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Ellen Ochoa Innovative Lives Presentation

Topic:
Innovative Lives Program (NMAH public program series)
Interviewee:
Ochoa, Ellen, Dr., 1958-  Search this
Creator:
Jerome and Dorothy Lemelson Center for the Study of Invention and Innovation.  Search this
Names:
National Aeronautics and Space Administration  Search this
Extent:
0.75 Cubic feet (3 boxes)
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Videotapes
Lectures
Slides
Date:
1996/09/24
Scope and Contents:
Original master and reference videos documenting children's program by Dr. Ellen Ochoa. Dr. Ellen Ochoa discusses her role as an inventor, scientist, and astronaut at NASA.
Arrangement:
Divided into 3 series: 1. Original videos; 2. Master videos; 3. Reference videos.
Biographical / Historical:
Dr. Ochoa was born in Los Angeles, Calif. B.S. in physics, San Diego State, 1975; master's and doctorate in electrical engineering, Stanford University, 1981 and 1985. Dr. Ochoa holds three patents in the field of optical processing and has worked as a research scientist at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) since 1988. In 1990 she became the first Hispanic woman astronaut selected by NASA. In April 1993, Ochoa flew as a mission specialist on the space shuttle Discovery.
Provenance:
National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution Department of History.,Jerome and Dorothy Lemelson Center for the Study of Invention and Innovation, 12th St. and Constitution Ave., N.W., Washington, D.C.,Made for NMAH.,1997.3162.
Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions. Signed copies of releases on file.
Topic:
Space shuttles -- 1990-2000  Search this
Inventors -- 20th century  Search this
Women inventors -- 20th century  Search this
Space flight -- 1990-2000  Search this
Hispanic Americans -- 1950-2000  Search this
Electric engineering -- 1980-2000  Search this
Astronautics -- 1990-2000  Search this
Inventions -- 1980-2000  Search this
Astronauts -- 1990-2000  Search this
Genre/Form:
Videotapes -- 1990-2000
Lectures -- 1990-2000
Slides
Citation:
Ellen Ochoa Innovative Lives Presentation, 1996, Archives Center, National Museum of American History.
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.0595
See more items in:
Ellen Ochoa Innovative Lives Presentation
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmah-ac-0595

Nathan Kane Innovative Lives Presentation

Creator:
Kane, Nathan, 1969-  Search this
Jerome and Dorothy Lemelson Center for the Study of Invention and Innovation.  Search this
Extent:
0.5 Cubic feet
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Interviews
Oral history
Videotapes
Photographs
Date:
1997 September 17
Summary:
Collection consists of original, master, and reference videos documenting Nathan Kane, inventor of Pass-It-Football, a remote control for television, Project-A-Sketch opaque projector for children and low distortion bellows folds for industrial machines.
Scope and Contents note:
This collection contains original, master, and reference videos documenting Nathan Kane, inventor of low-distortion bellow folds for industrial machines, the Pass-It  television remote control, and the Project-A-Sketch opaque projector for children. This video was created on September 17, 1997.
Arrangement:
The collection is divided into four series.

