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Friday Knight Fights: Russian MMA Fighters Go Medieval

Creator:
Smithsonian Magazine  Search this
Type:
Blog posts
Smithsonian staff publications
Blog posts
Published Date:
Wed, 29 Apr 2015 15:39:33 +0000
Topic:
Search this
See more post:
Smithsonian Article Database
Data Source:
Smithsonian Magazine
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:posts_79a44963d2e6886a142f4bde144c8a90

Agbogho mma players followed by urukpo mma players in the njenji parade at Ezi Nwachi compound, Ndibe village, Afikpo Village-Group, Nigeria

Photographer:
Ottenberg, Simon  Search this
Collection Photographer:
Ottenberg, Simon  Search this
Extent:
1 Slide (col.)
Culture:
Igbo (African people)  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Slides
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Nigeria
Date:
1959-1960
Scope and Contents:
This photograph was taken by Dr. Simon Ottenberg while conducting field research at Afikpo village-group, southeastern Nigeria, from September 1959 to December 1960.
Original caption reads, "Njenje masked parade, Ndibe Village, but with players from Mgbom. Njenje male masqueraders dressed up as adolescent girls agboghe mma (girls-fairies) or ladies urokpo mma (ladies, married women-fairies). Hairdo differs for each. Unmarried ones have waist bands. All have mirrors, the 'queen' or upa nwa (carry-child) mask. Mgbom Village maskers at Ndibe Village. Men dressed in modern women's clothes in back." [Ottenberg field research notes, September 1959-December 1960, Part I].
Publication caption reads, "Agbogho mma players in the njenji parade, followed by masqueraders dressed as married women and wearing ibibio masks."
"The most elaborate masquerade, njenji, presented as part of the four-day Dry Season Festival, Iko Okoci, is a parade of the young adult members through many of the communities of afikpo. The masked paraders walk in a line, arranged in an order of descending age. Many players are dressed in costumes that make them appear as females. Some walk side by side as couples, dressed as man and wife, frequently in European-style dress. Other paraders are costumed as scholars, priests, or as Muslims. The players are arranged by the type of wooden mask they wear. Accompanying the masked line are small groups of net-masked dancers in various raffia and costumes who dance and prance about." [ Ottenberg, 1975: Masked rituals of Afikpo, the context of an African art; Seattle: University of Washington Press, 1975].
Local Numbers:
187/1959-1960

EEPA 2000-070409
General:
Title source: Dr. Simon Ottenberg, Professor Emeritus of Anthropology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA.
Other Archival Materials:
Simon Ottenberg Papers are located at the National Anthropological Archives, National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution.
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original records requires an appointment. Contact Archives staff for more details.
Collection Rights:
Permission to reproduce images from the Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives must be obtained in advance. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Rites and ceremonies -- Africa  Search this
Clothing and dress -- Africa  Search this
Cultural landscapes  Search this
Masquerades  Search this
Masks  Search this
Genre/Form:
Color slides
Identifier:
EEPA.2000-007, Item EEPA 2000-007-0409
See more items in:
Simon Ottenberg photographs
Archival Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-eepa-2000-007-ref917

Agbogho mma players followed by urukpo mma players in the njenji parade at Ezi Nwachi compound, Ndibe village, Afikpo Village-Group, Nigeria

Photographer:
Ottenberg, Simon  Search this
Collection Photographer:
Ottenberg, Simon  Search this
Extent:
1 Slide (col.)
Culture:
Igbo (African people)  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Slides
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Nigeria
Date:
1959-1960
Scope and Contents:
This photograph was taken by Dr. Simon Ottenberg while conducting field research at Afikpo village-group, southeastern Nigeria, from September 1959 to December 1960.
Original caption reads, "Njenje masked parade, Ndibe Village, but with players from Mgbom. Njenje male masqueraders dressed up as adolescent girls agboghe mma (girls-fairies) or ladies urokpo mma (ladies, married women-fairies). Hairdo differs for each. Unmarried ones have waist bands. All have mirrors, the 'queen' or upa nwa (carry-child) mask. Mgbom Village maskers at Ndibe Village. A praise singer in okwa ebo dress as well." [Ottenberg field research notes, September 1959-December 1960, Part I].
"The most elaborate masquerade, njenji, presented as part of the four-day Dry Season Festival, Iko Okoci, is a parade of the young adult members through many of the communities of afikpo. The masked paraders walk in a line, arranged in an order of descending age. Many players are dressed in costumes that make them appear as females. Some walk side by side as couples, dressed as man and wife, frequently in European-style dress. Other paraders are costumed as scholars, priests, or as Muslims. The players are arranged by the type of wooden mask they wear. Accompanying the masked line are small groups of net-masked dancers in various raffia and costumes who dance and prance about." [ Ottenberg, 1975: Masked rituals of Afikpo, the context of an African art; Seattle: University of Washington Press, 1975].
Local Numbers:
186/1959-1960

EEPA 2000-070408
General:
Title source: Dr. Simon Ottenberg, Professor Emeritus of Anthropology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA.
Other Archival Materials:
Simon Ottenberg Papers are located at the National Anthropological Archives, National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution.
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original records requires an appointment. Contact Archives staff for more details.
Collection Rights:
Permission to reproduce images from the Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives must be obtained in advance. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Rites and ceremonies -- Africa  Search this
Clothing and dress -- Africa  Search this
Cultural landscapes  Search this
Masquerades  Search this
Masks  Search this
Genre/Form:
Color slides
Identifier:
EEPA.2000-007, Item EEPA 2000-007-0408
See more items in:
Simon Ottenberg photographs
Archival Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-eepa-2000-007-ref916

The Spanish Apse from San Martin de Fuentiduena at The Cloisters, MMA

Author:
Charola, A. Elena  Search this
Wheeler, G. E.  Search this
Lazzarini, L.  Search this
Koestler, Robert J.  Search this
Object Type:
Smithsonian staff publication
Electronic document
Year:
1986
Topic:
Museum conservation methods  Search this
Museum techniques  Search this
Data source:
Smithsonian Libraries
EDAN-URL:
edanmdm:SILSRO_56885

