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[Letter to Miiss Cox : typescript]

Author:
Sato, Kiyo (student)  Search this
Names:
Cox, Alice, Miss  Search this
Collection Creator:
Sato, Sanji (student)  Search this
Satow, R. (student)  Search this
Satow, Susama Paul (student)  Search this
Lamboley, E. Gerald  Search this
Sato, Kiyo (student)  Search this
Komata, Tomi (student)  Search this
Extent:
1 Item
Culture:
Japanese Americans -- Evacuation and relocation, 1942-1945  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Correspondence
Typescripts
Place:
Garrett (Ind.)
Indiana -- 20th century
Date:
[Dec. 26, 1942.]
Scope and Contents:
Typescript with hand-written P.S.
Arrangement:
Box No.
Local Numbers:
AC0450-0000001.tif (AC Scan No.)
Restrictions:
Unrestricted research access on site by appointment.
Collection Rights:
Usage or copyright restrictions. Contact repository for further information.
Topic:
Students -- 1940-1950  Search this
Concentration camps -- United States  Search this
World War, 1939-1945 -- Japanese Americans  Search this
Genre/Form:
Correspondence -- 1940-1950
Typescripts -- 1940-1950
Collection Citation:
Gerald Lamboley Collection of Japanese-American Letters, 1942-1943, Archives Center, National Museum of American History.
See more items in:
Gerald Lamboley Collection of Japanese-American Letters
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-nmah-ac-0450-ref532

Yasuo Kuniyoshi papers

Creator:
Kuniyoshi, Yasuo, 1889-1953  Search this
Extent:
11.8 Linear Feet
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Photographs
Scrapbooks
Date:
1906-2013
Summary:
The papers of artist Yasuo Kuniyoshi measure 11.8 linear feet and date from 1906-2013. The collection documents his career as a painter, graphic artist, and photographer, as well as his involvement in political, social, and art organizations, especially during World War II. Included are biographical material; correspondence; writings by Kuniyoshi and others; subject files primarily on his participation in various organizations and business dealings with American and Japanese galleries, museums, and dealers; exhibition catalogs and other printed material; photographs of Kuniyoshi and others; and artwork; exhibition and artwork records; and four scrapbooks. The collection also contains materials on Kuniyoshi's career and artwork obtained after his death by his widow Sara Mazo Kuniyoshi.
Scope and Content Note:
The papers of artist Yasuo Kuniyoshi measure 11.8 linear feet and date from 1906-2013. The collection documents his career as a painter, graphic artist, and photographer, as well as his involvement in political, social, and art organizations, especially during World War II. Included are biographical material; correspondence; writings by Kuniyoshi and others; subject files primarily on his participation in various organizations and business dealings with American and Japanese galleries, museums, and dealers; exhibition catalogs and other printed material; photographs of Kuniyoshi and others; and artwork; exhibition and artwork records; and four scrapbooks. The collection also contains materials on Kuniyoshi's career and artwork obtained after his death by his widow Sara Mazo Kuniyoshi.
Arrangement:
This collection is arranged as 10 series. Additions to the collection received in 2014 were integrated in the finding aid according to appropriate series, but not physically integrated. Thus, box numbers may be out of order.

Series 1: Biographical Material, 1906-1990s (Boxes 1, 5; 0.2 linear feet)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1931-2004 (Boxes 1, 5-6; 1.2 linear feet)

Series 3: Writings, 1939-2000 (Boxes 1, 6; 0.4 linear feet)

Series 4: Subject Files, circa 1920s-2009 (Boxes 1-2, 6-8; 2.9 linear feet)

Series 5: Printed Material, 1921-2013 (Boxes 2-3, 8, 16; 1.5 linear feet)

Series 6: Photographs, circa 1920s-2001 (Boxes 3, 9, 15; 0.8 linear feet)

Series 7: Artwork, 1927-circa 1940s (Boxes 3, 9, OV 4; 0.2 linear feet)

Series 8: Exhibition Files, 1953-2004 (Boxes 9-10; 0.6 linear feet)

Series 9: Artwork Records, circa 1920s-2004 (Boxes 10-13, 16, 18; 3.3 linear feet)

Series 10: Scrapbooks, 1919-1978 (Boxes 13-14, 17; 0.6 linear feet)
Biographical Note:
Yasuo Kuniyoshi (1889-1953) was a Japanese-American painter, printmaker and photographer in New York, N.Y.