Series 1: Original Videos

Series 2: Master Videos

Series 3: Reference Videos

Series 4: Photographs and Slides
Biographical/Historical note:
Nathan Kane (1969-), is an inventor of several inventions that range from toys to industrial equipment. As a graduate student at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Kane won the Lemelson-MIT Student Prize in 1997, for his inventiveness. The Lemelson-MIT Prize honors distinguished careers in invention each year. Kane's invention of an ultra-low distortion bellow fold patterns allow extremely light-weight, structurally rigid, long-extending bellows to be made inexpensively from a single sheet of foldable plastic. Traditional bellows, by comparison, are much heavier and more expensive to manufacture, because they consist of a complex assembly of fabric layers sewn to stiffening panels. Kane's folded patterns have many applications, such as making collapsible containers, expandable shelters, low cost pumps, and low cost protective bellows for industry. The increased extending ability means two to three times less material is needed for production, which cuts cost. The bellow is also two to three times lighter and more compact when folded, allowing machines that use the bellow to move further and, for precision applications, more accurately. Kane also invented the Pass-It television remote. This television remote is built into a foam rubber football so viewers can pass the remote with ease. Another invention is the Project-A-Sketch--a projector intended for children and which displays art or solid objects onto a wall.
Provenance:
This collection was created by the Innovative Lives Program of The Jerome and Dorothy Lemelson Center for the Study of Invention and Innovation on September 17, 1997. The Innovative Lives series brings young people and American inventors together to discuss inventions and the creative process and to experiment and play with hands-on activities related to each inventor's product.
Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions. Signed copies of releases on file.
Topic:
Bellows (Mechanical engineering)  Search this
Industrial equipment -- 1980-2000  Search this
Inventors -- 1980-2000  Search this
Inventions -- 1980-2000  Search this
Projectors  Search this
Toys -- 1980-2000  Search this
Slides  Search this
Genre/Form:
Interviews -- 1980-2000
Oral history -- 1990-2000
Videotapes -- 1990-2000
Photographs
Citation:
Nathan Kane Innovative Lives Presentation, September 17, 1997, Archives Center, National Museum of American History.
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.0637
See more items in:
Nathan Kane Innovative Lives Presentation
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmah-ac-0637

Sally Fox Innovative Lives Presentation

Creator:
Person, Abigail  Search this
Jerome and Dorothy Lemelson Center for the Study of Invention and Innovation.  Search this
Fox, Sally  Search this
Names:
Fox Fibre.  Search this
Natural Cotton Colours, Inc.  Search this
Extent:
0.25 Cubic feet (3 boxes)
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Videotapes
Oral history
Interviews
Photographs
Date:
1997
Scope and Contents:
This collection contains 5 1/2 hours of footage documenting Sally Fox, an inventor of a commercially spinnable naturally colored cotton. This video was created on November 14, 1997.
Arrangement:
The collection is divided into four series.

Series 1: Original Videos, 1997

Series 2: Master Videos, 1997

Series 3: Reference Videos, 1997

Series 4: Photographs, 1997
Biographical / Historical:
Sally Fox began growing brown cotton in 1982 and experimented with crossbreeding it. By 1985, some of Fox's plants growing from cross-pollinated seeds produced green cotton as well as brown. These naturally colored cottons were brought to the marketplace in 1989, when Fox established her company, Natural Cotton Colours, Inc., in Arizona. FoxFibre is the registered trademark of her naturally colored cotton. Fox developed several different types and colors of cotton--pink, yellow, lavender, brown, green, and red. Crossbreeding two types, reddish-brown Coyote and traditional white Pima produces the bronze brown Buffalo FoxFibre. The six varieties of FoxFibre include three browns: Coyote (reddish), Buffalo (mocha), and New Brown; and three greens: Green FoxFibre, Palo Verde (sage), and New Green. FoxFibre is naturally colored, so there is need to bleach or dye the fabric. The Coyote and Buffalo FoxFibre are naturally flame resistant. FoxFibre is environmentally friendly because it is grown organically, without the use of chemical pesticides.
Provenance:
Created by the Jerome and Dorothy Lemelson Center for the Study of Invention and Innovation on November 14, 1997.
Restrictions:
Collection is open for research.
Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions. Copies of release forms exist.
Topic:
Inventors -- 1980-2000  Search this
Inventors -- 20th century  Search this
Spinning -- 1980-2000  Search this
Cotton growing -- 1980-2000  Search this
Cotton -- 1980-2000  Search this
Inventions -- 1980-2000  Search this
Slides  Search this
Genre/Form:
Videotapes -- 1990-2000
Oral history -- 1980-2000
Interviews -- 1980-2000
Photographs
Citation:
Sally Fox Innovative Lives Presentation, Archives Center, National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.0646
See more items in:
Sally Fox Innovative Lives Presentation
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmah-ac-0646