Players with mma ji mask at the okonkwo dance, Oha Nwego Village, Okpoha Village-Group, Nigeria

Photographer:
Ottenberg, Simon  Search this
Collection Photographer:
Ottenberg, Simon  Search this
Extent:
1 Slide (col.)
Culture:
Igbo (African people)  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Slides
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Nigeria
Date:
1959-1960
Scope and Contents:
This photograph was taken by Dr. Simon Ottenberg at the Okonkwo dance presented on the the market day, aho, 9 January 1960 in the Eastern Igbo community of Oha Nwego Village, in neighboring Okpoha Village-Group. Dr. Ottenberg was conducting field research at Afikpo village-group, southeastern Nigeria, from September 1959 to December 1960.
Original caption reads, "Okpoha Ngodo performance at Okpoha Village-Group, an Igbo village-group northwest of Afikpo, related to it historically. Dancing counterclockwise as usual for Igbo and other Africans. The mask is similar to the Afikpo mma ji (knife-ham) or mma ubi (knife-farm) except at Afikpo the top knife part is straight, here it is curved back toward the dancer's head. Note the plastic waist beads, normally worn by girls before initiation and marriage at their waists." [Ottenberg field research notes, September 1959-December 1960, Part I].
Publication title reads, "Dancers with the circular-style 'knife' on the mma ji mask at the okonkwo dance, Okpoha Village-Group."
"Okonkwo, also called okpoha ngodo, is a dance of young adult men wearing wooden masks and costumes something like those of the akparakpa dancers in the okumkpa, who perform to the music of a xylophone, basket rattles, and in some cases a wooden gong. The xylophone (igeri or akware) is in the center of the common. Composed of nine boards, without calabashes underneath, it is colored orange, black and white, with red, black, and white spots on it. There was a human figure at the end. The xylophone was played by two musicians wearing white-faced masks looking something like the nne mgbo mask. When the musicians commenced to play, the dancers formed a line and moved about counterclockwise." [ Ottenberg, 1975: Masked rituals of Afikpo, the context of an African art; Seattle: University of Washington Press, 1975].
Local Numbers:
323/1959-1960

EEPA 2000-070539
General:
Title source: Dr. Simon Ottenberg, Professor Emeritus of Anthropology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA.
Other Archival Materials:
Simon Ottenberg Papers are located at the National Anthropological Archives, National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution.
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original records requires an appointment. Contact Archives staff for more details.
Collection Rights:
Permission to reproduce images from the Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives must be obtained in advance. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Rites and ceremonies -- Africa  Search this
Cultural landscapes  Search this
Masquerades  Search this
Clothing and dress -- Africa  Search this
Masks  Search this
Genre/Form:
Color slides
Identifier:
EEPA.2000-007, Item EEPA 2000-007-0539
See more items in:
Simon Ottenberg photographs
Archival Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-eepa-2000-007-ref1047

Players with mma ji mask at the okonkwo dance, Oha Nwego Village, Okpoha Village-Group, Nigeria

Photographer:
Ottenberg, Simon  Search this
Collection Photographer:
Ottenberg, Simon  Search this
Extent:
1 Slide (col.)
Culture:
Igbo (African people)  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Slides
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Nigeria
Date:
1959-1960
Scope and Contents:
This photograph was taken by Dr. Simon Ottenberg at the Okonkwo dance presented on the the market day, aho, 9 January 1960 in the Eastern Igbo community of Oha Nwego Village, in neighboring Okpoha Village-Group. Dr. Ottenberg was conducting field research at Afikpo village-group, southeastern Nigeria, from September 1959 to December 1960.
Original caption reads, "Okpoha Ngodo performance at Okpoha Village-Group, an Igbo village-group northwest of Afikpo, related to it historically. Dancing counterclockwise as usual for Igbo and other Africans. The mask is similar to the Afikpo mma ji (knife-ham) or mma ubi (knife-farm) except at Afikpo the top knife part is straight, here it is curved back toward the dancer's head. Note the plastic waist beads, normally worn by girls before initiation and marriage at their waists." [Ottenberg field research notes, September 1959-December 1960, Part I].
"Okonkwo, also called okpoha ngodo, is a dance of young adult men wearing wooden masks and costumes something like those of the akparakpa dancers in the okumkpa, who perform to the music of a xylophone, basket rattles, and in some cases a wooden gong. The xylophone (igeri or akware) is in the center of the common. Composed of nine boards, without calabashes underneath, it is colored orange, black and white, with red, black, and white spots on it. There was a human figure at the end. The xylophone was played by two musicians wearing white-faced masks looking something like the nne mgbo mask. When the musicians commenced to play, the dancers formed a line and moved about counterclockwise." [ Ottenberg, 1975: Masked rituals of Afikpo, the context of an African art; Seattle: University of Washington Press, 1975].
Local Numbers:
324/1959-1960

EEPA 2000-070540
General:
Title source: Dr. Simon Ottenberg, Professor Emeritus of Anthropology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA.
Other Archival Materials:
Simon Ottenberg Papers are located at the National Anthropological Archives, National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution.
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original records requires an appointment. Contact Archives staff for more details.
Collection Rights:
Permission to reproduce images from the Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives must be obtained in advance. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Rites and ceremonies -- Africa  Search this
Cultural landscapes  Search this
Masquerades  Search this
Clothing and dress -- Africa  Search this
Masks  Search this
Genre/Form:
Color slides
Identifier:
EEPA.2000-007, Item EEPA 2000-007-0540
See more items in:
Simon Ottenberg photographs
Archival Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-eepa-2000-007-ref1048

Players with mma ji mask at the okonkwo dance, Oha Nwego Village, Okpoha Village-Group, Nigeria