Kuniyoshi was born in Okayama, Japan. In 1906 he came to the United States and a year later began studying at the Los Angeles School of Art and Design. In 1910 he moved to New York and took courses at the National Academy of Design, the Independent School of Art, and the Art Students League, where he studied with Kenneth Hayes Miller. He was married to fellow artist Katherine Schmidt from 1919 to 1932. After traveling throughout Europe, they moved to the Woodstock, New York, in 1927 and took part in the Woodstock Art Colony. Kuniyoshi studied and later taught at the Art Students League summer school there. By 1930 he had established himself as an internationally known painter and graphic artist. In New York City he taught at the Art Students League, the New School for Social Research, and served as the first president of the Artists Equity Association from 1947 to 1950. Kuniyoshi was active in social organizations, especially Japanese American organizations, such as the Japanese American Committee for Democracy, and took an active role in the war effort during World War II. Yasuo Kuniyoshi died in 1953 and was survived by his second wife Sara Mazo Kuniyoshi who preserved the legacy of his work.
Related Materials:
Also found at the Archives of American Art are the Yasuo Kuniyoshi photographs of artwork, a 1948 letter from Kuniyoshi to E. P. Richardson, and checklists of Yasuo Kuniyoshi prints.
Provenance:
The collection was donated in installments, from 1969 to 1995, by Sara Mazo Kuniyoshi, Yasuo Kuniyoshi's widow. Additional papers were donated in 2014 by Stephen Diamond, Sara Mazo Kuniyoshi's nephew.
Restrictions:
A portion of the collection has been digitized. Use of material not digitized requires an appointment. Use of archival audiovisual recordings with no duplicate access copy requires advance notice.
Rights:
Yasuo Kuniyoshi's papers are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Art, Modern -- 20th century  Search this
Asian American artists  Search this
Political clubs  Search this
World War, 1939-1945 -- Japanese Americans  Search this
Photographers -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Japanese American art  Search this
Painters -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Printmakers -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Scrapbooks
Citation:
Yasuo Kuniyoshi papers, 1906-2013. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.kuniyasu
See more items in:
Yasuo Kuniyoshi papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-kuniyasu
Additional Online Media:

Gerald Lamboley Collection of Japanese-American Letters

Creator:
Sato, Sanji (student)  Search this
Satow, R. (student)  Search this
Satow, Susama Paul (student)  Search this
Lamboley, E. Gerald  Search this
Sato, Kiyo (student)  Search this
Komata, Tomi (student)  Search this
Names:
Edward Kelley School (Sacramento (Cal.))  Search this
Pinedale Assembly Camp.  Search this
Poston Relocation Camp  Search this
War Relocation Authority  Search this
Cox, Mary Aline, 1890-1972 (teacher)  Search this
Extent:
0.12 Cubic feet (1 folder, 6 letters)
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Correspondence
Biographies
Typescripts
Transcripts
Place:
Sacramento (Calif.) -- Correspondence -- 1940-1950
Poston (Ariz.) -- Correspondence -- 1940-1950
Pinedale (Calif.) -- Correspondence -- 1940-1950
Date:
1942-1943
Summary:
Letters from students of Japanese-American ancestry to Miss Cox, their former teacher at the Edward Kelley School in Sacramento, California. This teacher has been identified as Mary Aline Cox by Ms. Colleen Zoller, January 13, 2009.
Scope and Contents:
This collection contains six letters dated 1942 1943 from former students of Japanese American ancestry to Miss Cox, a teacher at the Edward Kelley School in Sacramento, California. Three letters were written from inside a camp, while the others were written from outside of camp. The letters are arranged chronologically. Sanji Sato, a young male not yet out of high school, penned both Letters 1 and 3. The first dated June 12, 1942 was written from Pinedale "A.C." [Assembly Center]. This letter contains a brief description of the center, one of many used to keep internees until the ten more permanent camps were prepared to receive them, and its physical surroundings, as well a mention of the medical examination and vaccinations the evacuees underwent.