Analogue Music Synthesizer Oral History Project

Creator:
Jerome and Dorothy Lemelson Center for the Study of Invention and Innovation.  Search this
Interviewee:
Krause, Bernie  Search this
Deutsch, Herbert  Search this
Hemsath, Bill  Search this
Pollock, Jay  Search this
Moog, Robert  Search this
Oberheim, Tom  Search this
Sear, Walter  Search this
Preston, Don  Search this
Scott, Jim  Search this
Chowning, Jonathan  Search this
Buchla, Don  Search this
Interviewer:
Pinch, Trevor  Search this
Extent:
1 Cubic foot (8 boxes)
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Audiocassettes
Transcripts
Audiotapes
Interviews
Oral history
Oral histories (document genres)
Date:
1996-2000
Summary:
The collection consists of over thirty hours of 7" open reel-to-reel master tapes, compact discs (DVDs), and transcripts for oral histories documenting the invention and development of the analogue music synthesizer.
Scope and Contents:
The collection consists of over thirty hours of 7" open reel-to- reel master tapes, compact discs, and transcripts for the oral histories documenting the invention and development of the analogue music synthesizer. Not all interviews have master tapes, reference copies, or transcripts.
Arrangement:
Collection is arranged into three series.

Series 1: Transcripts, 1996-1998

Series 2: Reference Disks (DVDs), 1996-2000

Series 3: Master Tapes (7"), 1996-1998
Biographical / Historical:
The Jerome and Dorothy Lemelson Center for the Study of Invention and Innovation, in cooperation with Trevor Pinch and Frank Trocco of Cornell University, conducted oral histories to document the pioneering engineers and musicians of the electronic music synthesizer from 1960 to 1970. Pinch and Trocco authored in 2002, Analog Days: The Invention and Impact of the Moog Synthesizer by Harvard University Press. This book is based on the oral histories from the Analogue Music Synthesizer Oral History Project.
Provenance:
This collection was created by the Jerome and Dorothy Lemelson Center for the Study of Invention and Innovation with National Museum of American History staff member Jim Weaver, Division of Cultural History and Trevor Pinch and Frank Trocco, Department of Science and Technology Studies, Cornell University.
Restrictions:
Collection is open for research use.
Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
Inventors -- 20th century  Search this
Piano and synthesizer music  Search this
Electric engineering -- 1980-2000  Search this
Inventions -- 1980-2000  Search this
Synthesizer music  Search this
Music -- Acoustics and physics  Search this
Music -- 20th century  Search this
Genre/Form:
Audiocassettes
Transcripts
Audiotapes
Interviews
Oral history
Oral histories (document genres)
Citation:
Title and date item, Analogue Music Synthesizer Oral History Project, 1996-1998, Archives Center, National Museum of American History
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.0640
See more items in:
Analogue Music Synthesizer Oral History Project
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmah-ac-0640

Mike Augspurger Innovative Lives Presentation and Oral History

Creator:
Augspurger, Mike  Search this
Jerome and Dorothy Lemelson Center for the Study of Invention and Innovation.  Search this
Cater, Anita  Search this
Names:
One-Off Titanium  Search this
Extent:
0.25 Cubic feet
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Interviews
Videotapes
Oral history
BetaCam SP (videotape format)
Date:
1998
2001
2000
Summary:
Mike Augspurger was born in 1956 in Fort Wayne, Indiana. Working with steel land titanium, he invented an all terrain rear wheel drive handcycle. Collection contains approximately eight hours of video footage documenting Augspurger discussing his life and work and a promotional video titled One-Off Handcycle.
Scope and Contents:
This collection contains seven (7) hours of original (BetaCam SP) recordings and eight (8) hours of reference (viewing) copies documenting the life and work of Mike Augspurger, inventor of the One-Off All Terrain Handcycle. The recordings include a presentation by Augspurger for the Lemelson Center's Innovative Lives Program. Audience participants are students from Jefferson Junior High School (Washington, D.C.), Nysmith School (Herndon, Virginia), Nicholas Orem Middle School (Hyattsville, Maryland), and Rosa Parks Middle School (Olney, Maryland). The collection also contains interviews with Leni Fried, Augspurger's wife, and Provi Morillo, an owner of a One-Off Handcycle.
Arrangement:
The collection is organized into three series.