Photographer:
Ottenberg, Simon  Search this
Collection Photographer:
Ottenberg, Simon  Search this
Extent:
1 Slide (col.)
Culture:
Igbo (African people)  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Slides
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Nigeria
Date:
1959-1960
Scope and Contents:
This photograph was taken by Dr. Simon Ottenberg at the Okonkwo dance presented on the the market day, aho, 9 January 1960 in the Eastern Igbo community of Oha Nwego Village, in neighboring Okpoha Village-Group. Dr. Ottenberg was conducting field research at Afikpo village-group, southeastern Nigeria, from September 1959 to December 1960.
Original caption reads, "Okpoha Ngodo performance at Okpoha Village-Group, an Igbo village-group northwest of Afikpo, related to it historically. Dancing counterclockwise as usual for Igbo and other Africans. The mask is similar to the Afikpo mma ji (knife-ham) or mma ubi (knife-farm) except at Afikpo the top knife part is straight, here it is curved back toward the dancer's head. Note the plastic waist beads, normally worn by girls before initiation and marriage at their waists." [Ottenberg field research notes, September 1959-December 1960, Part I].
"Okonkwo, also called okpoha ngodo, is a dance of young adult men wearing wooden masks and costumes something like those of the akparakpa dancers in the okumkpa, who perform to the music of a xylophone, basket rattles, and in some cases a wooden gong. The xylophone (igeri or akware) is in the center of the common. Composed of nine boards, without calabashes underneath, it is colored orange, black and white, with red, black, and white spots on it. There was a human figure at the end. The xylophone was played by two musicians wearing white-faced masks looking something like the nne mgbo mask. When the musicians commenced to play, the dancers formed a line and moved about counterclockwise." [ Ottenberg, 1975: Masked rituals of Afikpo, the context of an African art; Seattle: University of Washington Press, 1975].
Local Numbers:
327/1959-1960

EEPA 2000-070543
General:
Title source: Dr. Simon Ottenberg, Professor Emeritus of Anthropology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA.
Other Archival Materials:
Simon Ottenberg Papers are located at the National Anthropological Archives, National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution.
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original records requires an appointment. Contact Archives staff for more details.
Collection Rights:
Permission to reproduce images from the Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives must be obtained in advance. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Rites and ceremonies -- Africa  Search this
Cultural landscapes  Search this
Masquerades  Search this
Clothing and dress -- Africa  Search this
Masks  Search this
Genre/Form:
Color slides
Identifier:
EEPA.2000-007, Item EEPA 2000-007-0543
See more items in:
Simon Ottenberg photographs
Archival Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-eepa-2000-007-ref1051

Players with mma ji mask at the okonkwo dance, Oha Nwego Village, Okpoha Village-Group, Nigeria

Photographer:
Ottenberg, Simon  Search this
Collection Photographer:
Ottenberg, Simon  Search this
Extent:
1 Slide (col.)
Culture:
Igbo (African people)  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Slides
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Nigeria
Date:
1959-1960
Scope and Contents:
This photograph was taken by Dr. Simon Ottenberg at the Okonkwo dance presented on the the market day, aho, 9 January 1960 in the Eastern Igbo community of Oha Nwego Village, in neighboring Okpoha Village-Group. Dr. Ottenberg was conducting field research at Afikpo village-group, southeastern Nigeria, from September 1959 to December 1960.
Original caption reads, "Okpoha Ngodo performance at Okpoha Village-Group, an Igbo village-group northwest of Afikpo, related to it historically. Dancing counterclockwise as usual for Igbo and other Africans. The mask is similar to the Afikpo mma ji (knife-ham) or mma ubi (knife-farm) except at Afikpo the top knife part is straight, here it is curved back toward the dancer's head. Note the plastic waist beads, normally worn by girls before initiation and marriage at their waists." [Ottenberg field research notes, September 1959-December 1960, Part I].
"Okonkwo, also called okpoha ngodo, is a dance of young adult men wearing wooden masks and costumes something like those of the akparakpa dancers in the okumkpa, who perform to the music of a xylophone, basket rattles, and in some cases a wooden gong. The xylophone (igeri or akware) is in the center of the common. Composed of nine boards, without calabashes underneath, it is colored orange, black and white, with red, black, and white spots on it. There was a human figure at the end. The xylophone was played by two musicians wearing white-faced masks looking something like the nne mgbo mask. When the musicians commenced to play, the dancers formed a line and moved about counterclockwise." [ Ottenberg, 1975: Masked rituals of Afikpo, the context of an African art; Seattle: University of Washington Press, 1975].
Local Numbers:
329/1959-1960

EEPA 2000-070545
General:
Title source: Dr. Simon Ottenberg, Professor Emeritus of Anthropology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA.
Other Archival Materials:
Simon Ottenberg Papers are located at the National Anthropological Archives, National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution.
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original records requires an appointment. Contact Archives staff for more details.
Collection Rights:
Permission to reproduce images from the Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives must be obtained in advance. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Rites and ceremonies -- Africa  Search this
Cultural landscapes  Search this
Masquerades  Search this
Clothing and dress -- Africa  Search this
Masks  Search this
Genre/Form:
Color slides
Identifier:
EEPA.2000-007, Item EEPA 2000-007-0545
See more items in:
Simon Ottenberg photographs
Archival Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-eepa-2000-007-ref1053

Players with mma ji mask at the okonkwo dance, Oha Nwego Village, Okpoha Village-Group, Nigeria