Letter 3, more lengthy in nature, covers the dates January 1, 1943, to March 6, 1943. Sent from Poston, Arizona (location of the largest relocation camp), Sato indicated the block and barrack numbers of his lodgings. The camp is defined by the arid surroundings, temperature, flora and fauna, and natural landmarks; its

inhabitants are defined by their New Year's Exhibition and Boy Scout Troops. Pertinent to the historian are Sato's opinion of the "loyalty" forms, why Japanese Americans should fight in World War II, and the behavior of other Poston residents. Also of interest are his personal discussions of his former life on the farm, his passion for the American flag, and remembrance of his dog.

Letter 2 was written by a student identified as "Kiyo" on December 26, 1942, in Garrett, Indiana while on vacation from college (later identified as Ms. Kiyo Sato). A former internee at Poston Relocation Center, she wrote of her reaction to school and dorm life, as well as her reaction, as a person of Japanese ancestry, to a Midwestern town. She expressed hope of ending any misconceptions and of the evacuees returning home "in one piece." Letter 4 is signed "R. Satow and family" and dated April 19, 1943. A year after leaving the relocation center, the writer, having reached Keenesburg, Colorado, thanks Miss Cox for her assistance. The writer's surroundings are reported in addition to updates on other former internees' activities.

The Poston Relocation Center was also the home of Susuma Paul Satow, writer of Letter 5. Satow diplayed the belief that his volunteering in the army benefited the government and reflected well on Japanese Americans. Another topic discussed the regret that some "No No Boys" experienced and Satow's personal lack of empathy for them. The writer voiced concern about anti Japanese American discrimination in Sacramento, and, thus, his hesitancy to return.

Letter 6, from Tomi Komata, was undated and meant to inform Miss Cox of his life in college (possibly Downer College). "Released and happy," Komata announced the lack of expected discrimination and the racial tension that did exist, as well as his scorn of those in camp who listened to rumors of prejudice. Mentions of the WRA and how internees should be more willing to embrace its programs are included.
Arrangement:
1 series. Not arranged.
Biographical / Historical:
On February 19, 1942, President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066 to bar "any and all persons" from certain sections of the United States for purposes of national defense. A reaction to the "yellow peril" "demonstrated" by the attack on Pearl Harbor December 7, 1941, the Executive Order would mean that all Japanese immigrants and Americans of Japanese ancestry would be required to "evacuate" the West Coast of the United States. By the end of this policy in 1946, over 120,000 men, women, and children had been forcefully relocated to various types of internment camps.

Not only had the possessions and lives of these people been disrupted, their privacy and Constitutional rights were ignored as the government thoroughly investigated their lives, looking for any signs of disloyalty to America. Early in 1943, tests were made of their "loyalty" as they were asked to forswear allegiance to the emperor of Japan, swear allegiance to the United States, and volunteer for military service.

Through programs established by the War Relocation Authority (WRA), internees were permitted to leave the camps permanently, provided they had a job or attended a college or university and passed additional government investigations. By 1943, 17,000 people had left the camps in this manner. Others left by joining the military. By 1946, the last permanent camp was dismantled.
Materials in Other Organizations:
War Relocation Authority, Record Group 210, or those of the United States Commands, 1947 , Record Group 338, National Archives and records Administration

National Headquarters of the Japanese American Citizens League in San Francisco, California

Japanese American National Museum in Los Angeles, California
Materials in the Archives Center, National Museum of American History:
Japanese American Documentary Collection, 1905-1945 (AC0305)
Provenance:
Collection donated by E. Gerald Lamboley, June 2, 1992.
Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Rights:
Usage or copyright restrictions. Contact repository for further information.
Topic:
Japanese Americans -- Evacuation and relocation, 1942-1945  Search this
Internees -- Japanese Americans -- 1940-1950  Search this
Concentration camps -- United States  Search this
World War, 1939-1945 -- Japanese Americans  Search this
World War, 1939-1945 -- Evacuation of civilians  Search this
Teachers -- 1940-1950  Search this
Students -- 1940-1950  Search this
Genre/Form:
Correspondence -- 1940-1950
Biographies
Typescripts -- 1940-1950
Transcripts
Citation:
Gerald Lamboley Collection of Japanese-American Letters, 1942-1943, Archives Center, National Museum of American History.
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.0450
See more items in:
Gerald Lamboley Collection of Japanese-American Letters
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmah-ac-0450
Additional Online Media:

Kamekichi Tokita Papers

Creator:
Tokita, Kamekichi  Search this
Names:
Art Institute of Seattle  Search this
Henry Art Gallery  Search this
Hotel Cadillac (Seattle, Wash.)  Search this
Minidoka Relocation Center  Search this
Public Works of Art Project  Search this
Seattle Art Museum  Search this
Baker, Burt Brown  Search this
Boynton, Roy  Search this
Callahan, Kenneth, 1905-1986  Search this
Tokita, Elsie  Search this
Tokita, Shokichi  Search this
Extent:
1.5 Linear feet
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Photograph albums
Photographs
Sketches
Scrapbooks
Diaries
Date:
circa 1900-circa 2010
bulk 1900-1948
Summary:
The scattered personal papers of Seattle area painter Kamekichi Tokita (1897-1948) measure 1.5 linear feet and date from circa 1900 to circa 2010 with the bulk of the material dating from circa 1910 to 1948. The papers include biographical materials, including documents about the closing of the War Relocation Authority's Minidoka Camp in Idaho; correspondence; three diaries written in Japanese documenting Tokita's war time experiences and relocation to Minidoka, two earlier notebooks, also written in Japanese, and scattered notes; a few personal business records; printed materials; one scrapbook; sketches; and one family photograph album.
Scope and Contents:
The scattered personal papers of Seattle area painter Kamekichi Tokita (1897-1948) measure 1.5 linear feet and date from circa 1900 to circa 2010 with the bulk of the material dating from circa 1910 to 1948. The papers include biographical materials, including documents about the closing of the War Relocation Authority's Minidoka Camp in Idaho; correspondence; three diaries written in Japanese documenting Tokita's war time experiences and relocation to Minidoka, two earlier notebooks, also written in Japanese, and scattered notes; a few personal business records; printed materials; one scrapbook; sketches; and one family photograph album.

Biographical materials include a file on the Public Works of Art Project, a file on the War Relocation Authority and the closing of the Minidoka internment camp, an immigration document, and an essay on Tokita written by Shokichi and Elsie Tokita.

Correspondence is primarily professional in nature and concerns exhibitions at the Seattle Museum of Art (previously the Art Institute of Seattle) and other topics. Correspondents include Burt Brown Baker, Roy Boynton, Kenneth Callahan, Henry Gallery, the Seattle Art Museum, and others.

Tokita's writings consist of three diaries, two notebooks, and scattered general writings, most of which are in Japanese. The diaries were kept during World War II and document the family's confinement at the Minidoka Relocation Camp in Idaho. Included is a transcript of the diaries which were translated from prewar to modern Japanese by Haruo Takasugi and from modern Japanese to English by Naomi Kusunoki-Martin.

Scattered business records include a patent application, records from the Cadillac Hotel, and a claim filed through the Department of Justice. A few published books in English and Japanese are about art and religion. Also found are exhibition catalogs for shows in which Tokita participated and clippings. There is one mixed media scrapbook about Tokita's exhibitions.

Artwork consists of unsigned pencil and watercolor sketches by Tokita. There is also a family photo album containing snapshots and portraits of the Tokita family and friends.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as 8 series:

Series 1: Biographical Material, 1934-1985 (Box 1; 4 folders)

Series 2: Correspondence, circa 1920-1944 (Box 1; 6 folders)

Series 3: Writings and Notes, 1923-circa 1950 (Box 1; 0.2 linear feet)

Series 4: Personal Business Records, 1928-1950 (Box 1; 3 folders)

Series 5: Printed Material, circa 1910-1940 (Box 1-3; 0.5 linear feet)

Series 6: Scrapbook, 1929-1933 (Box 2-3; 0.1 linear feet)

Series 7: Artwork, circa 1910-1940s (Box 2-3; 0.1 linear feet)

Series 8: Photograph Album, circa 1900-1930 (Box 2; 0.2 linear feet)
Biographical / Historical:
Kamekichi Tokita (1897-1948) was a painter and businessman who emigrated from Japan in 1919 and settled in Seattle, Washington. Tokita was a member of the Seattle area progressive artists' collective known as the "Group of Twelve" and widely exhibited his artwork throughout the Pacific Northwest.