Series 1, Original Videos, 2000

Series 2, Reference Videos (viewing copies), 1998; 2000

Series 3, Supplemental Documentation, 2001
Biographical / Historical:
Mike Augspurger (1956-) was born and raised in Fort Wayne, Indiana, where he built, modified, and raced bicycles, motorcycles, and go-karts from a young age. He attended motorcycle mechanic school at the Indiana Institute of Technology and received his B.A. from Hampshire College in 1981. Augspurger founded Merlin Metalworks in 1987 with business partners and began using titanium to manufacture bicycle frames because of its flexibility, corrosion resistance, and lightweight nature. It was his friendship with neighbor Bob Hall, a wheelchair racing athlete, which prompted him to create an all terrain arm-powered cycle. He founded One-Off Titanium, Inc., to design, manufacture, and custom-build handcycles in 1989.

The Jermone and Dorothy Lemelson Center for the Study of Invention and Innovation was founded in 1995 at the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of American History through a generous gift from the Lemelson Foundation. The Center's mission is: to document, interpret, and disseminate information about invention and innovation; to encourage inventive creativity in young people; and to foster an appreciation for the central role invention and innovation play in the history of the United States. The Innovative Lives series brings together museum visitors and, especially, school-aged children and American inventors to discuss inventions and the creative process and to experiment and play with hands-on activities related to each inventor's product. This collection was recorded by the Innovative Lives Program of the Jerome and Dorothy Lemelson Center for the Study of Invention and Innovation.
Provenance:
This collection was recorded by the Innovative Lives Program of the Jerome and Dorothy Lemelson Center for the Study of Invention and Innovation on May 5, 2000. The Innovative Lives series brings Museum visitors and American inventors together to discuss inventions and the creative process and to experiment and play with hands-on activities related to each inventor's product.
Restrictions:
The collection is open for research use. Series 1, Original Videos, 2000, is stored off-site and may not be used by researchers. Gloves must be worn when handling unprotected photographs and negatives.
Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. The Archives Center does not own rights to the promotional video One-Off Handcycle. Reproduction permission and fees from the Archives Center may apply. Copies of releases on file.
Topic:
Inventors -- 20th century  Search this
Inventions -- 1980-2000  Search this
Bicycles  Search this
Mountain bikes  Search this
Bicycle industry  Search this
Slides  Search this
Photographs  Search this
Genre/Form:
Interviews -- 1980-2000
Videotapes
Oral history -- 1990-2000
BetaCam SP (videotape format)
Citation:
Mike Augspurger Innovative Lives Presentation and Oral History, Archives Center, National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.0689
See more items in:
Mike Augspurger Innovative Lives Presentation and Oral History
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmah-ac-0689

Patricia Bath Innovative Lives Presentation and Interview, [videotapes]

Creator:
Jerome and Dorothy Lemelson Center for the Study of Invention and Innovation.  Search this
Bath, Patricia, Dr., 1949-  Search this
Extent:
0.5 Cubic feet (2 boxes)
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Oral history
Videotapes
BetaCam SP (videotape format)
Interviews
Slides
Photographs
Date:
February 17, 2000 and March 1, 2000.
Summary:
Dr. Patricia Bath was born in 1949 in New York. She conceived of the Laserphaco Probe in 1981 and patented it in 1988 (US Patent # 4,744,360 for an "Apparatus for ablating and removing cataract lenses"). The collection contains original and reference video footage of Dr. Bath's Innovative Lives Presentation documenting her work in the field of ophthalmology and her work creating and patenting the LaserPhaco Probe, an instrument to remove cataracts. Also included is an interview with Dr. Bath at her home in Los Angeles and an interview with her daughter, Eraka Bath and supplemental documentation assembled by Dr. Bath. The documentation includes photocopies of articles, patents, biographical sketch material, and selected publications and references to related to lasers and surgery of Dr. Bath
Scope and Contents:
This collection consists of 8.5 hours of original (BetaCam SP) video recordings and reference (viewing) copies (VHS) documenting the life and career of Dr. Patricia Bath. The recordings include a presentation by Dr. Bath for the Lemelson Center's Innovative Lives Program and interviews at her home and laboratory in Los Angeles. The collection also includes an interview with Dr. Bath's daughter, Eraka Bath, and copies of footage from other sources about Dr. Bath's work. Additionally, there is supplemental documentation assembled by Dr. Bath. The documentation includes photocopies of articles, patents, biographical sketch material, and selected publications and references to related to lasers and surgery of Dr. Bath.
Arrangement:
This collection is arranged into three series.

