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Beatrice Fenton papers

Creator:
Fenton, Beatrice, 1887-1983  Search this
Names:
Bishop, Emily Clayton, 1883-1912  Search this
Martinet, Marjorie D., 1886-1981  Search this
Extent:
9.36 Linear feet
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Sketches
Sketchbooks
Interviews
Sound recordings
Photographs
Date:
1836-1984
bulk 1890-1978
Summary:
The papers of sculptor Beatrice Fenton date from 1836-1984 (bulk 1890-1978) and measure 9.36 linear feet. The collection documents Fenton's career as a sculptor and art instructor, as well as her life-long friendships with artist Emily Clayton and art educator Marjorie Martinet. Found are scattered biographical materials, correspondence primarily with Martinet (approximately 1/2 of the collection), business records, notes and writings, scattered records of arts organizations, transcripts of interviews with Fenton, sketches and sketchbooks, a scrapbook, brochures, clippings, postcards, reproductions of artwork, and photographs of friends and family, travels, and artwork. Writings include several illustrated hand-made books of poetry by Emily Clayton.
Scope and Content Note:
The papers of sculptor Beatrice Fenton date from 1836-1984 (bulk 1890-1978) and measure 9.36 linear feet. The collection documents Fenton's career as a sculptor and art instructor, as well as her life-long friendships with artist Emily Clayton and art educator Marjorie Martinet. Found are scattered biographical materials, correspondence primarily between Fenton and Martinet (approximately 1/2 of the collection), business records, notes and writings, scattered records of arts organizations, transcripts of interviews with Fenton, sketches and sketchbooks, a scrapbook, brochures, clippings, postcards, reproductions of artwork, and photographs of friends and family, travels, and artwork.

The collection includes scattered biographical material for Fenton, Emily Clayton Bishop, and Marjorie Martinet, such as biographical accounts, membership cards, and a diploma. The correspondence is primarily between Fenton and Martinet and documents the development of their close friendship and professional concerns. There are also scattered letters from Fenton's instructor, Alexander S. Calder and Emily Clayton Bishop. Personal business records include those of Fenton and Martinet and include wills, estate papers, insurance and banking records, price lists, receipts, and records from the Oldfields School where Marjorie Martinet taught for 36 years. Found within the Notes and Writings series are address books, hand-made illustrated booklets of poems by Emily Clayton Bishop, lecture manuscripts, and notes and typescripts on various topics, including a file Fenton created to promote Bishop's artwork following Bishop's death.

There is a series of scattered records of arts organizations to which Fenton belonged, including the Charcoal Club, the Three Arts Club, Lizette Wood Reese Memorial Association, and the Maryland Institute Alumni Association. Also found in the papers are interview tapes and transcripts of interviews conducted with Fenton by Mary Hamel-Schwulst and Marlene Obarzaneck, artwork consisting primarily of sketchbooks and loose drawings by Fenton and Bishop, a scrapbook concerning Martinet, additional printed material, and photographs and photograph albums depicting Fenton, Martinet, Bishop, other family, colleagues, studios, artwork, and travel destinations.
Arrangement:
The collection is arranged as 9 series. Glass plate negatives are housed separately and closed to researchers.

Series 1: Biographical Material, 1897-1967 (Boxes 1, 10; 5 folders)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1857-1980 (Boxes 1-5, 10; 4.5 linear feet)

Series 3: Business Records, 1836, 1907-1978 (Box 5; 39 folders)

Series 4: Notes and Writings, 1866-1971 (Boxes 5-6; 58 folders)

Series 5: Organization Records, 1903-1938 (Box 6; 9 folders)

Series 6: Interviews, 1978 (Box 6; 5 folders)

Series 7: Artwork, 1903-1943 (Boxes 7, 10; 21 folders)

Series 8: Scrapbook, 1905-1925 (Boxes 10; 1 folder)

Series 9: Printed Material, 1865-1984 (Boxes 7-8, 10; 1.7 linear feet)

Series 10: Photographs, 1890-1978 (Boxes 9-10, MGP 6; 1.0 linear feet)
Biographical Note:
Beatrice Fenton was born on July 12, 1887 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, to ophthalmologist Thomas H. Fenton and Lizzie Remak Fenton, who was the daughter of prominent lawyer Gustavus Remak.

From 1903-1904 Fenton began to study art at the Philadelphia School of Industrial Art under Alexander Stirling Calder. Through her father's aunt, Mary Fenton Holmes, she met Thomas Eakins who advised her to sculpt in clay in order to overcome flatness in drawings. In 1904 Eakins painted a portrait of Fenton as the central figure in The Coral Necklace.

Fenton was attracted to sculpture and continued her studies in this field from 1904-1908 at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts in Philadelphia, under Charles Grafly. Here she began life-long friendships with fellow students Marjorie Martinet and Emily Clayton Bishop.

A Cresson European Traveling Scholarship enabled Fenton to visit Belgium, Germany, Austria, Switzerland, Italy, Greece, France, and England during the summer of 1909. She returned to the Pennsylvania Academy and won a second scholarship that financed further travel to Spain, France, Holland, Belgium, and England in 1910 with Marjorie Martinet. On her return from Europe Fenton began working as an artist in Philadelphia.

Both Fenton and Martinet were deeply affected by the sudden death of Emily Clayton Bishop in 1912, and spent several years promoting Bishop's sculpture. Martinet, who changed the spelling of her surname from Martenet to Martinet in June 1918, established her own art school in Baltimore, Maryland, and later taught painting at the Maryland Institute of Art. Fenton and Martinet maintained a close relationship for fifty years, primarily through correspondence.