Kamekichi Tokita was born in Shizouka City, Japan and immigrated to the United States at the age of twenty-two. He settled in the Japantown neighborhood of Seattle, Washington where he opened the Noto Sign Company with business partner Kenjiro Nomura. Nomura was also an artist and encouraged Tokita's interest in oil painting. They both used the sign shop as their studio after-hours. In 1936, the Noto Sign Company closed and Tokita took over management of the Cadillac Hotel, although he continued to paint commercial signs. Tokita married Haruko Suzuki in 1932 and together they had eight children.

As a child in Japan, Tokita studied calligraphy in China. Although he attended a few art school classes in in the U.S. and went on weekend painting trips with Nomura and other Seattle artists, Tokita is considered to be a largely self-trained artist. Support and recognition came from Dorothy V. Morrison of the Henry Gallery at the University of Washington who wrote to Tokita to inquire whether a "group of Japanese artists in the city" would be interested in exhibiting their work. Although the exhibition of Japanese artists did not happen, Tokita later loaned paintings to the gallery for inclusion in an exhibition sponsored by the American Federation of Arts. Throughout the late 1920s and 1930s Tokita exhibited widely in the Seattle area. In 1935, the Seattle Daily Times touted the work of Tokita and other painters in the "Group of Twelve" that also included Morris Graves, Kenneth Callahan, Walter F. Isaacs, and Ambrose and Viola Patterson, among others. In 1942, after the bombing of Pearl Harbor, Kamekichi Tokita and his family (five children at the time), along with the 110,000 – 120,000 Japanese and Japanese-American citizens living on the West Coast, were ordered under President Franklin Roosevelt's Executive Order 9066 to relocate to one of several confinement camps. For the first six months of their confinement, the family lived at a temporary Civilian Assembly Center in Puyallup, Washington. They were transferred to the Minidoka Relocation Camp in Hunt, Idaho where they remained until their release in 1945. The confinement camps were organized much like communes and independent cities (fenced and guarded) where the residents were self-reliant for most of their basic necessities, including schooling. While interned in Minidoka, Tokita worked as a sign painter and continued to privately paint, using whatever materials he could find, including beaver board. His work was featured in art shows at the camp. Many of his camp scenes are now lost or were given away.

At the end of World War II, Tokita and his family (now seven children) moved back to the Seattle-area. Unable to find housing, the Tokitas lived at a Japanese language school until Tokita was able to re-establish his business. During this period he painted very little. In 1946 Tokita and his wife purchased the New Lucky Hotel in the Chinatown area of Seattle. Shortly thereafter, Tokita fell ill and died in 1948. Many of his works are believed to have been destroyed or lost. Some of his work remains, however, and is among the permanent collections of the Seattle Art Museum, the Tacoma Art Museum, the Portland Art Museum.

Note: Much of this biographical note was taken from "A Biographical Resume" written by Shokichi and Elsie Y. Tokita.
Separated Materials:
A watercolor painting on paper by Kamekichi Tokita, Untitled (Still Life), 9 x 12 in. was transferred to the Smithsonian American Art Museum in 2012.
Provenance:
The Kamekichi Tokita papers were donated by his son, Shokichi Tokita in 1990. He donated a third and final diary in 2017. They were collected as part of the Archives of American Art Northwest Asian American project in Seattle, Washington.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment and is limited to the Archives' Washington, D.C. Research Center. Contact Reference Services for more information. Use of archival audiovisual recordings with no duplicate access copy requires advance notice.
Rights:
The Kamekichi Tokita papers are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Occupation:
Painters -- Washington (State) -- Seattle  Search this
Topic:
Art, American -- Northwestern States  Search this
World War, 1939-1945 -- Japanese Americans  Search this
Japanese Americans -- Evacuation and relocation, 1942-1945 -- Diaries  Search this
Painting, Modern -- 20th century -- Washington (State) -- Seattle  Search this
Art, Modern -- 20th century -- Northwestern States  Search this
Asian American artists  Search this
Japanese American art  Search this
Japanese Americans  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photograph albums
Photographs
Sketches
Scrapbooks
Diaries
Citation:
Kamekichi Tokita papers, circa 1900-circa 2010, bulk circa 1910-1948. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.tokikame
See more items in:
Kamekichi Tokita Papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-tokikame