Series 1, Original Videos, 2000

Series 2, Reference Videos, 2000

Series 3, Supplemental Documentation
Biographical / Historical:
Dr. Patricia Bath (1949-) was born in New York. She attended Charles Evans Hughes High School, Hunter College (B.A. 1964), and Howard University College of Medicine (M.D. 1968). Bath held a fellowship in ophthalmology at Columbia University (1969-1970) and an internship at New York University (1970-1973) where she was the first African American resident in ophthalmology. Dr. Bath later joined the faculty of UCLA and Charles R. Drew University in surgery and ophthalmology and later the Department of Ophthalmology at UCLA's Jules Stein Eye Institute. In 1976, Dr. Bath and other colleagues formed the American Institute for the Prevention of Blindness (AIPB). Dr. Bath conceived of the Laserphaco, an instrument to remove cataracts in 1981. She received US patent #4,744,360 for an "Apparatus for ablating and removing cataract lenses" on May 17, 1988. Later patents include a method and apparatus for ablating and removing cataract lenses; laser apparatus for surgery of cataractous lenses; and pulsed ultrasound method for fragmenting/emulsifying and removing cataractous lenses. Dr. Bath retired from the UCLA Medical Center in 1993 to work in telemedicine, the use of electronic communication to provide medical services to remote areas where healthcare is limited.

The Jerome and Dorothy Lemelson Center for the Study of Invention and Innovation was founded in 1995 at the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of American History through a generous gift from the Lemelson Foundation. The Center's mission is: to document, interpret, and disseminate information about invention and innovation; to encourage inventive creativity in young people; and to foster an appreciation for the central role invention and innovation play in the history of the United States. The Innovative Lives series brings together Museum visitors and especially, school age children, and American inventors to discuss inventions and the creative process and to experiment and play with hands-on activities related to each inventor's product. This collection was recorded by the Innovative Lives Program of the Jerome and Dorothy Lemelson Center for the Study of Invention and Innovation.
Related Materials:
An anatomical eye (accession # 2000.0038.01) was donated to the Division of Medicine and Science in 2000 by Dr. Patricia Bath.
Provenance:
This collection was recorded by the Innovative Lives Program of The Jerome and Dorothy Lemelson Center for the Study of Invention and Innovation on March 1, 2000. The Innovative Lives series brings Museum visitors and American inventors together to discuss inventions and the creative process and to experiment and play with hands-on activities related to each inventor's product.
Restrictions:
The collection is open for research.
Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.
Topic:
Ophthalmology  Search this
African American physicians  Search this
Surgeons  Search this
Women inventors -- 20th century  Search this
African American women  Search this
Eye equipment and supplies  Search this
Eye diagnosis  Search this
Eye -- Examination  Search this
Eye -- Diseases  Search this
Inventions -- 1980-2000  Search this
Laserphaco (medical instrument)  Search this
Inventors -- 20th century  Search this
Ophthalmologists  Search this
Medicine -- Communication systems  Search this
Genre/Form:
Oral history -- 1990-2000
Videotapes
BetaCam SP (videotape format)
Interviews -- 1980-2000
Slides
Photographs
Citation:
Dr. Patricia Bath Innovative Lives Presentation and Interview, Archives Center, National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.0753
See more items in:
Patricia Bath Innovative Lives Presentation and Interview, [videotapes]
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmah-ac-0753