Photographer:
Ottenberg, Simon  Search this
Collection Photographer:
Ottenberg, Simon  Search this
Extent:
1 Slide (col.)
Culture:
Igbo (African people)  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Slides
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Nigeria
Date:
1959-1960
Scope and Contents:
This photograph was taken by Dr. Simon Ottenberg at the Okonkwo dance presented on the the market day, aho, 9 January 1960 in the Eastern Igbo community of Oha Nwego Village, in neighboring Okpoha Village-Group. Dr. Ottenberg was conducting field research at Afikpo village-group, southeastern Nigeria, from September 1959 to December 1960.
Original caption reads, "Okpoha Ngodo performance at Okpoha Village-Group, an Igbo village-group northwest of Afikpo, related to it historically. Dancing counterclockwise as usual for Igbo and other Africans. The mask is similar to the Afikpo mma ji (knife-ham) or mma ubi (knife-farm) except at Afikpo the top knife part is straight, here it is curved back toward the dancer's head. Note the plastic waist beads, normally worn by girls before initiation and marriage at their waists." [Ottenberg field research notes, September 1959-December 1960, Part I].
"Okonkwo, also called okpoha ngodo, is a dance of young adult men wearing wooden masks and costumes something like those of the akparakpa dancers in the okumkpa, who perform to the music of a xylophone, basket rattles, and in some cases a wooden gong. The xylophone (igeri or akware) is in the center of the common. Composed of nine boards, without calabashes underneath, it is colored orange, black and white, with red, black, and white spots on it. There was a human figure at the end. The xylophone was played by two musicians wearing white-faced masks looking something like the nne mgbo mask. When the musicians commenced to play, the dancers formed a line and moved about counterclockwise." [ Ottenberg, 1975: Masked rituals of Afikpo, the context of an African art; Seattle: University of Washington Press, 1975].
Local Numbers:
325/1959-1960

EEPA 2000-070541
General:
Title source: Dr. Simon Ottenberg, Professor Emeritus of Anthropology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA.
Other Archival Materials:
Simon Ottenberg Papers are located at the National Anthropological Archives, National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution.
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original records requires an appointment. Contact Archives staff for more details.
Collection Rights:
Permission to reproduce images from the Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives must be obtained in advance. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Rites and ceremonies -- Africa  Search this
Cultural landscapes  Search this
Masquerades  Search this
Clothing and dress -- Africa  Search this
Masks  Search this
Genre/Form:
Color slides
Identifier:
EEPA.2000-007, Item EEPA 2000-007-0541
See more items in:
Simon Ottenberg photographs
Archival Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-eepa-2000-007-ref1049

Players with mma ji mask at the okonkwo dance, Oha Nwego Village, Okpoha Village-Group, Nigeria

Photographer:
Ottenberg, Simon  Search this
Collection Photographer:
Ottenberg, Simon  Search this
Extent:
1 Slide (col.)
Culture:
Igbo (African people)  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Slides
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Nigeria
Date:
1959-1960
Scope and Contents:
This photograph was taken by Dr. Simon Ottenberg at the Okonkwo dance presented on the the market day, aho, 9 January 1960 in the Eastern Igbo community of Oha Nwego Village, in neighboring Okpoha Village-Group. Dr. Ottenberg was conducting field research at Afikpo village-group, southeastern Nigeria, from September 1959 to December 1960.
Original caption reads, "Okpoha Ngodo performance at Okpoha Village-Group, an Igbo village-group northwest of Afikpo, related to it historically. Dancing counterclockwise as usual for Igbo and other Africans. The mask is similar to the Afikpo mma ji (knife-ham) or mma ubi (knife-farm) except at Afikpo the top knife part is straight, here it is curved back toward the dancer's head. Note the plastic waist beads, normally worn by girls before initiation and marriage at their waists." [Ottenberg field research notes, September 1959-December 1960, Part I].
"Okonkwo, also called okpoha ngodo, is a dance of young adult men wearing wooden masks and costumes something like those of the akparakpa dancers in the okumkpa, who perform to the music of a xylophone, basket rattles, and in some cases a wooden gong. The xylophone (igeri or akware) is in the center of the common. Composed of nine boards, without calabashes underneath, it is colored orange, black and white, with red, black, and white spots on it. There was a human figure at the end. The xylophone was played by two musicians wearing white-faced masks looking something like the nne mgbo mask. When the musicians commenced to play, the dancers formed a line and moved about counterclockwise." [ Ottenberg, 1975: Masked rituals of Afikpo, the context of an African art; Seattle: University of Washington Press, 1975].
Local Numbers:
326/1959-1960

EEPA 2000-070542
General:
Title source: Dr. Simon Ottenberg, Professor Emeritus of Anthropology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA.
Other Archival Materials:
Simon Ottenberg Papers are located at the National Anthropological Archives, National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution.
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original records requires an appointment. Contact Archives staff for more details.
Collection Rights:
Permission to reproduce images from the Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives must be obtained in advance. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Rites and ceremonies -- Africa  Search this
Cultural landscapes  Search this
Masquerades  Search this
Clothing and dress -- Africa  Search this
Masks  Search this
Genre/Form:
Color slides
Identifier:
EEPA.2000-007, Item EEPA 2000-007-0542
See more items in:
Simon Ottenberg photographs
Archival Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-eepa-2000-007-ref1050

Players with mma ji mask at the okonkwo dance, Oha Nwego Village, Okpoha Village-Group, Nigeria

Photographer:
Ottenberg, Simon  Search this
Collection Photographer:
Ottenberg, Simon  Search this
Extent:
1 Slide (col.)
Culture:
Igbo (African people)  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Slides
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Nigeria
Date:
1959-1960
Scope and Contents:
This photograph was taken by Dr. Simon Ottenberg at the Okonkwo dance presented on the the market day, aho, 9 January 1960 in the Eastern Igbo community of Oha Nwego Village, in neighboring Okpoha Village-Group. Dr. Ottenberg was conducting field research at Afikpo village-group, southeastern Nigeria, from September 1959 to December 1960.
Original caption reads, "Okpoha Ngodo performance at Okpoha Village-Group, an Igbo village-group northwest of Afikpo, related to it historically. Dancing counterclockwise as usual for Igbo and other Africans. The mask is similar to the Afikpo mma ji (knife-ham) or mma ubi (knife-farm) except at Afikpo the top knife part is straight, here it is curved back toward the dancer's head. Note the plastic waist beads, normally worn by girls before initiation and marriage at their waists." [Ottenberg field research notes, September 1959-December 1960, Part I].
"Okonkwo, also called okpoha ngodo, is a dance of young adult men wearing wooden masks and costumes something like those of the akparakpa dancers in the okumkpa, who perform to the music of a xylophone, basket rattles, and in some cases a wooden gong. The xylophone (igeri or akware) is in the center of the common. Composed of nine boards, without calabashes underneath, it is colored orange, black and white, with red, black, and white spots on it. There was a human figure at the end. The xylophone was played by two musicians wearing white-faced masks looking something like the nne mgbo mask. When the musicians commenced to play, the dancers formed a line and moved about counterclockwise." [ Ottenberg, 1975: Masked rituals of Afikpo, the context of an African art; Seattle: University of Washington Press, 1975].
Local Numbers:
328/1959-1960