Americans of Japanese ancestry and the United States Constitution, 1787-1987

Author:
National Japanese American Historical Society (U.S.)  Search this
Physical description:
91 p. : ill. ; 28 cm
Type:
Pictorial works
Date:
1987
Topic:
Japanese Americans--History--Chronology  Search this
Japanese Americans--Evacuation and relocation, 1942-1945--Chronology  Search this
World War, 1939-1945--Japanese Americans--Chronology  Search this
Japanese Americans--History--Pictorial works  Search this
Japanese Americans--Evacuation and relocation, 1942-1945  Search this
World War, 1939-1945--Japanese Americans--Pictorial works  Search this
Call number:
E184.J3A46 1987X
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_393872

The courage our stories tell : the daily lives and maternal child health care of Japanese American women at Heart Mountain / by Susan McKay

Author:
McKay, Susan 1942-  Search this
Subject:
Heart Mountain Relocation Center (Wyo.)  Search this
Physical description:
iv, 159 : ill., map ; 23 cm
Type:
Books
Place:
Wyoming
Park County
Date:
2002
C2002
20th century
Topic:
World War, 1939-1945--Japanese Americans--Health and hygiene  Search this
Maternal health services--History  Search this
Maternal and infant welfare--History  Search this
World War, 1939-1945--Japanese Americans--Social conditions  Search this
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_711251

Ganbare! : an example of Japanese spirit / Patsy Sumie Saiki

Author:
Saiki, Patsy Sumie  Search this
Physical description:
viii, 230 p. : ill., map ; 23 cm
Type:
Books
Place:
Hawaii
United States
Date:
1983
1983, c1982
Topic:
Japanese Americans--Evacuation and relocation, 1942-1945  Search this
Japanese  Search this
World War, 1939-1945--Japanese Americans  Search this
World War, 1939-1945  Search this
Concentration camps  Search this
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_1007183

Honor by fire : Japanese Americans at war in Europe and the Pacific / Lyn Crost

Author:
Crost, Lyn  Search this
Physical description:
xiv, 346 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm
Type:
Books
Date:
1994
C1994
20th century
Topic:
World War, 1939-1945--Japanese Americans  Search this
World War, 1939-1945--Campaigns  Search this
Japanese Americans--History  Search this
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_471573

Democracy on trial : the Japanese American evacuation and relocation in World War II / Page Smith

Author:
Smith, Page  Search this
Physical description:
476 p. ; 25 cm
Type:
Books
Date:
1995
C1995
Topic:
Japanese Americans--Evacuation and relocation, 1942-1945  Search this
World War, 1939-1945--Japanese Americans  Search this
Japanese Americans--Civil rights  Search this
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_488947

The japanning of America : redress & reparations demands by Japanese-Americans / Lillian Baker ; introductions by Robert M. Garrick, William J. Hopwood, Mimi Jaffe

Author:
Baker, Lillian  Search this
Physical description:
ix, 252 p. : ill. ; 22 cm
Type:
Books
Date:
1991
Topic:
Japanese Americans--Evacuation and relocation, 1942-1945  Search this
World War, 1939-1945--Reparations  Search this
World War, 1939-1945--Japanese Americans  Search this
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_517649

Enemy alien / Kiyo Hirano

Title:
Tekikoku gaijin
Author:
Hirano, Kiyo  Search this
Subject:
Hirano, Kiyo  Search this
Physical description:
iv, 70, 85, ii p. [2] leaves of plates : ill., ports. ; 22 cm
Type:
Books
Place:
Amache Relocation Center (Colo.)
Date:
1983
C1983
Topic:
World War, 1939-1945--Japanese Americans  Search this
Call number:
E184.J3 H57 1983
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_519121

Wherever I go, I will always be a loyal American : schooling Seattle's Japanese Americans during World War II / Yoon K. Pak

Author:
Pak, Yoon K  Search this
Physical description:
xv, 204 p. : ill. ; 24 cm
Type:
Books
Place:
Washington (State)
Seattle
Date:
2002
Topic:
Japanese Americans--Education  Search this
World War, 1939-1945--Japanese Americans--Education (Primary)  Search this
World War, 1939-1945  Search this
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_711167