Dr. William Phillips Innovative Lives Presentation

Topic:
Innovative Lives Program (NMAH public program series)
Interviewee:
Phillips, William, Dr., 1948-  Search this
Creator:
Jerome and Dorothy Lemelson Center for the Study of Invention and Innovation.  Search this
Interviewer:
Cater, Anita  Search this
Names:
Chu, Steven  Search this
Cohen-Tannouudji, Claude  Search this
Physicists -- Chronological subdivision--1930-2000  Search this
Extent:
1 Cubic foot (4 boxes)
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Videotapes
BetaCam SP (videotape format)
Oral history
Interviews
Mini DV (Videotape format)
Photographs
Date:
2001 April 27
Summary:
Approximately 5-1/2 hours of video footage documenting an interview with Dr. William Phillips, a physicist and Nobel Laureate (Physics, 1997). Phillips discusses his background, work at the National Institute of Standards (NIST) using laser light to cool gases to the lowest temperature ever achieved, and his memories of winning the Nobel Prize.
Scope and Contents:
This collection contains approximately 5-1⁄2 hours of original (digital), master (BetaCam SP), and reference videos (VHS) documenting William Phillips, physicist and Nobel Laureate (Physics, 1997). Audience participants are students from Ormond Stone Middle School (Centreville, Virginia); Queen Anne School (Upper Marlboro, Maryland); Nysmith School (Herndon, Virginia): and Gwynn Park Middle School (Brandywine, Maryland).
Arrangement:
The collection is organized into three series.

Series 1, Original Videos, 2001

Series 2, Master Videos, 2001

Series 3, Reference Videos, 2001
Biographical / Historical:
Dr. William Phillips was born November 5, 1948 in Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania. He received his B.S. from Juniata College in 1970 and his Ph.D. from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in 1976. Phillips was awarded the Chaim Weizmann Fellowship at MIT to work on collisions and Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) in spin-polarized hydrogen. After leaving MIT in1978, Phillips joined the National Bureau of Standards (NBS) which was renamed the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). At NIST, Phillips worked on precision measurements of the proton gyromagnetic ratio and of the Absolute Ampere. Also, he pursued laser cooling experiments which led him and colleagues Steve Chu and Claude Cohen-Tannoudji to win the Nobel Prize for Physics in 1997.

The Jerome and Dorothy Lemelson Center for the Study of Invention and Innovation was founded in 1995 at the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of American History through a generous gift from the Lemelson Foundation. The Center's mission is: to document, interpret, and disseminate information about invention and innovation; to encourage inventive creativity in young people; and to foster an appreciation for the central role invention and innovation play in the history of the United States. The Innovative Lives series brings together museum visitors and, especially, school aged children, and American inventors to discuss inventions and the creative process and to experiment and play with hands-on activities related to each inventor's product. This collection was recorded by the Innovative Lives Program of the Jerome and Dorothy Lemelson Center for the Study of Invention and Innovation.
Related Materials:
Materials in the Archives Center

Nobel Voices Video History Project (AC0771)
Provenance:
Transferred by the Jerome and Dorothy Lemelson Center for the Study of Invention and Innovation, May 17, 2001.
Restrictions:
The collection is open for research use.
Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions. Signed releases on file.
Topic:
Physics  Search this
Inventors -- 20th century  Search this
Inventions -- 1980-2000  Search this
Nobel Prizes  Search this
Lasers  Search this
Physicists  Search this
Slides  Search this
Genre/Form:
Videotapes
BetaCam SP (videotape format)
Oral history -- 2000-2010
Interviews -- 2000-2010
Mini DV (Videotape format)
Photographs
Citation:
Dr. William Phillips Innovative Lives Presentation, Archives Center, National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution.
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.0770
See more items in:
Dr. William Phillips Innovative Lives Presentation
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmah-ac-0770