EEPA 2000-070544
General:
Title source: Dr. Simon Ottenberg, Professor Emeritus of Anthropology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA.
Other Archival Materials:
Simon Ottenberg Papers are located at the National Anthropological Archives, National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution.
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original records requires an appointment. Contact Archives staff for more details.
Collection Rights:
Permission to reproduce images from the Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives must be obtained in advance. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Rites and ceremonies -- Africa  Search this
Cultural landscapes  Search this
Masquerades  Search this
Clothing and dress -- Africa  Search this
Masks  Search this
Genre/Form:
Color slides
Identifier:
EEPA.2000-007, Item EEPA 2000-007-0544
See more items in:
Simon Ottenberg photographs
Archival Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-eepa-2000-007-ref1052

Players wearing mma ji and ibibio masks, with agbogho mma player and praise singer (in the foreground) in the njenji parade at Ezi Nwachi compound, Ndibe village, Afikpo Village-Group, Nigeria

Photographer:
Ottenberg, Simon  Search this
Collection Photographer:
Ottenberg, Simon  Search this
Extent:
1 Slide (col.)
Culture:
Igbo (African people)  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Slides
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Nigeria
Date:
1959-1960
Scope and Contents:
This photograph was taken by Dr. Simon Ottenberg while conducting field research at Afikpo village-group, southeastern Nigeria, from September 1959 to December 1960.
Original caption reads, "Njenje masked parade, Ndibe Village, but with players from Mgbom. Praise singer masquerader and others." [Ottenberg field research notes, September 1959-December 1960, Part I].
Publication caption reads, "Njenji parade players, with praise singers in the foreground."
"The most elaborate masquerade, njenji, presented as part of the four-day Dry Season Festival, Iko Okoci, is a parade of the young adult members through many of the communities of afikpo. The masked paraders walk in a line, arranged in an order of descending age. Many players are dressed in costumes that make them appear as females. Some walk side by side as couples, dressed as man and wife, frequently in European-style dress. Other paraders are costumed as scholars, priests, or as Muslims. The players are arranged by the type of wooden mask they wear. Accompanying the masked line are small groups of net-masked dancers in various raffia and costumes who dance and prance about." [ Ottenberg, 1975: Masked rituals of Afikpo, the context of an African art; Seattle: University of Washington Press, 1975].
Local Numbers:
192/1959-1960

EEPA 2000-070414
General:
Title source: Dr. Simon Ottenberg, Professor Emeritus of Anthropology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA.
Other Archival Materials:
Simon Ottenberg Papers are located at the National Anthropological Archives, National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution.
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original records requires an appointment. Contact Archives staff for more details.
Collection Rights:
Permission to reproduce images from the Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives must be obtained in advance. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Rites and ceremonies -- Africa  Search this
Clothing and dress -- Africa  Search this
Cultural landscapes  Search this
Masquerades  Search this
Masks  Search this
Genre/Form:
Color slides
Identifier:
EEPA.2000-007, Item EEPA 2000-007-0414
See more items in:
Simon Ottenberg photographs
Archival Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-eepa-2000-007-ref922

Players wearing mma ji mask with rounded top-piece at the okonkwo dance, Oha Nwego Village, Okpoha Village-Group, Nigeria

Photographer:
Ottenberg, Simon  Search this
Collection Photographer:
Ottenberg, Simon  Search this
Extent:
1 Slide (col.)
Culture:
Igbo (African people)  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Slides
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Nigeria
Date:
1959-1960
Scope and Contents:
This photograph was taken by Dr. Simon Ottenberg at the Okonkwo dance presented on the the market day, aho, 9 January 1960 in the Eastern Igbo community of Oha Nwego Village, in neighboring Okpoha Village-Group. Dr. Ottenberg was conducting field research at Afikpo village-group, southeastern Nigeria, from September 1959 to December 1960.
Original caption reads, "Okpoha Ngodo performance at Okpoha Village-Group, an Igbo village-group northwest of Afikpo, related to it historically. Dancing counterclockwise as usual for Igbo and other Africans. The mask is similar to the Afikpo mma ji (knife-ham) or mma ubi (knife-farm) except at Afikpo the top knife part is straight, here it is curved back toward the dancer's head. Note the plastic waist beads, normally worn by girls before initiation and marriage at their waists." [Ottenberg field research notes, September 1959-December 1960, Part I].
Publication title reads, "Okonkwo players in the Okpoha Village-Group, wearing mma ji mask form with the rounded top-piece."
"Okonkwo, also called okpoha ngodo, is a dance of young adult men wearing wooden masks and costumes something like those of the akparakpa dancers in the okumkpa, who perform to the music of a xylophone, basket rattles, and in some cases a wooden gong. The xylophone (igeri or akware) is in the center of the common. Composed of nine boards, without calabashes underneath, it is colored orange, black and white, with red, black, and white spots on it. There was a human figure at the end. The xylophone was played by two musicians wearing white-faced masks looking something like the nne mgbo mask. When the musicians commenced to play, the dancers formed a line and moved about counterclockwise." [ Ottenberg, 1975: Masked rituals of Afikpo, the context of an African art; Seattle: University of Washington Press, 1975].
Local Numbers:
331/1959-1960

