screen Process, Exhibition Records AV03-001, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
ACMA.03-001, Item ACMA AV003305-1
See more items in:
Through their eyes: the art of Lou and Di Stovall exhibition records
Archival Repository:
Anacostia Community Museum Archives
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-acma-03-001-ref509

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