What Pearl Harbor wrought / Akio Konoshima

Author:
Konoshima, Akio 1924-  Search this
Subject:
Konoshima, Akio 1924-  Search this
United States Armed Forces Japanese Americans  Search this
Physical description:
169 p. : ill. ; 24 cm
Type:
Fiction
Date:
2010
C2010
Topic:
Japanese Americans--Evacuation and relocation, 1942-1945  Search this
World War, 1939-1945--Japanese Americans  Search this
Japanese American soldiers  Search this
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_994897

Due process : Americans of Japanese ancestry and the United States Constitution, 1787-1994

Title:
Americans of Japanese ancestry and the United States Constitution, 1787-1994
Author:
National Japanese American Historical Society (U.S.)  Search this
Physical description:
112 p. : ill. ; 28 cm
Type:
Chronology
Pictorial works
Date:
1995
Topic:
Japanese Americans--History  Search this
Japanese Americans--Evacuation and relocation, 1942-1945  Search this
World War, 1939-1945--Japanese Americans  Search this
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_1007184

Imprisoned : the betrayal of Japanese Americans during World War II / Martin W. Sandler

Author:
Sandler, Martin W  Search this
Physical description:
176 pages : illustrations (some color) ; 28 cm
Type:
Juvenile literature
History
Juvenile works
Date:
2013
20th century
Topic:
Japanese Americans--Evacuation and relocation, 1942-1945  Search this
World War, 1939-1945--Japanese Americans  Search this
Japanese Americans--History  Search this
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_1019050

Senpai gumi / by Richard S. Oguro

Author:
Oguro, Richard S  Search this
Subject:
Army Language School (U.S.) History  Search this
Physical description:
xlvi, 234, lxxxviii pages : illustrations, portraits ; 22 cm
Type:
Books
History
Date:
1982
[1982?]
Topic:
World War, 1939-1945--Japanese Americans  Search this
Call number:
D753.8 .O37 1982
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_1098439

The internment of the Japanese in America during World War II : an interpretation according to the ethics of character / by Wallace Hisashi Ryan Kuroiwa

Author:
Kuroiwa, Wallace Hisashi Ryan  Search this
Physical description:
420 leaves ; 28 cm
Type:
Books
Place:
United States
Date:
1984
1983
Topic:
Japanese Americans--Evacuation and relocation, 1942-1945  Search this
World War, 1939-1945--Japanese Americans  Search this
World War, 1939-1945--Evacuation of civilians  Search this
Japanese--History  Search this
Call number:
D769.8.A6 K96 1983a
D769.8.A6K96 1983a
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_230812

I can never forget : men of the 100th/442nd / Thelma Chang

Author:
Chang, Thelma  Search this
Subject:
United States Army Infantry Battalion, 100th History  Search this
United States Army Regimental Combat Team, 442nd History  Search this
Physical description:
207 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 27 cm
Type:
Personal narratives
Place:
United States
Eastern Front
Date:
1991
C1991
Topic:
World War, 1939-1945--Regimental histories  Search this
World War, 1939-1945  Search this
World War, 1939-1945--Japanese Americans  Search this
World War, 1939-1945--Campaigns  Search this
Call number:
D769.31 100th .C43 1991
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_515373

One thousand days in Siberia : the Odyssey of a Japanese-American POW / Iwao Peter Sano

Title:
1,000 days in Siberia
Author:
Sano, Iwao Peter 1924-  Search this
Subject:
Sano, Iwao Peter 1924-  Search this
Physical description:
xvii, 210 p. : ill ; 22 cm
Type:
Personal narratives, Japanese
Personal narratives
Place:
Russia (Federation)
Siberia
Date:
1997
C1997
Topic:
World War, 1939-1945  Search this
World War, 1939-1945--Japanese Americans  Search this
Prisoners of war--Biography  Search this
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_528678

Patriotism, perserverance, posterity : the story of the National Japanese American Memorial

Author:
National Japanese American Memorial Foundation  Search this
Physical description:
xi, 253 p. : ill. (some col.), maps ; 29 cm
Type:
Books
Place:
Washington (D.C.)
Date:
2001
C2001
Topic:
World War, 1939-1945--Japanese Americans  Search this
National Japanese American Memorial to Patriotism (Washington, D.C.)  Search this
World War, 1939-1945--Monuments  Search this
War memorials  Search this
Japanese Americans--Evacuation and relocation, 1942-1945  Search this
Data Source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:siris_sil_707466

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