EEPA 2000-070547
General:
Title source: Dr. Simon Ottenberg, Professor Emeritus of Anthropology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA.
Other Archival Materials:
Simon Ottenberg Papers are located at the National Anthropological Archives, National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution.
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original records requires an appointment. Contact Archives staff for more details.
Collection Rights:
Permission to reproduce images from the Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives must be obtained in advance. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Rites and ceremonies -- Africa  Search this
Cultural landscapes  Search this
Masquerades  Search this
Clothing and dress -- Africa  Search this
Masks  Search this
Genre/Form:
Color slides
Identifier:
EEPA.2000-007, Item EEPA 2000-007-0547
See more items in:
Simon Ottenberg photographs
Archival Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-eepa-2000-007-ref1055

Players with Afikpo-style mma ji mask at the okonkwo dance, Oha Nwego Village, Okpoha Village-Group, Nigeria

Photographer:
Ottenberg, Simon  Search this
Collection Photographer:
Ottenberg, Simon  Search this
Extent:
1 Slide (col.)
Culture:
Igbo (African people)  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Slides
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Nigeria
Date:
1959-1960
Scope and Contents:
This photograph was taken by Dr. Simon Ottenberg at the Okonkwo dance presented on the the market day, aho, 9 January 1960 in the Eastern Igbo community of Oha Nwego Village, in neighboring Okpoha Village-Group. Dr. Ottenberg was conducting field research at Afikpo village-group, southeastern Nigeria, from September 1959 to December 1960.
Original caption reads, "Okpoha Ngodo performance at Okpoha Village-Group, an Igbo village-group northwest of Afikpo, related to it historically. Dancing counterclockwise as usual for Igbo and other Africans. The mask is similar to the Afikpo mma ji (knife-ham) or mma ubi (knife-farm) except at Afikpo the top knife part is straight, here it is curved back toward the dancer's head. Note the plastic waist beads, normally worn by girls before initiation and marriage at their waists." [Ottenberg field research notes, September 1959-December 1960, Part I].
Publication title reads, "Okonkwo dancers, Okpoha Village-Group. The player at front center wears an Afikpo-style mma ji mask, the player in back of him the Okpoha style."
"Okonkwo, also called okpoha ngodo, is a dance of young adult men wearing wooden masks and costumes something like those of the akparakpa dancers in the okumkpa, who perform to the music of a xylophone, basket rattles, and in some cases a wooden gong. The xylophone (igeri or akware) is in the center of the common. Composed of nine boards, without calabashes underneath, it is colored orange, black and white, with red, black, and white spots on it. There was a human figure at the end. The xylophone was played by two musicians wearing white-faced masks looking something like the nne mgbo mask. When the musicians commenced to play, the dancers formed a line and moved about counterclockwise." [ Ottenberg, 1975: Masked rituals of Afikpo, the context of an African art; Seattle: University of Washington Press, 1975].
Local Numbers:
330/1959-1960

EEPA 2000-070546
General:
Title source: Dr. Simon Ottenberg, Professor Emeritus of Anthropology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA.
Other Archival Materials:
Simon Ottenberg Papers are located at the National Anthropological Archives, National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution.
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original records requires an appointment. Contact Archives staff for more details.
Collection Rights:
Permission to reproduce images from the Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives must be obtained in advance. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Rites and ceremonies -- Africa  Search this
Cultural landscapes  Search this
Masquerades  Search this
Clothing and dress -- Africa  Search this
Masks  Search this
Genre/Form:
Color slides
Identifier:
EEPA.2000-007, Item EEPA 2000-007-0546
See more items in:
Simon Ottenberg photographs
Archival Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-eepa-2000-007-ref1054

The ancestral shrine house, Mma obu (ancestor-rest house), in Ezi Ukwu compound, Mgbom village, Afikpo Village-Group, Nigeria

Photographer:
Ottenberg, Simon  Search this
Collection Photographer:
Ottenberg, Simon  Search this
Extent:
1 Slide (col.)
Culture:
Igbo (African people)  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Slides
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Nigeria
Date:
1951-1953
Scope and Contents:
This photograph was taken by Dr. Simon Ottenberg while conducting field research at Afikpo village-group, southeastern Nigeria, from December 1951 to March 1953.
Original title reads, "Man taking ukie chi title, Ezi Ukwu compound, Ndibe Village. Compound ancestral rest house in front of which this part of the title takes place, Ezi Ukwu compound, Ndibe Village." [Ottenberg field research notes, O Series,December 1951-March 1953].
Publication title reads, "Ancestral shrine house (Mma obu), with Ibini okpabe shrine outside."
"A short distance inside the compound entrance is the ancestral shrine of the lineage founder, Mma obu (ancestor-rest house), which also serves as a rest house and meeting place for the lineage elders, and near which is a small cleared area used for meetings and feasts. The founder's house is believed to have been located where the shrine stands and his body to be buried beneath it, and the spirits of the male ancestors of the major patrilineage, Nde mma (people-ancestors or spirits), are said to reside in the shrine. Another commonly found shrine, Ibini okpabe, to the Aro Chuku oracle, is located outside of the ward resthouse. It usually has no priest, a thank offering being given it by an interested elder at the New Yam Festival and at other times on the suggestion of a diviner." [Ottenberg S., 1968: Double Descent in an African Society; the Afikpo Village-Group. University of Washington Press].
Local Numbers:
O-162/1951-1953

EEPA 2000-070143
General:
Title source: Dr. Simon Ottenberg, Professor Emeritus of Anthropology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA.
Other Archival Materials:
Simon Ottenberg Papers are located at the National Anthropological Archives, National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution.
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original records requires an appointment. Contact Archives staff for more details.
Collection Rights:
Permission to reproduce images from the Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives must be obtained in advance. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Cultural landscapes  Search this
Vernacular architecture  Search this
Religious buildings  Search this
Shrines  Search this
Genre/Form:
Color slides
Identifier:
EEPA.2000-007, Item EEPA 2000-007-0143
See more items in:
Simon Ottenberg photographs
Archival Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-eepa-2000-007-ref651