William "Cat" Anderson Collection

Creator:
Anderson, William "Cat", 1916-1981 ((musician))  Search this
Names:
Benny Carter All Stars  Search this
Cat Anderson Quintet  Search this
Duke Ellington Orchestra  Search this
Lionel Hampton Orchestra  Search this
Mingus Quintet  Search this
Bechet, Sidney (musician)  Search this
Calloway, Cab, 1907-  Search this
Carter, Benny, 1907-1997  Search this
Ellington, Duke, 1899-1974  Search this
Fitzgerald, Ella  Search this
Hampton, Lionel  Search this
Humphrey, Hubert H. (Hubert Horatio), 1911-1978  Search this
Humphrey, Muriel  Search this
Johnson, Lucy Bird  Search this
Johnson, Lyndon B. (Lyndon Baines), 1908-1973  Search this
Tatum, Art, 1910-1956  Search this
Webster, Ben  Search this
Extent:
5 Cubic feet (12 boxes)
Type:
Archival materials
Collection descriptions
Manuscripts
Transcripts
Oral histories (document genres)
Oral history
Phonograph records
Photographs
Recordings
Interviews
Clippings
Audiotapes
Awards
Audiocassettes
Articles
Date:
1940-1981
bulk 1963-1977
Scope and Contents note:
Primarily audiotapes, sheet music, and photographic images. Also: correspondence, newspaper clippings, magazine articles, itineraries, awards, and ephemera.,Of particular interest are recordings or photographic images, including the personalities listed below, and President and Mrs. Tubman of Liberia; also, two interviews and three recordings of Cat Anderson as guest with various university and college jazz bands.
Arrangement:
Divided into 4 series: (1) Music; (2) Original tapes and recordings; (3) Photographs; (4) Miscellaneous. Arranged topically.
Biographical/Historical note:
Prominent African American jazz musician (trumpet), b. Sept. 12, 1916, d. April 29, 1981.,One of the premier trumpet players of the Duke Ellington Orchestra. Known for effortless high notes; a strong section leader and great soloist whose style exhibited humor and precision. Grew up in Jenkins' Orphanage, Charleston, S.C., received basic music training there, and participated in many of their famous student ensembles. Formed and played with the Cotton Pickers, a group of orphanage teens. Before joining Ellington in 1944, played in several big bands, including Claude Hopkins and Lionel Hampton. Left the Ellington organization 1947-49 to lead his own group. Free-lanced 1959-1961 and after 1971, working with the Ellington orchestra intermittently. Received honors from tyhe U.S. Air Force, the Prix du Disque de Jazz, and the City of Los Angeles.
Related Archival Materials:
Additional memorabilia can be found in the Division of Cultural History, NMAH.
Provenance:
National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution Department of History.,Jerome and Dorothy Lemelson Center for the Study of Invention and Innovation, ,Made for NMAH.,2006.3046.
Collection donated by Dorothy Anderson, 1998, January 22.
Restrictions:
Master tapes not available to researchers.
Collection is open for research.
Rights:
Collection items available for reproduction, but the Archives Center makes no guarantees concerning copyright restrictions. Other intellectual property rights may apply. Archives Center cost-recovery and use fees may apply when requesting reproductions.

Copyright status of items varies. Signed copies of releases on file.
Topic:
Music -- 20th century  Search this
Music -- Acoustics and physics  Search this
Musicians -- 20th century  Search this
Piano and synthesizer music  Search this
Inventions -- 1980-2000  Search this
Synthesizer music  Search this
Composers -- 20th century  Search this
Electric engineering -- 1980-2000  Search this
Band musicians  Search this
African American musicians  Search this
Jazz musicians -- United States  Search this
Inventors -- 20th century  Search this
Genre/Form:
Manuscripts -- Music -- 20th century
Transcripts
Oral histories (document genres)
Oral history
Phonograph records
Photographs -- 20th century
Recordings
Interviews
Interviews -- 1950-2000
Clippings -- 20th century
Audiotapes -- 1940-1980
Awards
Audiocassettes
Audiotapes
Articles -- 1940-1980
Citation:
William "Cat" Anderson Collection, ca. 1940-1981, Archives Center, National Museum of American History.
Identifier:
NMAH.AC.0630
See more items in:
William "Cat" Anderson Collection
Archival Repository:
Archives Center, National Museum of American History
EDAN-URL:
ead_collection:sova-nmah-ac-0630
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