Fenton's first success came with a portrait bust of her father's friend, painter and etcher Peter Moran, brother of Thomas Moran. The bust was purchased by the painter's friends for the Art Club and in 1915 won Honorable Mention in the Panama-Pacific International Exposition in San Francisco. The success of Fenton's Seaweed Fountain in 1922 generated many commissions, primarily for fountains.

Martinet taught at Oldfields School from 1925 to 1961. From 1942 to 1953, Fenton taught at the Moore College of Art in Philadelphia, and later joined the faculty of St. John's Night School for Adults.

Beatrice Fenton died February 11, 1983 in Germantown, Pennsylvania.
Provenance:
The Beatrice Fenton papers were donated from 1987-1991 by Joan Martin, a sculptor and former Fenton student, who inherited Fenton's studio and its contents.
Restrictions:
The collection is open for research. Use requires an appointment.
Rights:
The Beatrice Fenton papers are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Sculptors -- Pennsylvania -- Philadelphia  Search this
Women sculptors -- Pennsylvania -- Philadelphia  Search this
Genre/Form:
Sketches
Sketchbooks
Interviews
Sound recordings
Photographs
Citation:
Beatrice Fenton papers, 1836-1984 (bulk 1890-1978). Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.fentbeat
See more items in:
Beatrice Fenton papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-fentbeat
Additional Online Media:

Charles Searles papers

Creator:
Searles, Charles Robert, 1937-2004  Search this
Names:
Edmonds, Walt  Search this
Gordon, Russell Talbert, 1936-  Search this
Spicer, Kathleen  Search this
Extent:
3.9 Linear Feet
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Photographs
Scrapbooks
Transcripts
Sketches
Date:
1953-2010
Summary:
The papers of sculptor and painter Charles Searles measure 3.9 linear feet and date from 1953 to 2010. The collection documents his career through scattered biographical material, correspondence, personal business records, printed material, artwork, photographs, and a scrapbook.
Scope and Contents:
The papers of sculptor and painter Charles Searles measure 3.9 linear feet and date from 1953 to 2010. The collection documents his career through scattered biographical material, correspondence, personal business records, printed material, artwork, photographs, and a scrapbook.

Scattered biographical material includes legal papers, address books, transcripts, and awards. Correspondence includes correspondence with galleries, museums, and organizations. Personal business records consist of Searles' files on commissions, exhibitions, workshops and programs, and employment contracts. Printed material includes exhibition announcements, exhibition catalogs, as well as printed material of interest to Searles, but not directly documenting his career. Artwork consists of sketches, designs, flyers, a portrait of Kathleen Spicer by Russell Gordon, and a portrait of Searles by K. Spicer. Photographs depict Searles, Searles' artwork, and artist Walt Edmonds. Scrapbooks consist of news clippings and loose material that was originally inserted in between the pages in no particular order.
Arrangement:
This collection is arranged as 7 series.

Series 1: Biographical Material, 1963-2004 (0.5 linear ft.; Boxes 1, 6)

Series 2: Correspondence, 1956-2004 (5 folders; Box 1)

Series 3: Personal Business Records, 1969-2007 (1.2 linear feet; Boxes 1-2,6)

Series 4: Printed Material, 1953-2010 (1.4 linear feet; Boxes 3-4, 6)

Series 5: Artwork, circa 1980s-2000 (9 folders; Box 5)

Series 6: Photographs, circa 1964-2000 (3 folders; Box 5)

Series 7: Scrapbooks, circa 1970s-2005 (0.3 linear ft.; Box 6)
Biographical / Historical:
Charles Robert Searles (1937-2004) was a sculptor, painter and muralist in Philadelphia, Pa. and New York, N.Y. Searles attended the University of Pennsylvania and graduated from the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts in 1972. He was influenced by African art after traveling to Nigeria on the Ware Memorial Traveling Scholarship during his studies at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts. During his career he participated in over 100 exhibitions in Denmark, Nigeria, and throughout the United States.

Searles taught art at several institutions including the Pratt Institute, the University of the Arts (Philadelphia College of Art), and the Philadephia Museum of Art. He also completed commission work for Newark Station, PATCO (Port Authority Transit Corporation), and MTA (Metropolitan Transportation Authority).

Searles moved to New York, NY in 1978 where he spent most of his career. He was married to artist Kathleen Spicer until his death on November 27, 2004.
Related Materials:
Also at the Archives of American Art is an interview with Charles Searles conducted on June 13, 1991, by Cynthia Veloric, for the Archives of American Art Philadelphia Project.
Provenance:
Donated in 2012 by Kathleen Spicer Searles, Charles Searles' widow.
Restrictions:
Use of original papers requires an appointment.
Rights:
The Charles Searles papers are owned by the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Literary rights as possessed by the donor have been dedicated to public use for research, study, and scholarship. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Occupation:
Muralists -- Pennsylvania -- Philadelphia  Search this
Topic:
Sculptors -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Muralists -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Sculptors -- Pennsylvania -- Philadelphia  Search this
Painters -- New York (State) -- New York  Search this
Painters -- Pennsylvania -- Philadelphia  Search this
Genre/Form:
Photographs
Scrapbooks
Transcripts
Sketches
Citation:
Charles Searles papers, 1953-2010. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
AAA.searchar
See more items in:
Charles Searles papers
Archival Repository:
Archives of American Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-aaa-searchar

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