Agbogho mma players lined up before starting out in the njenji parade, Mgbom village, Afikpo Village-Group, Nigeria

Photographer:
Ottenberg, Simon  Search this
Collection Photographer:
Ottenberg, Simon  Search this
Extent:
1 Slide (col.)
Culture:
Igbo (African people)  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Slides
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Nigeria
Date:
1959-1960
Scope and Contents:
This photograph was taken by Dr. Simon Ottenberg while conducting field research at Afikpo village-group, southeastern Nigeria, from September 1959 to December 1960.
Original caption reads, "Njenje masquerade parade, Mgbom village, players practicing at home then moving out to Amuro Village. Masqueraders lined up to start out. masked praise singer near front center. Friends and relatives give maskers money or yams, which others hold for them to return from parade." [Ottenberg field research notes, September 1959-December 1960, Part I].
Publication caption reads, "Agbogho mma players lined up to be checked out before starting out in the nlenji parade from their home village of Mgbom. Friends and relatives are giving money or yams to the masqueraders."
"The most elaborate masquerade, njenji, presented as part of the four-day Dry Season Festival, Iko Okoci, is a parade of the young adult members through many of the communities of afikpo. The masked paraders walk in a line, arranged in an order of descending age. Many players are dressed in costumes that make them appear as females. Some walk side by side as couples, dressed as man and wife, frequently in European-style dress. Other paraders are costumed as scholars, priests, or as Muslims. The players are arranged by the type of wooden mask they wear. Accompanying the masked line are small groups of net-masked dancers in various raffia and costumes who dance and prance about." [ Ottenberg, 1975: Masked rituals of Afikpo, the context of an African art; Seattle: University of Washington Press, 1975].
Local Numbers:
224/1959-1960

EEPA 2000-070445
General:
Title source: Dr. Simon Ottenberg, Professor Emeritus of Anthropology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA.
Other Archival Materials:
Simon Ottenberg Papers are located at the National Anthropological Archives, National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution.
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original records requires an appointment. Contact Archives staff for more details.
Collection Rights:
Permission to reproduce images from the Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives must be obtained in advance. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Rites and ceremonies -- Africa  Search this
Clothing and dress -- Africa  Search this
Cultural landscapes  Search this
Masquerades  Search this
Masks  Search this
Genre/Form:
Color slides
Identifier:
EEPA.2000-007, Item EEPA 2000-007-0445
See more items in:
Simon Ottenberg photographs
Archival Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-eepa-2000-007-ref953

Couple masqueraders wearing mma ji, nne mgbo and ibibio masks in the njenji parade, Amuro village, Afikpo Village-Group, Nigeria

Photographer:
Ottenberg, Simon  Search this
Collection Photographer:
Ottenberg, Simon  Search this
Extent:
1 Slide (col.)
Culture:
Igbo (African people)  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Slides
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Nigeria
Date:
1959-1960
Scope and Contents:
This photograph was taken by Dr. Simon Ottenberg while conducting field research at Afikpo village-group, southeastern Nigeria, from September 1959 to December 1960.
Original caption reads, "Njenje masquerade parade, Amuro Village players." [Ottenberg field research notes, September 1959-December 1960, Part I].
Publication caption reads, "Masked couples in the njenji parade."
"The most elaborate masquerade, njenji, presented as part of the four-day Dry Season Festival, Iko Okoci, is a parade of the young adult members through many of the communities of afikpo. The masked paraders walk in a line, arranged in an order of descending age. Many players are dressed in costumes that make them appear as females. Some walk side by side as couples, dressed as man and wife, frequently in European-style dress. Other paraders are costumed as scholars, priests, or as Muslims. The players are arranged by the type of wooden mask they wear. Accompanying the masked line are small groups of net-masked dancers in various raffia and costumes who dance and prance about." [Ottenberg, 1975: Masked rituals of Afikpo, the context of an African art; Seattle: University of Washington Press, 1975].
Local Numbers:
246/1959-1960

EEPA 2000-070467
General:
Title source: Dr. Simon Ottenberg, Professor Emeritus of Anthropology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA.
Other Archival Materials:
Simon Ottenberg Papers are located at the National Anthropological Archives, National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution.
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original records requires an appointment. Contact Archives staff for more details.
Collection Rights:
Permission to reproduce images from the Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives must be obtained in advance. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Rites and ceremonies -- Africa  Search this
Clothing and dress -- Africa  Search this
Cultural landscapes  Search this
Masquerades  Search this
Masks  Search this
Genre/Form:
Color slides
Identifier:
EEPA.2000-007, Item EEPA 2000-007-0467
See more items in:
Simon Ottenberg photographs
Archival Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-eepa-2000-007-ref975

Couple masqueraders wearing mma ji and ibibio masks in the njenji parade, Amuro village, Afikpo Village-Group, Nigeria

Photographer:
Ottenberg, Simon  Search this
Collection Photographer:
Ottenberg, Simon  Search this
Extent:
1 Slide (col.)
Culture:
Igbo (African people)  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Slides
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Nigeria
Date:
1959-1960
Scope and Contents:
This photograph was taken by Dr. Simon Ottenberg while conducting field research at Afikpo village-group, southeastern Nigeria, from September 1959 to December 1960.
Original caption reads, "Njenje masquerade parade, Amuro Village players." [Ottenberg field research notes, September 1959-December 1960, Part I].
"The most elaborate masquerade, njenji, presented as part of the four-day Dry Season Festival, Iko Okoci, is a parade of the young adult members through many of the communities of afikpo. The masked paraders walk in a line, arranged in an order of descending age. Many players are dressed in costumes that make them appear as females. Some walk side by side as couples, dressed as man and wife, frequently in European-style dress. Other paraders are costumed as scholars, priests, or as Muslims. The players are arranged by the type of wooden mask they wear. Accompanying the masked line are small groups of net-masked dancers in various raffia and costumes who dance and prance about." [Ottenberg, 1975: Masked rituals of Afikpo, the context of an African art; Seattle: University of Washington Press, 1975].
Local Numbers:
247/1959-1960

EEPA 2000-070468
General:
Title source: Dr. Simon Ottenberg, Professor Emeritus of Anthropology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA.
Other Archival Materials:
Simon Ottenberg Papers are located at the National Anthropological Archives, National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution.
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original records requires an appointment. Contact Archives staff for more details.
Collection Rights:
Permission to reproduce images from the Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives must be obtained in advance. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Rites and ceremonies -- Africa  Search this
Clothing and dress -- Africa  Search this
Cultural landscapes  Search this
Masquerades  Search this
Masks  Search this
Genre/Form:
Color slides
Identifier:
EEPA.2000-007, Item EEPA 2000-007-0468
See more items in:
Simon Ottenberg photographs
Archival Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-eepa-2000-007-ref976

Construction of the ancestral shrine house, Mma obu (ancestor-rest house), in Ezi Akputa compound, Mgbom village, Afikpo Village-Group, Nigeria

Photographer:
Ottenberg, Simon  Search this
Collection Photographer:
Ottenberg, Simon  Search this
Extent:
1 Slide (col.)
Culture:
Igbo (African people)  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Slides
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Nigeria
Date:
1951-1953
Scope and Contents:
This photograph was taken by Dr. Simon Ottenberg while conducting field research at Afikpo village-group, southeastern Nigeria, from December 1951 to March 1953.
Original title reads, "Pile of stones to be used in building the men's compound ancestral shrine building (obu) in Ezi Akputa compound, Mgbom Village." [Ottenberg field research notes, O Series,December 1951-March 1953].
"A short distance inside the compound entrance is the ancestral shrine of the lineage founder, Mma obu (ancestor-rest house), which also serves as a rest house and meeting place for the lineage elders, and near which is a small cleared area used for meetings and feasts. The founder's house is believed to have been located where the shrine stands and his body to be buried beneath it, and the spirits of the male ancestors of the major patrilineage, Nde mma (people-ancestors or spirits), are said to reside in the shrine. Women often fear this shrine, entering the house only for rituals." [Ottenberg S., 1968: Double Descent in an African Society; the Afikpo Village-Group. University of Washington Press].
Local Numbers:
O-85/1951-1953

EEPA 2000-070077
General:
Title source: Dr. Simon Ottenberg, Professor Emeritus of Anthropology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA.
Other Archival Materials:
Simon Ottenberg Papers are located at the National Anthropological Archives, National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution.
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original records requires an appointment. Contact Archives staff for more details.
Collection Rights:
Permission to reproduce images from the Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives must be obtained in advance. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Cultural landscapes  Search this
Vernacular architecture  Search this
Religious buildings  Search this
Shrines  Search this
Genre/Form:
Color slides
Identifier:
EEPA.2000-007, Item EEPA 2000-007-0077
See more items in:
Simon Ottenberg photographs
Archival Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-eepa-2000-007-ref585

Construction of the ancestral shrine house, Mma obu (ancestor-rest house), in Ezi Akputa compound, Mgbom village, Afikpo Village-Group, Nigeria

Photographer:
Ottenberg, Simon  Search this
Collection Photographer:
Ottenberg, Simon  Search this
Extent:
1 Slide (col.)
Culture:
Igbo (African people)  Search this
Type:
Archival materials
Slides
Color slides
Place:
Africa
Nigeria
Date:
1951-1953
Scope and Contents:
This photograph was taken by Dr. Simon Ottenberg while conducting field research at Afikpo village-group, southeastern Nigeria, from December 1951 to March 1953.
Original title reads, "Committee for the construction of the ancestral shrine house (obu) in Ezi Akputa compound, Mgbom Village, discussing plans with the contractor." [Ottenberg field research notes, O Series,December 1951-March 1953].
"A short distance inside the compound entrance is the ancestral shrine of the lineage founder, Mma obu (ancestor-rest house), which also serves as a rest house and meeting place for the lineage elders, and near which is a small cleared area used for meetings and feasts. The founder's house is believed to have been located where the shrine stands and his body to be buried beneath it, and the spirits of the male ancestors of the major patrilineage, Nde mma (people-ancestors or spirits), are said to reside in the shrine. The uke ekpe grade, the executive arm of the lineage elders, is responsible for rebuilding the ancestral shrine house, the fashion nowdays is to use cement blocks and galvanized iron roofs, but only after receiving assurances from a diviner that the ancestral spirits will not be offended by this bit of modernity. The uke ekpe sees that the necessary communal work is carried out, that any contractor involved is paid, and that sacrifices to the appropriate shrines are performed so that the ancestral spirits will not be upset by the rebuilding." [Ottenberg S., 1968: Double Descent in an African Society; the Afikpo Village-Group. University of Washington Press].
Local Numbers:
O-88/1951-1953

EEPA 2000-070080
General:
Title source: Dr. Simon Ottenberg, Professor Emeritus of Anthropology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA.
Other Archival Materials:
Simon Ottenberg Papers are located at the National Anthropological Archives, National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution.
Collection Restrictions:
Use of original records requires an appointment. Contact Archives staff for more details.
Collection Rights:
Permission to reproduce images from the Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives must be obtained in advance. The collection is subject to all copyright laws.
Topic:
Cultural landscapes  Search this
Vernacular architecture  Search this
Religious buildings  Search this
Shrines  Search this
Genre/Form:
Color slides
Identifier:
EEPA.2000-007, Item EEPA 2000-007-0080
See more items in:
Simon Ottenberg photographs
Archival Repository:
Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives, National Museum of African Art
EDAN-URL:
ead_component:sova-eepa-2000-007-ref588

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